This information was published in 1993 EPA Report, A Summary of the Emissions Characterization and Noncancer Respiratory Effects of Wood Smoke, EPA-453/R-93-036 It can be ordered from the EPA at (919)-541-5344.

Chemical Composition of Wood Smoke

Species                              g/kg wood         
Carbon Monoxide                      80-370            
Methane                              14-25             
VOCs (C2-C7)                         7-27              
Aldehydes                            0.6-5.4           
   Formaldehyde                      0.1-0.7           
   Acrolein                          0.02-0.1          
   Propionaldehyde                   0.1-0.3           
   Butryaldehyde                     0.01-1.7          
   Acetaldehyde                      0.03-0.6          
   Furfural                          0.2-1.6 1.6       
Substituted Furans                   0.15-1.7          
Benzene                              0.6-4.0           
Alkyl Benzenes                       1-6               
    Toluene                          0.15-1.0          
Acetic Acid                          1.8-2.4           
Formic Acid                          0.06-0.08         
Nitrogen Oxides (NO,NO2)             0.2-0.9           
Sulfur Dioxide                       0.16-0.24         
Methyl chloride                      0.01-0.04         
Napthalene                           0.24-1.6          
Substituted Napthalenes              0.3-2.1           
Oxygenated Monoaromatics             1 - 7             
     Guaiacol (and denvatives)       0.4-1.6           
     Phenol (and denvatives)         0.2-0.8           
     Syringol (and derivatives)      0.7-2.7           
     Catechol (and denvatives)       0.2-0.8           
Total Particle Mass                  7-30              
Particulate Organic Carbon           2-20              
Oxygenated PAHs                      0.15-1            
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH)
    Fluorene                         4x10-5 - 1.7x10-2 
    Phenanthrene                     2x10-5 - 3.4x10-2 
    Anthracene                       5x10-5 - 2.1x10-5
    Methylanthracenes                7xl0-5 -  8x10-5      
    Fluoranthene                   7xl0-4- 4.2xl0-2
    Pyrene                         8x10-4 - 3.1x10-2
    Benzo(a)anthracene             4x10-4 - 2x10-3 
    Chrysene                       5x104- 1x10-2   
    Benzofluoranthenes             6x10-4- 5x10-3  
    Benzo(e)pyrene                 2x104 - 4x10-3  
    Benzo(a)pyrene                3x104- 5x10-3   
    Perylene                      5x10-5 - 3x10-3 
    Ideno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene          2xl0-4- 1.3x10-2
    Benz(ghi)perylene              3x10-5- 1.lx10-2
    Coronene                       8x10-4- 3x10-3  
    Dibenzo(a,h)pyrene             3x104- lx10-3   
    Retene                         7x10-3 - 3x10-2 
    Dibenz(a,h)anthracene          2x10-5 - 2xl0-3 
Trace Elements                     
Na                                 3x10-3 - 1.8xl0-2
Mg                                 2x10-4 - 3x10-3 
Al                                 1x10-4 - 2.4x10-2
Si                                 3x10-4 - 3.1x10-2
S                                  1x10-3 - 2.9x10-2
Cl                                 7x10-4 - 2.1xl0-2
K                                  3x10-3 - 8.6x10-2
Ca                                 9xl0-4 - 1.8x10-2
Ti                                 4x10-5 - 3x10-3 
V                                  2xl0-5 - 4x10-3 
Cr                                 2x10-5 - 3x10-3   
Mn                                 7xl0-5 - 4x10-3   
Fe                                 3x10-4 - 5x10-3  
Ni                                 lxl0-6 - lx10-3 
Cu                                 2x10-4 - 9x10-4  
Zn                                 7xl0-4 - 8x10-3 
Br                                 7x10-5 - 9x10-4 
Pb                                 lx10-4 - 3x10-3
                                   
Particulate Elemental              0.3 - 5
        Carbon
Normal alkanes (C24-C30)           1x10-3 - 6x10-3 
Cyclic di-and triterpenoids    
     Dehydroabietic acid           0.01 - 0.05     
     Isopimaric acid               0.02 - 0.10     
     Lupenone                      2x10-3 - 8x10-3 
     Friedelin                     4x10-6 - 2x10-5 
Chlorinated dioxins                1xl0-5 - 4x10-5 
Particulate Acidity     .          7x10-3 - 7x10-2 


1 Some species are grouped into general classes as indicated by italics
2 To estimate the weight percentage in the exhaust, divide the g/kg value by 80. This assumes that there are 7.3 kg combustion air per kg of wood. Major species not listed here include carbon dioxide and water vapor (about 12 and 7 weight percent respectively under the assumed conditions
3 At ambient conditions; V = vapor, P = particulate, and VIP = vapor and/or particulate (i.e., semi-volatile).
4 DeAngelis (1980)
5 OMNI (1988)
6 Lipari (1984), Values for fireplaces
7 Edye et al (1991). smoldering conditions; other substituted furans include 2-furanmethanol, 2 acetylfuran, 5 methyl-2furaldehyde, and benzofuran
8 Value estimated for pine from Edye et al (1991) from reported yield relative to guaiacol, from guaiacol values of Hawthorne (1989) and assuming particulate organic carbon is 50% of total particle mass
9 Steiber et al (1992), values computed assuming a range of 3-20 g of total extractable, speciated mass per kg wood
10 Khalil (1983)
11 Hawthorne (1989), values for syringol for hardwood fuel; see also Hawthorne (1988)
12 Core (1989), DeAngelis (1980), Kalman and Larson (1987)
13 From one or more of the following studies: Cooke (1981), Truesdale (1984), Alfheirn et al (1984), Zeedijk (1986), Core (1989), Kalman and Larson (1987); assuming a range of 7 to 30 grams of particulate mass per kg wood when values were reported in grams per gram of particulate mass. Similar assumptions apply to references 14,15 and references 17-19
14 Core (1989), Kalman and Larson (1987)
15 Watson (1979), Core (1989), Kalman and Larson (1987)
16 Rau (1989), Core (1989)
17 Core (1989)
18 Standley and Simoneit (1990); Dehydroabietic acid values for pine smoke, lupenone and isopimaric acid values for alder smoke and friedlin values for oaf: soot.
19 Nestrick and Lamparski (1982), from particulate condensed on flue pipes; includes TCDDs, HCDDs, H7CDDs and OCDDS
20 Burnet et al (1986); one gram of acid = one equivalent of acid needed to reach a pH of 5.6 in extract solution