Kate Middleton baby: So a male heir to the throne is born on St George's Day and they CAN'T name him George!' Social media users see funny side of Kate and Wills' naming predicament

  • Mystery surrounds what the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge will call the baby¬†
  • Couple expected to take regal name with Albert, Philip, and Henry favourites
  • Some of enjoyed the irony that they cannot call St George's Day baby, George¬†

Royal fans have poked fun at William and Kate after their third child was born on St George's Day but they are unable to name the baby George.

Mystery surrounds what the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge will call the baby, who was born today at the Lindo Wing at 11.01am weighing 8lb7oz. 

Some have taken pleasure in the irony that they can't call the boy George after it was given to their first born, who was at school today.

Ellie Agius said: 'When you give birth on St. George’s day but you’ve already named one of your baby’s George'. 

@BenScotchbrook tweeted: 'A royal boy - born ON ST GEORGE'S DAY. The timing just couldn't be better. They'll be able to call him Geor... oh. B*****'.   

Royal fans have poked fun at William and Kate after their third child was born on St George's Day but they are unable to name the baby George

Royal fans have poked fun at William and Kate after their third child was born on St George's Day but they are unable to name the baby George

Some have taken pleasure in the irony that they can't call the boy George after it was given to their first born, who was at school today.

Some have taken pleasure in the irony that they can't call the boy George after it was given to their first born, who was at school today.

LATEST ODDS ON THE NAME OF KATE AND WILLIAM'S THIRD BABY

Arthur 2/1 

James 4/1 

Albert 6/1 

Philip 8/1 

Alexander 10/1 

Thomas 16/1 

Frederick 25/1 

Henry 25/1 

Alfred 33/1 

Charles 33/1 

Edward 33/1 

Jack 33/1 

Louis 33/1 

William 33/1 

50/1 bar

Odds supplied by Ladbrokes 

Lydia Pluckrose said: 'Bet Will and Kate are gutted they already used the name George' and Mike Peters tweeted: 'Oh the irony! A royal Prince born on St George's Day and they can't call him George!'.

The couple is expected to take regal inspiration with Albert, Philip, Thomas and Henry among the favourites. 

Others enjoyed the fact the baby came on St George's Day, calling it a 'quintessentially English' royal birth and is 'as British as it gets'.

Royal punters are gambling huge amounts trying to predicts the third royal baby's name.

After opting for the traditional names George and Charlotte for their first two children, William and Kate are expected to keep it classic once again for baby number three. 

One female customer asked to put some £5,000 on Arthur - currently leading as the favourite name - at a bookmakers in Cheltenham.

Others are hedging their bets on Albert, Frederick, James and Philip.

So what will the new prince be called? Here are some of the contenders:

The wait for the baby's name has got people on Twitter having some fun

The wait for the baby's name has got people on Twitter having some fun

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge outside the Lindo Wing in 2015 after Charlotte's birth

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge outside the Lindo Wing in 2015 after Charlotte's birth

Arthur

One of Charles's middle names, Arthur is also one of William's middle names and was a middle name of the Queen's father, George VI.

The legendary King Arthur was the mythical leader of the knights of the Round Table, who supposedly lived in the 5th or 6th century.

Once popular, the name fell out of fashion but has had a revival in recent years. Former prime minister David Cameron has a son called Arthur.

Albert

Queen Victoria used to insist that the name Albert was used as a middle name by her descendants, if not a first, in honour of her much-loved consort Prince Albert.

By choosing Albert or Bertie for a boy, William and Kate would be honouring Queen Elizabeth II's father, George VI, who was actually Albert Frederick Arthur George but always known to his family as Bertie.

LATEST ODDS ON THE NAME OF KATE AND WILLIAM'S THIRD BABY

Arthur 2/1 

James 4/1 

Albert 6/1 

Philip 8/1 

Alexander 10/1 

Thomas 16/1 

Frederick 25/1 

Henry 25/1 

Alfred 33/1 

Charles 33/1 

Edward 33/1 

Jack 33/1 

Louis 33/1 

William 33/1 

50/1 bar

Odds supplied by Ladbrokes 

Shy, stammering Bertie was forced to become king when his brother Edward VIII abdicated, but won the nation's affection by standing firm in London during the Second World War.

Philip

A lasting tribute to the Duke of Edinburgh might see a Prince of Cambridge called Philip.

Both Charles and William have Philip as a middle name.

The Duke - known for his dedication to duty and his acerbic wit - has been married to the Queen for more than 70 years and is the nation's longest serving consort.

Frederick

A Prince Freddie of Cambridge would have a historical link to the 1st Duke of Cambridge.

Prince Adolphus Frederick lived from 1774 to 1850 and was a son of George III.

He was apparently very fond of interrupting church services by bellowing out 'By all means' if the priest said 'Let us pray'.

Charles

William may want to pay tribute to his father - but perhaps as a middle name as it may be considered to similar to Charlotte.

James

James could be chosen to signify Kate's affection for her brother, the baby's uncle, James Middleton.

William already has a cousin James, the Earl and Countess of Wessex's son, Viscount Severn.

James is a Stuart name. James I, son of Mary, Queen of Scots, had been king of Scotland for 36 years as James VI when he became king of England in 1603.

Other names

They could choose William as a middle name, but also perhaps Michael as a middle name out of respect for Kate's father.

Kate's grandfather on her paternal side was called Peter, while on her maternal side, her grandfather was Ronald.

Thomas also appears several times in Kate's family tree as does Francis.

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Kate Middleton baby: Funny side to royal baby not being named George

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