Watch the 'idiot's nuke' in action: Scientists reveal the astonishing tactic that saw pilots drop nuclear weapons while upside down so they had enough time to escape the blast

  • Called a LABS maneuver, which stands for low altitude bombing system
  • The pilot flies up in vertical path and drops bomb far past the target
  • Trajectory takes the bomb in the parabolic arch straigh to the mark

In 1957 a pilot at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida performed a tactic deemed ‘idiot loops’.

Flying a Boeing B-47 Stratojet bomber, Richard Bach released a bomb past the target as he pulled the jet up into a steep climb – sending the bomb upwards into the air.

Traveling along a high arc path, the bomb flung back over to the mark as the plane lopped around out of the danger zone – this became a safer maneuver for delivering nuclear weapons.

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Flying a Boeing B-47 Stratojet bomber, Richard Bach released a bomb past the target as he pulled the jet up into a steep climb ¿ sending the bomb upwards int the air. Traveling along a high arc path, the bomb flung back over to the mark as the plane lopped around out of the danger zone

Flying a Boeing B-47 Stratojet bomber, Richard Bach released a bomb past the target as he pulled the jet up into a steep climb – sending the bomb upwards int the air. Traveling along a high arc path, the bomb flung back over to the mark as the plane lopped around out of the danger zone

HOW PILOTS PERFORM MANEUVER

The airplane flies in at low level, pulls up and does an Immelmann, which refers to an aerobatic maneuver that results in level flight in the opposite direction at a higher altitude.

When the airplane gets to a certain point, it releases the bomb and the trajectory takes it in the parabolic arch to the target -- pulling the airplane up and roll it out of the danger zone.

The maneuver used is called a LABS maneuver, which stands for low altitude bombing system.

This method is carried out when the attacking plane pulls upward as it releases the bomb, giving the explosive additional time of flight by starting its airborne path with an upward vector.

Pilots use this strategy to compensate for the gravity drop of the bomb while it’s in flight, which allows the pilot to hit their target without flying directly over it.

The airplane soars in at low level, pulls up and does an Immelmann, which refers to an aerobatic maneuver that results in level flight in the opposite direction at a higher altitude.

When the aircraft gets to a certain point, it releases the bomb and the trajectory takes it in the parabolic arch to the target - pulling the airplane up and roll it out of the danger zone.

It was the design of the B-47 that made this tactic successful.

This plane was built with a swept-wing design, a compact 100 10-foot long body and speed were all key to performing ‘idiot loops’ or ‘over-the-shoulder maneuver’.

When the airplane gets to a certain point, it releases the bomb and the trajectory takes it in the parabolic arch to the target -- pulling the airplane up and roll it out of the danger zone. The B-47 was built with a swept-wing design, a compact 100 10ft  body and speed were all key to performing ¿idiot loops¿. This B-47 took flight in 1963

When the airplane gets to a certain point, it releases the bomb and the trajectory takes it in the parabolic arch to the target -- pulling the airplane up and roll it out of the danger zone. The B-47 was built with a swept-wing design, a compact 100 10ft body and speed were all key to performing ‘idiot loops’. This B-47 took flight in 1963

The six-jet bomber ripped past the front of the audience at the Eglin Air Force Base in 1957 and pulled into a vertical climb until it was basically standing on its tail, reports Air&Space.

The bomb bay doors flew open and an orange practice bomb released from the jet.

Bach’s trip was the first time the public witnessed a B-47 perform a new tactic of nuclear weapons deliver.

Prior to using this tactic, pilots would drop bombs from the operational ceiling – the highest level of flight.

Prior to using this idot looks, pilots would drop bombs from the operational ceiling ¿ the highest level of flight. The bomb that hit Hiroshima (pictured) in 1945 was dropped from 31,000 feet above the city

Prior to using this idot looks, pilots would drop bombs from the operational ceiling – the highest level of flight. The bomb that hit Hiroshima (pictured) in 1945 was dropped from 31,000 feet above the city

In 1945, an American B-29 bomber dropped the world’s first atomic bomb over Hiroshima, Japan.

Called ‘Little Boy’, the bomb contained 141 pounds of uranium-235 and took 44.4 seconds to hit the ground after being dropped at 31,000 feet – it detonated at about 1,900 feet above the city.

Anywhere from 90,000 to 146,000 people were killed from massive the blast that formed a 60,000-foot mushroom cloud in just ten minutes.

  

 

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