Fresh abuse quiz for shamed Tory: Former MP Harvey Proctor to be interviewed for second time by detectives investigating claims of a VIP paedophile ring

  • Already quizzed in March over claims he was present during abuse of boys
  • Insists he did not attend ‘sex parties’ at apartments in Dolphin Square
  • Former Essex MP is angered by the continuing insinuations against him 
  • Quit Parliament in 1987 after admitting ‘spanking sessions’ with rent boys

Former Tory MP Harvey Proctor is expected to be interviewed for a second time today by detectives investigating claims of a VIP paedophile ring

Former Tory MP Harvey Proctor is expected to be interviewed for a second time today by detectives investigating claims of a VIP paedophile ring.

He was interviewed under police caution in March over claims he was present when underage boys were abused and murdered at Westminster ‘sex parties’.

The 68-year-old, who quit Parliament in 1987 after admitting ‘spanking sessions’ with rent boys, vigorously denied any knowledge of the abuse and deaths of three young boys.

He said he did not attend ‘sex parties’ at apartments in Dolphin Square near Parliament and claimed to be trapped in a ‘Kafkaesque fantasy’.

However, detectives from Operation Midland - which was set up to examine claims of systematic child abuse by a Westminster paedophile ring operating in the 1970s and 1980s – are set to grill him for a second time today.

The former Essex MP is angered by the continuing insinuations against him and is planning to release a lengthy statement at a press conference tomorrow.

The statement is expected to list the allegations, reiterate his firm denials and tell how he believes those wrongly accused of abuse can be protected by the law.

‘If someone faces allegations, of course the police should investigate,’ he told The Independent on Sunday.

‘But they have to produce some evidence. When people hear what has been claimed about what I am supposed to have done, they will find it both astonishing, totally far-fetched and hair-raising.

‘The police of course have an obligation to look into any claims, particularly given previous shortcomings. On Tuesday I will be open, frank and honest.’

Mr Proctor says his statement will be critical of the weight apparently attached to the evidence of a particular witness.

Mr Proctor said he did not attend ‘sex parties’ at apartments in Dolphin Square (pictured) near Parliament and claimed to be trapped in a ‘Kafkaesque fantasy’

He was first questioned after Scotland Yard officers spent two days searching his grace-and-favour home at Belvoir Castle in Leicestershire in March.

Mr Proctor quickly proclaimed his innocence, denying any knowledge of abuse or murders.

Standing in the grounds of Belvoir Castle, he said he was ‘helping police with their inquiries’. At no stage has he been arrested.

Mr Proctor, who represented Basildon and nearby Billericay, was an outspoken hard-right Tory but left Parliament after pleading guilty to gross indecency.

The MP – who was given the nickname ‘Wacko’ – would order rent boys as young as 17 to call him ‘Sir’ or ‘Keith’ and pretend he was a headmaster as he caned them.

He was fined just £1,450 but the case signalled the end of his career because his confession followed years of vehement denials.

The 68-year-old quit Parliament in 1987 after admitting ‘spanking sessions’ with rent boys

Two months before his court appearance it was revealed how Mr Proctor was caught by security staff on holiday in Morocco with a naked 15-year-old local boy hiding under his bed.

He later went to work for the Duke of Rutland as his private secretary and in recent years has been responsible for ‘public and park events’.

A friend of Mr Proctor’s who has seen a draft of his statement said last night: ‘I think people will find what he has to say is very powerful. People will wonder how anyone can begin to believe this stuff.

‘I think people will find it hair-raising that things can have got so far. He will be frank and forthright, but his statement won’t just reflect his anger, although there is plenty he could complain about.

‘He has thought long and hard about all this and the injustice that has faced so many of the accused, and is seeking to be constructive.

‘I think people will be genuinely horrified. He certainly doesn’t want to diminish the terrible things done to abused children, but what he was convicted of has nothing to do with that. I’m afraid the police will have questions to answer.’

Scotland Yard declined to comment last night.