Heartbreaking pictures of Nepal quake's child victims still fighting for their lives, the parents who dug them out the rubble... and the little girl who no one has come to claim

  • It is thought two million Nepalese children have been affected by disaster
  • Injured children being treated at Bir Hospital, Kathmandu, are just a handful of the thousands injured in the natural disaster last month
  • MailOnline spent time with 10 of the patients recovering in the earthquake

These are the faces of some of the youngest victims of Nepal's deadly earthquake, which left more than 7,500 dead and hundreds of thousands homeless.

These little ones, scared, injured and even alone, witnessed horrors most will never see in the hours and days after the 7.8 magnitude quake in April.

Some describe the moment they witnessed their families crushed by falling buildings. 

The traumatised parents who sit by their sides describe digging them out of collapsed homes with their own bare hands.

They are all now being treated at Bir Hospital, in Kathmandu, and are among the 15,000 people that are believed to have been hurt in the natural disaster, and two million children affected in some way by the events of less than two weeks ago.  

Here, Nepalese journalist Shiwani Neupane shares some of their stories.

KRISHA RAI, aged 18 months

18-month-old Krisha Rai was fast asleep when I went to visit her. 

Nothing happened to her during the first big earthquake, said her mother Kapana Rai.

But then, almost a week after the initial disaster, another aftershock hit Kathmandu. 

This time, the toddler was playing out on the balcony.

Shock: Krisha Rai survived the first quake unscathed, but fell from a collapsing balcony in an aftershock

Shock: Krisha Rai survived the first quake unscathed, but fell from a collapsing balcony in an aftershock

Her parents, inside the house, heard her scream and cry.

By the time they got outside, the balcony had crashed to the ground below - Krisha along with it. 

'The balcony was shaking during the earthquake. We didn't think it would fall,' said Mrs Rai. 

It seems the little girl has been lucky for a second time as well. 

'We took her to another hospital first and they said she has a blood clot in her head, but doctors here say she is fine and maybe discharged soon,' said her mother.

NIRMAL PARAJULI, 13  

Nirmal Parajuli reads a book on his hospital bed, and has a wide grin whenever I ask a question. 

'He couldn't bear the sight of the hospital at first. He had never been to a hospital,' the teenager's mother Suvadra explained.

Mrs Parajuli dug son out of the ruins of the house in the village of Sindhupalchock before he was brought to Kathmandu.

Determination: Nirmal Parajuli was dug from the wreckage of their home by his mother Suvadra

Determination: Nirmal Parajuli was dug from the wreckage of their home by his mother Suvadra

'He kept crying, "Save me mommy, save me",' she recalled. 

Nirmal is still waiting for his turn for surgery at the Bir Hospital, but at least he is still with his traumatised mother, who was left by Nirmal's father six months ago, and reveals she did not eat for three days following the quake.

'There is a hole in his arm. It was bleeding continuously,' she said. 'If my son had died, I would want to die too.'

DINESH TAMANG, 11 

Dinesh Tamang was listening to music on his mother's phone. When I asked if the 11-year-old liked music, he nodded and said, 'I like everything,' and went back to fiddling with his mother's phone.

When his house started crumbing down, his mother, Somaya, 41, screamed his name, asking him to run out.

She had to save her disabled husband, and hoped her son would escape on his own.

Dinesh did run, but the stones of the mud and stone house came tumbling down, and he fell, crushing his legs under a pile of stones and debris. 

Flee: Dinesh tried to run to safety when the quake hit, but rocks crushed his legs

Flee: Dinesh tried to run to safety when the quake hit, but rocks crushed his legs

Doctors operated on him and plastered his leg, but he will need to go into surgery once more after infection took hold.

But Mrs Tamang is looking to the future, and what she sees when they return to their village in Dolakha, east of Kathmandu, worries her hugely.

'There are no houses left where I live because all of us had mud and stone homes,' she told MailOnline. 

Desperate: Dinesh's family has been given 2,000 rupees - not enough to buy new cooking dishes

Desperate: Dinesh's family has been given 2,000 rupees - not enough to buy new cooking dishes

'My daughter says someone gave 2000 rupees. What will we buy with that? We wont even be able to buy new dishes to cook on.' 

RADHIKA MASKEY, aged two months

Although the elastic bands on both sides clinch her cheeks, the mask is too big for Radhika Maskey's small face. 

It looks uncomfortable but Radhika doesn't cry. She is just two months old, and her mother has to constantly fix it to ensure she gets enough oxygen.

The little girl fell from the bed when the quake hit. 

Surgery: Little Radhika Mahey appeared to be fine, but has developed a blood clot and needs an operation

Surgery: Little Radhika Mahey appeared to be fine, but has developed a blood clot and needs an operation

Unlike other homes, the Maksey's house appeared to withstand the force of the shaking earth.

But then Radhika began vomiting and broke a fever, said her mother Nirmala Maskey, 22. 

'She stopped eating. She wouldn't drink my milk,' Mrs Maskey said.

She rushed her daughter to the nearest hospital, where she was kept in intensive care for three days. 

Doctors there referred her to the Bir Hospital, Kathmandu. 

'It seems like she has a blood clot in her head. Doctors say she will need surgery,' said Mrs Maskey. 

'We didn't see any wounds on the outside. If we had, we would have got here immediately.'

PRABIN TAMANG, 7

Prabin stares curiously as visitors and volunteers go by the Bir Hospital floor where he is being treated.

He is quiet but smiles and fidgets around his bed, a sight that relieves his father Ratna Singh Tamang.

Mr Tamang dug his seven-year-old son out with his own bare hands - although originally, he did not realise he was under the rubble.

Lucky: Prabin's father only heard his cries as he tried to pull his nephew to safety

Lucky: Prabin's father only heard his cries as he tried to pull his nephew to safety

'I thought he had run,' he told MailOnline. 

Half immersed under Mr Tamang's collapsed house in Sindhupalchok, to the north east of Kathmandu, was also his brother's son.

It was only when he was digging him out that the 31-year-old noticed the cries of his own son.

'He was fully covered in the rubble and was crying and crying,' he recalled 

Prabin has dislocated his knee. They also operated on his head, said his father.

But luckily, his smiles now suggest he is on the mend. 

ARUSH MAHARJAN, 6 

Arush Maharjan was fast asleep, the blanket covering his face slightly so it wouldn't touch his wounds.

The six-year-old was playing with a few friends at his neighbour's house in Kathmandu when the earthquake hit Nepal. 

'We looked for him and realised he wasn't at home,' said his sister Ritu Maharjan, 22. 

Tragedy: Arush was playing with his friends when the earthquake struck in April, one of whom died

Tragedy: Arush was playing with his friends when the earthquake struck in April, one of whom died

Arush's father dug him out of the neighbour's house. When he was found, he had injuries to the back of his head, as well as a number of other wounds. 

But he was lucky: his friend, Raken Maharjan,10, died. 

'He is still scared. He wakes up with nightmares sometimes,' said his sister, who revealed their home has been damaged beyond repair. 

PRADEEP NEPALI, 13 

Three family members held on to Pradeep Nepali's hands and legs as he kicked and screamed.

His mother tried to soothe him continually, but the little boy was not responding. 

Nurses say he is still unconscious. Almost more heartbreaking for Pradeep's mother, Santoshi, 27, he was fine for the first couple of days after two houses in Nuwakot, to the north west of the city, fell on him.

Fear: Pradeep was awake for the first few days, but has since lapsed into unconciousness

Fear: Pradeep was awake for the first few days, but has since lapsed into unconciousness

Like other children, he was dug from the rubble by his father. 

'He started diarrhea three days ago and can't eat anything from his mouth,' said his mother. 'I feel so helpless. I just want him to be treated quickly.'   

Doctors tried doing a CT scan, but Pradeep was kicking and screaming, which made things impossible. 

SABIN BASNET, 10

On first sight, nothing is wrong with Sabin Basnet. 

The 10-year-old looks healthy and has a small bandage behind his ears. He pulls some crushed instant noodles from a packet and eats slowly as he appears to be looking at a distance.

But when a house fell on him when the earthquake struck in Dhading, to the north west of Kathmandu, Sabin lost his vision.

Life changing: Sabin may appear to be fine, but an impact during the quake has left him blind

Life changing: Sabin may appear to be fine, but an impact during the quake has left him blind

'His ears were bleeding and he said he couldn't see. I took him to Til Ganga Hospital [an eye hospital] and the doctors said a nerve connecting his ear and eye has been cut,' said his mother Meera, 30.

Doctors have given her hope. He is still a child so they think there is a chance for him to re-grow his nerve - which means he may regain his vision in the future.

As she struggles to take her son from hospital to hospital, her husband is in Qatar working as a laborer. 

'He says he can't stay there if our son is like this,' she said. 'There is nothing left. We have no place to go back to.' 

DHITAK BOMJOM, 12

Dhitak Bomjom did not want to smile. When he tried to hide under the blanket, his plastered leg was too heavy to move, so he listened to his father speak.

The youngster only got to the hospital three days after the quake hit, sending stones tumbling towards him, burying him and breaking his leg.

Landslides blocked all roads going up and down his village, and the the army helicopters took as many patients as they could from the village.

Wait: It took days for Dhitak to be brought to the hospital for treatment because the roads were blocked

Wait: It took days for Dhitak to be brought to the hospital for treatment because the roads were blocked

But Dhitak had to wait, and be bandaged by a local clinic in the meantime, 

His father Sano, 51, says at least 200 people had died in his small village in Sindhupalchok when he was there. 

'Deaths, uncountable. I don't even know how many. I heard the police say 200 when we were there. Everyone was dead, I cannot begin to tell you about it,' he told MailOnline.  

Home: Manmaya saw her mother  die, but she thinks her father alive - but he hasn't come to get her

Home: Manmaya saw her mother die, but she thinks her father alive - but he hasn't come to get her

MANMAYA TAMANG, 11 

Munmaya Tamang,11, smiles but doesn't speak much. She was airlifted from her village and bought to Bir hospital, where doctors operated on her head.

She saw her grandmother and mother die. 

'We also cremated them before the army came to take me,' she said. 'My house is also gone.' 

She says her father was alive then but it's been a week, and no one has come to claim her.

 She smiles warmly when she recalls her father: she really wants to go home. 

'My father loves me a lot,' she said. 

  • To donate to the Disasters Emergency Committee's Nepal appeal, click here.