Bill Clinton concedes his policies led to mass incarceration - as wife Hillary vows to UNDO the sweeping crime laws

  • Bill Clinton implemented 'three strikes' rule to jail offenders for life
  • Hillary has blamed mass incarceration as reason for mistrust of police and vows to reform the 1994 bill her husband implemented
  • On Wednesday, Bill Clinton admitted the policies were imperfect 

Former President Bill Clinton has conceded that his policies built today's 'incarceration generation' - which his wife Hillary is now vowing to dismantle.

With prisons swelling to critical capacity levels, and African American inmates drastically outnumbering white convicts, politicians across parties are calling to reform anti-crime legislation.

A key factor is the 'three strikes' rule that Bill Clinton signed into law in 1994 to jail federal convicts for life after three offenses. 

In addition, his bill built more prisons, created more life sentence and death penalty crimes, and put thousands more police on the streets.

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'We have too many people in prison': Bill Clinton conceded his wife Hillary is moving away from the crime bill he implemented in 1994, admitting that it led to today's era of mass incarceration

'We have too many people in prison': Bill Clinton conceded his wife Hillary is moving away from the crime bill he implemented in 1994, admitting that it led to today's era of mass incarceration

Though the move was hailed as a success at the time, the former president told CNN's Christiane Amanpour that it was imperfect.

And he is now backing his wife Hillary, who has vowed to backtrack. 

'The problem is the way it was written and implemented. We have too wide a net. We have too many people in prison,' he said, according to a CNN transcript of the interview. 

'And we wound up spending - putting so many people in prison that there wasn't enough money left to educate them, train them for new jobs and increase the chances when they came out that they could live productive lives.'

Hillary Clinton, the front-runner for the Democratic presidential nomination, has criticized mass incarceration, launching an effort last week to reform the criminal justice system and cut sentences in the wake of the Baltimore riots.

New tune: Hillary Clinton has blamed the 'incarceration generation' for the public's mistrust of police 

New tune: Hillary Clinton has blamed the 'incarceration generation' for the public's mistrust of police 

Asked by CNN whether he agreed with his wife moving away from his policy, Clinton replied: 'Oh, absolutely,' according to the transcript.

Clinton also said foreign donations to the Clinton Foundation charity did not affect U.S. foreign policy when Hillary was secretary of state between 2009 and 2013.

'We had a policy when she was secretary of state that we would only continue accepting money from people who were already giving us money,' he said.

Bill Clinton said on Monday he may consider stepping down or taking less of an executive role at the Clinton Foundation should his wife become president.

The Clintons' political opponents have criticized the foundation for accepting funding from foreign governments for its endowment and for its charitable work abroad.

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