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The alligator hatchery

It's really not an Ed thing. Really! Picked up during a "tour" at a manufacturing site (plant) that shall go unnamed.  An executive summed up the presentation just rendered as "so this is the alligator hatchery"  or something to that affect.

His meaning was of course ...my plant keeps receiving non-conforming product from this facility.  It's mixed in with the  usable material and causes line stops, machine malfunctions, etc.

These non-conforming little "gremlins" hush, hush of course we speak of out-of-spec parts generated with the same process as the in-spec parts variation are supposedly sorted out

..we've had them on level (code name beta) containment for 6 months !!

but they keep sneaking through the marshy little areas of variation.....

the alligator hatchery...

it's where the flow gets de-railed

it's where Herbie hangs out

it's where direct runners go collateral...damaged

 

AND they spread....

and nest

After mating, the female alligator moves into the marshy areas and shoreline where she will begin to construct a nest;. Using her back feet, the female will scratch together a mound of sticks, mud and vegetation. Into this mound she will deposit her eggs, and it is the breakdown of the nesting material that helps keep the eggs warm. Female alligators begin to lay their eggs in late June and early July. Alligators tend to lay about 40-45 eggs on the average, however, the rate of fertility varies with the age of the female.

The incubation period of the eggs is 65 days. During this time the female alligator guards her nest against intruders. Raccoons for example, are notorious nest raiders, and have been known to completely destroy a nest. The eggs begin to hatch in August through September, during which time the baby alligators make-high pitched grunting noises to alert the mother gator. The female alligator will then uncover the nest releasing the babies, and some females have even been known to carry their young to the water.

not hungry I guess....who is it that eats their youngbut I digress...

The young alligators are known as hatchlings, and are about 6-8 inches at birth. After birth, the hatchling alligators form groups called "pods" and may stay in the same vicinity of their nesting site for several years. Until the next breeding season begins, the female alligator will remain near her brood, defending them against predators. The first few years of a hatchlings life are the most dangerous, as anything that can eat a small alligator will! Snakes, wading birds, osprey, raccoons, otters, large bass, garfish, even larger alligators will feed upon the young alligator. Once the alligator reaches about 4 feet, its only real predator is man.

they eat into your profits....hatchlings !!

hate it when that happens...

 

BUT NOT TO FEAR

we'll take corrective action.
Find BOB and wake up 'ol WOW !!
nesto...presto...
they're on level beta containment !!!

and we'll never, ever see another little gremlin again..so there!

 

hop hop...

web speed to final line...you WALRUS you....
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