Revealed: Cancer faker Belle Gibson's massive earnings from her wellbeing business after she claimed she survived the disease - as court hears demand she pay $1MILLION fine

  • Belle Gibson faces prosecution in Federal Court over alleged false claims
  • Consumer Affairs Victoria is asking for Ms Gibson to publicly apologize
  • They also want her to pay a fine, which could be about $1 million 
  • She is facing legal action over claims she made about her 'terminal cancer' 
  • Ms Gibson convinced thousands she had cured cancer on her own  
  • Her Whole Pantry app and book made around $500,000 in about three years

Disgraced blogger Belle Gibson made more than half a million dollars after claiming to have cured her terminal cancer with natural remedies. 

Court documents revealed on Friday that Ms Gibson made $578,005 from sales of her app The Whole Pantry and book with the same name, as well as a deal with Apple Watch.

She may now be forced to pay back every dollar, and then some. 

Watchdog Consumer Affairs Victoria want Gibson to pay a fine - possibly more than $1 million - and publish in newspapers an apology that acknowledges her lies and advises cancer patients to seek advice from medical professionals, according to the court documents. 

Disgraced Victorian blogger Belle Gibson (pictured) could be forced to publicly apologise and pay a $1 million fine for claiming to have cured her terminal brain cancer with natural therapies 

Disgraced Victorian blogger Belle Gibson (pictured) could be forced to publicly apologise and pay a $1 million fine for claiming to have cured her terminal brain cancer with natural therapies 

Healthy food app The Whole Pantry was runaway success - until Ms Gibson admitted she never had cancer in the first place

Healthy food app The Whole Pantry was runaway success - until Ms Gibson admitted she never had cancer in the first place

The regulator says Gibson engaged in 'unconscionable conduct' by claiming she had been diagnosed with brain cancer in 2009 and given four months to live, before taking and rejecting conventional treatments to heal herself naturally.

They also say she engaged in misleading or deceptive commerce by making these claims to promote her app and book.

This deceptive commerce was repeated when Gibson said she would donate a portion of her app's revenue to charities or other humanitarian causes.

This included the Birthing Kit Foundation, One Girl, the Asylum Seeker Resource Centre, and the family of a seven-year-old boy who is battling terminal brain cancer.

Gibson is said to have conducted misleading commerce before Mother's Day 2014 by telling purchasers of her app the full amount of that sale, and an additional $1 for family-themed social media posts, would be donated to not-for-profit 2h Project, and the Bumi Sehat Foundation.

The Whole Pantry app was available for purchase between August 2013 and May 2016, court documents show.

By March 2015, it had been downloaded 115,324 times from iTunes.

In a range of media interviews last year, Ms Gibson admitted she had not told the truth about her cancer

In a range of media interviews last year, Ms Gibson admitted she had not told the truth about her cancer

Gibson received $20,725 from Apple, while her company Inkerman Road Nominees - formerly known as Belle Gibson Pty Ltd - was paid $264,881.

It's believed Gibson and her company also received $28,452 from sales of the android version of Whole Pantry.

The consumer regulator say Gibson's company was paid $263,947 by publisher Penguin for her The Whole Pantry book, released in October 2014 and withdrawn from sale five months later.

Penguin had signed a contract with Gibson in late 2013. 

Ms Gibson was the founder of the popular wellness and recipe app, The Whole Pantry

Ms Gibson was the founder of the popular wellness and recipe app, The Whole Pantry

CAV announced on May 6 that it was launching proceedings against the 23-year-old social media entrepreneur in the Federal Court. 

Simon Cohen, the director of CAV, had applied for leave to commence proceedings against Ms Gibson's company, Inkerman Road Nominees Pty Ltd. Now leave has been granted, proceedings can go ahead against the company and Ms Gibson. 

In civil proceedings, companies can be forced to pay penalties of up to $1.1 million and individuals up to $220,000. 

A range of other penalties, including declarations and injunctions, are also available to the court.  

Daily Mail Australia has contacted Ms Gibson for comment. 

Earlier this year, the mother-of-one said she did not believe she would face charges following the consumer probe. 

'I don't believe I will,' she told Melbourne newspaper The Herald Sun. 

 

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