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Germany / Europe & Central Asia

Journalists attacked in Germany since 1992

  

Demonstrators attack, obstruct journalists covering protests against COVID-19 lockdown in Germany

Since mid-July, 2020, German protesters against the country’s COVID-19 restrictions have attacked journalists covering their demonstrations, according to news reports and videos of the incidents shared on social media. On July 17, at a protest in the town of Weiden, Bavaria, protesters harassed Beate Josefine Luber, a local freelance reporter covering the demonstrations for regional…

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German injunction against BuzzFeed story in place since September due to COVID-19

On September 18, 2019, the Berlin Regional Court issued a temporary injunction ordering BuzzFeed Germany, the local branch of the U.S. media outlet, to remove two articles from its website, according to news reports from the time. Due to the country’s lockdown to halt the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic, the court has not held…

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Can Dündar, the former editor-in-chief of Cumhuriyet newspaper pictured on April 7, 2017, now runs nonprofit online radio station 'Ozguruz' from exile in Germany. (AP/Markus Schreiber)

For Turkish journalists in Berlin exile, threats remain, but in different forms

For Can Dündar, sitting in the audience of a theater performance near Dortmund in Germany in May was an emotional moment. In an interview with CPJ, he recalled how during the premiere night, he watched the main actor on stage playing a journalist as he was imprisoned in Turkey, had his house searched, his books…

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Former Austrian Vice Chancellor Heinz-Christian Strache is seen in Vienna, Austria, on May 18, 2019. Strache recently filed a criminal complaint against "all persons" involved in the dissemination of a video that led to his resignation. (AP/Michael Gruber)

Austrian politician Strache sues German newspapers over ‘Ibiza video’

Berlin, June 12, 2019 — German authorities should reject criminal complaints filed by former Austrian Vice Chancellor Heinz-Christian Strache against news outlets that published a video that led to his resignation, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today.

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The Bundestag is seen in Berlin, Germany, on December 12, 2018. A piece of draft legislation would make it easier for intelligence services to surveil journalists and their sources. (Reuters/Fabrizio Bensch)

German draft legislation would enable intelligence agencies to spy on journalists

Berlin, June 7, 2019 — The Committee to Protect Journalists today called on the German Ministry of the Interior to drop draft legislation that would make it easier for intelligence services to surveil journalists and their sources.

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German freelancer Billy Six, pictured after his release from Syrian detention in 2013. Six is detained in Venezuela on charges including espionage. (AFP/Louai Beshara)

CPJ alarmed by detention of German freelance reporter in Venezuela

Miami, November 29, 2018–The Committee to Protect Journalists today expressed concern over the detention in Venezuela of German freelance journalist Billy Six. Venezuelan counterintelligence agents detained Six in the northwestern state of Falcón on November 17, according to his parents and news reports.

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Germany should use UN Security Council role to promote press freedom

CPJ calls on Chancellor Angela Merkel to use Germany’s position on the U.N. Security Council to prioritize press freedom and the safety of journalists. The country should extend its legacy of speaking up when journalists are under attack.

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A mural at the Facebook office in Berlin. A new law in Germany requires Facebook and other large social media platforms to quickly delete posts reported as inappropriate. (Reuters/Stefanie Loos)

As German hate speech law sinks Titanic’s Twitter post, critics warn new powers go too far

The satirical magazine Titanic appears to have been an unlikely victim of Germany’s recently adopted online anti-hate speech law, NetzDG. “We were truly surprised,” the magazine’s editor-in-chief Tim Wolff told CPJ, as he explained how Twitter blocked the Titanic account for 48 hours after the magazine republished a post Twitter had deleted, in which Titanic…

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An EU flag, pictured in January 2012. The European Parliament is due to vote this month on legislation around exports of surveillance software. (AP/Vadim Ghirda)

CPJ joins call for EU to stop surveillance software going to rights abusers

The Committee to Protect Journalists today joined a group of human rights groups in calling on the European Parliament to vote tomorrow in favor of legislation that could prevent surveillance equipment from going to rights-abusing governments.

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A German legislator uses a mobile device during a session of the Bundestag in Berlin, March 1, 2013. (AP/Gero Breloer)

Proposed German legislation threatens broad internet censorship

The German cabinet on April 5 approved a “Draft Law to Improve Law Enforcement in Social Networks” (Netzwerkdurchsetzungsgesetz), ostensibly aimed at combatting disinformation and hate speech, that raises concerns about restrictions on free expression and the privatization of censorship. The law would compel social media companies to remove content or risk fines as high as…

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