Jetstar fined $12,000 after allowing a passenger to fly back to the country he had been deported from (despite THREE warnings not to let him board)

  • Deported passenger boarded flight in Bangkok and travelled to Auckland
  • Check-in agent misspelled the man's name to get a boarding pass for him
  • Judge ordered Jetstar to pay NZD$12,000 (£5,600) for failing to comply 

An airline has been fined NZD$12,000 (£5,600) after it allowed a passenger who had been deported from New Zealand to fly back to the country, despite receiving warnings not to let the man board. 

The passenger in question had been deported to Bangkok, Thailand, but he was able to board a Jetstar Airways flight and travel to Auckland via Singapore, a court heard.

He was let on the flight despite the message ‘do not board’ being flashed three times on the computer of the check-in desk agent dealing with him in Bangkok. 

The passenger in question had been deported to Bangkok, Thailand, but he was able to board a Jetstar Airways flight and travel to Auckland via Singapore, a court heard

The passenger in question had been deported to Bangkok, Thailand, but he was able to board a Jetstar Airways flight and travel to Auckland via Singapore, a court heard

Despite the trio of alerts, which came from the Advanced Passenger Processing System, the check-in agent then entered the man's name again, this time incorrectly spelling it, a court heard.

The agent was then able to give the passenger an outward ticket to use on the flight. 

The passenger was removed from the country the following day.

Representatives of the airline, who had previously pleaded guilty to the offence, appeared in Manukau District Court on Monday where they were hit with the fine.

A judge ordered Jetstar to pay NZD$12,000 (£5,600) for failing to comply with the obligations under the Immigration Act 2009.

Immigration New Zealand's National Manager Senta Jehle, told Scoop that the incident, which happened in 2014, is the second time the airline has been prosecuted for not meeting its requirements under the Immigration Act.

Speaking to MailOnline Travel, a Jetstar spokesman said: 'Jetstar takes its immigration compliance responsibilities very seriously. 

'Our internal investigation showed that the breach was an inadvertent operator mistake in Bangkok and that compliance programs have been put in place to improve the reliability of the system to prevent a similar error reoccurring.

The man was let on the flight despite the message ¿do not board¿ being flashed three times on the computer of the check-in desk agent dealing with him in Bangkok

The man was let on the flight despite the message ‘do not board’ being flashed three times on the computer of the check-in desk agent dealing with him in Bangkok

'Since 2012 the number of immigration infringement notices issued to Jetstar in New Zealand per 1,000 passengers carried has been steadily declining. We'll continue to focus on training and process improvements to further reduce any risk of not complying with immigration laws.

'In setting the fine the judge took into account operational improvements we have made which have resulted in a declining number of infringements.

'The judge also considered that the level of fines handed out to airlines in the past was not sufficient and wished to increase the starting point for the level of fines for consideration in future cases.

'We accept the court’s decision and will not be taking the matter further.'

The comments below have not been moderated.

The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline.

We are no longer accepting comments on this article.

Who is this week's top commenter? Find out now