6.6/10
3,194
71 user 18 critic

Man of La Mancha (1972)

The funny story of mad but kind and chivalrous elderly nobleman Don Quixote who, aided by his squire Sancho Panza, fights windmills that are seen as dragons to save prostitute Dulcinea who is seen as a noblewoman.

Director:

Writers:

(musical play), (screenplay)
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Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 2 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »
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The most faithful of all the major film versions of Cervantes' novel.

Director: Rafael Gil
Stars: Rafael Rivelles, Juan Calvo, Fernando Rey
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Pedro
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Antonia Quijana
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Captain of the Guard
Dorothy Sinclair ...
The Innkeeper's Wife
Miriam Acevedo ...
Fermina
Dominic Barto ...
Muleteer (as Dominic Bartó)
Poldo Bendandi ...
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Storyline

This musical version of Don Quixote is framed by an incident allegedly from the life of its author, Miguel de Cervantes. Don Quixote is the mad, aging nobleman who embarrasses his respectable family by his adventures. Backed by his faithful sidekick Sancho Panza, he duels windmills and defends his perfect lady Dulcinea (who is actually a downtrodden whore named Aldonza). Written by Reid Gagle

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Rarely does the motion picture bring to the screen all the warmth, adventure and great music you've been waiting for. See more »


Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

|

Language:

Release Date:

8 September 1973 (Italy)  »

Also Known As:

El hombre de La Mancha  »

Box Office

Budget:

$12,000,000 (estimated)

Gross:

$3,800,000 (USA)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(70 mm prints)| (35 mm prints)

Color:

(DeLuxe)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

One of the few post-1955 roadshow theatrical releases to be shot in the 1.85:1 screen ratio. In its roadshow engagements, the film was also "blown up" from 35mm to 70mm. See more »

Goofs

At the start of the brawl with the Muleteers, Aldonza goes from standing right next to Pedro to far behind him and back throughout the scene. She also appears to be moving toward him in two separate shots. See more »

Quotes

Don Quixote: Dear God, it is she. Sweet lady, fair virgin. I dare not gaze fully upon thy countenance as I'd be blinded by beauty.
Aldonza: I'll get you the wine.
Don Quixote: My lady, you must not wait upon my needs, I implore you. Speak once, your name
Aldonza: Aldonza.
Don Quixote: My lady jest!
Aldonza: Aldonza!
See more »

Crazy Credits

Practically all of the actors in the film, with the exception of those who play the Captain of the Guard and the soldiers of the Spanish Inquisition respectively, play dual or triple roles, but only five of them are actually listed in the credits as having done so. All of the other actors are listed as if they only played one role in the film, as the prisoners generally aren't given names. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Barney Miller: Bureaucrat (1975) See more »

Soundtracks

It's All The Same
Music by Mitch Leigh
Lyrics by Joe Darion
Sung by Sophia Loren
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more (Spoiler Alert!) »

User Reviews

The Message is More Important...
7 June 2003 | by (Hawaii) – See all my reviews

I'll keep it short. The message of this story is infinitely more important than any perceived flaws in casting, makeup, music, singing, etc. The emotions are there in this movie, and quite moving. The message is also there, and as fresh as it was when Cervantes wrote his famous book centuries ago. Don Quixote was a madman, yes, but his "quest" is one we should all embrace. Knight errantry, chivalry, compassion, and treating women with kindness and respect may be considered terribly out of sync with todays values, but when I read stories about a 16 year-old boy lured, by the promise of sex, to a savage beating death at the hands of his peers, I seriously question the soundness of those values. In many ways, today's world is every bit as "base and debauched" as it was during the Spanish Inquisition. Frankly, I would much rather live in Quixote's "mad" version of the world than I would in the reality of this one.

Squash the movie critic in you for a couple of hours and just enjoy the movie for it's wonderful message!

PS: I've been waiting years for Man of La Mancha to come out on DVD. Anybody know when?


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