Incredible aerial pictures show US and European tectonic plates in Iceland pulling apart leaving dramatic 200ft water-filled crevices that divers can explore

  • The dramatic terrain is popular with tourists who can explore the natural wonder on land and underwater
  • Some of the rifts are filled with clear cold water where divers can often be seen exploring the underwater crevices 
  • To take the colourful images San Franciscan Jassen Todorov, 40, flew in a Cessna 170 plane around 2,000ft high

Tourists look like toys in these bird's eye view photos which show an impressive split landscape where two lands meet.

The dramatic terrain - the join between two tectonic plates - is popular with tourists who can explore the natural wonder on land and underwater.

The splits in the land, which has many faults, valleys, volcanoes and hot springs, are caused by the Eurasian and North American plates in Iceland pulling apart.

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The dramatic terrain - the join between two tectonic plates - is popular with tourists who can explore the natural wonder on land and underwater

The splits in the land, which has many faults, valleys, volcanoes and hot springs, are caused by the Eurasian and North American plates in Iceland pulling apart

Some of the rifts are filled with clear cold water where divers can often be seen exploring the underwater crevices, which can be up to 61m (200ft) deep

To take the colourful photos Jassen Todorov, 40, flew in a Cessna 170 plane around 600m (2,000 feet) high

Split decision: The rift can be found in Thingvellir National Park, which is a popular tourist destination

Some of the rifts are filled with clear cold water where divers can often be seen exploring the underwater crevices, which can be up to 61m (200ft) deep.

The clean water is coloured by the sand, silt and other minerals at the bottom and the deeper rifts can be clearly seen from above.

To take the colourful photos Jassen Todorov, 40, flew in a Cessna 170 plane around 600m high.

The professor of music at San Francisco State University, in California, USA, said there were up to 300 people visiting Thingvellir National Park, in Iceland.

Mr Todorov, of San Francisco, said: 'This divide splits Iceland in two and it is very impressive to see from above.

The clean water is coloured by the sand, silt and other minerals at the bottom and the deeper rifts can clearly be seen from above

Thingvellir National Park became a Unesco World Heritage Site in 2004. In this image divers can be seen exploring the rift

'Everything in Iceland is interesting and unusual. The canyons, rivers, black-sand beaches: it's all a wonder to see and photograph,' said Todorov

'Thingvellir National Park is a unique place, so I was thrilled to have the opportunity to photograph it.

'The faults and splits reminded me a little of the San Andreas Fault in California.

'It was a beautiful day, with temperatures around 2C which is why you can see lots of people.

'There were probably around 200 to 300 people around. I didn't actually spot the divers when I was photographing the landscape from the plane so was really excited to see them in the beautiful and colourful-looking waters.

'Everything in Iceland is interesting and unusual. The canyons, rivers, black-sand beaches: it's all a wonder to see and photograph.'

Thingvellir National Park became a Unesco World Heritage Site in 2004.

 

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