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MS Windows 98 Training Kit - Chapter 12

ISBN: 1-57231-730-2

Chapter 12 and the Table of Contents of the MS Windows 98 Training Kit reprinted with permission from Microsoft Press.
http://mspress.microsoft.com/

Table of Contents

About This Book

Intended Audience
About The CD-ROM
Features of This Book
Chapter and Appendix Overview
Where to Find Specific Skills in This Book
Getting Started
About The Online Book
The Microsoft Certified Professional Program
Technical Support

Chapter 1: The Windows 98 Operating System

About This Chapter
Before You Begin

Lesson 1: Windows 98 Overview

Lesson Summary

Lesson 2: Windows 98 Features

Key Improvements
Advanced Support for New Hardware Standards
Improved Communications and Networking Support
Lesson Summary

Lesson 3: Selecting Windows 98 as a Client Operating System

Lesson Summary
Summary
Review

Chapter 2: Installing Windows 98

About This Chapter
Before You Begin

Lesson 1: Preparing for Installation

Determining Hardware Requirements
Preventing Software Conflicts During Setup
Dual Booting Windows 98
Selecting a Setup Method
Lesson Summary

Lesson 2: Upgrading from Windows 95

Phase 1-Preparing to Run Windows 98 Setup
Phase 2-Collecting Information About Your Computer
Phase 3-Copying Windows 98 Files to Your Computer
Phase 4-Restarting Your Computer
Phase 5-Setting Up Hardware and Finalizing Settings
Lesson Summary

Lesson 3: Installing from MS-DOS

When to Install from MS-DOS
Five-Phase Setup in MS-DOS
Preparing to Run Windows 98 Setup in MS-DOS
Collecting Information About Your Computer
Setting Up Hardware and Finalizing Settings
Lesson Summary

Lesson 4: Automating Setup

Setup Script Structure
Generating a Setup Script
Lesson Summary

Lesson 5: Troubleshooting Windows 98 Setup

Recovering Before the First Restart
Recovering During Hardware Detection
Other Installation Support Issues
Practice: Installing Windows 98
Lesson Summary

Lesson 6: Uninstalling Windows 98

Requirements for Uninstalling Windows 98
Procedure for Uninstalling Windows 98
Procedure for Removing the Windows 95 System Files
Lesson Summary

Recommended Practices
Summary
Review

Chapter 3: Windows 98 File System Support

About This Chapter
Before You Begin

Lesson 1: Partitioning a Hard Disk

Primary and Extended Partitions
Creating and Deleting Partitions
Formatting Partitions
Lesson Summary

Lesson 2: Choosing a File System in Windows 98

Comparing FAT16 and FAT32
Setting Up a FAT32 Partition
Converting from FAT16 to FAT32
Optional Practice: Creating Partitions
Lesson Summary

Lesson 3: Long File Names in Windows 98

How Windows 98 Generates Long File Names
How Windows 98 Generates MS-DOS File Names
Troubleshooting Long File Name Problems
Lesson Summary

Lesson 4: Implementing Disk Compression

Overview of DriveSpace 3
Managing and Tuning Compressed Disks
Lesson Summary

Recommended Practices
Summary
Review

Chapter 4: Windows 98 Hardware Support

About This Chapter
Before You Begin

Lesson 1: The Win32 Driver Model

Overview of the Win32 Driver Model
WDM Architecture
Lesson Summary

Lesson 2: Using OnNow Power Management

Overview of OnNow Power Management
System Requirements
Configuring Power Management
Lesson Summary

Lesson 3: Supporting Universal Serial Bus Devices

USB Topology
Data Transfer Rates
Adding a USB Device
Troubleshooting USB Devices
Lesson Summary

Lesson 4: Implementing IEEE 1394 Serial Bus Devices

IEEE 1394 Topology
Adding an IEEE 1394 Device
Lesson Summary

Lesson 5: Multiple Display Support

Overview of Multiple Display Support
Multiple Display Hardware Requirements
Practice: Configuring Multiple Displays
Troubleshooting Multiple Display Support
Lesson Summary

Recommended Practices
Summary
Review

Chapter 5: Windows 98 System Architecture

About This Chapter
Before You Begin

Lesson 1: The Windows 98 System Architecture Overview

Core System Components
Key Features of the Windows 98 Architecture
Multitasking in Windows 98
Practice: Viewing Current Tasks
Lesson Summary

Lesson 2: Windows 98 Memory Management

Virtual Memory
Memory Paging
Lesson Summary

Lesson 3: Virtual Machines

Overview of Virtual Machines
The Virtual Machine Manager
The System Virtual Machine
Practice: Viewing MS-DOS Virtual Machine Resources
Lesson Summary

Summary
Review

Chapter 6: Configuring Windows 98

About This Chapter
Before You Begin

Lesson 1: Configuring Hardware Settings

Using Control Panel to Configure Windows 98
Adding New Hardware
Creating Hardware Profiles
Configuring Display
Practice: Configuring Display Properties
Lesson Summary

Lesson 2: Configuring System Settings

Configuring Virtual Memory
Configuring Hard Disk File Systems
Optimizing CD-ROM File System Performance
Configuring Floppy and Removable Drives
Configuring Accessibility Options
Lesson Summary

Lesson 3: Creating the Software Environment

Adding or Removing Components
Installing and Removing Applications
Lesson Summary

Lesson 4: Using the Registry to Configure Windows 98 Settings

The Registry Defined
The Registry Structure
Registry Editor
Lesson Summary

Recommended Practices
Summary
Review

Chapter 7: Customizing the Windows 98 Desktop

About This Chapter
Before You Begin

Lesson 1: User Interface Enhancements

Start Menu Enhancements
Practice: Customizing the Start Menu
Taskbar Enhancements
Practice: Creating a Custom Toolbar
Windows 98 Explorer
Practice: Viewing My Computer as a Web Page
Lesson Summary

Lesson 2: Web Integration

Desktop Styles
Launching Applications from the Desktop
Practice: Customizing the Desktop View
Customizing a Folder
Practice: Using the Customize this Folder Wizard
Customizing a Folder with an HTML File
Practice: Creating a Custom View for a Folder
Lesson Summary

Lesson 3: Using Active Desktop

Configuring Active Desktop Items
Practice: Configuring an Active Desktop Item
Adding a Web Site to the Active Desktop
Practice: Using the Subscription Wizard
Recovering the Active Desktop
Lesson Summary

Recommended Practices
Summary
Review

Chapter 8: Supporting Local Printers in Windows 98

About This Chapter
Before You Begin

Lesson 1: The Windows 98 Print Subsystem

Print Subsystem Components
Processing the Print Job
Printing from MS-DOS Programs
Bi-directional Communication
Practice: Enabling Extended Capabilities Port (ECP) Support in Windows 98
Enabling Deferred Printing
Lesson Summary

Lesson 2: Installing a Local Printer

Plug and Play Printer Detection
Add Printer Wizard
Practice: Installing a Local Printer in Windows 98
Lesson Summary

Lesson 3: Configuring and Managing a Local Printer

Configuring a Local Printer
Practice: Configuring a Local Printer in Windows 98
Managing a Local Printer
Practice: Managing Print Tasks in Windows 98
Troubleshooting Printing Problems
Lesson Summary

Recommended Practices
Summary
Review

Chapter 9: Maintaining Windows 98 in a Stand-alone Environment

About This Chapter
Before You Begin

Lesson 1: Viewing System Information

Overview of the System Information Utility
Practice: Viewing Configuration Information
Viewing and Saving
Lesson Summary

Lesson 2: Performing Maintenance Tasks

Using ScanDisk
Defragmenting a Hard Drive
Task Monitor
Using Disk Cleanup
Using the Maintenance Wizard
Using Scheduled Tasks
Practice: Using Scheduled Tasks
Lesson Summary

Lesson 3: Using Web-based Troubleshooting Tools

Windows Update
Technical Support
Windows Report Tool
Lesson Summary

Recommended Practices
Summary
Review

Chapter 10: Troubleshooting Windows 98 in a Stand-Alone Environment

About This Chapter
Before You Begin

Lesson 1: Preparing for Troubleshooting

Using Registry Checker
Practice: Using Registry Checker
Creating an Emergency Startup Disk
Lesson Summary

Lesson 2: Controlling and Troubleshooting the Boot Process

The Windows 98 Boot Process
Files Needed to Boot Windows 98
Editing Msdos.sys
Using the Microsoft System Configuration Utility
Practice: Using the System Configuration Utility
Using the Startup Menu
Monitoring the Boot Process
Practice: Examining the Default Boot Process
Lesson Summary

Lesson 3: Resolving Hardware Conflicts

Using Windows 98 Troubleshooters
Troubleshooting with Device Manager
Resolving Additional Hardware Issues
Lesson Summary

Lesson 4: Resolving Software Problems

Using System File Checker
Customizing System File Checker
Practice: Using System File Checker
Using Version Conflict Manager
Using Dr. Watson
Practice: Using Dr. Watson
Lesson Summary

Recommended Practices
Summary
Review

Chapter 11: Installing Windows 98 for Use on a Network

About This Chapter
Before You Begin

Lesson 1: Installing Multiple Copies in a Network Environment

Developing a Multiple Installation Plan
Choosing a Multiple Installation Method
Lesson Summary

Lesson 2: Automating a Multiple Installation Setup

Creating a Batch Installation File
Practice: Preparing a Batch File for Windows 98 Installation
Installing Additional Components During Setup
Practice: Installing Files on a Server for a Pull Installation
Lesson Summary

Recommended Practices
Summary
Review

Chapter 12: Configuring Windows 98 for Use on a Network

About This Chapter
Before You Begin

Lesson 1: Installing and Configuring Network Components

Identifying Your Computer on the Network
Installing and Configuring Network Adapter Cards
Installing Network Protocols
Configuring TCP/IP
Viewing your TCP/IP Configuration
Troubleshooting TCP/IP
Configuring Network Bindings
Optional Practice: Interoperating with TCP/IP
Lesson Summary

Lesson 2: Sharing Windows 98 Resources

Installing Client for Microsoft Networks
Configuring Microsoft File and Printer Sharing
Sharing Folders
Optional Practice: Configuring Sharing for Microsoft Networks
Sharing Printers
Installing and Configuring Network Printers
Optional Practice: Installing a Network Printer
Configuring the Browse Master
Lesson Summary

Recommended Practices
Summary
Review

Chapter 13: Using Windows 98 on a Windows NT Network

About This Chapter
Before You Begin

Lesson 1: Interoperating with Windows NT

Connecting to DFS Resources
Lesson Summary

Lesson 2: Logging on to a Windows NT Domain

Identifying a Domain
Configuring a Domain Logon
Synchronizing Passwords
Optional Practice: Logging on to a Windows NT Domain
Lesson Summary

Lesson 3: Using Windows NT Network Resources

Connecting to a Computer Running Windows NT
Printing to a Windows NT Print Server
Enabling User-Level Security
Editing an Access Control List
Assigning Folder Permissions
Explicit vs. Implicit Permissions
Optional Practice: Implementing User-Level Security
Troubleshooting Windows NT Interoperation
Lesson Summary

Recommended Practices
Summary
Review

Chapter 14: Using Windows 98 on a Novell Network

About This Chapter
Before You Begin

Lesson 1: Interoperating with NetWare Overview

Lesson Summary

Lesson 2: Logging On to a NetWare Server

Installing and Configuring the IPX/SPX-compatible Protocol
Installing and Configuring Client for NetWare Networks
Configuring Service for NetWare Directory Services
Configuring Logon Functions
Optional Practice: Logging On to a NetWare 4.x Network
Lesson Summary

Lesson 3: Connecting to NetWare Servers

Browsing the NetWare Network
Mapping Network Drives
Optional Practice: Mapping a Drive to a NetWare Server
Printing to NetWare Print Servers
Lesson Summary

Lesson 4: Sharing Resources with NetWare Users

Install and Configure File and Printer Sharing for NetWare Networks
Sharing Resources with User-Level Access Control
Troubleshooting NetWare Interoperation
Lesson Summary

Recommended Practices
Summary
Review

Chapter 15: Managing Windows 98 User Profiles

About This Chapter
Before You Begin

Lesson 1: Identifying a User Profile

Profile Contents
Types of User Profiles
Lesson Summary

Lesson 2: Enabling User Profiles

Enabling Through Passwords Icon
Enabling Through Users Icon
Disabling User Profiles
Lesson Summary

Lesson 3: Loading and Updating User Profiles

Loading Local Profiles
Loading Roaming Profiles
Updating Local and Roaming Profiles
Lesson Summary

Lesson 4: Configuring User Profiles on a Network

On a Windows NT Network
On a Novell NetWare Network
Implementing Mandatory User Profiles
Lesson Summary

Lesson 5: Troubleshooting User Profiles

Lesson Summary

Recommended Practices
Summary
Review

Chapter 16: Implementing Windows 98 System Policies

About This Chapter
Before You Begin

Lesson 1: An Overview of System Policies

What Are System Policies?
How Do System Policies Work?
Why Use System Policies?
How Do You Implement System Policies?
Lesson Summary

Lesson 2: Creating Policies With System Policy Editor

Using System Policy Editor
Using Templates for System Policies
Implementing System Policies on Networks
Troubleshooting System Policies
Lesson Summary

Recommended Practices
Summary
Review

Chapter 17: Using Windows 98 and the Internet

About This Chapter
Before You Begin

Lesson 1: The Internet and Intranets

Overview of Internetworking and Intranetworking
Overview of Internet Explorer 4.0
Practice: Configuring Internet Explorer
Connecting to Internet Resources
Subscribing to Web Sites
Practice: Creating a Web Page Subscription
Practice: Configuring a Web Page Subscription for Offline Reading
Viewing Channel Content
Viewing NetShow Productions
Lesson Summary

Lesson 2: Controlling Access to Internet Content

Content Ratings
Practice: Implementing Content Ratings
Using Security Zones
Practice: Adding a Site to a Security Zone
Connecting to the Internet through a Proxy or Firewall
Configuring an Internet Explorer Kiosk
Practice: Using Kiosk Mode
Practice: Configuring Internet Explorer with a Start Page

Lesson 3: Sharing Resources on an Intranet

Overview of Personal Web Server
Installing Personal Web Server
Managing Personal Web Server
Optional Practice: Installing and Configuring Personal Web Server
Lesson Summary

Lesson 4: Communicating on the Internet and Intranets

Using NetMeeting
Practice: Configuring Microsoft NetMeeting
Using Outlook Express
Lesson Summary

Recommended Practices
Summary
Review

Chapter 18: Implementing Dial-Up Networking in Windows 98

About This Chapter
Before You Begin

Lesson 1: Setting Up Dial-Up Networking

Overview of Dial-Up Networking
Installing Dial-Up Networking
Practice: Installing Dial-Up Networking
Installing and Configuring Modems and Dial-Up Adapters
Installing and Configuring ISDN Adapters
Configuring a Dialing Location
Optional Practice: Installing a Modem and Configuring Locations
Creating a Dial-Up Networking Connection
Lesson Summary

Lesson 2: Configuring Dial-Up Networking Clients

Defining Server Types and Protocols
Configuring Server Types and Protocols
Configuring Scripting for Modem Connections
Configuring Multilink Connections
Establishing Virtual Private Networks
Installing and Configuring Dial-Up Server
Using Direct Cable Connection
Lesson Summary

Recommended Practices
Summary
Review

Chapter 19: Maintaining and Troubleshooting

Windows 98 on a Network
About This Chapter
Before You Begin

Lesson 1: Troubleshooting Dial-Up Networking

Troubleshooting Modem Problems
Troubleshooting Connection Problems
Troubleshooting PPTP Connections
Troubleshooting Multilink Connections
Lesson Summary

Lesson 2: Using Web-based Troubleshooting Tools in Windows 98

Using Windows Update
Using the Windows Report Tool
Lesson Summary

Lesson 3: Using Windows 98 Troubleshooting Tools for Networks

Using Troubleshooters
Troubleshooting Remote Computers
Optional Practice: Using Remote Troubleshooting Tools
Lesson Summary

Recommended Practices
Summary
Review

Appendix A: Questions and Answers

Appendix B: Choosing the Best Windows Platform from a Corporate Perspective

Appendix C: Emergency Startup Disk Contents

Appendix D: Setup Summary

Appendix E: Setup Script

Appendix F: Io.sys settings

Appendix G: Contents of the Windows Msdos.sys File

Appendix H: Introduction to NDIS 5.0

Appendix I: Understanding PPTP

Appendix J: Virtual Private Networking

Appendix K: How to Interpret the Ppplog.txt File

Glossary

Index

Chapter 12: Configuring Windows 98 for Use on a Network

About This Chapter

To establish a network, you have to set up the necessary hardware and then install and configure the software. This chapter describes how to perform the tasks required for installing and configuring Windows 98 networking components. These components provide the basis for a peer-to-peer network, or the client side of a server/client network.

This chapter presents information to help you identify your computer on a network, install protocols, and to install and configure hardware and software components necessary for a network environment.

This chapter also discusses the procedures for configuring file and printer sharing, as well as administering a remote Windows 98 computer.

Before You Begin

To complete the lessons in this chapter, you must have:

  • Installed the Windows 98 operating system.
  • The Supplemental Course Materials CD-ROM that accompanies this book.

In order to use the networking features and components included in Windows 98, you must first select, install, and configure them. This lesson discusses the procedures for installing and configuring network components.

You start the process by giving your computer a unique name to ensure that other computers on the network will recognize it. You install the hardware and software that enables your computer to connect to the network, and then you configure the protocol that your computer uses to communicate with other computers on the network.

After this lesson, you will be able to:

  • Identify a computer on a network.
  • Assign a computer name.
  • Install and configure a network adapter card.
  • Install network protocols.
  • Configure TCP/IP.
  • Troubleshoot TCP/IP.
  • Configure network bindings.

Estimated lesson time: 120 minutes

Identifying Your Computer on the Network

In order to connect a Windows 98 computer to a network, you must provide a way for the computer to identify itself. You do this by assigning it a unique name.

Assigning a Computer Name

Each Windows 98 computer on a network uses a unique name to distinguish it from all other computers connected to the network. If another computer, workgroup, or domain on the same network has the same name, your computer cannot communicate on the network. Your computer name can have up to 15 characters, and should contain no blank spaces. Although Windows 98 allows you to enter spaces in a computer name, spaces can cause problems with network connectivity. For example, MS-DOS clients cannot connect to a computer with spaces in its name. The names are not case sensitive.

Workgroup

In addition to the computer name, you must also specify a unique workgroup name. The workgroup name, which is used for organizational purposes only, defines your Network Neighborhood. Whenever you explore the Network Neighborhood on the desktop, the computers it displays are those that have the same workgroup name as your computer.

You should assign a common workgroup name to computers that share resources such as files and printers with each other. For example, you can assign a common workgroup name to computers that belong to a single department, project, or site.

Computer Description

You may also enter an optional description of your computer. The description will appear to anyone browsing the network, but it has no other function.

If you want to assign a name to your computer, perform the following procedure:

  1. Choose Start, Settings, and then Control Panel.
  2. Double-click the Network icon and click the Identification tab (see Figure 12.1).
  3. Enter a computer name, workgroup name, and computer description for your computer.
  4. Click OK.

F12XX01

Figure 12.1 Identifying your computer on a network

Installing and Configuring Network Adapter Cards

You must install a network adapter card that the computer uses to interface with the network. This card provides the physical connection to the network type, media, and protocols.

Windows 98 supports a wide range of network types including:

  • Ethernet
  • Token Ring
  • Attached Resource Computer network (ArcNet)
  • Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI)
  • Wireless technologies, including infrared
  • Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM)

Windows 98 supports up to four network adapter cards in a single computer. After you physically install the drivers for the network adapter card in the computer, you can install the adapter and configure it for Windows 98 using the Add New Hardware Wizard or the Network icon in Control Panel.

F12XX02

Figure 12.2 Installing a network adapter card

Windows 98 automatically assigns the interrupt request line (IRQ) and input/output (I/O) address for the adapter, or prompts you to confirm those resources if it cannot determine what resources to use.

If you want to install and configure a network adapter, perform the following procedure:

  1. In Control Panel, double-click the Network icon.
  2. On the Configuration tab, click Add.
  3. In the Select Network Component Type dialog box, click Adapter, and then click Add.
  4. Choose the manufacturer and adapter, and then click OK (see Figure 12.2).
  5. Click OK to close the Network properties sheet. After copying the files needed to support the adapter, Windows 98 may prompt you to confirm or change resources for the adapter if there is a conflict. If there are no conflicts, the program will prompt you to restart the computer.
  6. After the computer restarts, you can configure the adapter by returning to Control Panel and double-clicking the Network icon.
  7. Click the adapter, then click Properties. Depending on the adapter, you can change the driver type and the binding.

NDIS

Windows 98 uses the Network Device Interface Specification (NDIS) to support adapter cards. NDIS is an industry-standard device driver specification that is independent of both the network protocol and the adapter card. NDIS allows a network adapter card to use more than one protocol. Windows 98 supports NDIS 2.0, 3.1, 4.0, and 5.0 drivers. NDIS 5.0 supports a wide range of network media including Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) and wide area network (WAN) technology. NDIS 5.0-compliant drivers also provide performance improvements, including NDIS power management.

Important If your network adapter card does not support NDIS 5.0, contact the manufacturer for an updated device driver. For more information on NDIS 5.0, refer to Appendix H, "Introduction to NDIS 5.0."

This course does not discuss earlier NDIS-compliant drivers or Open Data-link Interface (ODI) drivers. For more information on configuring these types of network adapters, refer to the Microsoft Windows 98 Resource Kit.

Installing Network Protocols

In order for two computers to communicate on a network, they must use a common network protocol.

If you want to install a network protocol, perform the following procedure:

  1. Open Control Panel and double-click the Network icon.
  2. On the Configuration tab click Add.
  3. In the Select Network Component Type dialog box, select Protocol and click Add.
  4. Select the Manufacturer and Network Protocol you want to add and click OK (see Figure 12.3).

F12XX03

Figure 12.3 Installing a network protocol

Windows 98 can accommodate multiple protocols on a single computer including:

  • NetBIOS Enhanced User Interface (NetBEUI)
  • Internetwork Packet Exchange/Sequenced Packet Exchange (IPX/SPX)
  • Microsoft Data-link Control (DLC)
  • Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)
  • Fast Infrared Protocol

In addition, Windows 98 supports Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) using software components that are installed as protocols.

NetBEUI

NetBIOS Enhanced User Interface (NetBEUI) is a fast protocol often used in small networks. Because it does not support routing, NetBEUI is not appropriate for large networks. However, NetBEUI is easy to administer because it has no required configuration. For this reason, it is a good choice for small networks that do not use routers.

IPX/SPX-compatible Protocol

The Internetwork Packet Exchange/Sequenced Packet Exchange (IPX/SPX)-compatible protocol is a routable protocol primarily used in a Novell NetWare environment. Because IPX/SPX is not as fast or as universal as TCP/IP, another routable protocol, IPX/SPX is not recommended for use in a non-NetWare environment.

DLC

Microsoft Data-link Control (DLC) is used primarily to communicate with various IBM mainframe and AS/400 computers using the same network adapter architecture. You also can use DLC to print to printers connected directly to the network instead of to a port on a computer acting as a print server.

Although you can install DLC on a Windows 98 computer, you cannot use it to communicate with other Windows 98 computers.

Windows 98 includes both 32-bit and 16-bit DLC drivers. If possible, you should use the 32-bit driver for increased performance and stability.

TCP/IP

The Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) protocol suite is a set of standard protocols and utilities most often associated with the Internet. It is fully routable and is often used as a basis for wide area networks (WANs).

Fast Infrared Protocol

Fast infrared protocol can give a computer wireless LAN access. This protocol supports devices with a throughput of up to 4 Megabits per second (Mbps). Throughput is a measure of the data transfer rate through a typically complex communications system or of the data processing rate in a computer system.

ATM Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) is a high-speed network technology capable of transmitting data, voice, and video traffic in real time using fixed-length packets transmitted over reserved network bandwidth.

ATM is a connection-based protocol and therefore must establish a connection before transmitting any data. Three components-ATM Call Manager, ATM Emulated LAN, and ATM LAN Emulation Client-provide a bridge between connectionless protocols such as TCP/IP and IPX and ATM, enabling them to function transparently over ATM networks.

ATM Call Manager

This level establishes the connection (initiates the call) and communicates with the switch (hardware that is analogous to a hub in an Ethernet environment). This level also is called the User Network Interface (UNI). Both the call manager and switch must conform to the same UNI specification, which in Windows 98 is UNI 3.1.

ATM LAN Emulation Client

This core component of the ATM topology facilitates communication between the ATM driver and NDIS. Windows 98 supports LAN Emulation (LANE) Client 1.0 specification, to which the switch also must conform.

ATM Emulated LAN

This layer is used to set up Virtual local area networks (LANs)-VLANs. You can set up bridges to other network segments or partition part of the ATM network to form a smaller segment. For example, on a 10-machine, ATM-only network, you can set up a VLAN to include only five machines. You can then set up the Emulated LAN (ELAN) client to use only the machines listed in the VLAN.

Configuring TCP/IP

The Windows 98 implementation of TCP/IP includes the standard suite of TCP/IP protocols, and is compatible with other TCP/IP-based networks. Standard TCP/IP protocols include:

  • Internet Protocol (IP)
  • Transmission Control Protocol (TCP)
  • Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP)
  • Address Resolution Protocol (ARP)
  • User Datagram Protocol (UDP)

TCP/IP requires configuration before it can be used to communicate on a network. At the least, each network adapter you install in the computer requires an IP address and a subnet mask. The IP address must be unique among the computers on the intra- or inter-network, or TCP/IP will not initialize. A subnet mask is used to distinguish the network ID from the host ID, so that TCP/IP can determine whether an IP address is located on a local or remote network.

Assigning an IP Address

You can assign the IP Address and subnet mask automatically using Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) or you can assign the IP address manually.

F12XX04

Figure 12.4 IP Address tab on the TCP/IP properties sheet

If you want to assign an IP address, perform the following procedure:

  1. Open Control Panel and double-click the Network icon.
  2. On the Configuration tab, click the TCP/IP listing for the network adapter you have installed.
  3. Click on Properties. The TCP/IP Properties dialog box appears.

    On the IP Address tab (see Figure 12.4), choose one of the following options:

    • Obtain an IP address automatically\Windows 98 can obtain TCP/IP configuration information automatically via DHCP. Choosing this option requires that a Windows NT Server computer or any other computer running a DHCP Server service or maintenance utility program (called daemon for UNIX computers) is available on the network. A Windows 98 computer cannot act as a DHCP server.
    • Specify an IP address

    If you do not have a computer on your network that can act as a DHCP server, or if you need to assign a permanent, static address to your computer, you should specify an IP address and subnet mask manually.

    Important If you use a static IP address, make sure the address is accurate. If you assign an incorrect number, your computer may not be able to communicate on the network. You could also prevent another user from being able to use the network.

  4. Click OK.
  5. If you need to assign a gateway manually, return to the TCP/IP Properties dialog box, click the Gateway tab, and enter the number you wish to assign.
  6. Click OK.
  7. If you need to enable a Windows Internet Naming Service (WINS) server, return to the TCP/IP Properties dialog box, click the WINS Configuration tab, and click Enable WINS Resolution and enter the appropriate WINS server information.
  8. If you need to enable a domain name system (DNS) server, return to the TCP/IP Properties dialog box, click the DNS Configuration tab, click Enable DNS, and then enter the appropriate DNS server information.
  9. Click OK.

Obtaining an IP Address Automatically

If the Windows 98 computer has access to a DHCP server, then during system startup, the Windows 98 computer receives an IP address, subnet mask, and other optional parameters from the DHCP server. This simplifies TCP/IP configuration, especially for mobile computers. For example, using DHCP (see Figure 12.5), your notebook computer can move from subnet to subnet or intranet to Internet, and be assigned a valid TCP/IP configuration automatically. If the DHCP servers are configured properly, each client will receive a unique IP address.

F12XX05

Figure 12.5 Obtaining an IP address from a DHCP server

In the absence of a DHCP server, a Windows 98 feature called Automatic Private IP Addressing provides support for automatic IP address assignment. When a computer running Windows 98 starts with TCP/IP configured to obtain an address automatically, Windows 98 will first attempt to locate a DHCP server for the address assignment. If Windows 98 fails to locate a DHCP server, the operating system will use Automatic Private IP Addressing. This new Windows 98 mechanism causes the computer to assign itself an IP address in the form of 169.254.x.x. Windows 98 will continue to use this address until it detects the presence of a DHCP server.

Automatic Private IP Addressing can automatically assign a TCP/IP address to a computer running Windows 98, but it does not generate all of the information typically provided by a DHCP server that uses a name resolution system such as DNS and WINS. Consequently, computers enabled with Automatic Private IP Addressing can communicate only with computers that also have addresses of the form 169.254.x.x; that is, they can communicate only with other computers enabled the same way. Computers that obtain their IP address through Automatic Private IP Addressing cannot communicate with the Internet without a Proxy or Network Address Translation (NAT) gateway.

Assigning a Gateway

In order to access computers on other subnets, your Windows 98 computer must be configured for one or more gateways, a combination of hardware and software that connect two different types of networks. Although you can have as many as eight gateways in the Installed Gateway list (see Figure 12.6), the gateway at the top of the list is your default gateway and will always be used if it is available.

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Figure 12.6 Configuring your computer for gateways

If you are using DHCP, a DHCP server probably assigns your gateway assignment. Because gateways entered manually will supersede the ones assigned through DHCP, if you manually enter a gateway assignment, be careful not to override the DHCP-provided default gateways.

Using WINS Server for Computer Name Resolution

Because TCP/IP uses IP addresses rather than computer names for interconnectivity, you need either DNS or a WINS server in order to connect to another computer by specifying its computer name.

If you enable WINS resolution, you can specify the name of a WINS server on which your computer will register its computer name and IP address at system startup. When you attempt to connect to another computer running Windows 98, your computer will query the WINS server to find out the IP address of the remote computer.

Without a WINS server, you need to maintain a text database file that contains computer names-to-IP address mappings to connect to computers on remote subnets.

Note You can browse your own subnet without enabling WINS or having the text database file.

Using DNS for Computer Name Resolution

DNS is a hierarchical naming system that uses a combination of text names separated by periods to create a unique name, such as example.microsoft.com. The DNS server contains a database that converts the name assigned to your computer into a number. The number enables the computer to connect to the network. If you enable DNS, you can use your host name (a name to identify your computer on a local network) plus a domain name or suffix to create an Internet address.

Viewing your TCP/IP Configuration

Windows 98 includes a diagnostic program for viewing your TCP/IP configuration (see Figure 12.7). This utility enables you to see not only your IP address but also your subnet mask and other information that could be critical to your setup.

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Figure 12.7 Using Winipcfg to view your TCP/IP configuration

If you want to view your TCP/IP configuration, perform the following procedure:

  1. Click Start, then Run and type winipcfg.
  2. Click OK to display the IP Configuration dialog box.
  3. To view additional information about your TCP/IP configuration, click More Info.

This diagnostic program displays current TCP/IP configuration values, including your IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway. Additional information is also available, including DHCP and WINS configuration. You can also release a DHCP-provided IP address, and renew a lease on an existing DHCP-provided address.

Note DHCP assigned IP addresses are dynamic; that is, the DHCP server assigns (leases) IP addresses from a finite pool of available addresses, for limited amounts of time. Releasing an IP address before the lease has expired makes the address available for assignment to other computers.

Troubleshooting TCP/IP

If you are having trouble connecting to your network or communicating with other computers, either on your network or on the Internet, there are two troubleshooting utilities you can use to test your TCP/IP configuration: the ping command or the tracert command.

Troubleshooting a Connection Using Ping

The ping command verifies a connection to a remote host by sending four (by default) ICMP echo packets to the host and listening for echo reply packets. The ping command waits for up to one second for each packet sent and prints the number of packets transmitted and received.

To test a connection, you can use the ping command with the following options:

  • An IP address
  • A host name
  • A computer name

If a ping to a remote host fails, try to ping your default gateway. If that also fails, either your default gateway is unavailable or your computer has an improperly configured IP address and/or subnet mask.

Three commands you can use are:

  • ping remote_gateway_IP_address
  • ping remote_host_name
  • ping localhost

Localhost

You can verify that TCP/IP has initialized on your computer by typing ping localhost. Localhost is a reserved host name that maps to a reserved IP address (127.0.0.1) that represents your computer. When you type ping localhost, the messages are local to your computer; no packets are sent to the network.

If pinging localhost is successful, you receive four replies from IP address 127.0.0.1. If the ping command is unsuccessful you will receive a message that says localhost is unknown. If this happens, verify that you installed TCP/IP, and that you restarted the computer after the installation.

Troubleshooting a Connection Using Tracert

If you can ping your default gateway but not a remote host, try the tracert (trace route) command. The tracert command displays the Fully Qualified Domain Name (FQDN) and IP address of each gateway along the route to a remote host. The tracert commands you can use are:

  • tracert target_name
  • tracert IP address

Document the information that the tracert command returns when the remote host is available. Later, if the remote host is not available, you can compare the information returned by tracert at that time to the original tracert report and determine which gateway is unavailable.

Note If your organization uses a proxy server for access to the Internet, you may not be able to use ping or tracert for hosts outside of your intranet.

Configuring Network Bindings

Because Windows 98 can support multiple network adapters, protocols, and services simultaneously, these network components need a way to interface with each other. To do this, the components use a process called binding, which sets up communication between the components.

Bindings are configured between network adapter cards and protocols, and between protocols and services. By default, all possible bindings are enabled, but you can optimize performance by modifying bindings. Here are some sample scenarios:

  • Your computer running Windows 98 has two network adapters. One adapter is connected to a TCP/IP intranetwork; the other is connected to a NetBEUI network. By default, both TCP/IP and NetBEUI will be bound to both network cards, even though only one protocol is ever in use on either network. Disabling the unused bindings can improve your computer's performance slightly.
  • Your computer running Windows 98 has one network adapter, and is running both TCP/IP and IPX/SPX-compatible Protocol. You have also installed the Client for Microsoft Networks for connectivity with Windows NT servers, and the Client for NetWare Networks for connectivity with NetWare servers. By default, the Client for Microsoft Networks will be bound to both TCP/IP and IPX/SPX-compatible Protocol, even though IPX/SPX-compatible Protocol is used only for connecting to NetWare servers. Disabling the unused binding may improve your computer's performance slightly.
  • Suppose your computer uses NetBEUI, TCP/IP, and IPX-compatible Protocol to connect to various type of computers on your network. You use NetBEUI most often to connect to the computers in your workgroup. You can make NetBEUI your default protocol by selecting the default protocol option on the Advanced tab in the Properties dialog box for that protocol (see Figure 12.8). The default protocol overrides other protocols when your computer attempts to establish a session with a remote computer. To optimize performance, you should make the protocol you use most often your default protocol.

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Figure 12.8 The default protocol setting on the Advanced tab of the NetBEUI dialog box

To improve performance when you have multiple adapters and protocols, you can modify bindings between adapters, protocols, and clients. If you want to configure the bindings for a network component, perform the following procedure:

  1. In Control Panel, double-click the Network icon.
  2. On the Configuration tab, choose the adapter or protocol whose binding you want to modify.
  3. Click Properties and select the Bindings tab.
  4. Select the appropriate bindings.
  5. Click OK.

Lesson Summary

To use Windows 98 networking features, you must first give your computer a unique name that other computers on the network will recognize. You then install the hardware and software that enables your computer to connect to the network, and configure the protocol that your computer uses to communicate with other computers on the network. Windows 98 supports a wide range of network types including Ethernet, Token Ring, and Attached Resource Computer network (ArcNet). Network protocols supported by Windows 98 include NetBIOS Enhanced User Interface (NetBEUI), Internetwork Packet Exchange/Sequenced Packet Exchange (IPX/SPX), Microsoft Data-link Control (DLC), Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), and Fast Infrared Protocol. The Windows 98 implementation of TCP/IP includes the standard suite of TCP/IP protocols, including Internet Protocol (IP), Transmission Control Protocol (TCP), Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP), Address Resolution Protocol (ARP), and User Datagram Protocol (UDP).

To share resources on a Windows 98 network, you must set up your computer and other computers so that they can function in a shared environment. This lesson discusses sharing Windows 98 resources, including files and printers.

After this lesson, you will be able to:

  • Install and configure Client for Microsoft Networks.
  • Configure file and printer sharing.
  • Install and configure a network printer.
  • Configure the Browse Master.

Estimated lesson time: 90 minutes

Installing Client for Microsoft Networks

On a Microsoft network, you must have Client for Microsoft Networks installed in order to enable file and printer sharing. With Client for Microsoft Networks installed, you can enable sharing, and you can modify the properties of folders and printers in order to share them.

Client for Microsoft Networks is a 32-bit, protected-mode network client for Windows 98 that provides network functionality for Microsoft operating systems, including:

  • Windows 98
  • Windows NT
  • Windows 95
  • Windows for Workgroups
  • Workgroup Add-on for MS-DOS
  • LAN Manager network operating system

Client for Microsoft Networks can use any combination of the following protocols:

  • NetBEUI
  • IPX/SPX-compatible Protocol
  • TCP/IP

If the setup program detects your network adapter during setup, the program installs Client for Microsoft Networks by default. You can also install and configure Client for Microsoft Networks manually.

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Figure 12.9 Adding Client for Microsoft Networks

If you want to install and configure Client for Microsoft Networks, perform the following procedure:

  1. In Control Panel, double-click the Network icon.
  2. On the Configuration tab click Add

    The Select Network Component Type dialog box appears.

  3. Click Client and click Add.

    The Select Network Client dialog box appears (see Figure 12.9).

  4. Click Microsoft, and then click Client for Microsoft Networks.
  5. Click OK.

After installing Client for Microsoft Networks, you can allow other computers on the network to access shared data on your computer by enabling file and printer sharing for Microsoft Networks.

Configuring Microsoft File and Printer Sharing

After you have configured network connectivity, you can share resources among the Windows 98 computers on your network by installing File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks.

File and Printer sharing for Microsoft Networks is based on the Server Message Block (SMB) protocol, and is compatible with other SMB network operating clients, such as:

  • Windows NT
  • Windows 95
  • Windows for Workgroups
  • LAN Manager
  • IBM LAN Server
  • DEC Pathworks

You can configure file and printer sharing using Control Panel (see Figure 12.10.)

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Figure 12.10 Enabling file and printer sharing

If you want to configure file and printer sharing, perform the following procedure:

  1. In Control Panel, double-click the Network icon.

    On the Configuration tab, click File and Print Sharing.

    • Select the choice(s) you want.
    • I want to be able to give others access to my files.
  2. I want to be able to allow others to print to my printer(s).
  3. Click OK.

Note You cannot install File and Printer sharing for Microsoft Networks if another sharing service is already installed. Only one File and Print Sharing service can be installed at any time.

Sharing Folders

After you install file and printer sharing for Microsoft Networks, you can share that computer's resources with other Windows 98 computers in a peer-to-peer relationship, or on a Windows NT network.

One issue you must address is security. When you have shared folders, you will want to make sure you can adequately restrict access to important resources. You can choose from two types of access control in Windows 98: share-level access control or user-level access control.

Share-level Access Control

When you implement share-level access control, resource access control is limited to a password (or passwords) associated with the shared folder or printer. This type of access control is called share-level access control, and it allows anyone with the password to access the shared resource. Share-level access control cannot be implemented on a computer running Windows NT.

User-level Access Control

On a Windows NT or Novell NetWare network, you can implement tighter security by applying user-level access control. With user level access control, you can designate which users will have access to shared resources and then assign access rights to those users.

Setting up a Shared Folder

You can share folders using Windows Explorer. If want to share a folder, perform the following procedure:

  1. Open Windows Explorer.
  2. Click the folder you wish to share.
  3. Right-click the folder, and then click Sharing (see Figure 12.11).
  4. Click Shared As and enter a name for the shared folder. By default, the Share Name will be the name of the folder, although you can change this if you wish. You can also enter a comment, which is displayed when viewing the list of shares on that computer.
  5. Click OK.

Note if you add a dollar sign ($) to the end of the share name, the share name will not appear in Windows Explorer. This type of share is called a hidden share.

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Figure 12.11 Sharing a folder in Windows 98

Assigning an Access Type to Share-Level Shares

When setting up a share-level share, you must assign an Access Type, which can be configured as:

  • Read-Only
  • Full
  • Depends on Password

If you choose Depends on Password, specify two passwords: one for users who should be able to only read the contents of the shared folder, and the other for users who need to modify the contents of the shared folder.

Unless you choose Depends on Password, you do not need to assign a password. If you leave the password entry blank, anyone will be able to access the shared folder.

Sharing Printers

When you share a printer using share-level access control, you can assign a password to protect it from unauthorized use. Anyone with the password can send documents to the shared printer. There is only one level of access to a remote printer.

Configuring a Shared Printer

When you configure a local printer as a shared printer, other users have access to the printer. If you want to configure a shared printer, perform the following procedure:

In My Computer, double-click the Printers folder. Right-click on the printer you want to share. Click Sharing. On the Sharing tab, click Shared As and enter a share name for the printer. Click OK. Connecting to a Shared Printer

When you share a printer, you also share your C:\Windows\system folder, with the hidden share name printer$. When remote Windows clients connect to your shared printer, your printer drivers and supporting files are copied from your printer$ shared folder to the remote client's C:\Windows\system folder. The remote client does not have to provide the drivers manually. This is called Point and Print installation.

Note A Windows 98 client will not query the print server for a new driver each time the client prints. In order to receive an updated print driver from the print server, delete the shortcut to the remote printer and add it again.

Installing and Configuring Network Printers

To install and configure a network printer, you follow many of the same steps that are required to set up a local printer. The primary difference is that you identify a network path instead of a local port for the networked printer.

You can use the Add Printer icon in the Printers folder or Point and Print installation to install a network printer in Windows 98.

Using the Add Printer Wizard

When you add a printer using the Add Printer icon in the Printers folder, you must specify that the printer you are adding is a network printer and provide the network path using a universal naming convention (UNC) path name for the printer. You must also select the printer manufacturer and model name. Windows 98 then copies the appropriate printer driver files to the C:\Windows\system folder.

If you have applications (such as MS-DOS applications) that must print to a local port, you can also associate an LPT port with a network path by capturing that port. Capturing the port means that the MS-DOS program prints to the local port, where the print job is then redirected to the network printer.

Using Point and Print Installation

You can add Point and Print-enabled network printers to your computer without specifying the manufacturer and model of the printer. If you want to install a network printer using point and print, perform the following procedure:

  1. Use Network Neighborhood or Windows Explorer to view the computer that is sharing the printer. - Or - Click Start, Run and type the UNC name of the computer that is sharing the printer.
  2. Double-click that computer.
  3. Click Start, point to Settings, and click Printers.
  4. Drag the printer icon from the computer window to your Printers folder. - Or - Right-click on the printer's icon to open its context menu and choose Install.

Printers shared from Windows 98 computers using file and printer sharing for Microsoft Networks are automatically Point and Print enabled. Printers shared from Windows NT servers that are installed as Windows 98 print servers are also Point and Print enabled. Novell NetWare print servers require some configuration on the server to successfully use Point and Print.

Note For more information about enabling Point and Print, refer to the Microsoft Windows 98 Resource Kit.

Before you continue with the lesson, run the Chap12.exe animation located in the Animations folder on the Supplemental Course Materials CD-ROM that accompanies this book. This animation demonstrates how to install a network printer in Windows 98.

Configuring the Browse Master

When you explore your Network Neighborhood or the Entire Network, the list of computers you see is provided by the Browse Master. The Browse Master is a designated computer that maintains the master list of computers in a given workgroup, as well as in other workgroups.

By default, the Browse Master in a Windows 98 workgroup will be the first computer that has File and Print Sharing enabled to initialize in that workgroup. However, you can also configure a Windows 98 computer manually as the Browse Master.

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Figure 12.12 Configuring Browse Master in the File and printer sharing Properties Window

Tip Because maintaining the resources list can affect the performance of the computer assigned as the Browse Master, you may want to change the computer assigned as Browse Master. You can use a computer that is always on the network, but is seldom used as a workstation.

If you want to configure the Browse Master, perform the following procedure:

  1. In Control Panel, double-click the Network icon.
  2. On the Configuration tab in the network components list, select File and printer sharing for Microsoft Networks.
  3. Click Properties.
  4. On the Advanced tab, click Browse Master, and then select the Value you want this computer to have (see Figure 12.12).
  5. Click OK.

Tip The other option you can configure for File and Printer sharing for Microsoft Networks is called LM Announce. You should enable it only when LAN Manager clients need to connect to your Windows 98 computer. Enabling this setting forces your computer to double its announcement traffic so that your server will appear to both Windows 98 and LAN Manager clients. Keeping this setting disabled will help minimize network traffic.

Selecting a Value for the Browse Master
The Browse Master Value setting on the Advanced tab has three possible values:

  • Enabled: Specifies that the computer should be the Browse Master. If more than one computer in a workgroup has this option configured, an "election" ensues in which one of these computers will be designated the Browse Master.
  • Disabled: Specifies that the computer should never become the Browse Master. Use this setting if the computer has little free memory, or if it is connected to the rest of the workgroup by a slow link and would suffer from poor performance as a result of providing browse lists to clients.
  • Automatic: Specifies that the computer may become the Browse Master if the current Browse Master shuts down, and no computers have the Browse Master setting set to enabled. If this happens, those computers that have Browse Master set to automatic perform an election to select a new Browse Master from among that group. This is the default setting, which is appropriate for most networks.

Lesson Summary On a Microsoft network, you must have Client for Microsoft Networks installed in order to enable file and printer sharing. Client for Microsoft Networks is a 32-bit, protected-mode network client for Windows 98 that provides network functionality for Microsoft operating systems.

After you have configured network connectivity, you can share resources among the Windows 98 computers on your network by installing file and printer sharing for Microsoft Networks.

To install and configure a network printer, you follow many of the same steps that are required to set up a local printer. The primary difference is that you identify a network path instead of a local port for the networked printer.

By default, the Browse Master in a Windows 98 workgroup will be the first computer that has File and Print Sharing enabled to initialize in that workgroup. However, you can also configure a Windows 98 computer manually as the Browse Master.

Recommended Practices Here are some recommendations for installing and configuring Windows 98 network components:

  • Create workgroups based on people who frequently work together, so they can easily share resources in Network Neighborhood.
  • Create a logical, consistent naming scheme for computers to make them easily identifiable.
  • If you are using share-level security, stress the importance of passwords and security to your users. If you are using an NT or NetWare network, implement user-level security for more restricted access.
  • If you are using multiple adapters, protocols, or services, disable bindings for those components that do not need to work together in order to increase performance. For instance, you might unbind TCP/IP from Client for NetWare Networks.
  • Do not enable the Browse Master on every Windows 98 computer. This can slow down network communications. Instead, configure one seldom used computer as the Browse Master and leave the setting as automatic on the other computers.

Summary The following information summarizes the key points in this chapter:

Installing and Configuring Network Components

  • To use Windows 98 networking features, you must first give your computer a unique name that other computers on the network will recognize, install the hardware and software that enables your computer to connect to the network, and configure the protocol that your computer uses to communicate with other computers on the network.
  • Windows 98 supports a wide range of network types, including Ethernet, Token Ring, Attached Resource Computer network (ArcNet), Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI), wireless technologies (including infrared), and Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM).
  • The Windows 98 implementation of TCP/IP includes the standard suite of TCP/IP protocols, including Internet Protocol (IP), Transmission Control Protocol (TCP), Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP), Address Resolution Protocol (ARP), and User Datagram Protocol (UDP).

Sharing Windows 98 Resources

  • You must have Client for Microsoft Networks installed in order to enable file and printer sharing. Client for Microsoft Networks is a 32-bit, protected-mode network client for Windows 98 that provides network functionality for Microsoft operating systems,
  • To share resources after you have configured network connectivity, you must install file and printer sharing for Microsoft Networks.
  • To install and configure a network printer, you follow many of the same steps that are required to set up a local printer. The primary difference is that you identify a network path instead of a local port for the networked printer.
  • By default, the Browse Master in a Windows 98 workgroup will be the first computer that has File and Print Sharing enabled to initialize in that workgroup. However, you can also configure a Windows 98 computer manually as the Browse Master.

Review The following questions are intended to reinforce key information presented in this chapter. If you are unable to answer a question, review the appropriate lesson and then try the question again. Answers to the questions can be found in Appendix A, "Questions and Answers," located at the back of this book.

  1. You are installing Windows 98 on a computer that will share resources with other Windows 98 computers that are connected to the network. In addition, you want to use the computer to access resources on your company's Web servers. Which protocol or protocols should you configure on your Windows 98 computer? What protocol settings should you configure?
  2. You want to share a folder that contains inventory reports that are updated frequently. Four other people in your department should be able to change the contents of the shared folder; anyone else should be able to read only the contents. What should you do?
  3. A computer running Windows 98 on the receptionist's desk has no function other than printing visitor badges for guests. The computer is connected to the network, and you would like to configure it to serve as the workgroup's Browse Master. How should you do this?
  4. You need to restart your computer after installing a new program, but Windows 98 tells you that there are still users connected to your computer. However, Windows 98 does not tell you who the connected users are. You would like to view the user names of the connected users in order to notify them so that they will not lose any data when you shut down your computer. How can you do this?
  5. Your computer running Windows 98 computer has two network adapters. One adapter is used to connect to the corporate network, and the other adapter connects to a small NetBEUI workgroup used by interns. How can you optimize your network bindings for the best network performance?



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  Last updated January 12, 2000
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