China to test new anti-satellite missile capable of destroying enemy communications as work starts on satellite that can GRAB its rivals in space

  • US intelligence has detected preparations for a test launch of the Dong Neng-3
  • The tests are due to take place at a military facility in central area of China
  • Beijing thought to be working on satellite capable of grabbing its rivals in space

China is set to test a new anti-satellite missile capable of destroying enemy communications, it has emerged.

US intelligence officials have detected preparations for a test launch of the Dong Neng-3 which is due to take place at a military facility in central China.

They were alerted to the trial run after China announced restrictions on air space in the area.

It comes as it emerged Beijing may also be developing its own satellite capable of grabbing its rivals in space. 

China is set to test a new anti-satellite missile capable of destroying enemy communications, it has emerged (file picture)

According to Free Beacon, they will be small manoeuvring satellites capable of both seizing and destroying other satellites.

Few additional details are known about the missile and the satellite. 

Last month, a large metal cylinder thought to be from a Chinese satellite or aircraft fell from the sky and slammed into the ground in northern Myanmar.

The barrel-shaped object crashed onto property owned by a jade mining company in Kachin State's Hpakant township on Thursday.

Another smaller piece of metal bearing Chinese writing tore through the roof of a house in the nearby village of Hmaw His Zar, at the same time, but fortunately no one was injured.

US intelligence officials have detected preparations for a test launch of the Dong Neng-3 which is due to take place at a military facility in central China (file picture)

The bizarre events came the same day Chinese state media reported Beijing had recently launched a satellite into space.

China successful launched it in front of thousands of spectators, carrying the Shijian-17 ion propulsion technology experiment satellite towards orbit.

The 187-foot (57-metre) two-stage rocket was China's largest, capable of carrying 25 tons of payload into low-earth orbit and 14 tons to the more distant geostationary transfer orbit, in which a satellite orbits constantly above a fixed position on the earth's surface. 

 

 

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