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Showing posts with label MichaelEGiesler. Show all posts
Showing posts with label MichaelEGiesler. Show all posts

Wednesday, 24 April 2019

Author Profile and Interview with Father Michael E. Giesler

Author Profile and Interview with Father Michael E. Giesler 


I had two books by Father Michael E. Giesler on my two be read pile for a few years. Once I read the first one, I have been on a quest to track down and read all of his works. Father Michael is a as a priest, professor, and retreat director for one of the retreat centres of Opus Dei. He has published two academic works for his masters and graduate studies. Since then he has published four fiction and four non-fiction works. The six I have read were amazing books. I was able to track father Michael down and Father Michael E. Giesler recently took some time from his busy schedule to answer 20 questions for the readers here at Book Reviews and More. So here in his own words is father Michael.

1. You have 8 books available in English, including a historical fiction trilogy. And yet they are published under a wide variation on your name: Michael E. Giesler, Rev. Michael Giesler, Father Michael Giesler, Michael Edward Giesler and just Michael Giesler. Even Across the Historical fiction trilogy there are three variations on your name. Can I ask what name you would prefer if you could consolidate them all under one name?

In my spiritually themed books, I have preferred to use Father or Reverend before my name. For the historical Fiction trilogy, I preferred to use my untitled name, since I began writing the first of them, Junia, as a layman back in the late 70’s. Also the main characters in the early Christian stories are not priests, but men and women among the ordinary faithful of 1900 years ago.

2. Speaking of your historical fiction trilogy which is comprised of: Junia (2002), Marcus (2004), Grain Of Wheat (2008) the three books are published by Scepter, but books 1 and 3 have eBooks and Kindle editions, and book 2 Marcus, does not. Would you like to see this volume available as an eBook also?

Yes, I would like to see it as an e-book and may bring up this point with my publisher.

3. You self-published through Create Space the volume, Called by Name: Twelve Guideline Meditations for Diocesan Priests, I am wondering if you have plans to release it as an eBook?

If there were a clear surge of interest in the book, I would negotiate with Create Space and possibly Amazon to offer it as an ebook. I think it would increase accessibility.

4. Your writing career spans 41 years, from the publication of Christ the Rejected Stone in 1974 to Family Grace: A Story of Conversion Through Friendship published in 2015. Do you plan time for writing around your duties as a priest, professor, and retreat director? Or When you get an idea the writing project becomes a priority?

I have been able to keep up a steady pace of writing over the years, and have found enough time between my duties as a priest and spiritual director, with the help of God’s grace. If a clear idea or motivation comes for writing a specific book, as in the case of Called by Name for the Year of Priests, or the Guidebook
for Confessors, I put those books on the “fast track”. In the case of You See Me, You Hear Me, I was specifically requested for a book on prayer, and was
able to complete it quickly over a summer vacation.


5. You have published four fictional works, and four non-fiction volumes. Do you find it easier writing fiction or non-fiction? Why?

While having to work hard at both genres of writing, I find them equally challenging as well as satisfying. As a writer, the most important consideration for me is if I have something useful or inspiring to say. That is enough motivation for me to get started and to complete the book, whether it be fiction or non-fiction.

6. What does your writing process look like? Takes us through the steps from idea to publishing?

The idea for a book could be generated in many different ways. Since my college days, I’ve always been interested in Greco-Roman civilization, as well as the spread of early Christianity. This was the seedbed for my novels on the early Christians. As a priest, I have always had the desire to help my brother priests, and this generated the idea of a book of meditations to help them in daily ministry, and of a practical guidebook on hearing confessions.

7. Is the process different when writing fiction compared to when writing non-fiction?

Yes, there is a far greater use of the imagination in writing fiction. I have to imagine and create the characters, the challenges they face, and the timeline of their lives. There are also dramatic effects to the story, which require several rewritings and re-focusing. In writing non-fiction, I have to pay far more attention to research and the proper framing of ideas and words. I cannot leave things for the reader’s imagination and feeling, but need to write sure and well-founded conclusions.

8. One of the greatest strengths in your fiction books are the characters, they are so solid and believable. The characters you create, are they reflections of people you know, composites of different people you know or entirely your creations?

Some of the characters, like Junia and her friend Marcia are simply drawn from my imagination and little bit of observation of young women and their interaction with one another. Other characters like Scintilla, servant of Marcia who gives Junia lessons in Christianity, are simply creations to keep the story going and alive. Junia’s father Gaius and her mother Aurelia are more based on particular characters in other novels. The character Numer is drawn from my knowledge of certain members of the Catholic institution Opus Dei, who have a combination of faith, intelligence and good humor in the way they live and react to others.

9. Which character from your fiction books is your favorite? Why?
 
Of them all I like Marcus the most. He has big ideals, but overthinks things and has a certain naivete which makes him a little mysterious, as well as charming. He also has a big heart for others. For this reason I was glad to put him as the main character in the last two books. I also was able to show his conversion to Christianity in a more developed way than I did with his sister Junia.

10. Which character in your novels was the hardest to write and why?

I really did not have a problem with any of the characters. As the story flowed, the characters came to me rather naturally…each with his or her own personality traits.

11. I once heard Madeleine L'Engle state that her characters were real to her and almost an extended part of her family, she said once that at the dinner table she sat up and stated: "Meg just finished her PhD." Are your characters real to you, do you ever get glimpses of what they are up to now, or once you finish a book is that it?

Though many of my characters lived 1900 years ago, and were fervent Christians, I like to imagine them being with God right now. At times I like to think that their lives more or less corresponded to the stories in my novels. And for this reason I would like to meet them some day in the afterlife … especially Junia, Marcia, Numer, and Atticus the priest who is sent to the lead mines in Dacia but has such a powerful love for his fellow Christians.

12. A few of your books are available in Spanish, are their plans to translate any of the others in to Spanish? Other Languages?

I would hope that all the novels could be translated someday into European languages such as Spanish, French, Italian, and German. I would like to see Marcus translated into Spanish fairly soon, since it is the key transitional book between Junia and Grain of Wheat.

13. If you could only recommend 10 books to a reader looking to grow in their Catholic faith what books would you suggest?

Apart from a thorough reading of Sacred Scripture, I would recommend the Confessions of Saint Augustine, Evelyn Waugh’s Brideshead Revisited, G.K. Chesterton’s Orthodoxy and the complete Didache series published by Midwest Theological Forum in Chicago.

14. What are some of your favorite fiction authors and books that you can recommend to our readers?

I’m a fan of J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis. I find that most of their books are quite rewarding, though Lewis himself did not become a member of the Catholic Church, at least while he was alive on earth.

15. Can you think of a book or two that the readers are unlikely to have heard of that you would highly recommend?

A new book by Scepter Publishers comes to mind, on the life of Guadalupe Ortiz de Landazuri, a Spanish woman who is soon to be beatified in Madrid. In a simple ordinary way her life demonstrates a life of prayer and service to the Church.

(Note: Guadalupe: The Freedom of Loving by Cristina Abad Cadenas, is the book he is making reference to.)


16. What current projects are you working on or are in the back burner in some stage of development?

I am working on a long poem entitled THY KINGDOM COME, which summarizes the history of salvation from the creation of Adam and Eve until the Second Coming of Christ. As you can see, it’s a very ambitious project and I am trying to get some feedback for what I have written so far from good friends and fellow authors. I am also working on a theological study of the “Mystery of Co-redemption” … our vital union with Christ in order to redeem the world…with practical applications to our contemporary life.

17. Completely off topic but what TV shows or movies do you enjoy or could you recommend?

I’ve always liked musicals, especially from the 1940’s and 50’s. They leave you with an upbeat feeling, a trait often lacking in today’s movies.

18. I once had a university professor state that the true goal of a university education should be to teach one to learn how to think. What would you state should be the goal of higher education and why?

The goal of all education is to lead a person from ignorance into truth. One reaches the truth by a combination of personal reflection and appreciation for the thoughts and discoveries of the great minds of the past. It is not enough to simply be informed about things; the truly educated person must have the ability to look at things both deeply and “fondly”, that is with a certain amount of love, which is the classical definition of wisdom.

19. If you were stuck on a desert island and could only have 10 books to read again and again, what books would you want with you?

I would definitely want all 73 books of the Old and New Testament recognized as inspired by the Church; the Catholic Catechism 1994 edition; the second encyclical of Pope Emeritus Benedict on the virtue of Hope, (Spe Salvi, 2007). Finally Dante’s Divine Comedy in Italian and English, particularly the Purgatorio and Paradiso sections of that poem.

20. What advice would you give to young aspiring authors and artists particularly those looking to have their art reflect their faith?

First, be very familiar with the teachings of the Catholic Church, and foster a particular devotion to Christ’s Sacred Heart and to Mary: Most Pure his Mother.

Second, have a dream with what you would like to do with your work. Hopefully it will not simply be to express yourself, but to create something beautiful that will instruct and inspire others to become better persons, and will lead them closer to Truth and Beauty Himself.

Finally get the sincere reactions of others to what they write. This may be hard on the ego at first, but it will enhance your work in the end. As my father used to say, who was a creative writer himself, “the best writer is a re-writer.”


Thank you, Father Michael, for your time in answering the twenty question. I have loved your books I have read and encourage all readers to give them a try. I look forward to some of the pieces you are currently working on. May God continue to bless you, your ministry, and us your readers. Thank you again.


Books by Rev. Michael Giesler:
You See Me, You Hear Me
Guidebook for Confessors
Family Grace: A Story of Conversion Through Friendship
Called by Name: Twelve Guideline Meditations for Diocesan Priests

Christ the Rejected Stone
...

Spanish Editions:
Dios te ve y te oye

...

Christian Historical Fiction Trilogy:
Junia
Marcus
Grain Of Wheat

...

Author Profile and Interview with Father Michael E. Giesler.









Saturday, 30 March 2019

Top Ten Fiction and Non-Fiction Books First Quarter 2019

Top Ten Fiction and Non-Fiction Books First Quarter 2019

This quarter I have read 123 books. Of those 123 a total of 53 books received 5/5 stars and are first time reads and are therefor eligible for this quarters top ten list. That left me with 15 to choose from for the fiction and 30 for the non-fiction. For a few of the selections I have picked series. I could just not narrow it down to 10 books.

Here is my top ten fiction and non-fiction books of the first quarter of 2019. 

Top Ten Non-Fiction Books:
1. Called by Name: Twelve Guideline Meditations for Diocesan Priests - Michael E. Giesler
2. Illustrissimi: The Letters Of Pope John Paul I - Albino Luciani - Pope John Paul I
3. Life Lessons Fifty Things I Learned in My First Fifty Years - Patrick Madrid 
4. The Lamb Will Conquer: Reflections on the Knock Apparition - Nigel Woollen 
5. Remember Your Death Memento Mori - Theresa Aletheia Noble
6. Devotions to St Thomas Becket - John S. Hogan
7. Christian Shrines Series - Catholic Truth Society
8. Understanding the Diaconate: Historical, Theological, and Sociological Foundations - W. Shawn McKnight
9. Saints of the Isles Series - Catholic Truth Society
10. Be Saints! An Invitation from Pope Benedict XVI - Amy Welborn and Ann Kissane Engelhart

Top Ten Fiction Books:
1. Tortured Soul - Theresa Linden 
2. With Two Eyes Into Gehenna - Jane Lebak
3. Dragon Assassin - Arthur Slade
4. No Middle Name - Lee Child - Jack Reacher 21.5
5. Seven Angels Short Story Bundle - Jane Lebak - Seven Archangels Short Stories
6. I Am God's Storyteller - Lisa M. Hendey and Eric Carlson 
7. The Friendship War - Andrew Clements 
8. The Adventures of Lee and Bucky - Jane Lebak
9. Toward the Gleam - T.M. Doran 
10. Relic of His Heart - Jane Lebak

This quarter has been my most prodigious in reading since I started keeping track. Some of that is attributed to lifestyle changes. I now commute to work on a bus and read on the bus every day. A few years ago, I removed all games from my phone and tablet, except for a brain training game. And over the last six months or so I have been reading far more non-fiction again than fiction. And many i find hard to put down.


Note: I did not include books that have been read in previous years and were reread this year in my top ten lists, they were in the bonus section. As stated it was no easy task making this quarter. But if you want more options check out my favorite books year by year list. This post is going up early because of the end of the quarter falling during holy week.


Relates Posts: 
Top 10 Fiction Books 1st Quarter 2010
Top 10 Fiction Books 2nd Quarter 2010
Top 10 Reading Goals for 2010
Top 10 Fiction Books 3rd Quarter 2010

Top 10 Fiction Books 4th Quarter 2010
Top Ten Reading Goals For 2010 - Recap

Top 10 Fiction Books 2010
Top 10 Picture Books of 2010
Top 10 Non-Fiction Books of 2010

Top 10 Graphic Novels for 2010
Top Ten Reading Goals For 2011
 

Top Ten Fiction Books 1st Quarter 2011
Top Ten Fiction Books 2nd Quarter 2011
Top Ten Reading Goals for 2011 Update
 
Top Ten Fiction Books 3rd Quarter 2011 
Top Ten Fictions Books 4th Quarter 2011
Top Ten Fiction Books 2011
Top Ten Reading Goals 2011 - Recap
Top Ten Reading Goals 2012
Top Ten Fiction Books 1st Quarter 2012
Top Ten Fiction Books 2nd Quarter 2012

Top Ten Fiction Books 3rd Quarter 2012
Top Ten Fiction Books  4th Quarter 2012
Top Ten Fiction Books 2012
Top Ten Non-Fiction Books 2012
Top Ten Reading Goals 2012 - Recap
Top Ten Reading Goals 2013
Top 10 Fiction Books 1st Quarter 2013

Top 10 Fiction Books 2nd Quarter 2013
Top 10 Books Second Half 2013
Top Ten Fiction Books 2013
Top Ten Non-Fiction Books 2013 
Top Ten Books First Quarter 2014
Top Ten Books Second Quarter 2014
Top Ten Books Third Quarter 2014
Top Ten Books Fourth Quarter 2014
Top Ten Fiction Books 2014
Top Ten Non-Fiction Books 2014
Top Ten Books First Quarter 2015
Top Ten Books Second Quarter 2015
Top Ten Books Third Quarter 2015
Top Ten Books Fourth Quarter 2015
Top Ten Fiction Books 2015
Top Ten Non-Fiction Books 2015
Top Ten Books First Quarter 2016
Top Ten Books Second Quarter 2016
Top Ten Books Third Quarter 2016
Top Ten Books Fourth Quarter 2016
Top Ten Non- Fiction Books 2016
Top Ten Fiction Books 2016
Top Ten Catholic Books
Top Ten Books First Quarter 2017
Top Ten Books Second Quarter 2017
Top Ten Books Third Quarter 2017
Top Ten Books Fourth Quarter 2017
Top Ten Non-Fiction Books 2017
Top Ten Fiction Books 2017
Top Ten Books First Quarter 2018
Top Ten Books Second Quarter 2018
Top Ten Books Third Quarter 2018
Top Ten Books Fourth Quarter 2018
Top Ten Non-Fiction Books 2018
Top Ten Fiction Books 2018
Top Ten Books First Quarter 2019
Top Ten Books Second Quarter 2019 

All Top Ten Lists on Book Reviews and More

Statistics Books Read By Year:

143 - January-March 2019
359 - 2018
380 - 2017 
272 - 2016 
177 - 2015 
130 - 2014 
88 -  2013
176 - 2012 
163 - 2011
302 - 2010
142 - 2009
98 - 2008
83 - 2007
191 - 2006
151 - 2005
60 - 2004
52 - 2003
97 - 2002
50 - 2001
41 - 2000
71 - 1999
73 - 1998
131 - 1997
101 - 1996




Friday, 15 March 2019

Called by Name - Father Michael E. Giesler - Twelve Guideline Meditations for Diocesan Priests

Called by Name: 
Twelve Guideline Meditations for Diocesan Priests
Father Michael E. Giesler
ISBN 9781466371231
ISBN 1466371234


I am not a priest and considering my marriage and age of my children I likely never will be. But after reading five other books by Father Michael R. Giesler I could not help but read this one. And I am thankful I have. I loved this book and can honestly recommend it to all diocesan priests. In fact, that is my first suggestion to you. But a copy and give it to your priest. I have known many great priests and been fortunate to be able to count on one hand those I have known well that I did not respect. And I wish I was in a position to buy this book by the case to give away to priests. In the forward Archbishop Robert J. Carlson of Saint Louis states:

“During the 2009-2010 Year of the Priest, Father Giesler composed twelve reflections on diocesan priesthood, inspired by the life and writings of saints John Mary Vianney, Phillip Neri, and Josemaria Escriva. He did this in addition to writing and seeing published a helpful ‘Guidebook for Confessors’. All twelve of these meditations, published here as ‘Called by Name’, have an appealing and practical style, interspersed with personal prayer; they address the life and challenges of diocesan priests as they begin the second decade of the 21st century.” 

And also:

“In sum, ‘Called by Name’ is ideal spiritual reading for the busy contemporary priests; it effectively focuses him on the purpose of his ordination, and provides him with specific ways to grow in holiness of life.”

And I could not agree more. It is a great read. This little volume of 99 pages is packed with some amazing information. I believe any priest would benefit from reading these meditations. And I as a lay person have used them to be able to pray for priests more specifically. In the introduction Father Giesler states:

“The reflections cover such topics as vocation, the work of the priest, life of prayer, humility, obedience to their Ordinary, love for celibacy, devotion to Mary, helping the poor through the works of mercy, having hope and giving hope to others, fraternity for other priests, and making Holy Mass to be the center of our priesthood. All of these topics of course overlap, so the reader should not be surprised if he finds certain key concepts and quotations repeated and emphasized in the different sections.”

The chapters in the book are:

Forward
Introduction
Bibliographical Note
Vocation
Life of prayer
Serving the faithful
Humility
Supernatural Hope and Optimism
Fidelity to the Church
Holy Mass and the Eucharist
Holy Purity and Celibacy
Sharing Christ’s Challenge of Holiness
Redemptive Sacrifice
Caring for Our Brothers in the priesthood
Mary Our Mother

In the first reflection ‘VOCATION’ Father Giesler states:

“Our vocation takes into account many factors: our family history, our schooling, our temperament, and all the events – even those that seemed inconsequential at the time – that led us to the call of priesthood. Whenever they occurred they were workings of God’s grace in our lives – perhaps in dramatic ways, perhaps in slow almost imperceptible ways. … Now it is up to each one of us to correspond to that gift, for the glory and love of God first of all, and then for the service of the souls that he has entrusted to us.”

Later in that same chapter he says:

“The call to priesthood is first of all then a personal call to give praise to God through our work and prayer. It is also a personal call to become saints. It would be a waste of time and energy if we were to try and make others holy and neglect our own spiritual lives. A priest must be a man of God and have Jesus Christ as his model. This means that literally everything that we do, from our first thought in the morning to our last thought at night, should be for the glory of God.”

The passage in this meditation that hit me the most is:

“The final test of any vocation is perseverance. “I am the vine, you are the branches. He who abides in Me, and I in him, he it is that bears much fruit” (Jn 15:5). Abide! What a beautiful old English word! It signifies not only being in a place – but remaining there in a fixed and permanent way. May I always abide in you, Lord, as your faithful priest and minister. We have all known priests who have left, often in very painful circumstances for themselves and those around them, and frequently with scandal to the church. We must realize that the ultimate goal of our calling as priests is to be faithful to the end. Let’s resolve, again with God’s constant help, to die in the state of grace and in the state of priesthood.”

In the second chapter ‘Life Of Prayer’ Father Giesler states:

“The glory which thou hast given Me I have given it them that they may be one even as We are one” (Jn 17:22) Our Lord spoke those words at the Last Supper, to remind His followers forever about the real source of effectiveness. The Priority of a priest’s life is to be always united to the Master; therefore he puts the things of God first, and in union with God, he serves others.”

A few paragraphs later he advises:

“He must therefore have certain priorities in his life, which means that he has to say yes to some things, and no to others. First he must say yes to his greatest privilege and duty as a priest; to celebrate the Holy Sacrifice of Mass with the attention and devotion. It is the center of the Church’s life, and of his own life. We should therefore prepare for it well, by spending a little time in prayer before it begins – either with a Breviary or a period of meditation. Many pious priests over the centuries have also invoked their ministerial Archangel before saying Mass.”

I hope that from those few quotes you will see the power of this book. I have already picked up and given away a few copies of this book. It was an informative read, as a layperson. And I encourage you to pick it up and give it to the parish priest in your home parish, or to other priests that you know. I am certain it will be edifying for them, and through that bring even more blessings to their ministry. 

I will state it again, I implore you to buy this and give it to the priests you know! Bless them with this book. And be praying for them.

Note: This book is part of a series of reviews: 2019 Catholic Reading Plan!

Books by Rev. Michael Giesler:
You See Me, You Hear Me
Guidebook for Confessors
Family Grace: A Story of Conversion Through Friendship
Called by Name: Twelve Guideline Meditations for Diocesan Priests

Christ the Rejected Stone
...

Spanish Editions:
Dios te ve y te oye

...

Christian Historical Fiction Trilogy:
Junia
Marcus
Grain Of Wheat

...

Author Profile and Interview with Father Michael E. Giesler.






Monday, 31 December 2018

Top Ten Fiction Books 2018

Top Ten Fiction Books of 2018

My total books this year is down a bit from last year, but my page count is actually up. Just variations in the length of material read. And I am finishing the year at just under a book a day with 359 books read over the year, down a bit from the 380 last year. The year by the numbers:

359 books read
215 received 5/5 stars
35 of those had been read before
137 were non-Fiction
78 were fiction

So here is my top ten fiction books of 2018. 

Top Ten Fiction Books of 2018 are:

1. Lives of the Early Christians in Rome Trilogy - Father Michael E. Giesler
  Junia - Marcus - Grain of Wheat
2. West Brothers Books - Theresa Linden
  Battle for His Soul
  Life-Changing Love 
  Roland West Outcast
  Anyone But Him
3. Down Time - Barry Lyga - An I Hunt Killers Prequel
4. Image and Likeness: Literary Reflections on the Theology of the Body - Edited by Erin McCole Cupp and Ellen Gable
5. Thanos Titan Consumed - Barry Lyga - MARVEL's Avengers
6. Outwalkers - Fiona Shaw  
7. Secrets Visible & Invisible - Catholic Teen Books Anthology
8. The Absence of War - Amy Welborn
9. We Are All Jacob's Children: A Tale of Hope, Wisdom, and Faith - Noah benShea
10. Kayan Kronicles - Derya Little 
       Lost
       Found

There were so many great reads this year it was really hard to narrow it down to just 10. 

Note: I did not include books that have been read in previous years and were reread this year in my top ten lists, they were in the bonus section. As stated it was no easy task making this quarter. But if you want more options check out my favorite books year by year list. This post is going up early because of the end of the quarter falling during holy week.


Relates Posts: 
Top 10 Fiction Books 1st Quarter 2010
Top 10 Fiction Books 2nd Quarter 2010
Top 10 Reading Goals for 2010
Top 10 Fiction Books 3rd Quarter 2010

Top 10 Fiction Books 4th Quarter 2010
Top Ten Reading Goals For 2010 - Recap

Top 10 Fiction Books 2010
Top 10 Picture Books of 2010
Top 10 Non-Fiction Books of 2010

Top 10 Graphic Novels for 2010
Top Ten Reading Goals For 2011
 

Top Ten Fiction Books 1st Quarter 2011
Top Ten Fiction Books 2nd Quarter 2011
Top Ten Reading Goals for 2011 Update
 
Top Ten Fiction Books 3rd Quarter 2011 
Top Ten Fictions Books 4th Quarter 2011
Top Ten Fiction Books 2011
Top Ten Reading Goals 2011 - Recap
Top Ten Reading Goals 2012
Top Ten Fiction Books 1st Quarter 2012
Top Ten Fiction Books 2nd Quarter 2012

Top Ten Fiction Books 3rd Quarter 2012
Top Ten Fiction Books  4th Quarter 2012
Top Ten Fiction Books 2012
Top Ten Non-Fiction Books 2012
Top Ten Reading Goals 2012 - Recap
Top Ten Reading Goals 2013
Top 10 Fiction Books 1st Quarter 2013

Top 10 Fiction Books 2nd Quarter 2013
Top 10 Books Second Half 2013
Top Ten Fiction Books 2013
Top Ten Non-Fiction Books 2013 
Top Ten Books First Quarter 2014
Top Ten Books Second Quarter 2014
Top Ten Books Third Quarter 2014
Top Ten Books Fourth Quarter 2014
Top Ten Fiction Books 2014
Top Ten Non-Fiction Books 2014
Top Ten Books First Quarter 2015
Top Ten Books Second Quarter 2015
Top Ten Books Third Quarter 2015
Top Ten Books Fourth Quarter 2015
Top Ten Fiction Books 2015
Top Ten Non-Fiction Books 2015
Top Ten Books First Quarter 2016
Top Ten Books Second Quarter 2016
Top Ten Books Third Quarter 2016
Top Ten Books Fourth Quarter 2016
Top Ten Non- Fiction Books 2016
Top Ten Fiction Books 2016
Top Ten Catholic Books
Top Ten Books First Quarter 2017
Top Ten Books Second Quarter 2017
Top Ten Books Third Quarter 2017
Top Ten Books Fourth Quarter 2017
Top Ten Non-Fiction Books 2017
Top Ten Fiction Books 2017
Top Ten Books First Quarter 2018
Top Ten Books Second Quarter 2018
Top Ten Books Third Quarter 2018
Top Ten Books Fourth Quarter 2018
Top Ten Non-Fiction Books 2018
Top Ten Fiction Books 2018
Top Ten Books First Quarter 2019 

All Top Ten Lists on Book Reviews and More

Statistics Books Read By Year:

359 - 2018
380 - 2017 
272 - 2016 
177 - 2015 
130 - 2014 
88 -  2013
176 - 2012 
163 - 2011
302 - 2010
142 - 2009
98 - 2008
83 - 2007
191 - 2006
151 - 2005
60 - 2004
52 - 2003
97 - 2002
50 - 2001
41 - 2000
71 - 1999
73 - 1998
131 - 1997
101 - 1996




Friday, 28 December 2018

Top Ten Fiction and Non-Fiction Books Fourth Quarter 2018

Top Ten Fiction and Non-Fiction Books Fourth Quarter 2018

My total books this quarter is down a bit from last quarter, but my page count is actually up. Just variations in the length of material read. And I am finishing the year at just under a book a day with 359 books read over the year, down a bit from the 380 last year. The Quarter by the numbers: 

78 books read
49 received 5/5 stars
8 of those had been read before
25 were non-Fiction
24 were fiction

So here is my top ten fiction and non-fiction books of the fourth quarter 2018. 

Top Ten Non-Fiction Books:

1. Inspiration from the Saints - Maolsheachlann O Ceallaigh
2. Father Damien's Letters - Joseph Damien De Veuster
3. Finding Our Way Home: A family's story of life, love, and loss - J Damon Dagnone
4. Footprints of the Northern Saints - Basil Cardinal Hume
5. Love In Action - Fernando Ocáriz
6. Overcoming Lukewarmness: Healing Your Soul's Sadness - Francis Fernandez-Carvajal
7. Wisdom from Pope Paul VI - Pope Paul VI and Mary Leonora Wilson FSP
8. Call Him Father: How to Experience the Fatherhood of God - Fr. Edward Maritany
9. To Raise the Fallen: A Selection of the War Letters, Prayers, and Spiritual Writings of Fr. Willie Doyle, S.J. - Edited by Patrick Kenny
10. Catholic Christianity: A Complete Catechism of Catholic Beliefs Based on the Catechism of the Catholic Church - Peter Kreeft 

Top Ten Fiction Books:

1. Lives of the Early Christians in Rome Trilogy - Father Michael E. Giesler
Junia - Marcus - Grain of Wheat
2. Thanos Titan Consumed - Barry Lyga - MARVEL's Avengers
3. The Absence of War - Amy Welborn
4. Siege of Reginald Hill - Corinna Turner 
5. Treachery and Truth - Katy Huth Jones 
6. Ornamental Graces - Carolyn Astfalk
7. Charlotte's Honor - Ellen Gable - Great War Great Love Book 2
8. Guarding Aaron - T.M. Gaouette - Faith & Kung Fu Book 3
9. David Vining Short Stories Collections:
A Boy and His Satellite
Shoes for Two Soldier Sons
10. Death by Airship - Arthur Slade - Orca Currents

If you give some of these a try I am sure they will be with the read! 

Note: I did not include books that have been read in previous years and were reread this year in my top ten lists, they were in the bonus section. As stated it was no easy task making this quarter. But if you want more options check out my favorite books year by year list. This post is going up early because of the end of the quarter falling during holy week.


Relates Posts: 
Top 10 Fiction Books 1st Quarter 2010
Top 10 Fiction Books 2nd Quarter 2010
Top 10 Reading Goals for 2010
Top 10 Fiction Books 3rd Quarter 2010

Top 10 Fiction Books 4th Quarter 2010
Top Ten Reading Goals For 2010 - Recap

Top 10 Fiction Books 2010
Top 10 Picture Books of 2010
Top 10 Non-Fiction Books of 2010

Top 10 Graphic Novels for 2010
Top Ten Reading Goals For 2011
 

Top Ten Fiction Books 1st Quarter 2011
Top Ten Fiction Books 2nd Quarter 2011
Top Ten Reading Goals for 2011 Update
 
Top Ten Fiction Books 3rd Quarter 2011 
Top Ten Fictions Books 4th Quarter 2011
Top Ten Fiction Books 2011
Top Ten Reading Goals 2011 - Recap
Top Ten Reading Goals 2012
Top Ten Fiction Books 1st Quarter 2012
Top Ten Fiction Books 2nd Quarter 2012

Top Ten Fiction Books 3rd Quarter 2012
Top Ten Fiction Books  4th Quarter 2012
Top Ten Fiction Books 2012
Top Ten Non-Fiction Books 2012
Top Ten Reading Goals 2012 - Recap
Top Ten Reading Goals 2013
Top 10 Fiction Books 1st Quarter 2013

Top 10 Fiction Books 2nd Quarter 2013
Top 10 Books Second Half 2013
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Top Ten Books First Quarter 2019 

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Statistics Books Read By Year:

359 - 2018
380 - 2017 
272 - 2016 
177 - 2015 
130 - 2014 
88 -  2013
176 - 2012 
163 - 2011
302 - 2010
142 - 2009
98 - 2008
83 - 2007
191 - 2006
151 - 2005
60 - 2004
52 - 2003
97 - 2002
50 - 2001
41 - 2000
71 - 1999
73 - 1998
131 - 1997
101 - 1996