Forget nightly baths... I let my children go three days or more without one: Mummy blogger tells parents that 'only washing your kid if he stinks or is visibly dirty' is better for their skin

  • Parenting blogger says nightly baths caused her son to have mild eczema 
  • When Lauren Knight's family grew she wasn't always able to bath kids 
  • Ms Knight says: 'wash your kid if he stinks or is visible dirty'
  • She recommends using good old fashioned soap and water to wash hands

A parenting blogger is claiming that a soothing night time bathing routing for your child may not be such a good thing for their skin after all. 

Lauren Knight, a parenting blogger based in the US, says that constant bathing of her eldest son at night when he was a baby was the reason he developed mild eczema on his back and legs.

And when Ms Knight had two more sons, she and her husband weren't always able to give their boys their nightly bath.

Scrubbing up: Mum blogger says that soothing nightly baths caused her son to have mild ezcema as a baby

Scrubbing up: Mum blogger says that soothing nightly baths caused her son to have mild ezcema as a baby

Playtime: She noticed her oldest boy's skin healthier and less irritated going three or more days without a bath

Playtime: She noticed her oldest boy's skin healthier and less irritated going three or more days without a bath

Playing in the dirt: Ms Knight said society's attitude towards cleanliness is linked with unhygienic practices

Playing in the dirt: Ms Knight said society's attitude towards cleanliness is linked with unhygienic practices

'During the times our children went for three (or more, I admit) days without a bath, I noticed that our oldest boy's skin seemed healthier and less irritated,' Ms Knight said on Essential Baby.

She said that society's attitude towards cleanliness is linked with unhygienic practices, particularly doctors during the 1600 to 1800s who attended to one birth next to another birth without washing their hands and causing infections.

The germaphobia developed is tied with overuse of anti-bacterial products.

Ms Knight noted biology professor Dr Rob Dunn who wrote in his book that the medical community's hard work to get rid of harmful bacteria led to the development of anti-bacterial products.

The overuse of antibacterial wipes and gels has potential to do more harm than good to our bodies and their immune system.

Getting messy: development of anti-bacterial products and its overuse has potential to do more harm

Getting messy: development of anti-bacterial products and its overuse has potential to do more harm

Outdoor play: Kids between six to eleven once or twice a week, or every time after messy outdoor play

Bath time: She says 'spot clean with a washcloth between baths... I'm willing to bet everyone will be happier'

Bath time: She says 'spot clean with a washcloth between baths... I'm willing to bet everyone will be happier'

'We have become accustomed to antibacterial wipes and gels; parents carry around mini bottles of hand sanitisers and are encouraged to douse their children's hands in the liquid during every public outing,' she said. 

Ms Knight says the American Academy of Dermatology recommends kids between six to eleven once or twice a week, or every time after messy outdoor play.

BabyCentre.com.au recommends washing a baby two or three times a week, but in between baths to wash baby's face regularly, bottom are after nappy changes and wiping of any other mess that your baby makes.

But when it comes to bathing your child she says; 'wash your kid if he stinks or is visible dirty... Wash hands regularly with good old fashioned soap and water, and spot clean with a washcloth between baths, and I'm willing to bet everyone will be happier.'

  

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