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August 08, 2005

IBM Embodies Corporate Podcasting

"IBM is the latest major company to embrace podcasting, the digital audio craze that allows consumers to take audio programming off the Web and listen to it on portable music players.

"The world's largest computer company said on Friday it plans to introduce a series of occasional podcasts on its investor relations site as part of a broader effort to communicate directly to its investors and the wider public about hot topics."

Editor's note IBM's System & Technology Group offers podcasts with updates on key business and IT topics.

Eric Auchard. IBM Joins Podcast Craze With Audio Think-Pieces. Reuters. Aug. 5, 2005.

IBM. IBM To Start ''IBM and The Future Of ...'' Podcasts on Investor Web Site. (Press Release.) Aug. 5, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:48 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

July 21, 2005

Will Canadian Copyright Bill Declare Search Engines Illegal?

"A bill before Canada's Parliament could make it illegal for search engines to cache Web pages, critics say, opening the door to unwarranted lawsuits and potentially hindering public access to information.

"The legislation in question, Bill C-60, is designed to amend Canada's Copyright Act by implementing parts of the 1996 World Intellectual Property Organization treaty, the treaty that led to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act in the U.S."

Elinor Mills. In Canada: Cache a Page, Go to Jail?. News.com. July 19, 2005.

See also:
Jack Kapica. Could Googling Become Illegal?. Globe and Mail. July 12, 2005.

Michael Geist. Bill C-60 User Guide: The ISPs and Search Engines. June 21, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:55 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

July 20, 2005

K. Matthew Dames Gives Virtual Presentation

K. Matthew Dames, managing partner of Seso Group Digital Information Advisors and the executive editor of SNTReport.com and Search & Text Mining Report, is this month's speaker for SLA's Virtual Seminar series. Dames will present the second part of a two-part series on digital collaboration projects for information professionals, "Launching A Digital Collaboration Project." The second session is Webcast live at 2:00 EST on July 20.

(The first session was Webcast on July 6, and can be viewed via an SLA Replay.)

Attendance & Registration
Want to view Dames' presentation live? Check the SLA Virtual Seminar page for more information. If you have any additional questions, e-mail SLA at learning@sla.org or call the Professional Development Center at (703) 647-4925.

This session will be taped and available for viewing within one week of the Webcast.

Description
Whatever you call it – digital collaboration, social software, social networking – working across the Web is about more than technology or devices. Ultimately, it is about developing a community of practice where people readily share their information and knowledge, regardless of distance.

Many clients and end-users will suggest that the trend toward using digital collaboration lessens the need for librarians and other information professionals. Instead, the opposite is true: online information sharing increases the need for librarians as facilitators, researchers, and knowledge managers. With some work and initiative, technology-savvy Info Pros can position themselves inside their organizations as critically important team members at a time when their value is being questioned.

This two-part series looks at the tools and issues involved in creating an effective digital collaboration environment, and shares some ideas on how best to establish a digital collaboration initiative within an organization. The first part of the series, part of SLA's Virtual Learning Series, will explain the tools and terminology of digital collaboration, and how different organizations are using these tools to improve productivity and knowledge sharing.

Slides
K. Matthew Dames. Launching A Digital Collaboration Project. (.pdf, 1.8 MB) July 20, 2005.

Coming in August 2005
Stephen E. Arnold. The Google Legacy (Tetbury, Gloucester: United Kingdom. Infonortics, 2005)

Webliography

The American Customer Satisfaction Index.

Basecamp

Salesforce.com

Google Labs

Google Short Message Service

Google Mobile

Google Code

Blogger

Functioning Form. Battle for the Web OS. July 12, 2005.

Fred Vogelstein. Gates vs. Google: Search and Destroy. Fortune. May 2, 2005.

Charles Ferguson. What's Next for Google. TechnologyReview.com. January 2005.

Relax, Everything Is Deeply Intertwingled. Weblications. Dec. 20, 2004.

Troutgirl. Google Is Good for Web Dev. Dec. 18, 2004.

Kuro5hin. Web-Apps Are the Legacy of the Future. Oct. 25, 2004.

Jon Udell. Under Gmail’s Hood. InfoWorld. Oct. 22, 2004.

Kottke.org. GoogOS, the Google Operating System. April 6, 2004.

Topix.net Weblog. The Secret Source of Google's Power. April 4, 2004.

Tim O'Reilly. Inventing the Future. O'Reilly Networks. April 9, 2002.

Martha K. Heyman. Building Successful Relationships with IT Professionals. Information Outlook. April 2001.

PaulGraham.com. The Other Road Ahead. Sept. 2001.

Adam Bosworth. Microsoft's Vision for XML. Infoloom. No date.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 09:00 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

PBS to Launch Internet-Only TV Series

"In the spirit of reaching audiences wherever they can be found, PBS said Wednesday it will launch a downloadable television series.

"NerdTV features author and PBS columnist Robert X. Cringely's interviews with intriguing personalities drawn from the world of technology."

Chris Marlowe. PBS Viewers Can Download NerdTV Series. Reuters. July 14, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:09 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

July 18, 2005

Podcasting Attracts Major Media Companies

"The runaway popularity of blogging, which has turned everyday people into online news outlets, caught the media establishment off guard.

"The industry is trying not to make the same mistake with podcasting which lets nearly anyone 'broadcast' on the Internet.

"While profits remain elusive, there's a bigger prize out there the company that manages to become the go-to Web site for podcasts could gain enough leverage to strike favorable deals with proven content providers, and generate cash by charging for subscriptions and advertising."

Associated Press. Podcasting Spurs a Media 'Land Grab'. ABC News. July 16, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:36 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

The Vital Role of Forwarding E-Mail

"Forwarding a quirky email or an amusing link or video attachment to colleagues may seem innocent enough, but it is the modern equivalent of ritual gift exchange and carries with it similar social implications, say US researchers.

"Benjamin Gross at the University of Illinois, US, and colleagues studied email forwarding behaviour by conducting informal interviews among email users. He says forwarding emails plays a vital role in constructing and maintaining modern social ties, despite the phenomenon receiving scant attention from social scientists."

Will Knight. Email Forwarding Amounts to Ritual Gift Exchange. NewScientist.com. July 12, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:35 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Multi-Purpose Software for iPod

"Accessories for the iPod are plentiful, and now there's software to make the portable music player even more versatile.

"Roxio's The Boom Box ($50, Mac only) includes five applications that reportedly can do a lot. Windows PC owners, read on because there probably is, or will be, similar software for you, too. Let's take a look."

Linda Knapp. Spice up Your iPod with Extra Applications. Seattle Times. July 16, 2005.

Editor's note See also SNTReport.com's prior story on Roxio's software suite.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:18 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

July 16, 2005

P2P Projects Continue Despite Grokster

"The ripples of anxiety from last month's landmark Supreme Court ruling on peer-to-peer software haven't quite made it to Jonathan Nilson's home in Tallahassee, Fla.

"Nilson, a programmer who has been working on peer-to-peer software called Shareaza for several years, says the loose band of developers who share responsibility for the open-source project haven't been dissuaded from their work by the court ruling, which is casting a dark legal cloud over the future of companies such as Grokster and LimeWire."

John Borland. Open-source P2P Projects Keep Swapping. News.com. July 15, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:55 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Clear Channel Sees Potential in Podcasts

"The San Antonio, Texas-based radio giant, Clear Channel Communications, the nation's largest with more than 1,200 stations, says the new medium has potential, both as a way to expand its reach and as a possible new source of revenue.

"Thousands of amateurs are getting into the act, with various talk and music formats, and Clear Channel is betting that its expertise in radio gives it a chance to put a large footprint on the new medium."

David B. Wilkerson. Clear Channel: Potential for Podcasts. MarketWatch. July 15, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:22 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

July 15, 2005

Australia Rules On Copyright & Linking

"Stephen Cooper, operator of a Web site called MP3s4free.net, was found guilty Thursday of copyright infringement by Australia Federal Court Justice Brian Tamberlin.

"Although Cooper didn't host pirated recordings per se, the court found the resident of the state of Queensland breached the law by creating hyperlinks to sites that had infringing sound recordings."

Steven Deare. Australian Man, ISP Found Guilty of Piracy. News.com. July 14, 2005.

See also:
Alex Malik. Oz ISP, Employee and Principal Held Liable for Copyright Breaches. The Register. July 14, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:55 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Bloggers Take Commentary to Next Level

"It was inevitable: Bloggers who previously wrote endlessly about everything from politics to tech tips to how to fry an egg on a hot sidewalk can now take their commentary, advice and random experiments to the next level by filming and broadcasting their work, thanks to the latest web trend -- video blogging.

"Video blogs -- also known by their shorter, clunkier name, vlogs -- are blogs that primarily feature video shorts instead of text."

Katie Dean. Blogging + Video = Vlogging. Wired News. July 13, 2005.

See also:
Neeraj Saxena. Video Blogs Move Full Stream Ahead. Economic Times. July 12, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:24 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

July 13, 2005

Mark Cuban Offers Podcasting Advice

"The man who became a billionaire capitalizing on the Internet's ability to deliver radio programs has some advice for the thousands of people producing podcasts: Trying to make a business out of it is a mistake.

"In comments on his Web log, Mark Cuban, the founder of Audionet - which he sold for $6 billion - says all the enthusiasm about podcasting is déjá vu from 1996."

Frank Barnako. Mark Cuban: Been There, Heard That. MarketWatch. July 11, 2005.

See also:
Blog Maverick. Podcasting. July 8, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:33 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

CBS to Extend Online Reach

"CBSNews.com announced a major Web site expansion today. With it come expanded ad opportunities that capitalize on broadband, incorporate other CBS broadcast and Web properties, and will eventually involve both text and video RSS feeds, as well as podcasts.

"Andrew Heyward, president of CBS News, said the company had successfully 'placed a bet early on ad-supported video' which has paid off for the network.

"The new site's aim is to reach the 45 million-strong audience of affluent, at-work broadband users, many of whom are in a younger demographic than CBS' broadcast viewers."

Rebecca Lieb. CBSNews.com Launches Far-Reaching Ad Network. ClickZNews. July 12, 2005.

See also:
Susan Kuchinskas. TV Moves to the Internet. InternetNews.com. July 12, 2005.

David Bauder. CBS News Revamps Web Site as 24-hr Network. SeattlePI.com. July 12, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:05 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

July 12, 2005

Opera 8.02 to Support P2P

"The next version of the Opera Web browser will support peer-to-peer (P2P) technology, which has been the focus of a lot of legal discussions recently.

"A technical preview of Opera 8.02 released Thursday allows users to download BitTorrent files directly from the browser rather than downloading the file and using a client application like Azureus to download the full file."

Jim Wagner. Opera Adds BitTorrent. InternetNews.com. July 7, 2005.

See also:
John Borland. Browsers Add BitTorrent Support. News.com. July 8, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:39 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

July 11, 2005

Sony BMG & iMesh Reach Licensing Deal

"Music giant Sony BMG has reached a licensing agreement with file-swapping service iMesh, one of the first such tie-ups since a U.S. Supreme Court decision clamping down on online copyright infringement.

"The deal, confirmed on Friday by an iMesh representative, followed a high court ruling that unauthorized networks such as Grokster could be held liable for the copyright infringement of their users. Analysts said that decision added momentum to the move toward networks sanctioned by media companies.

"Once one of the most popular of post-Napster song-swapping networks, iMesh, formed in 1999, was sued by the record labels in 2003 for copyright infringement and settled for $4.1 million."

Reuters. Sony BMG Reaches Licensing Deal with iMesh. News.com. July 9, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:34 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

July 09, 2005

Yahoo Moves Toward RSS Search

"Whether intentionally or not, Yahoo briefly showcased some of its RSS search plans on Friday when Webloggers discovered and then posted screen shots of a Yahoo site for finding syndication feeds.

"Yahoo Inc. executives previously have hinted at a possible search engine for blogs and feeds, but this week's sighting indicates that Yahoo is getting closer to releasing at least a test version of RSS search, search experts say.

"It also could usher in competition from a major Web search player for startups such as Technorati Inc. and Feedster Inc., which concentrate on feed search."

Matt Hicks. Yahoo RSS Search Test Skims the Web. eWeek. July 8, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:39 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Dell, Napster Offer Colleges Music

"Dell and Napster are teaming up in a bid to help colleges alleviate network bottlenecks caused by students stealing digital music. If successful, the project may help boost Dell's paltry market share in portable music players.

"Dell says that its college and university customers have complained that excessive illegal downloading of music was causing a slowdown in the performance of their networks.

"Napster will make its entire music library available to cache, or store, on Dell servers at colleges and universities that participate in the program."

Lisa DiCarlo. Dell, Napster Target College Downloads . Forbes.com. July 7, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:56 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

July 08, 2005

TV Technology May Generate New Lawsuits

"Days after the Supreme Court weighed in on digital copyright infringement issues in the MGM v. Grokster case, select consumer electronics chains began stocking a product some predict could spark the entertainment industry's next showdown over intellectual property rights.

Andrew Wallenstein. TV Technology at Edge of Legal Frontier. Reuters. July 6, 2005.

Editor's note See also SNTReport.com's prior story on the MGM, Grokster decision.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:45 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Podcasting Poised for Big Future

"Market researchers and analysts continue to buoy up podcasting's future with latest figures suggesting a US audience alone of 56 million by 2010.

"Podcasts, which are only a year old, are online audio shows by amateurs and professionals which can be sent automatically to digital music players.

"The predictions also match those for growing digital music player sales."

BBC News. Podcasting Set for 'Huge Growth'. July 7, 2005.

See also:
Jack Kapica. Podcasting Audience to Skyrocket: Study. Globe & Mail. July 6, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:09 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

July 07, 2005

Vast Opportunities for Podcasting

"The word is barely a year old, and already it seems 2005 is the year of the podcast. The marriage of portable audio players and radio broadcasting, podcasting is a kind of radio on demand. People can download audio files from the Internet and listen to them at their leisure from their iPods or other devices. Last week, Apple released its new version of software for the iPod, which includes a directory of podcasts available for download.

"Most downloads are currently free, and advertisers are just beginning to find ways to sponsor them. Even if podcasting is not yet profitable, it is finding its way into many parts of society. The opportunities are vast."

Megan Barnett. Tech Trends: Podcasting Hits the Mainstream. USNews.com. July 5, 2005.

See also:
Podcast Users Expected To Reach 60 Million In Five Years. InformationWeek. July 5, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:15 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

July 06, 2005

K. Matthew Dames Gives SLA Virtual Presentation

K. Matthew Dames, managing partner of Seso Group Digital Information Advisors and the executive editor of SNTReport.com and Search & Text Mining Report, is this month's speaker for SLA's Virtual Seminar series. Dames will present a two-part series on digital collaboration projects for information professionals, with the first live session being Webcast at 2:00 EST on July 6. and the second live session being Webcast at 2:00 EST on July 20.

Attendance & Registration
Want to view Dames' presentation live? Check the SLA Virtual Seminar page for more information. If you have any additional questions, e-mail SLA at learning@sla.org or call the Professional Development Center at (703) 647-4925.

This session will be taped and available for viewing within one week of the Webcast.

Description
Whatever you call it – digital collaboration, social software, social networking – working across the Web is about more than technology or devices. Ultimately, it is about developing a community of practice where people readily share their information and knowledge, regardless of distance.

Many clients and end-users will suggest that the trend toward using digital collaboration lessens the need for librarians and other information professionals. Instead, the opposite is true: online information sharing increases the need for librarians as facilitators, researchers, and knowledge managers. With some work and initiative, technology-savvy Info Pros can position themselves inside their organizations as critically important team members at a time when their value is being questioned.

This two-part series looks at the tools and issues involved in creating an effective digital collaboration environment, and shares some ideas on how best to establish a digital collaboration initiative within an organization. The first part of the series, part of SLA's Virtual Learning Series, will explain the tools and terminology of digital collaboration, and how different organizations are using these tools to improve productivity and knowledge sharing.

Slides
K. Matthew Dames. Digital Collaboration: Tools & Terms. (.pdf, 2.7 MB) July 6, 2005.

Webliography
Covad. "The Ringing" (Flash movie; Flash Player required.)

Salesforce.com: Hosted customer relationship management tool, with contact management, marketing campaign budgeting and analysis, and mobile and wireless capability.

Bloglines: Hosted RSS and news aggregator.

37Signals: Developer of several hosted business tools, including Backpack (a collaborative online planner and to-do list), and the highly regarded Basecamp (hosted project management application).

Thomas Bleha. Down to the Wire. Foreign Affairs. May/June 2005. ("Once a leader in Internet innovation, the United States has fallen far behind Japan and other Asian states in deploying broadband and the latest mobile-phone technology.")

Heather Green and Robert D. Hof. Picking Up Where Search Leaves Off. BusinessWeek Online. April 11, 2005. ("The time-saving trend of "tagging" is luring legions of Web surfers -- and Yahoo! ")

Daniel Terdiman. Folksonomies Tap People Power. Wired News. Feb. 1, 2005. ("The job of tags isn't to organize all the world's information into tidy categories. It's to add value to the giant piles of data that are already out there.")

Technorati: A blog index.

SNTReport.com: Seso Group LLC publication that finds, filters, summarizes important digital collaboration news six days each week.

Search & Text Mining Report: Seso Group LLC publication that finds, filters, summarizes important news about the business, technology, and law of search and search engines. Published five days each week.

Micro Persuasion: Blog of public relations executive Steve Rubel.

GM FastLane: "The FastLane blog is where you can come to read the latest, greatest musings of GM leaders on topics relevant to the company, the industry and the global economy, and -- most of all -- to our customers and other car enthusiasts."

Charlene Li. Blogging: Bubble or Big Deal? Forrester Research. Nov. 5, 2004.

Mark Pilgrim. What Is RSS? O'Reilly XML.com. Dec. 18, 2002.

Jeff Tyson. How Instant Messaging Works. HowStuffWorks. No date.

Robert Kaye. Next-Generation File Sharing with Social Networks. O'Reilly Open P2P. March 5, 2004.

Miriam Rainsford. A Musician's Take on File Sharing, DRM, and Copyleft Licensing. O'Reilly Open P2P. June 10, 2003.

Wikipedia. Founded in 2001, Wikipedia bills itself as "the free-content encyclopedia that anyone can edit."

JotSpot: A Wiki web application development through a " Microsoft Word style editing" interface. For a demonstration of JotSpot's capabilities, please see Jon Udell's Flash movie. (Flash Player required.)

Federal Communications Commission. Voice Over Internet Protocol: Frequently Asked Questions. May 24, 2005.

vSkype: Skype plugin that allows users to see who they are talking to while sharing applications, spreadsheets or photos in real time. (Windows only)

IPDrum. Its IPdrum Mobile Cable connects Skype to a mobile telephone via the mobile telephone network - allowing Skype users true mobility and worldwide calling for local rates.

Heather Wilson. Gaming for Librarians: An Introduction. (.pdf) VOYA. February 2005.

K. Matthew Dames. Commentary on New iTunes Cell Phone. SNTReport.com. July 5, 2005.

Fred Vogelstein. Gates vs. Google: Search and Destroy. Fortune. May 2, 2005. ("Bill Gates is on a mission to build a Google killer. What got him so riled? The darling of search is moving into software—and that's Microsoft's turf.")

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 09:00 AM | Send to a friend!

RSS Attracts Internet Advertisers

"The fledgling RSS business is starting to attract some attention from those catering to Internet advertisers.

"Google, Pheedo, Feedster and Yahoo Search Marketing are all peddling advertising options for RSS, an increasingly popular way of having a personal computer automatically retrieve information from the Internet.

"Some big companies, like Verizon, are starting to buy space in the RSS information streams, which are selected anonymously and pulled from Web sites by a PC."

Louise Story. Marketers See Opportunity as RSS Gains Users. News.com. July 5, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:14 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Outlook for Podcast Advertising

"Apple's integration of podcasting into its iTunes software has propelled the grassroots movement into the mainstream, but marketers say there are challenges to overcome before ad dollars begin pouring into podcasters' pockets.

"Among those challenges are finding ways of measuring listening and of efficiently buying ads on a medium that has so far been made up of small, fragmented audiences.

"Since podcasting uses RSS feeds for distribution -- the same mechanism popularized by blogs -- FeedBurner and other RSS-centric technology companies are at the forefront of helping podcasters build the format into a monetizable business. FeedBurner's technology measures the number of people who are subscribed to a blog's feed, reading the content of a post, or clicking through on any links. It is applying the same technology to podcasts."

Kevin Newcomb. Podcasting Ads Face Challenges. ClickZNews. July 5, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:10 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

July 05, 2005

Live 8 Concert Sets World Records

"Live 8 has proved to be a triumph for technology, with millions participating in the event via the web and mobiles.

"Almost 27 million people texted in their support for a petition asking G8 leaders to double aid and cancel debts for the world's poorest countries.

"Millions watched the event online and recordings of Sergeant Pepper were on sale an hour after being sung live. But videos and audio of many of the acts were also available via BitTorrent file-sharing software."

BBC News. Net Fuels Live 8 Extravaganza. July 4, 2005.

See also:
Lars Brandle. Live 8 Shatters Records. Billboard Radio Monitor. July 4, 2005.

Michelle Meyers. Live Aid for the Internet Age. News.com. July 2, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:45 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

July 01, 2005

Grokster's Impact on Podcasting

"Apple's new podcasting service could be in a sticky situation if podcasters post copyrighted material, thanks to Monday's Grokster decision by the Supreme Court, some experts say. But others suggested Apple's new podcast hub could prove to be an ideal one-stop-shop for securing music licenses for homebrew radio shows.

"Podcasters may not include unauthorized copyright material in their broadcasts, and Apple will reportedly monitor podcasts for infringing material, according to the Guardian. Apple also provides a complaint form on the iTMS to notify the company of any copyright violations.

"But with the unanimous Supreme Court decision in the MGM Studios v. Grokster case, companies can now be sued if they encourage users of their technology to infringe copyrights."

Katie Dean. Grokster May Haunt Podcasting. Wired News. June 29, 2005.

See also:

Bobbie Johnson. iPods get Colour, Podcasts. Guardian Unlimited Online Blog. June 28, 2005.

Katie Dean. Grokster Loss Sucks for Tech. Wired News. June 27, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:37 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Blinkx Unveils Podcast Search Tool

"Search provider blinkx on Wednesday debuted a service to find podcasts and video blogs across the web, addressing the rapid proliferation of these new forms of content.

"blinkx has already introduced a search engine that finds video content, and the video blog and podcast search facilities add to its multimedia and desktop search capabilities. Users can also upload their own video blogs and podcasts to the search site.

"Like other companies, blinkx is recognizing the growing importance of podcasts as a way to bring their message to users of iPods and other portable MP3 players."

Red Herring. Blinkx Debuts Podcast Search. June 29, 2005.

See also:
Gary Price. Blinkx Now Offering Podcast Search. SearchEngineWatch. June 29, 2005.

Keith Regan. Blinkx Carves Out Niche With Podcast Search Tool. E-Commerce Times. June 29, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:01 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

June 30, 2005

Sharing: The Next WWW Chapter

"When Caterina Fake arrives at the end of a plane flight, she snaps a photo of the baggage carousel with her camera phone to assure her mother, who views the photo on a Web page minutes later, that she has traveled safely.

"And if every picture tells a story, that may be only the start. At Flickr, the popular Web photo-sharing service where Fake, a co-founder, posted the photo, it can be tagged with geographic coordinates for use in a photographic map, or become part of a communal database of images that can be searched for certain colors or characteristics.

"Flickr, acquired this year by Yahoo, is just one example of a rapidly growing array of Web services all seeking to exploit the Internet's power to bring people together."

John Markoff. Web Content by and for the Masses. News.com. June 29, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:27 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

June 29, 2005

Apple Launches iTunes 4.9 with Podcast Support

"Apple Computer today unveiled a new version of its iTunes music software and its companion online store to incorporate podcasts, a move that could bring this nascent form of personal broadcasting to a mainstream audience.

"The new iTunes contains a directory of more than 3,000 free audio programs with an eclectic mix of content, from MTV veejay Adam Curry's pioneering Daily Source Code to ESPN sports to programming from National Public Radio stations such as KCRW in Los Angeles.

"The software removes the technological hurdles that have kept podcasting a largely early-adopter phenomenon, making it easy for anyone to find and subscribe to a podcast. And every time there's a new episode, it's automatically downloaded to their Mac or PC and automatically synchronized to their iPod."

Dawn C. Chmielewski. Apple Puts Podcasting on New iTunes. San Jose Mercury News. June 28, 2005.

See also:
Charles Arthur. Apple Pushes Podcasts Through iTunes. The Register. June 28, 2005.

BBC News. Apple Brings Podcasts Into iTunes. June 28, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:27 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

June 28, 2005

Supreme Court Rules Against Grokster

"The U.S. Supreme Court ruled (.pdf) Monday that software companies can be held liable for copyright infringement when individuals use their technology to download songs and movies illegally.

"The unanimous decision handed the music and movie industries a crucial victory in their ongoing battle to curb Internet piracy -- a campaign centered on lobbying for new laws, filing thousands of lawsuits against Internet users, and winning a ruling from the nation's highest court.

"Their victory Monday on the third piece of that strategy dealt a big blow to technology companies, which claim that holding them accountable for the illegal downloading of songs, movies, video games and other proprietary products would stifle their ability to develop new products."

Krysten Crawford. Hollywood Wins Internet Piracy Battle. CNNMoney.com. June 27, 2005.

See also:
U.S. Supreme Court. On Writ of Certiorari: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc., et al. v. Grokster, LTD., et al.. (.pdf) June 27, 2005.

News.com Special Coverage. File-Swap Fallout. News.com.

Libe Goad. Supreme Court Deals Blow to P2P Services. eWeek. June 27, 2005.

Technology & Marketing Law Blog. Grokster Supreme Court Ruling. June 27, 2005.

Electric Frontier Foundation. Supreme Court Sows Uncertainty. Deep Links. June 27, 2005.

Vauhini Vara. A Grokster Primer. WSJ.com. June 27, 2005.

The Wall Street Journal. Grokster Roundtable. June 27, 2005.

National Public Radio. File-Sharing Firms May Be Liable, Says High Court. All Things Considered. June 27, 2005.

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:55 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

June 25, 2005

Audible to Podcast N.Y. Times

"Digital audio publisher Audible plans to release podcasts of The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and the company's other periodic content via syndicated feeds.

"The podcasts--audio recordings that can be uploaded to an MP3 player--will be delivered through the Web publishing standard Really Simple Syndication, or RSS.

"Audible customers will be able to automatically schedule delivery of programming to their computers or to compatible handheld devices, the company said. Initially, the tool will be available only to Audible customers and content partners."

CNET News.com Staff. Audible to Offer New York Times Podcasts via RSS. News.com. June 24, 2005.

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June 24, 2005

Law Firms Brace for Grokster Verdict

"Want to know how heated the lobbying, arguing, positioning and maneuvering over copyright legislation is going to get this fall? Ask anyone who's ever published anything containing the words 'peer to peer' for a look in their e-mail in-box.

"Chances are good it has filled up in the past few days with helpful messages from publicists and lawyers offering expert opinions on the ramifications of the pending Supreme Court decision in the case known as MGM v. Grokster.

"During the year, the court releases its decisions on Mondays—and only on Mondays. But this is its final week of deliberation, and opinion could be issued at any time."

Chris Nolan. Preparing for the Grokster Watershed. eWeek. June 22, 2005.

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June 23, 2005

P2P Commerce Marches On

"As the file-swapping world waits for a verdict on its future from the Supreme Court, a handful of entrepreneurs are pushing ahead with plans to harness the anarchic networks for commerce.

"On Wednesday, a new service called Gnutelligence launched with the aim of bringing something very like Google's sponsored search results to the open-source Gnutella network.

"Run by a former LimeWire employee, the service is designed to produce clearly marked advertising results in response to specific, pre-purchased keywords inside the Gnutella network.

John Borland. New Plans for P2P Commerce, Despite Court Wait. News.com. June 22, 2005.

Related:
Associated Press. File-Swapping May Be Here to Stay. Forbes.com. June 22, 2005.

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June 21, 2005

Podcasts Come Early to iTunes

"A new company called BadFruit has anticipated Apple Computer's plans to add podcasting support to iTunes with a software plug-in called "BadApple" that does the trick itself.

"As yet, the programmers behind the BadFruit site are remaining anonymous, although several clues point to a corporate identity. Unlike most basement-hacker projects, the software comes with a sophisticated privacy policy and terms of use that may indicate bigger plans for the future.

"For now, the plug-in provides seamless access to hundreds of podcasts inside the iTunes shell, with downloads functioning in much the same way that the iTunes music store itself works."

John Borland. 'BadApple' Podcasts First in iTunes. ZDNet.com. June 20, 2005.

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June 20, 2005

Whither the Grokster Decision?

Ever since the Supreme Court agreed in December to hear the entertainment industry's case against the file-sharing software companies Grokster and Streamcast, armchair legal experts have been casually wagering on the outcome. The case pits copyright holders against those who fear a stifling of technological innovation. With the court poised to weigh in, perhaps as early as today, all sides have been getting edgy.

Tom Zeller Jr. The Court of Online Opinion Has Its Say on File Sharing. The New York Times. June 20, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

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Microsoft Develops Bit Torrent Alternative

"Researchers at Microsoft's labs in Cambridge, England, are developing a file-sharing technology that they say could make it easier to distribute big files such as films, television programs, and software applications to end users over the Internet.

Code-named Avalanche, the technology is similar to existing peer-to-peer (P-to-P) file swapping systems such as BitTorrent, in the sense that large files can be divided into many smaller pieces to ease their distribution. End users request the file parts from other users' hard drives and reassemble them to create the original file.

"Such systems can scale well to serve millions of users, and reduce the bandwidth and computing costs of sending content directly to users from central servers. Some have also irritated publishers who complain the services are used to share copyright works illegally."

James Niccolai. Microsoft Builds Its Own Peer-to-Peer App. PCWorld. June 16, 2005.

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Research Indicates Podcasting to Soar by 2010

"According to new forecasts from The Diffusion Group, a US-based consumer technology research consultancy, demand for time-shifted digital audio files - that's 'podcasts' to you and me - is expected to grow from less than 15% of portable digital music player owners in the US in 2004 to 75% by 2010.

"The firm says its new report Podcasting: Fact, Fiction and Opportunity - which costs a whopping $1,495.00! - suggests that between 2004 and 2010, the use of podcasting among US consumers will enjoy a compound annual growth rate of 101%."

NevOn. Ride the Podcasting Long Tail. June 17, 2005.

See also:
The Diffusion Group. Podcasting Users to Approach 60 Million US Consumers by 2010. June 15, 2005.

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Intercasting Launches Personal Publishing Solution

"The trouble with blogging is that bloggers are forced to think and compose at their desks.

"That is one view held by proponents of the latest twist on those Internet-based publications: mobile blogging.

"A handful of companies have begun offering software that allows people to read and write blogs on cellular phones. The concept, known in some circles as moblogging, lets bloggers take pictures, record sound and type in text while on the go."

Matt Richtel. Software Lets Bloggers Post via Cellphone. The New York Times. June 20, 2005.

Editor's note See also SNTReport.com's prior story on Rabble software.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

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June 18, 2005

DivX Finds Its Way Into DVD Players

"San Diego-based DivX, Inc. announced the newest iteration, DivX 6.0, of its video compression software Wednesday with features that up the ante for compression schemes.

"Video compression is one of the hottest genres in high technology. This is mostly because the amount of raw video in a digitized video stream is ridiculously large, thus putting a burden on storage and networks.

"If the future of video distribution is over the Internet, as many predict, these files have to be compressed -- by a lot."

John C. Dvorak. A Step Closer to Electronic Movie Distribution. MarketWatch. June 16, 2005.

See also:
Scott Fulton. DivX 6 Aims at CE Market with Enhanced Editing, Performance. Tom's Hardware Guide. June 15, 2005.

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June 17, 2005

Podcasters Seek Legal Compromise for Music

"On Sunday, Brian Ibbott will post his 100th 'Coverville' show, a significant milestone for a home disc jockey who is serious about the future of podcasting.

"But like other music disc jockeys producing podcasts, which are radio-like shows that can be downloaded from the Internet to a computer or digital music player, he has been operating with one foot squarely in a gray area of the law.

"Most of the cover songs he programs on his show are from independent labels and bands, from whom he usually seeks and gets permission. Even Warner Bros. Records gave him a green light once last month. Yet he posts a few songs from major labels without asking, lacking the time or resources to even track down the right people to ask."

John Borland. Hopes for Legal Music Podcasts Rise. News.com. June 16, 2005.

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June 15, 2005

OECD Disputes Link Between P2P And Music Sales

"File-swapping networks alone are not to blame for the recording industry's woes and might plausibly be converted into legitimate channels for distributing music, one of Europe's most influential economic bodies has concluded.

"In a report (.pdf) issued Monday, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development -- a Paris-based alliance of developed nations -- also suggested that it's difficult to establish a link between piracy and the music industry's shrinking revenues.

"The report said a 're-evaluation' of music distribution needs to happen to achieve a balance between consumers' desire to access digital music and the industry's copyright protection concerns."

Bruce Gain. Come On Music Biz, Embrace P2P. Wired News. June 13, 2005.

See also:
Dr. Sacha Wunsch-Vincent and Dr. Graham Vickery. OECD Report on Digital Music: Opportunities and Challenges. (.pdf) Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. June 8, 2005.

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EMI to Launch Copy Protected CDs

"Music fans who copy CDs for all their pals, take note: It may be time to shed some friends.

"Executives at EMI Group on Monday said they planned to begin rolling out CDs with technology designed to limit copying. The technology allows buyers to burn onto CDs only three full copies of a disc's songs, and the burned discs cannot be copied.

"Sony BMG is heading even faster down the same road. About half the discs it releases in the United States today have the three-copy limit, and it plans to have a similar restriction on all its U.S. releases by the end of the year, said Thomas Hesse, president of the company's global digital music business."

Jon Healey and Charles Duhigg. CDs to Restrict Copying of Songs. LATimes.com. June 14, 2005.

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June 14, 2005

Napster Creator Launches Legit P2P Service

"Snocap, the content management system for music distributed via peer-to-peer networks, is set to open its digital registry Monday.

"Chief strategy officer Shawn Fanning described Snocap as a music registry that would serve as a clearinghouse for files that consumers are trading among themselves.

"Each song has its digital 'fingerprint' determined and entered into a database. Then when users share a song, Snocap checks the database for the associated copyright information and enforces whatever usage rules the owner has assigned. This will allow music retailers and P2P networks to offer a massive library of legal content without having to maintain relationships with each individual copyright holder, according to Fanning."

Chris Marlowe. Online Music Firm Snocap Goes Indie Route. Reuters. June 13, 2005.

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June 13, 2005

Radio Stations Seek to Exploit Podcast Buzz

"Less than a year after podcasting caught the public imagination, the radio industry is beginning to wake up and smell the money.

"Earlier this month, talk-show host Rush Limbaugh began offering podcasts of his shows for $50 a year, and competitors like The Dr. Laura Schlessinger Program may follow his lead. Meanwhile, commercial and public radio stations are trying to figure out where they fit in the podsphere and how they can make a buck by filling up your MP3 player."

Randy Dotinga. Radio Sets Eyes on Podcast Profit. Wired News. June 11, 2005.

See also:
Antony Bruno. Podcasting Lures Wary Music Biz. Reuters. June 11, 2005.

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:29 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

June 11, 2005

Business Software Alliance Describes Future Technologies

"Too much wine with dinner? In the future, your car might not start if you're drunk -- and it might automatically call a cab, notify your spouse and even reschedule business appointments early the next morning.

"That sobering vision of things to come could also include the ability to read important e-mails and other vital messages on television, wireless telephone or computers at work and at home.

"To Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer, technology in the future promises better tools for sorting and managing important information -- from e-mails, instant messages, blogs and Web sites -- that will help computer users discard their digital junk."

Ted Bridis. Top CEOs Describe Future Technologies. BusinessWeek Online. June 10, 2005.

See also:
Associated Press. Video Interview with Business Software Alliance.

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June 08, 2005

iTunes Gives P2P Sites a Run for Money

"Apple Computer's iTunes online music store is as popular as most music-swapping networks, according to a study released Tuesday.

"The survey by market research firm NPD Group found that approximately 1.7 million U.S. households downloaded a song from iTunes in March. That was good enough to earn the store a second-place ranking with peer-to-peer downloading service LimeWire.

"The most popular digital music service during the month, however, was P2P site WinMX, which was used by 2.1 million households to download music during the month.

CNET News.com Staff. Study: iTunes More Popular Than Many P2P Sites. News.com. June 7, 2005.

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BBC's 'Go Digital' to Podcast

"The BBC World Service's flagship technology radio programme, Go Digital, will be available as a podcast from today as presenter Gareth Mitchell explains."

BBC News. Go Digital Turns to Podcasting. June 6, 2005.

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June 07, 2005

Apple Promises Easier Podcasting

"Apple Computer Inc. CEO Steve Jobs called podcasting 'the hottest thing going in radio' on Monday and promised to make it easier for audiophiles to create and distribute the digital recordings.

"At a technology conference on Monday, Jobs previewed iTunes version 4.9. The software allows users to click on and subscribe to different podcasts, then automatically delivers the shows to any connected iPod -- far less cumbersome than the third-party applications many listeners now need.

"The newest iTunes will include a directory of podcasts, and creators will be able to register their shows with Apple's iTunes Music Store."

Rachel Konrad. Apple Vows to Make Podcasting Easier. BusinessWeek Online. June 6, 2005.

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Mercora Offers Music Search Tool

"Music start-up Mercora is dipping its toes into the trendy world of Internet search, with a new Web-based tool aimed at finding free music being played on the company's peer-to-peer radio network.

"The company is expanding quickly from its roots as an innovative streaming Net radio service, in which it has blended much of the immediate on-demand listening of file-swapping networks with the legal framework of Web radio.

"The new tool is aimed at appealing to a new audience of casual Web surfers, allowing them to search the Mercora network and listen to a wide range of songs that approximates on demand. Thus, a person might search for The Beatles and have two dozen or more songs instantly at their fingertips to listen to for free."

John Borland. P2P Radio Morphing into Free Music Search. News.com. June 6, 2005.

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June 06, 2005

Warner Music: Downloads Are Purchases

"Third Story Music, a Los Angeles-based music publishing firm and the successor to the production company that managed singer-songwriter Tom Waits early in his career, has filed a federal suit against Warner Music Group, alleging that Waits has been shortchanged on the sale of digital downloads.

"The action, filed in U.S. District Court for the Central District of California in Los Angeles on Tuesday, stems from 1972 and 1977 contracts signed by Third Story principal Herb Cohen and Warner-owned Asylum Records regarding Waits' services.

"According to the suit, under the terms of the two contracts, Waits was entitled to royalties of either 25% or 50% from revenues derived from third-party licenses. Third Story maintains that digital music downloads constitute a form of third-party license, and that Waits is entitled to payment at that level."

Chris Morris. Publisher Sues Warner Music Over Waits Tunes. Reuters. June 2, 2005.

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BitTorrent As Distribution Platform

"Film and television executives no doubt wish the increasingly popular BitTorrent peer-to-peer file-sharing system never saw the light of day. Thousands of consumers are using the software to download hundreds of movies and hours upon hours of television programming.

"But one industry's threat is another's opportunity. There's an upside to allowing viewers to transfer copyright material content over BitTorrent."

Patrick Gray. The Other Side of BitTorrent. Wired News. June 2, 2005.

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U.S. Includes Canada on 'Watch List'

"The United States recently released the Special 301 Report (.pdf) on the state of global intellectual property protections. This report places countries deemed to have insufficient protections on a 'watch list.' The list includes Canada.

"This report deems Canada's intellectual property laws insufficient, along with those of 50 other countries, such as the European Union and dozens of nations in South America, Eastern Europe and Asia."

David Canton. Canada on U.S. Watch List. London Free Press. June 4, 2005.

See also:
United States Trade Representative. 2005 Special 301 Report. (.pdf) April 29, 2005.

United States Trade Representative. Watch List (.pdf) April 29, 2005.

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:45 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Web-Delivered TV Needs Work

"Years ago, our futuristic fantasies involved robot butlers, video wristwatches and flying cars. These days, we would be happy to have a cell phone with no dead spots, e-mail without spam and the ability to watch any TV show, anytime we want it.

"Actually, they are making progress on that last item. A company called Akimbo has a tantalizing idea. What if you had a TiVo-like set-top box, complete with a hard drive that could hold 200 hours of video--but instead of recording live broadcasts, you could tap into an enormous library of shows, stored on the Internet, and watch them whenever you liked?"

David Pogue. TV's Future Is Here, But It Needs Work. News.com. June 4, 2005.

Stefanie Olsen and Richard Shim. Search Giants Court TiVo. News.com. April 18, 2005.

Stefanie Olsen. Akimbo Debuts Video on Demand on Amazon. News.com. Oct. 25, 2004.

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Filmaker Preserves Culture Via Podcasts

"A filmmaker who has been collecting digital artifacts for 25 years is amassing the world's largest collection of podcasts, though he has little interest in actually listening to them.

"Jason Scott, a 34-year-old documentary filmmaker from the Boston area, has saved and cataloged more than 340 GB of online amateur radio since he started in February.

"Scott is currently monitoring and archiving some 1,500 podcasters using a $300 computer running a handwritten script that automatically downloads audio files to cheap hard drives."

Ryan Singel. Collector's Trove of Podcasts. Wired News. June 2, 2005.

See also:
ASCII by Jason Scott. All of the Podcasts. Feb. 26, 2005.

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June 04, 2005

Newspapers Embrace Podcasting

"Desperate to reach a more mobile audience, some newspapers are turning to podcasting. A growing number now offer Internet radio programs, sending stories from their pages to iPods and other players."

National Public Radio. Papers Turn to Podcasting, the Newest of Media. All Things Considered. June 2, 2005.

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June 03, 2005

Thunderbird Update to Include Podcast Support

"Developers of the Mozilla Foundation's open-source e-mail client have added a podcasting feature to its arsenal and improved its defense against phishing attacks.

"The changes were highlighted Tuesday in a Mozilla blog that discussed modifications to the software before its upcoming 1.1 release. They are not available in the current 1.0.2 release.

"Thunderbird already supports RSS feeds as they are commonly used by blogs, but a new patch will deal with Podcast-type content by opening a dialog box through which the user can summon a helper application such as a Web browser or audio player."

Renai LeMay. Thunderbird Gets Podcasting Support. News.com. June 2, 2005.

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June 02, 2005

Lawmaker Opposes Broadcast Flag in DTV Bill

"A key lawmaker has complicated the movie industry's push for a law to restrict consumers' ability to redistribute digital TV content over peer-to-peer networks and the internet at large.

"Rep. Joe Barton (R-Texas), chairman of the House Commerce Committee, has indicated that he opposes inserting a broadcast flag measure in his newly introduced digital TV bill, which would set a 2008 hard deadline for broadcasters to give back their analog spectrum."

Michael Grebb. Broadcast Flag at Half Mast?. Wired News. June 1, 2005.

Related:
CRS Report for Congress. Copyright Protection of Digital Television: The "Broadcast Flag". (.pdf) April 5, 2005.

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June 01, 2005

BBC to Offer Beethoven Podcasts

"BBC Radio 3 is offering downloadable live performances of all of Beethoven's nine symphonies from next month, part of the corporation's Beethoven Experience.

"The symphonies, which were performed by the BBC Philharmonic in Manchester and conducted by Gianandrea Noseda, will be available to download as MP3 files here from June 7."

Staff Brand Republic. Download to Joy as BBC offers Nine Beethoven Symphonies for Free. Digital Bulletin. May 27, 2005.

See also:
Clive Akass. BBC Offers Free Beethoven MP3 Recordings. VNunet.com. May 27, 2005.

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May 31, 2005

Tivo-like Radio Devices Raise Piracy Flags

"It's like Tivo for radio, but is it legal?

"Various devices that enable listeners to record Internet radio streams and then convert them into MP3 files are catching on and making Web radio and streaming services more appealing to the general public.

"But some legal experts say the recording software may violate digital copyright laws and does little more than promote piracy."

Sue Zeidler. Lawyers, Others Questions Radio TIVO-Like Devices. Reuters. May 27, 2005.

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May 26, 2005

SEMs Wary of P2P Search Ads

"Revelations that controversial file-sharing software developer Ask Jeeves alongside its upcoming search engine have drawn mixed results from SEMs.

"BitTorrent announced Monday that it is planning to launch a search engine to index the thousands of movies, music, video games and other files currently shared using the company's peer-to-peer software. Alongside search results, the company will show keyword-targeted text ads from Ask Jeeves."

Kevin Newcomb. Prospect of Search Ads on P2P Site Rattle SEMs. ClickZNews. May 25, 2005.

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Feds Target Star Wars Pirates, BitTorrent

"Federal agents launched a crackdown on users of a popular new technology used to steal the latest 'Star Wars' movie and other large data files off the Internet, immigration officials announced Wednesday.

"U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement said Wednesday that the campaign, which included search warrants and the shutdown of a Web site, was its first-ever criminal enforcement action against users of a file-sharing program known as BitTorrent."

Krysten Crawford. Feds Bite BitTorrent. CNNMoney. May 25, 2005.

See also:
U.S. Department of Justice. Federal Law Enforcement Announces Operation D-Elite Crackdown on P2P Piracy Network. (Press Release.) May 25, 2005.

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Senators Address International IP Piracy

"U.S. senators urged the Bush administration on Wednesday to increase pressure on Russia and China to respect copyright law, warning that those nations have become havens for movie and software piracy.

"Orrin Hatch, the Utah Republican who chairs the Senate copyright subcommittee, made one of the most ominous statements to date about what might happen if unfettered piracy continues.

"James Mendenhall, the acting general counsel for the U.S. Trade Representative, said his colleagues are hosting a delegation from China this week to talk in part about copyright law."

Declan McCullagh. Senators Urge International Copyright Crackdown. News.com. May 25, 2005.

See also:
U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary. Testimony of James Mendenhall. May 25, 2005.

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May 25, 2005

BitTorrent Search Engine to Carry Search Ads

"Whiz kid inventor Bram Cohen and a small cadre of developers and entrepreneurs are in the final stage of launching an advertising-supported search engine dedicated to cataloging and indexing the thousands of movies, music tracks, software programs and other files for download over Cohen's popular BitTorrent protocol.

"The free search tool will be the first large-scale commercial offering from BitTorrent, a five-person company headed by Cohen that so far has drawn most of its revenue from T-shirt sales and PayPal donations."

Kevin Poulsen. Next for BitTorrent: Search. Wired News. May 23, 2005.

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May 24, 2005

Jobs Promises Podcast Support in iTunes

"Apple Computer Inc. is working on a new update of its popular iTunes music software that will accommodate podcasts, Chief Executive Officer Steve Jobs said Sunday night.

"The new version of iTunes will let users of Apple's music management program and integrated online music store find and download podcasts, which are homemade radio-style shows that have become a grassroots phenomenon on the Internet.

"Jobs gave a preview of the software at D: All Things Digital, an annual technology conference sponsored by the Wall Street Journal. He later said the new version of iTunes won't be released for a 'few months.'

Benny Evangelista. Jobs Announces iTunes Will Accommodate Podcasts. San Francisco Chronicle. May 23, 2005.

See also:
Jim Louderback. Apple's Jobs Announces iTunes Podcast Support. eWeek. May 23, 2005.

Related:
John Shinal. The Shot Phoned Round the World. MarketWatch.com. May 23, 2005.

National Public Radio. Come One, Come All: The Rise of Podcasting. Morning Edition. May 23, 2005.

Bill Thompson. Podcasting Could be a Revolution. BBC News. May 20, 2005.

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:40 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

New Online Tool to Record, Mix & Publish Podcasts

"Aspiring singers don't have to wait for next year's 'American Idol' tryouts to try to make a name for themselves.

"On Monday, GarageBand.comi unveiled a set of online tools designed to let people record, mix and publish their own songs via podcast or to license and distribute their music to podcasters.

"Using Podcast Studio, the musically inclined can upload their recordings and mix them with music from the GarageBand catalog. Once a new playlist is published, it will become available to listeners for streaming, download and subscription from GarageBand's servers."

Dinesh C. Sharma. GarageBand.com Tunes Up Podcasting Tool. News.com. May 23, 2005.

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Elementary Schoolers Receive Copyright Warning

"Think schools are just scaring kids about drugs, sex and poor study habits these days? Now you can put illegal file trading on the list.

"Sixth-graders in American Fork, Utah, will start their journey to middle school on Tuesday with a warning from the director of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office about the ills of illegally downloading music, movies and games from the Web."

Alorie Gilbert. Never Too Young for a Copyright Lesson. News.com. May 23, 2005.

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:20 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

New Arrivals to Digital Music Market

"Napster Inc. should dump its 'Do the Math' ad campaign before it gets embarrassing. By any calculation, its all-you-can-download Napster To Go service can't compete with the subscription plans just launched by RealNetworks Inc. and Yahoo Inc.

"These new offerings remedy the glaring flaw of Napster To Go -- the way it seems to serve the record labels' interests a little too well. Napster To Go's $14.95 monthly fee permits subscribers to collect all the music they want and listen to it on some Windows Media-compatible digital music players. But if they stop paying, the music stops playing -- and getting a permanent copy that can be burned to CD requires purchasing it anew at the full list price of 99 cents."

Rob Pegoraro. Music Subscription Services Reach for an Edge. WashingtonPost.com. May 22, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

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May 23, 2005

Electronic Reserves Stir Copyright Dispute

"There's been a change in Ellen Lichtenstein's study patterns.

"For half her classes this past year, she no longer had to visit a library to get the reading materials professors had placed on reserve. Instead, she only needed Internet access and a password.

"And publishing companies are worried precisely because of that ease and convenience - it's another way for publishers to lose sales."

Anick Jesdanun. A Different Sort of Campus Copyright Fight. MSNBC News. May 21, 2005.

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May 21, 2005

Swedish Minister to Consider DRM Ban on CDs

"Sweden's justice minister, Thomas Bodström, has called for record companies to stop copy-protecting CDs.

"In a move which will stoke up the country's increasingly heated copyright protection debate, Bodström has said that if the industry continues to put blocking technology on new music CDs, the government will make it illegal."

No author. Justice Minister Threatens to Ban CD "Copy Protection". The Local. May 19, 2005.

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May 19, 2005

BBC to Test Internet TV Downloads

"Around 190 hours of TV shows and 310 hours of radio programmes are to be made available for legal downloading to selected individuals across the UK.

"It marks the second stage in the development of the BBC's interactive Media Player (iMP).

"The iMP will allow viewers to catch up with programmes up to seven days after they are broadcast, using the internet to download shows to home computers."

BBC News. BBC Moves Ahead With TV Downloads. May 16, 2005.

See also:
Jason Deans. BBC to Trial TV Content Online. Guardian Unlimited. May 16, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:43 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Adam Curry: Everyone Wins with Podcasting

"Adam Curry's name rings a bell for a lot of people who came of age in the 1980s watching the former video jockey, who was a mainstay on MTV.

"But Curry, who left the music channel in 1994 and moved to Europe, may be remembered by even more people for his pioneering work in the emerging field of podcasting.

"Podcasting is more than a hobby for Curry, who has used it to launch a return to the airwaves this week with 'PodShow,' a new program he's hosting on Sirius Satellite Radio. The show, which is designed to showcase the best from the podcasting universe, is also Curry's own personal attempt to shake up what he sees as the homogenized landscape of corporate radio."

Alorie Gilbert. The Man Who's Got Mainstream Radio Quaking. News.com. May 18, 2005.

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:17 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

May 18, 2005

Radio Station Adopts All-Podcast Format

"San Francisco radio station 1550 KYCY-AM began airing programming on Monday created exclusively by listeners with podcast technology, as new and old media start to collide.

"KYOURadio may well be the first station in the nation to adopt an all-podcast format, according to Infinity Broadcasting, the station's owner."

Alorie Gilbert. S.F. Radio Station Starts Airing Podcasts. News.com. May 16, 2005.

See also:
Seth Sutel. Infinity Tries All-Podcasting Radio Format. ABC News. April 27, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:24 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

May 16, 2005

Video Ads Link Customers Online

"Internet video? It's a mere blip in the ad market. Projected annual spending of just $198 million would finance barely a day and a half of ads on TV -- a $48 billion business. Yet in the marketing departments of some of the world's biggest advertisers, from General Motors Corp. to Unilever, online video represents a golden opportunity to move beyond the 30-second spots that TV viewers so often zap or ignore.

"These advertisers view online video as a laboratory for new ways to connect with customers. And they're busy figuring out ways to use the Internet to transform the most powerful advertising tool in history: television."

Ronald Grover, et al. Mad Ave Is Starry-Eyed Over Net Video. BusinessWeek Online. May 23, 2005.

Related:
Ingrid Marson. Firefox Video Campaign Gaining Steam. News.com. May 12, 2005.

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:39 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

CNN to Provide Free Video Online

"With demand growing for advertising space on the Internet, CNN.com plans to enhance and reorganize its Web offerings, adding free features that it hopes will attract both viewers and ad dollars.

"In June, CNN will make video clips free on its Web site for the first time, dropping a $4.95 fee, said Susan Grant, executive vice president of CNN News Services. Other major news sites, including the ones run by Fox News and CBS News, already provide free video; CNN and ABC News had chosen to make it a subscription service."

Geraldine Fabrikant. CNN to Add Free Video to Its Web Site. News.com. May 15, 2005.

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:38 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Wired News Interviews the 'Podfather'

"They call him the Podfather. Once best known as a star veejay on MTV, Adam Curry is now a pioneer of podcasting.

"Curry helped create ipodder, a tool that automates the process of downloading and listening to audio files. His Daily Source Code podcast has become an online hit, and he's developing a new software tool for podcasters -- a virtual studio for editing and producing.

"Wired News spoke to the radio Renaissance man by phone from his home in Guilford, England."

Xeni Jardin. Audience With the Podfather. Wired News. May 14, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Update: Read Dave Winer's reaction on his blog Scripting News.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:22 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Competitors Set Sights on the iPod

"Is Apple Computer's iPod headed for a fall? Microsoft seems to think so, as Bill Gates waxed pessimistically about his rival's chances in an interview with Germany's Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung magazine this week.

"Sure, you have to consider the source. Microsoft is trying to get its own fledgling digital music store off the ground and it's been working with wireless handset makers to help make a dent in the portable music player market. So it's only natural to be a little suspicious.

"Then again, if you follow the Macintosh lifeline, it's easy to see how Apple's pride cost it crucial market share in its battle against IBM and its personal computer clones. Although Apple is experiencing a resurgence of popularity with its desktops right now, it obviously commands a much thinner slice of the overall computing market these days."

Rick Aristotle Munarriz. Gates Takes a Bite Out of Apple. The Motley Fool. May 13, 2005.

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:19 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

May 14, 2005

MPAA Sues TV File Sharing Sites

"Continuing its war on Internet file-swapping sites, the Motion Picture Association of America said Thursday that it has filed lawsuits against a half-dozen hubs for TV show trading.

"The trade association said that piracy of TV programming is growing quickly online, and that shows are as important to protect as big-budget films. This is the first legal action from the group that has focused most heavily on TV content."

John Borland. MPAA Targets TV Download Sites. News.com. May 12, 2005.

See also:
John Borland. All Shows, All the Time. News.com. No date.

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:50 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Microsoft Acquires MessageCast

"MSN has bought MessageCast in a move that will give MSN Messenger more access to MessageCast's technologies and will help expand MSN alert services to new content channels, Microsoft announced this week.

"MessageCast develops broadcast messaging systems that work with real-time networks and RSS (really simple syndication) content feeds, and its technology notifies customers about information services, blog and podcast updates, and updates to MSN's alert service."

Paul Kallender. MSN Snaps Up MessageCast. PCWorld. May 13, 2005.

See also:
Matt Hicks. MSN Buys MessageCast for Real-Time Alerts. eWeek. May 11, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:45 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Gates: Cell Phones Will Beat Others for Music

"Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates sees mobile phones overtaking standalone MP3 players and views the raging popularity of Apple Computer's iPod player as unsustainable, he said in an interview published Thursday.

"'As good as Apple may be, I don't believe the success of the iPod is sustainable in the long run,' he said in an interview published in Germany's Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung."

Reuters. Gates Says Mobile Phones will Overtake iPods. News.com. May 12, 2005.

See also:
Ina Fried. Gates Sees Big Dollars in Little Devices. News.com. May 10, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:33 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

May 13, 2005

FirstGov.gov Provides RSS Library

A U.S. Government RSS Library is now available providing a central location to feeds on agriculture, consumer, cyber security, data and statistics, education, federal personnel, health, international relations, military affairs, forests, and science.

FirstGov.gov. U.S. Government RSS Library.

Attribution: SNTReport.com first discovered news of the U.S. Government RSS Library through a posting in beSpacific, edited by Sabrina I. Pacifici.

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:50 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Godcasts: Hottest Trend in Podcasting

"Weekly church sermons that can be downloaded from the Internet and played on portable audio players have become the Podcasts most in demand, according to analysis of search results at Lycos.com.

"'During the past month, searches for Godcasts have risen over 355%,' said Dean Tsouvalas, writer of the Lycos 50 report. 'There are no specific 'Pod preachers' being queried, but it's only a matter of time before the 'Billy Graham' of Podcasts emerges,' he wrote in an e-mail.

Frank Barnako. Podcasters Getting Religion. MarketWatch. May 12, 2005.

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:29 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

May 12, 2005

Overview of Podcasting

"What do the pope and Paris Hilton have in common? They're both podcasters - and you can be one too.

"Ranging from the sublime to the ridiculous, podcasts are essentially do-it-yourself recorded radio programs posted online. Anyone can download them free, and, using special software, listeners can subscribe to favorite shows and even have them automatically downloaded to a portable digital music player.

"Despite what the name suggests, podcasts can be played not just on iPods but on any device that has an MP3 player program, including PC's and laptops."

John R. Quain. Now, Audio Blogs for Those Who Aspire to Be D.J.'s. The New York Times. May 12, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:50 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Making RSS Really Simple

"I know what Shakespeare said about a rose by any other name, but accuracy is my profession's watchword. In that spirit, I propose changing the name of a technology that we Web news types use to persuade people to visit our sites.

"The technology is called RSS, which stands for 'Really Simple Syndication.' It's like installing a wire service on your computer -- or cell phone or handheld device. RSS lets you choose the "feeds" that you want to receive and posts updates as they happen. You install 'readers' so you can, well, read them. It's a great way to stay current not just on the news, but any Web site that runs a feed."

Robert MacMillan. Feed Simple. WashingtonPost.com. May 11, 2005.

See also:
Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols. Refining Paperless News. WashingtonPost.com. March 14, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:44 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

BBC Relaxes Rules for RSS

"The BBC has opened up its content more so that people can use news stories and headlines on their own sites via RSS.

"Revised licence terms mean other sites can integrate RSS feeds from the BBC without offline contract negotiations, as was previously the case."

BBC News. BBC Eases Rules on News Feed Use. May 11, 2005.

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:40 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

May 11, 2005

Microsoft Releases Windows Mobile 5.0

"Microsoft launched its next generation Windows Mobile platform as it attempts to elevate its standing in the mobile space and tread into lucrative niche markets dominated by RIM's Blackberry and Apple's iPod.

"The platform, developed under the code name 'Magneto,' is the successor to Windows Mobile 2003 and offers more stability and reliability, as well as rich access to office applications and multimedia data from Windows-based handhelds, Gates said."

Paula Rooney. Microsoft Launches Windows Mobile 5.0. CRN. May 10, 2005.

See also:
Ina Fried. Gates Sees Big Dollars in Little Devices. News.com. May 10, 2005.

Shelley Solheim. Gates: Windows Mobile 5.0 Will Make Your Phone Smarter. eWeek. May 10, 2005.

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:50 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Yahoo to Launch Online Music Service

"Yahoo Inc. on Tuesday said it was launching a new online music subscription service, aggressively competing against providers such as RealNetworks Inc.'s Rhapsody and Napster Inc. with lower pricing.

"Yahoo said it was offering the service with an introductory price of $4.99 per month for an annual subscription, or $6.99 on a monthly basis. The service, available May 11, lets fans play tunes from a catalog of more than one million songs, transfer tracks to portable devices and share music with friends through Yahoo! Messenger."

Sue Zeidler. Yahoo Launches Music Subscription Service. Reuters. May 10, 2005.

See also:
Lisa DiCarlo. Yahoo! Takes On iTunes. Forbes.com. May 10, 2005.

Associated Press. Yahoo Readies Cheap Music Service. Wired News. May 10, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:47 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Digital Media Holds Promise for Stakeholders

"Still using your cell phone just to make phone calls? How passé.

"If the seers are correct, within a year your cell phone will be capable of live television, music downloads and playback, videogames, storing movie clips and viewing everything from photo albums to digital home movies. In short, more than you may have ever thought possible.

"Of course, there are high hurdles to clear before all this great stuff happens--complex rights agreements, conflicting technology standards and the sometimes fractious relationship between carriers and content providers--but everyone involved has a stake in making it work.

"How big a stake? It's almost too big to put a number on."

Lisa DiCarlo. The Only Exciting Thing In Tech?. Forbes.com. May 9, 2005.

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Panel Discusses Future of Digital Entertainment

"The Internet and digital technology are changing entertainment at lightning speed. The coming years will scramble concepts of music-making, movies, TV networks and advertising. Last week, USA TODAY's Kevin Maney assembled a panel of some of the industry's most influential players to talk about what's ahead."

Kevin Maney. What's Ahead for Net, Digital Entertainment. USA Today. May 11, 2005.

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:30 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

May 10, 2005

Broadband Delivered Services Outpaces Broadband Adoption

"Consumer spending on broadband-delivered online services -- from streaming music and video to voice over Internet protocol phone calling -- more than doubled last year, according to a new report that bears promising news for telecommunications carriers as well as e-commerce companies and their content-provider partners.

"Research firm Point Topic said that at the start of 2004, the annual rate of consumer spending on what it calls broadband value-added services, or BVAS, was running at an annual rate of US$3.3 billion. By year's end, that figure had leapt to $6.9 billion worldwide.

"In fact, Point Topic said the data bears especially good news, since the growth of revenues and users of value-added services outpaced even the rapid expansion of broadband adoption itself."

Keith Regan. Report: Revenue from Broadband-Delivered Services Doubles. E-Commerce Times. May 9, 2005.

See also:
John Walko. Consumer Broadband Revenues Seen Doubling In One Year. InformationWeek. May 6, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:54 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

UCLA Libraries to Phase Out Print Subscriptions

"University of California libraries feeling the heat of the budget crisis will cut collections in an effort not to burn holes in their pockets. No information will be lost to UC students though, as long as they have access to the Internet.

"'The library is carrying out the first cancellation project as part of a multi-year plan to eliminate subscriptions to print when we license access to the electronic equivalent, said Cynthia Shelton, associate university librarian for collection management and scholarly communication, in a statement on the UCLA Library Web site."

Josh Blitstein. Libraries Cut Many Print Publications. Daily Bruin. May 6, 2005.

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:06 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

May 09, 2005

Copyright Issues Halt Podcast

"A local radio pro has found out that distributing his program like an amateur isn't as simple as it sounds.

"Chicago's Steve Dahl thought he could be at the forefront of the so-called podcasting trend, which was virtually unknown a year ago.

"Last month he began making his WCKG-FM 105.9 afternoon show available online as a digital audio file, so those with iPods and other portable media devices can download them and listen at leisure around the world. He used the same new technology that enables computer users to make and distribute homemade programs.

"But this re-purposing of Dahl's show has come to an abrupt halt because of copyright and royalty issues."

Phil Rosenthal. Dahl's Podcasts Halt Amid Stream of Legal Issues. Chicago Tribune. May 6, 2005.

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:48 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

May 07, 2005

Podcasting Changes Broadcasting Model

"Just the other week, a San Francisco radio station — KYCY AM, owned by Infinity Broadcasting — announced that it was going to become "the world's first-ever podcasting radio station." It would broadcast (and make available online) listener-created content.

"It's an interesting idea, although one that will likely fail. You don't hear of a lot of people tuning in to late-night public access TV for a reason. And radio stations cost a lot to upkeep compared to Web sites, so it's unlikely KYCY will make enough money to keep the station going.

"But that's fine. First efforts often fail, but smart people will learn from the arrows in the pioneers' backs."

Andrew Kantor. Podcasting a Noteworthy Alternative to Plain Ol' Radio. USA Today. May 6, 2005.

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:15 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

May 06, 2005

Yahoo Preparing Music Search Engine

"Web giant Yahoo is developing a search engine for finding downloadable songs and music data from across the Internet, CNET News.com has learned.

"The Sunnyvale, Calif.-based company plans to introduce the music search engine within the next couple of months, according to a source familiar with the service.

"The specialty engine will let people search on an artist's name, for example, and retrieve all the available songs from other music services, as well as album reviews and band information from Yahoo Music."

Stefanie Olsen. Yahoo Developing an Audio Search Engine. News.com. May 5, 2005.

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:53 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

DRM Costs Effect Mobile Music Services

"A tussle over antipiracy technology is looming over the young mobile phone content business, with big phone companies claiming that new music and video services could be derailed as a result.

"At issue is a set of technologies aimed at protecting music and other content from being indiscriminately copied after being sold through mobile phone networks, a critical component of the new content services if record labels and movie studios are to sign on."

John Borland. Anticopying Fight Mars Mobile Music. News.com. May 5, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:10 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

May 05, 2005

Web Changes Rules for Disseminating Information

"It seems there are no secrets any more... even when you try to keep them.

"NPR's Vicky O'Hara reported on a Defense Department document, which exonerated U.S. military personnel. The document was highly edited , with about 20 percent of the original information removed. Over the past weekend, NPR placed the document on its Web site.

"But some NPR listeners and cyber-savvy bloggers soon discovered if they downloaded the document from npr.org and translated it into another format, the edited portions could be restored.

"NPR removed the document from its Web site. But the information, available from many media sources, had already been disseminated around the Internet."

Jeffrey A. Dvorkin. When Those Pesky Blogs Undermine NPR News. National Public Radio. May 3, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:18 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Newspapers Launch Podcasts

"Recently, I noted our modest initial podcasting effort. We're in good company: More and more newspapers and newspaper-run sites are jumping on the bandwagon all the time."

Brian Chin. Papers That Podcast. SeattlePI.com. May 4, 2005.

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:01 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

May 04, 2005

Blog Discusses iTunes Affiliate vs. AdSense

"It’s been a little over 6 months since we started up this iTunes Super Filter site, and it’s been more successful than I could have ever hoped! I have always struggled to maintain a blog regularly just like everyone else out there, so thanks so much for reading what we write.

"We signed up for Apple’s iTunes Affiliate Program early on in the Fall of 2004. I thought, “What would happen if all we did was post music recommendations and point to the iTunes Music Store?” It’s been half a year now, and we have gathered enough data from this project to report some interesting results. Today I would like to share some statistics from our experience with the Affiliate Program."

Asian Mack. AsianMack Half-Year Review. No date.

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Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 12:31 PM | Send to a friend!

Shawn Fanning's Online Brokerage

"If forging a truce between the record labels and peer-to-peer services is dark, then Shawn Fanning -- the creator of the original Napster file-sharing program -- is guilty as charged.

"His aim with Snocap is not to sell tunes directly to consumers but to create a central global clearinghouse for digital music -- a back-end system equipped with technology to monitor, authorize, and monetize the swapping of copyrighted tracks."

John Heilemann. Shawn Fanning's New Tune. Business 2.0. April 27, 2005.

Related:
Snocap. About Snocap.

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Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 12:28 PM | Send to a friend!

AOL Adds Multimedia to AIM

"America Online has overhauled its instant messaging application to combine voice and text conversations with games and file- and photo-sharing.

Last week, the Internet company began testing an early-stage IM application, called Triton, which eventually will be the foundation of AOL Instant Messenger, or AIM. Among its innovations, Triton features a unified chat box with 'tabs' for each new conversation and easy access to address book information.

Stefanie Olsen. AOL Tests Triton IM Software. News.com. May 3, 2004.

See also:
Juan Carlos Perez. AOL Gives AIM an Extreme Makeover. PCWorld. April 29, 2005.

David Worthington and Nate Mook. AOL Testing Next Generation AIM Client. BetaNews. April 26, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:50 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Web Searches via Mobile Phones

"A few months ago, a group of friends in Austin, Tex., were dining out when the talk turned to the N.C.A.A. basketball tournament. Someone asked, When does the first round start? No one knew.

"So Mohit Goyal, a business analyst with a software company, opened his phone and typed in a few keywords. Mr. Goyal found the answer in seconds, and the group made plans to get together for the first-round game. 'I love the fact that no matter where I am, I can get this information,' he said.

"Mr. Goyal is an early adopter of technology, and his experience is most likely to sound too good to be true to most cellular users."

Lisa Guernsey. The Cellphone's Potential as a Search Tool Gets Tapped. The New York Times. May 4, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:40 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Study Notes Sharp P2P Increase

"Slyck.com has been tracking the population of the largest P2P networks since we opened in 2000. We gather the statistics from the network clients, and verify them through a third party.

"In March of 2005, Slyck compiled our collected data. Starting with January of 2003, the respective statistics for eDonkey2000, Direct Connect, FastTrack, Gnutella and Overnet were averaged per month. Unfortunately there is no accurate way to gauge BitTorrent’s population (other than bandwidth consumption), therefore it is excluded. We then released our 'Stats Expanded' section, which graphically depicted the growth or decline of these five networks."

Thomas Mennecke. Interest in File-Sharing at All Time High. Slyck. April 27, 2005.

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May 03, 2005

ABC to Offer News on PSP

"In a one-two punch for PSP owners, ABC News and AtomFilms have both said they will offer free downloadable video content for Sony's new handheld.

"ABC News will soon offer video snippets on its Web site that can be downloaded and viewed on demand, similar to podcasted content popular with bloggers and owners of MP3 players. There is no word yet on exactly when ABC News will make its content available."

GameSpot Staff. ABC News, AtomFilms Offer PSP Video. News.com. May 2, 2005.

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Disneyland to Podcast 50th Anniversary Celebration

"Could podcasts one day replace broadcasts?

"The Walt Disney Co. will give the new techno-trend a boost today when it starts podcasting festivities that will lead up to Disneyland's 50th anniversary celebration, which kicks off Thursday.

"'This all goes back to Walt's legacy,' said Duncan Wardle, a spokesman for Burbank-based Disney. 'Walt is the first person to put sound on animated film. And we are continuing Walt's legacy by pushing the boundaries of innovation.'"

Evan Pondel. Disney Courts the Pod People. L.A. Daily News. May 3, 2005

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Yahoo 360 to Broaden Capabilities

"Yahoo plans to add the capability to import content, such as photos and music, from non-Yahoo applications to its new Yahoo 360 social networking and blogging service, according to an executive of the company.

"'Some of the things that people very much want to do is to share content from other sources outside of Yahoo,' says Paul Brody, director of community products at Yahoo.

"To expand that capability, Yahoo 360 initially will allow users to include RSS feeds from other sources, according to Brody, who says Yahoo wants its Yahoo 360 service to be an 'open' product."

John Ribeiro. Yahoo Blogging Service Boosts Content. PCWorld. May 2, 2005.

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May 02, 2005

Red Square Launches Podcast Development Tool

"Australian Internet agency, Red Square, has the released the Podifier – claimed to be the first, all-in-one tool designed to simplify the publishing side of podcasts. The Windows-based tool is free and available for download at the website, http://www.podifier.com.

"Podifier is a simple-to-use application that automates – in one application – the creation of an RSS feed, the association of one or more MP3 files, and includes the FTP application to upload them to a server."

David Hague. Get Podified. Digital Producer. April 30, 2005.

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Six Apart Goes Mobile With Nokia

"Six Apart, the leader in weblogging software and services, and Nokia today announced that the users of Six Apart's LiveJournal online community can easily post text to their diaries using Nokia Lifeblog, an application solution that effortlessly keeps an organized multimedia diary of items collected with your mobile phone.

"LiveJournal users with paid accounts can also enhance their diaries by uploading photos with text to their LiveJournal entries."

Mobiledia. Six Apart LiveJournal Users Can Post With Nokia Lifeblog. April 26, 2005.

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Music Expands IR Research

"Sun Microsystems has unveiled a technology that will recommend songs to users based on an analysis of the music that they already enjoy.

"The technology analyses features such as rhythm and beat strength to categorise the music. It then searches for files with similar attributes."

Tom Sanders. Sun Unveils All-knowing Music Library. vnunet.com. April 29, 2005.

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Study: TV Phones Common By 2010

"About 125 million consumers will be watching television on their mobile phone in five years from now, a new survey found on Thursday.

"Mobile television is not yet commercially available, but trials are carried out around the world, and consumers are expected to be able to pick up the first TV phones by the end of the year. Handset makers will sell 130,000 TV phones this year, rising to 83.5 million by 2010, research group Informa said."

Reuters. Survey: TV for Mobile Phones Set to Reach Masses. April 28, 2005.

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April 30, 2005

Podcasting v. Online Radio

"The sun is setting, and Mark Cuebas and Walter Anaruk are chilling in the garage, sipping Negro Modelos and talking Bucs football.

"Okay, fine, but the fact remains, they've got two question marks at quarterback," Anaruk says. 'Griese is not a question mark!' Cuebas retorts.

"This goes on for nearly 20 minutes. Then the brothers-in-law edit a recording of their debate down to 16. Within hours, the whole thing is up on Anaruk's Web site, where others can download it onto digital music players.

"It's called 'podcasting,' and it may be the first big cultural breakthrough of the iPod era."

Jay Cridlin. Podcasting: The Radio-free Radio Experience. St. Petersburg Times. April 28, 2005.

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April 29, 2005

Survey: Smart Phone Users Aware of Viruses

"Most people with smart phones are aware of emerging security threats to the devices, but many of them still keep sensitive data on them, according to a new study.

"In a survey of 300 American adults published Thursday, security company Symantec found that 73 percent of smart phones users knew about viruses and other attacks that target the devices, which marry PC-like features such as e-mail and Internet access to a mobile handset.

"In addition, more than 70 percent of respondents expressed some concern over the possibility of hackers stealing or corrupting confidential information stored on their smart phones."

Matt Hines. Smart Phone Owners are Savvy About Viruses. News.com. April 28, 2005.

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April 28, 2005

Bush Signs Family Entertainment Act into Law

"File-swappers who distribute a single copy of a prerelease movie on the Internet can be imprisoned for up to three years, according to a bill that President Bush signed into law on Wednesday.

"The Family Entertainment and Copyright Act, approved by the House of Representatives last Tuesday, represents the entertainment industry's latest attempt to thwart rampant piracy on file-swapping networks. "

Declan McCullagh. Bush Signs Law Targeting P2P Pirates. News.com. April 27, 2005.

Commentary by K. Matthew Dames, Executive Editor, SNTReport.com:

I had an interesting conversation yesterday about this legislation with Siva Vaidhyanathan, a professor, author, cultural historian and copyright chronicler whose most recent book is The Anarchist in the Library. Siva was in Washington, D.C. yesterday to speak to members of the Law Librarians' Society of Washington, D.C. The speech, "How Fair and Useful Is Fair Use?," took place in the East Conference Room at the U.S. Supreme Court, mere steps from the courtroom where oral arguments (.pdf) in the MGM v. Grokster peer-to-peer case occurred last month.

First, I'll provide some background for our conversation. I noted last week that Orrin Hatch (R-UT), the ranking Republican on the Senate's Judiciary Committee, introduced The Family Entertainment Act in the Senate. (The Judiciary Committee considers and passes intellectual property legislation.) The law's primary beneficiary is a Utah company named ClearPlay, which makes technology that censors sex, violence, and other "objectionable" material from DVDs.

What I omitted from that note was my opinion on this issue, which I'll state now: The Family Entertainment Act sanctions a specific business model (home-based production of derivative works), and validates the existence of a corporate constituent whose home state, not coincidentally, is the same as one of the legislation's primary sponsors. Further, I see the Act as another in a series of events where public policy -- expressed through the legislative process in this case -- benefits specific corporate interests rather than the public at large. What I find interesting is that this legislation benefits a technology and the company that has developed the technology. Usually, most intellectual property legislation benefits entertainment companies that develop content.

Interestingly, Siva has a different take on this topic, one that suggests the Act does, in fact, serve the public's interest to the distinct detriment of industrial interests.

His thought is that the Act's passage is a Congressional sanction that gives consumers some level of control over their private uses of technology. To detail further, Siva thinks that by legally sanctioning ClearPlay's technology, families now have some autonomy in how they use their personal media spaces. Here is why this is important: by returning to consumers some control over their own personal media spaces, he says, the Act also diminishes the influence that the entertainment/content industry has over how digital media is used inside the home.

By diminishing this influence, Siva concludes, the entertainment industry's ability to set a copyright agenda for non-infringing uses that are not specifically accounted for in the Copyright Act also diminishes, however slightly.

I remain wary about this legislation, since I am always concerned about the ways in which the lines between private, corporate interests and public policy interests are continuing to blur. But Siva's take is quite interesting.

See also:
Associated Press. Bush Signs DVD 'Sanitizing' Bill. CBSNews.com. April 27, 2005.

National Public Radio. Decency Software Pits Hollywood Against Capitol Hill. Morning Edition. April 27, 2005.

Declan McCullagh. Prison Terms on Tap for 'Prerelease' Pirates. News.com. April 19, 2005.

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Infinity Broadcasting Launches Podcast Station

"Podcasting will soon break out of the 'pod' and onto the public airwaves.

"The world's first all-podcast radio station will be launched on May 16 by Infinity Broadcasting, the radio division of Viacom.

"Infinity, one of the country's largest radio operators with more than 183 stations around the country, will invite do-it-yourselfers to upload digital audio files for broadcast consideration by way of the KYOURadio.com website."

Xeni Jardin. Podcasting Killed the Radio Star. Wired News. April 27, 2005.

See also:
Patrick Norton. All Podcast Format For Infinity Radio Station In San Francisco. PCMag.com. April 27, 2005.

Associated Press. Infinity Tries All-Podcasting Radio Format. ABC News. April 27, 2005.

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:31 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Nokia Launches Multimedia Phone

"Nokia on Wednesday announced a trio of new phones, including one that can store up to 3,000 songs.

"The N91 has an integrated 4GB hard disk and supports digital music formats including MP3, M4A, AAC and WMA, Nokia said.

"Additionally, the handset comes with a stereo headset with remote control. The N91, expected to ship by the end of the year, will also feature a 2-megapixel camera, e-mail support, a Web-browser and video-sharing capabilities, the device maker said."

Dinesh C. Sharma. Nokia to Launch Phone that Stores 3,000 Songs. News.com. April 27, 2005.

See also:
Lucas van Grinsven. Nokia Takes Aim at IPod with Premium Line of Phones. Reuters. April 27, 2005.

Sascha Segan. Nokia's N91 Targets iPod. PCMag.com. April 27, 2005.

BBC News. Nokia Offers New Range of Phones. April 27,2005.

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April 27, 2005

Open Media Network Shares Video, Audio

"Mike Homer sees the future of public broadcasting, and it's on the Internet.

"Or rather, it is the Internet.

"Homer and erstwhile Netscape wunderkind Marc Andreessen are using file-sharing technology to distribute audio and video files for free online. Unlike Kazaa and other popular 'peer-to-peer' programs, however, Open Media Network allows only authorized sharing and weeds out bootlegged goods."

Jon Healey. Network Shares Audio and Video, Screens Out Bootlegs. LATimes.com. April 26, 2005.

See also:
Benny Evangelista. Startup to Offer Digital TV, Radio Shows Online for Free. San Francisco Chronicle. April 26, 2005.

John Borland. Netscape Pioneers Launch Free Content Network. News.com. April 25, 2005.

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RSS Enhances Search Engine Marketing

"This could be the year RSS comes of age. While it's been around for a number of years since original development by Netscape, RSS is not yet widely adopted.

"Thousands of commercial web sites and blogs publish content summaries in an RSS feed, but there are billions of web pages on the Internet.

"As RSS gains wider acceptance, it will impact the way companies communicate online and the way users get information. RSS not only provides benefits for publishers and users, it also enhances Search Engine Marketing programs."

Paul J. Bruemmer. RSS: Cool Tool for Search Engine Marketing. Pandia. April 2005.

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Municipal v. Private Wi-Fi

"What if a wireless computer user could access high speed Internet anywhere -- for free? It would be just like turning on a radio and receiving a signal. That's what's happening in some areas, and others are exploring it across the nation."

National Public Radio. The Internet as a Public Utility. Talk of the Nation. April 25, 2005.

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April 26, 2005

Gates Previews Longhorn Details

"Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates on Monday gave early peeks at his company's next-generation Windows operating system that he said will usher in a new era of laptops no thicker than 10 sheets of paper with day-long battery life and costing less than $1,000.

"His glimpse of the future was part of the Redmond, Wash. company's long-lasting drumbeat for the rollout of Longhorn, an operating system that Gates believes will move the computing world forward much in the way of Windows 95, which helped open up the Internet to the masses."

John Boudreau. Microsoft's Bill Gates Provides Peek at Longhorn. San Jose Mercury News. April 25, 2005.

See also:
Reed Stevenson. Microsoft Previews Next Windows, Aims to Bridge Gap. Reuters. April 25, 2005.

Susan Kuchinskas. Gates: Longhorn Plus 64-Bit Equals Power. InternetNews.com. April 25, 2005.

Elizabeth M. Gillespie. Microsoft Gives Details on Windows Release. BusinessWeek Online. April 25, 2005.

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DRM Restrictions Frustrate Music Lovers

"UK music lovers are getting frustrated with restrictions placed on digital music tracks once they buy them from online stores, says PC Pro magazine.

"The magazine reported that people are also being turned off net music stores because of pricing and disappointing sound quality compared to CDs."

BBC News. Online Music Lovers 'Frustrated'. April 25, 2005.

See also:
Alun Williams. PC Pro Online Music Exposé: UK Public Pays Too Much for Too Little. PC Pro. April 22, 2005.

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RealNetworks to Unveil Portable Music Service

"Digital media company RealNetworks Inc. plans to unveil on Tuesday a new portable music service for digital music players as part of its subscription service portfolio, a source familiar with the plans said on Monday.

"The Seattle-based company, which operates the Rhapsody subscription music service, will now let listeners rent music on a monthly basis that can be stored on a range of supported digital music players."

Kenneth Li. RealNetworks to Launch Music on the Go - Source. Reuters. April 25, 2005.

See also:
John Borland. RealNetworks Readies New Music Service. ZDNet. April 25, 2005.

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April 25, 2005

Video Search Stirs Rivalry

"As millions of broadband subscribers who missed a wardrobe-malfunction moment on TV can attest, the internet can be a convenient resource for finding much-talked-about events on video.

"Whether it's Janet Jackson's Super Bowl breast exposure or The Daily Show host Jon Stewart's explosive appearance on a political talk show, video clips of high-profile moments have sent millions of net users scrambling to search engines for footage.

"But until recently, internet users who don't patronize peer-to-peer sites had few options for tracking down video content outside of entering a query in a standard search box.

Joanna Glasner. Search Battle Heads to Video. Wired News. April 23, 2005.

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RSS Branches Out for New Networks

"The software and services used to read XML-based news feeds are continuing to branch out as the syndication method gains popularity on the Web.

"The enterprise is becoming a target for NewsGator Technologies Inc. as it preps a server-based version of its RSS aggregation service. Meanwhile, upstarts Rojo Networks Inc. and Onfolio Inc. this week expanded the availability of their respective RSS readers, each of which puts a new twist on finding and organizing feeds."

Matt Hicks. RSS Reaches Out for Enterprise, Social Networks. eWeek. April 22, 2005.

See also:
Anne Chen. RSS Makes Enterprise Headlines. eWeek. Sep. 20, 2004.

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April 23, 2005

Verizon, Movielink Launch Movie Download Service

"Verizon Communications on Thursday launched a movie download service for broadband customers through a partnership with Movielink.

"The rentals are available to customers of Verizon Online's digital subscriber line and Fios Internet service, Verizon said. These customers can choose from a selection of titles on Movielink's video-on-demand service."

Dinesh C. Sharma. Verizon Calls 'Action' on Movie Downloads. News.com. April 21, 2005.

See also:
Ben Charny and Jim Hu. Verizon's Fiber Race is On. News.com. July 19, 2004.

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Yahoo, Target Partner for Online Photo Service

"Yahoo on Thursday announced a new digital photo service in partnership with retail chain Target.

"The service, called Target Yahoo Photos, is designed to let people store, share and print their digital and camera-phone photos."

Dinesh C. Sharma. Yahoo, Target Team Up for Digital Photo Service. News.com. April 21, 2005.

See also:
Laurie Sullivan. Target And Yahoo Team Up To Offer Photo Sharing And Printing. InformationWeek. April 21, 2005.

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iTunes Mobile to Launch Soon

"Motorola CEO Ed Zander hailed a solid quarter for the phone maker and promised that the long-awaited, oft-delayed iTunes phone will debut soon.

"In a conference call to discuss the company's first-quarter results on Wednesday, Zander said the company has had 'another bang-up quarter' and will be looking to new technologies to drive growth."

Jo Best. Motorola CEO: iTunes Phone Coming Soon. News.com. April 21, 2005.

See also:
Paul Taylor. iTunes Phone in Motorola Lineup. MSNBC News. April 21, 2005.

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April 22, 2005

Prerequisite for Business Success: Blogs

"Look past the yakkers, hobbyists, and political mobs. Your customers and rivals are figuring blogs out. Our advice: Catch up...or catch you later.

"Go ahead and bellyache about blogs. But you cannot afford to close your eyes to them, because they're simply the most explosive outbreak in the information world since the Internet itself. And they're going to shake up just about every business -- including yours."

Starting today, Business Week launches its own blog at Blogspotting.net.

Stephen Baker and Heather Green. Blogs Will Change Your Business. BusinessWeek Online. May 2, 2005.

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Utah's Historic Newspapers Available Online

"Thanks to new technology, digital pictures are making old newspapers readable from the comfort of your home computer.

"On Tuesday, the University of Utah's Digital Technology Division began loading onto the Internet digitized copies of 19th century editions of The Salt Lake Tribune.

"Starting today, computer users can begin reading pages of The Tribune from the 1870s. Next month, plan on pursuing The Tribune's 1880s news accounts and by early July, read and browse news stories from the 1890s."

Shinika A. Sykes. Old News is Brand New at U. Library Project. Salt Lake Tribune. April 13, 2005.

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Closet Deadhead Addresses Podcasting

"Just when we grasped what blogging was all about, along came podcasting, which in some ways is even more disruptive and exciting than blogging.

"Being a podcaster myself, I've seen firsthand the business and legal chaos podcasts have created. As you'll see in this column, perhaps they might soon create some political chaos too."

Sam Whitmore. Podcasting: Making Waves. Forbes.com. April 21, 2005.

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April 21, 2005

Content on Demand: Full Text Newsfeeds

"A new company officially joined the world of content providers when it chose to launch its premium newsfeed service at the recent Buying and Selling eContent conference.

"Newstex, founded in late 2004 by president Larry Schwartz and CEO Steve Ellis, has announced Content On Demand, which offers full-text newsfeeds to content redistributors and enterprise customers.

"Content sources include branded newswires, newspapers, magazines, financial and business sources, official government feeds, and Weblogs."

Paula J. Hane. Newstex Launches Content On Demand. Information Today. April 18, 2005.

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Podscope Launches Search Beta for Podcasts

"Podscope, the new web engine that allows you to keyword search each and every word spoken in a podcast is now live in beta mode. We first reported that Podscope was coming about a week ago.

"At the moment Podscope is searching podcasts from a database of 1000 sites. The page to submit your url is now offline but look for it to return soon."

Gary Price. Podscope Beta Now Available, Keyword Search Podcasts. SearchEngineWatch. April 19, 2005.

See also:
Podcasting News. Podscope Beta Searches Podcast Audio Content. April 18, 2005.

Podscope Blog. Podscope Beta. April 17, 2005.

Gary Price. Podscope: New Search Engine Will Allow You to Keyword Search Every Word Spoken in a Podcast. SearchEngineWatch. April 11, 2005.

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April 19, 2005

Forbes Is Now Podcasting

"Forbes On Radio is a new weekly three-hour program that brings Forbes editors, outside experts and opinion leaders to bear on an enormous range of topical issues to take you behind today's headlines and ahead of tomorrow's."

Forbes.com Staff. Forbes On Radio Podcast. Forbes.com. April 18, 2005.

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April 16, 2005

Comcast Customer Sues Over Privacy Breach

"Comcast Corp., the top U.S. cable television network operator, is being sued by a Seattle-area woman for disclosing her name and contact information, court records showed on Thursday.

"In a lawsuit filed in King County, Washington, Dawnell Leadbetter said that she was contacted by a debt collection agency in January and told to pay a $4,500 for downloading copyright-protected music or face a lawsuit for hundreds of thousands of dollars."

Reuters. Comcast Customer Sues Over Disclosure. MSNBC News. April 14, 2005.

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BBC Adds 20 Podcasts to Lineup

"The BBC is making 20 more radio shows available for listeners to download onto their digital music players.

"People will be able to download shows, such as technology programme Go Digital and some Radio 1 audio, in a trial."

BBC News. BBC Radio Podcasts 20 More Shows. April 15, 2005.

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Motorola to Test iRadio for Cell Phones

"Motorola Inc. is betting consumers will pay to have it both ways, gaining control over the content on their car radios and the flexibility of taking their music with them on their cell phones when they turn off their engines.

"Motorola, the No. 2 maker of mobile telephones, is set to unveil a service called iRadio that will let users download preselected audio content from a range of providers on their home computers, dump it on their cell phones and listen to it on their car stereos."

Deborah Cohen. Motorola Set to Unveil iRadio for Cell Phones. Reuters. April 15, 2005.

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April 15, 2005

Grouper Twists P2P Debate

"Jennifer Urban, a law professor at USC, wanted to watch home movies of her 7-month-old nephew Peter in England, but nothing seemed to work. The videotapes and DVDs were in the wrong format, and the digital movie files were too big to e-mail. Then Urban hit on a software program called Grouper. And in addition to movies of her nephew, Grouper offers Urban, who specializes in copyright law, insight into how technology is testing the boundaries of copyright in a digital age.

"Grouper allows Urban to copy movies and pictures of young Peter directly from her brother and sister-in-law's computer without worrying about formats or oversized e-mail attachments. Unlike those global networks with millions of users, though, Grouper also lets Urban pick and choose with whom she shares online — and sets a strict limit of 30 people per group.

"What makes Grouper troubling to some entertainment industry executives are the other things people can do with it."

Jon Healey. Testing Copyright Limits. LATimes.com. April 12, 2005.

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Analysis of Issues in Supreme Court P2P Case

Although some people may not like it, copyright laws and regulations exist. Those who engage in mass copying and distribution of copyrighted works typically must pay licensing fees, or at least enter into an agreement with the owner of the content. That makes the free, unauthorized trading of massive numbers of music or video files over peer-to-peer networks illegal.

So far, the situation is clear.

What is not clear is the circumstances under which a technology company should be held liable if its product can be used to violate copyright restrictions. What standard should be used to judge this liability? How can one craft that standard so that the threat of liability is not so broad that it discourages beneficial technological innovation?

Anush Yegyazarian. Supreme Court Standards for Peer-to-Peer and Beyond. PC World. April 12, 2005.

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Google Maps Reveal Surprises

"For many years, Mike Leeds has been road-tripping from his home in Portland, Oregon, to Nevada's Black Rock Desert for the Burning Man arts festival.

"So last week, when Google announced its new Maps service, which includes the ability to view and navigate with high-resolution satellite images, Leeds couldn't resist tracing his 500-mile route, one screen at a time, to see what he drives by on his annual round trip. He never expected that the last of his '45 miles to the click' route images would show, in great detail, the early setup of Burning Man."

Daniel Terdiman. Surprises Lurk in Satellite Snaps. Wired News. April 14, 2005.

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April 14, 2005

MusicNet Sold to Private Equity Firm

"MusicNet, a joint venture created by the music industry to provide a legal alternative to the illegal sharing of music files, has been sold to Baker Capital, a private investment firm in New York.

"The deal ends months of jockeying for control of the company's fate by its shareholders: Bertelsmann, EMI Group, Time Warner and RealNetworks.

"RealNetworks, an Internet media company, had tried to buy MusicNet, but that transaction was blocked by Time Warner's America Online unit, two people involved in the transaction said."

Saul Hansell. Private Investment Firm Buys MusicNet Venture. The New York Times. April 13, 2005.

See also:
John Borland. Labels, Tech Owners Sell MusicNet to VCs. News.com. April 12, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

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Politicians Reach Public Through Podcasts

"John McCain in 2000 and Howard Dean in 2004 broke new ground in using the internet to raise funds and organise their supporters.

"And in the 2004 presidential campaign, the internet became even more central to political campaigns.

"Now politicians and the political parties in the US are jumping on the latest internet bandwagon: Podcasts."

Kevin Anderson. US Politicians Embrace Podcasts. BBC News. April 13, 2005.

See also:
Republican National Committee. Podcasting.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

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April 13, 2005

P2P Ruling Will Set Technology Standards

"Although some people may not like it, copyright laws and regulations exist. Those who engage in mass copying and distribution of copyrighted works typically must pay licensing fees, or at least enter into an agreement with the owner of the content. That makes the free, unauthorized trading of massive numbers of music or video files over peer-to-peer networks illegal.

"So far, the situation is clear.

"What is not clear is the circumstances under which a technology company should be held liable if its product can be used to violate copyright restrictions."

Anush Yegyazarian. Supreme Court Standards for Peer-to-Peer and Beyond. PC World. April 12, 2005.

See also:
Grant Gross. Supreme Court Justices Question Peer-to-Peer Lawsuits. PC World. March 29, 2005.

U.S. Supreme Court. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Inc., et al. v. Grokster, Ltd, et al.. (.pdf) March 29, 2005.

Grant Gross. P-to-P Case May Have Far-Reaching Impact. PC World. March 25, 2005.

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Forrester Predicts Digital Audio Growth

"Satellite radio subscriptions are likely to climb to more than 20 million in the next five years, driven by early adopters of the technology with above-average incomes, according to a study released on Tuesday.

"After that, however, the industry will have to consider price reductions or other measures to sustain rapid growth, the study concluded."

Paul Bond. Digital Audio's Future Loud, Clear. Reuters. April 13, 2005.

See also:
Dinesh C. Sharma. Study: Digital Audio to Surge. ZDNet. April 12, 2005.

Forrester. Forrester Research Defines The Future Of Digital Audio — New Report Forecasts Growth Of Satellite Radio And Podcasting. (Press Release.) April 12, 2005.

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Stage Set for Digital Newspaper War

"As Yahoo Inc. editors plan updates this week to their popular online news service, a computer program at Google Inc. tirelessly scours the Web for items to display on the company's competing news site.

"Few endeavors highlight the differences between Yahoo and Google — two of the most popular destinations on the Internet — more than their approach to news.

"Although Yahoo News is the most visited news site by U.S. Web surfers, Google News is one of the fastest growing, setting the stage for the Digital Age equivalent of an old-fashioned newspaper war."

Chris Gaither. Web Giants Go With Different Angles in Competition for News Audience. LATimes.com. April 12, 2005.

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April 12, 2005

Video Games to Include Dynamic Ads

"In video game vernacular, which of these commands seems out of place: throw punch, slay dragon or view Sprite billboard?

"It's a trick question; they all belong.

"At least they do to Mitchell Davis, who says he believes that advertisements and product placements will soon become as integral to video games as story lines and action."

Matt Richtel. A New Reality in Video Games: Advertisements. The New York Times. April 11, 2005.

See also:
Reuters. Coming Soon: Ads in Video Games. CNN/Money. April 11, 2005.

David Becker. Play to Pay: Service Inserts Ads in Games. News.com. April 10, 2005.

Dinesh Sharma. Advertisers to Go Gaga Over Gaming. News.com. October 18, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

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Computers in Libraries' Presentations Available Online

"This page features links to World Wide Web sites, PowerPoint slideshows, and other electronic resources used in support of presentations at Computers in Libraries 2005. Links are provided at the discretion of presenters. Additional links will be provided as they become available."

Information Today. Computers in Libraries 2005: Presentation Links.

Attribution: SNTReport.com first discovered news of these presentation links through a posting in beSpacific, edited by Sabrina I. Pacifici.

Editor's note See also SNTReport.com's prior story on K. Matthew Dames' presentation at the conference.

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P2P Myths Over Impact on Music Industry

"Canada is in the midst of a contentious copyright reform with advocates for stronger copyright protection maintaining that the Internet has led to widespread infringement that has harmed the economic interests of Canadian artists. The Canadian Recording Industry Association (CRIA) has emerged as the leading proponent of copyright reform, claiming that peer–to–peer file sharing has led to billions in lost sales in Canada.

"This article examines CRIA’s claims by conducting an analysis of industry figures. It concludes that loss claims have been greatly exaggerated and challenges the contention that recent sales declines are primarily attributable to file–sharing activities."

Michael Geist. Piercing the P2P Myths: An Examination of the Canadian Experience. First Monday. April 2005.

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UK DJs Launch Podcast Shows

"DJs Paul Gambaccini and Tony Blackburn are backing a new website offering radio shows for digital audio players.

"Podshows will offer shows to download to iPods and other players for between 49p and 99p each.

"The BBC and Virgin Radio already offer shows via 'podcasting', but only using shows which have already been broadcast on radio."

BBC News. UK DJs Backing Podcasting Outfit. April 11, 2005.

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April 11, 2005

File Sharing Discussion at NYPL

"The tickets for the event Thursday sold out in five minutes on the Internet, and on the evening itself the lines stretched down the block. The reverent young fans might as well have been holding cellphones aloft as totems of their fealty.

"Then again, this was the New York Public Library, a place of very high ceilings and even higher cultural aspirations, so the rock concert vibe created some dissonance. Inside, things became clearer as two high priests of very different tribes came together to address the question of 'Who Owns Culture?' - a discussion of digital file-sharing sponsored by Wired magazine, part of a library series called 'Live From the NYPL.'

"Both Jeff Tweedy, the leader of the fervently followed rock band Wilco, and Lawrence Lessig, a Stanford University law professor who has opposed criminalizing file sharing, seemed to agree that just about anybody who owns a modem also owns - or at least has every right to download - culture products."

David Carr. Exploring the Right to Share, Mix and Burn. The New York Times. April 9, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

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Podcasts Reach New Frontiers

"As millions of pilgrims streamed into Rome this past week, Internet listeners accompanied a Dutch priest on an intimate audio tour to pay one last visit to Pope John Paul II before he was laid to rest.

"Father Roderick Vonhogen brought the Catholic Church's ancient rites to life through a cutting-edge format: the podcast, a radio-style show that is distributed over the Internet.

"Podcasts have caught on like wildfire since they first emerged nine months ago. Listeners can pick from roughly 10,000 shows on topics ranging from religion to wine to technology, and media companies and advertisers are taking note."

Andy Sullivan. Homespun 'Podcasts' Explore Universe of Topics. Reuters. April 9, 2005.

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April 09, 2005

Slate Profiles Brewster Kahle

"Search-engine wiz and dot-com multimillionaire Brewster Kahle founded the Internet Archive in 1996 with a dream as big as the bridge: He wanted to back up the Internet. There were only 50 million or so URLs back then, so the idea only seemed half-crazy. As the Web ballooned to more than 10 billion pages, the archive's main server farm -- hidden across town in a data center beneath San Francisco's other big bridge -- grew to hold a half-million gigabytes of compressed and indexed pages.

"Kahle is less the Internet's crazy aunt than its evangelical librarian. Like it or not, the Web is the world's library now, and Kahle doesn't trust the guys who shelve the books. They're obsessed with posting new pages, not preserving old ones. Every day, Kahle laments, mounds of data get purged from the Web: government documents, personal sites, corporate communications, message boards, news reports that weren't printed on paper. For most surfers, once a page disappears from Google's cache it no longer exists."

Paul Boutin. The Archivist. Slate. April 7, 2005.

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Congress Mulls Mandatory DRM

"US legislators are debating whether to force Apple's products to interoperate with Microsoft's.

"The Congress have been considering a plan that would outlaw music protected by proprietary digital rights management (DRM) technology, such as Apple's FairPlay, which stops iTunes downloads being played on Microsoft digital music players and vice versa.

"However, yesterday's Congressional subcommittee hearing on 'Digital Music Interoperability and Availability', which included debate on mandating interoperability for digital music, received a 'hands off' message from industry representatives."

Jo Best. Law to Make iTunes Compatible with Microsoft?. Silicon.com. April 7, 2005.

See also:
Silicon.com. Leader: Apple Work with Microsoft? Let the People Decide. April 7, 2005.

Erika Morphy. Congress Holds Hearings on Digital Music. CRM Daily. April 7, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

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Blogger's Malfunctions Frustrate Users

"What's up with Blogger, the institution that is eponymous with the media phenomenon it helped spawn?

"Lately, it seems like almost every time you tune into your favorite Blogger-hosted blog to catch up on the latest gossip, meme, political diatribe or cybersnark, you find that the site is frozen in time. Or, there are multiple posts with identical content. Since Blogger, which is owned and operated by that sleek geek machine, Google, is a lot like a public utility, when it goes down, so do the lights on a large swatch of the blogosphere.

"The result: a lot of irate netizens."

Adam L. Penenberg. Bloggers Pitch Fits Over Glitches. Wired News. April 7, 2005.

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April 07, 2005

Phling! Enhances Mobile Lifestyle

"There’s a new player in the mobile social software sphere: Phling! is a service for your cellphone that allows you to relay multimedia between your phone, your IM buddy list, and your home computer."

Barb Dybwad. Phling! takes P2P Approach to MoSoSo-ing. thesocialsoftwareweblog. April 4, 2005.

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Podcasting Skepticism

Barefoot is a 'writer, technologist and marketer who lives in Vancouver, Canada,' according to his site. He raises enough issues-compounded by comments to the post-that I wanted to think through my responses. It seemed a good idea to use my own blog for that process. So here goes…

"Barefoot begins by leaving no doubt about his skepticism: 'I'm skeptical about who's doing it, who's going to do it, and who's going to listen to it. In short, I don't think podcasting is going to get very far into the mainstream.' He lays out several arguments. Let's examine them one by one."

Shel Holtz. Is Podcasting For Real? WebProNews. April 5, 2005.

Editor's Note: Since the Pew Internet & American Life Project published its podcasting report, which claims that "more than 6 million adults" have listened to at least one podcast, there have been a number of articles and editorial comments that have challenged the Project's contention. Since the appearance of these comments, SNTReport.com has updated its original story about the Pew report. We will continue to update this story as it develops.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

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Hacking for PSP has Begun

"Sony Corp.'s new PlayStation Portable is turning into a great tool for Web browsing, comics reading and online chat -- and it also happens to play video games, movies and music, if you prefer that sort of thing.

"The $249 PSP handheld video game player went on sale in the United States on March 24, and it took very little time before techies added the kinds of functions to the PSP that Sony did not include -- and may never have intended."

Ben Berkowitz. Hackers add Web, Chat to PSP. Reuters. April 5, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

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Wikis Speed Information Flow

"There is a public Web site where people can find a Web log written by some prominent members of the government information technology community. Visitors can view a list of officials in the CIO Council's Communities of Practice and read ongoing revisions to a major government document, the data reference model. Members of the public also are contributing to the discussions.

"An emerging technology called 'wiki' makes this collaboration possible. Wiki technology creates what is essentially a public Web log, one which anyone with a Web browser can add to or modify."

Aliya Sternstein. Wiki Means Fast. FCW. April 4, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

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April 05, 2005

Pew Study: 6 Million Have Heard Podcasts

"According to new research from The Pew Internet and American Life Project, 29 percent of Americans over the age of 18 with iPods or other MP3 players have listened to podcasts. Pew had predicted the growth early this year after studying sales of portable MP3 players.

"Pew estimates over 22 million American adults own an MP3 or iPod player, and more than 6 million of these owners have listened to podcasts. The study surveyed 2,201 people, 208 of whom were MP3 or iPod owners. Pew did not survey anyone under age 18."

Sean Michael Kerner. Podcasting Grows In Popularity. ClickZNews. April 4, 2005.

See also:
Lee Rainie and Mary Madden. Podcasting. (.pdf) Pew Internet & American Life Project. April 2005.

Updates:
Robert MacMillan. Podcasting in the Dark. WashingtonPost.com. April 6, 2005.

Erika Morphy. Six Million Podcasters and Counting. NewsFactor Network. April 4, 2005. (Despite the survey results, Pew research director believes numbers of people actually using the Internet to broadcast and/or download pods is smaller than the 6 million figure.)

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

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A Deep Look at DRM

"There are many things in the world that you feel to be true, but you're not exactly sure why. So if you're a thinking person, you're left with this nagging suspicion that you should be better able to come up with a better explanation than 'But it's just wrong!'

"For many people, myself included, digital rights management (DRM) technologies fall into this category.

"Even if we have no intention of breaking copyright law by downloading music or movies willy-nilly, and even though many of us earn our livings through the production and sale of copyrighted material, we're still offended that the entertainment and media conglomerates of the world - the Content Cartel, as one commentator has labeled them - are pushing so hard to ensure that every song, every movie, every television show, is wrapped up tight in some form of DRM that controls access to the content and use of it."

Adam C. Engst. Why DRM Offends the Sensibilities. TidBITS. March 5, 2005.

Attribution: SNTReport.com first discovered news of this look at DRM through a posting in LibraryLaw Blog, edited by Mary Minow.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

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Russian Library Guilty of Copyright Infringement

"A Moscow court has found Maxim Moshkov, owner of the biggest and most popular Russian on-line library, lib.ru, guilty of breaching copyright law.

"It was the only lawsuit brought against Moshkov that has ended in success for the plaintiff."

MosNews. Russia’s Biggest Online Library Found Guilty of Breaching Copyright. MosNews.com. April 1, 2005.

See also:
CCRC Staff. Russian Courts Attack On-line Libraries. Computer Crime Research Cente. April 1, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

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April 04, 2005

College Students: Early Adopters of Legal Downloading

"College junior Kyle Taylor is downloading hundreds of songs by No Doubt, Bruce Springsteen and others onto the Compaq laptop in his cramped dormitory room.

"With a few more clicks of his mouse, Taylor is watching commercial-free 'Seinfeld' episodes on his computer. In just minutes, he then downloads the entire movie 'A League of Their Own.' The 20-year-old is not breaking any laws. Nor is he at risk of expensive lawsuits by the entertainment industry over copyright violations."

Ted Bridis. Students Using New Generation of Downloads. BusinessWeek Online. April 3, 2005.

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April 02, 2005

Smithsonian Enters Download Party

The Smithsonian Institution is entering the highly competitive world of music downloads by offering the Smithsonian Folkways collection of ethnic and traditional music in an online music store.

Smithsonian Global Sound, the new project, will be formally launched during the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in June. The enterprise is in the same vein as Microsoft's MSNmusic, Apple's iTunes Music Store and Sony's Connect.

Jacqueline Trescott. Smithsonian Folkways to Open MP3 Music Store. WashingtonPost.com. March 31, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

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Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 03:51 PM | Send to a friend!

Software Links iPod & PSP

"A small California software maker has developed a program designed to bring at least part of Apple Computer's iTunes experience to the new Sony PlayStation Portable.

"The software, the latest in Information Appliance Associates' series of PocketMac tools to link handheld devices with PCs and Apple computers, allows consumers to sync music from iTunes playlists directly onto the PSP's memory cards. The software also syncs the devices with Apple's iPhoto and address book and contacts databases."

John Borland. iTunes meets Sony's PSP. News.com. March 31, 2005.

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Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 03:49 PM | Send to a friend!

Podcast for I.T. Industry

"Scrolling through the master playlist on an iPod, one could come across the following selections: The Beatles, Duran Duran, Foghat, I.T. Conversations, The Police, Frank Sinatra ... Wait a second. I.T. Conversations? Never heard of them.

"And to date, very few people have. But it's not because the band has yet to crack the Top 40."

No author. CIOs Getting Vocal about iPods. Health Data Management. March 28, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

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PocketMac Syncs iTunes to PSP

"A small California software maker has developed a program designed to bring at least part of Apple Computer's iTunes experience to the new Sony PlayStation Portable.

"The software, the latest in Information Appliance Associates' series of PocketMac tools to link handheld devices with PCs and Apple computers, allows consumers to sync music from iTunes playlists directly onto the PSP's memory cards. The software also syncs the devices with Apple's iPhoto and address book and contacts databases."

John Borland. iTunes Meets Sony's PSP. News.com. March 31, 2005.

See also:
Mark Hachman. Update: PocketMac Pushes iTunes To The Sony PSP. ExtremeTech. March 30, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

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Future Holds Promise for Yahoo News

"There are two ways to view Yahoo News. One is to dismiss it as simply a collection of other people's journalism, slapped together and considered just another feature of a big Internet portal.

"The other is to sit in awe of a site that includes some of the best journalism created, packages it in a simple way with links to outside sources and balances human judgment with technological innovation."

Mark Glaser. Inside Yahoo News: The Aggregator Brings RSS to the Masses. Online Journalism Review. April 1, 2005.

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April 01, 2005

Sony Plans iTunes for Movies

"Sony Pictures Digital Entertainment is trying to develop and own the next iTunes--but for films.

"We want to set business models, pricing models, distribution models like (Apple Computer CEO Steve) Jobs did for music, but for the film industry," Michael Arrieta, senior vice president of Sony Pictures, said at the Digital Hollywood conference here."

Stefanie Olsen. Hollywood Seeks iTunes for Film. News.com. March 30, 2005.

No author. Sony Wants an 'iTunes for Movies'. BBC News. March 30, 2005.

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Microsoft Unveils Video Download Service

"Microsoft has launched a video download service that offers daily television programming, entertainment clips, and other digital content for viewing on Windows Mobile-based devices, it says.

"The MSN Video Downloads service draws on content from Microsoft partners such as CinemaNow, MSNBC.com, and TiVo, allowing subscribers to watch video on their smart phones, Pocket PCs, and Portable Media Centers."

Scarlet Pruitt. Microsoft Launches Mobile Video Downloads. PC World. March 30, 2005.

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Intel, Bertelsmann Partner for P2P

"The world's largest chipmaker, Intel, and a unit of German media giant Bertelsmann plan to cooperate in technology for downloading and sharing films, music clips and games from the Internet.

"Intel will make chips for PCs, notebooks and mobile phones that are compatible with Bertelsmann's new online media file-sharing platform, capitalizing on a huge and growing public appetite for accessing music and other media online."

Reuters.Intel, Bertelsmann Link up for Online Media. News.com. March 30, 2005.

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Cellphones: Platforms for Services & Features

"Larry Azlin, a software engineer in El Cerrito, Calif., considers himself one of the lucky ones. His aging clamshell cellphone, a Motorola V60, seems to work just fine. But once he gives it some thought, it occurs to him that he does have a few complaints.

"His biggest complaint is that the phone insists on making noise at every opportunity.

"Mr. Azlin is hardly alone in being confused and confounded by his cellphone at times. Gone are the days when the most one expected from a mobile phone was to place or to receive a call."

Michel Marriot and Katie Hafner. It's Not Just a Phone, It's an Adventure. The New York Times. March 31, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

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March 31, 2005

Skypecasters Turn Net Phones into Broadcasting System

"Calling all music players.

"A growing number of people are sharing the digital music on MP3 players and other music devices using freely available software and Skype, a free Internet phone service.

"The enthusiasts are borrowing heavily from another personal broadcasting phenomenon called podcasting, in which digital recordings are posted on a Web site for download to a variety of music players, including desktop PCs and portable gadgets like Apple Computer's wildly popular iPod. 'Skypecasters, as they call themselves, use Skype's peer-to-peer telephone network to distribute recordings over the Internet directly to each other for free."

Ben Charny. VoIP Calls Get Podcast Treatment. News.com. March 29, 2005.

See also:
John Borland. A Novel Podcast. News.com. March 24, 2005.

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Yahoo 360 Site Opens: Invitation Only

"They used to say, 'On the Internet, no one knows you're a dog.' But with today's industrial strength search tools, it's impossible to hide your digital footprints.

"Instead of letting cold, impersonal algorithms determine what people find out about us online, social and business networking services let users help others to see them the way they'd like to be seen.

"The latest launch is the beta of Yahoo 360, Yahoo's service, which opened by invitation only on Tuesday."

Susan Kuchinskas. Searchable You. InternetNews.com. March 29, 2005.

See also:
Yahoo Search Blog. Yahoo! 360° - A New Model for Online Sharing. March 28, 2005.

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:43 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

DirtyHippo Comes to U.S. Cell Phones

"A new Internet site for downloading cell phone software, DirtyHippo.com, could be the latest example of how U.S. operators are loosening their famously draconian control over what subscribers can download.

"London-based cell phone software vendor DirtyHippo, unveiled Monday, is owned and operated by Buongiorno Vitaminic, a European wireless data heavyweight. Its downloads, using the DirtyHippo brand name, are now available to Cingular Wireless and T-Mobile USA subscribers."

Ben Charny. DirtyHippo Wallows in Muddy US Mobile Waters. Silicon.com. March 29, 2005.

See also
Buongiorno. Buongiorno Expands to U.S. to Meet Demand for Personalized Mobile Content. Yahoo! Finance. (Press Release.) March 28, 2005.

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Collaboration Tools Make Inroads in the Corporate Space

To give everyone simultaneous access to shared files such as animations and graphics, and to show what has been done to each along with the work remaining, Video on Location uses a software program called Virtual Office. It combines all sorts of applications -- voice conferencing, instant messaging, text chat, e-mail, calendars, project timelines, photo sharing -- into one shared view of related files, while encrypting everything to keep it private.

You may have never heard of Virtual Office, but you could be using its features one day. Microsoft Corp. announced earlier this month that it is buying the software's maker, Groove Inc., for an undisclosed sum, with plans to fold the product's capabilities into Microsoft's Office suite and the Windows operating system.

Leslie Walker. File-Sharing An Out-of-Office Experience. WashingtonPost.com. March 31, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

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Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 02:50 AM | Send to a friend!

March 30, 2005

Supreme Court Hears P2P Case

"The much-heralded Supreme Court showdown in the Grokster case today between old-fashioned entertainment and new-fangled technology found the justices surprisingly responsive to warnings from Grokster and its allies that a broad definition of copyright infringement could curtail innovation.

"Justice David H. Souter asked Donald B. Verrilli, Jr., the lawyer arguing for the Hollywood studios and the recording industry, to envision 'a guy sitting in his garage inventing the iPod.'

"That David Souter, the least technically minded of the justices, was an indication of how this confrontation of powerful interests had engaged the court.But by the end of the lively argument, any prediction about what the court will actually decide appeared perilous."

Linda Greenhouse. Justices Seem Responsive to Arguments on File Sharing. The New York Times. March 29, 2005.

See also:
John Borland. Supreme Court Takes Hard Look at P2P. News.com. March 29, 2005.

Jon Healey. Technology or Piracy? Court Asked to Draw Line. Seattle Times. March 29, 2005.

Ted Bridis. Supreme Court Weighs in on File-Sharing. ABC News. March 29, 2005.

National Public Radio. Supreme Court Weighs Online File-Sharing Case. All Things Considered. March 29, 2005.

National Pubic Radio. Slate's Jurisprudence: File-Sharing. Day to Day. March 29, 2005.

David McGuire. At a Glance: MGM v. Grokster. WashingtonPost.com. March 29, 2005.

Katie Dean. Camping Out for the Grokster Case. Wired News. March 29, 2005.

Update:
Andrew Leonard. Music Rules. Salon. March 30, 2005.

Jim Puzzanghera. Justices Wary of Barring Tools for File-sharing. San Jose Mercury News. March 30, 2005.

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Forrester: Usability Problems Curb Doctor Handheld Usage

"U.S. physicians are five times as likely as general consumers to use handheld computers, but less than a third of physicians who have mobile electronic medical records actually use them. That's the conclusion of a new report by Forrester Research that surveyed 1,331 physicians."

M.L. Baker. Doctors Using Handhelds, But Not for Medicine. CIO Insight. March 27, 2005.

See also:
Brian Fonseca. Medical Records' Digitization Offers a Quick Cure. eWeek. March 1, 2005.

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March 29, 2005

Showdown at the Supreme Court

"Ken Fuhrman's Colorado-based start-up company is a television junkie's dream, making powerful home media servers to hold digitized versions of television shows, movies and music.

"But Fuhrman is worried. On Tuesday morning, the Supreme Court will hear arguments on whether file-swapping software companies Grokster and StreamCast Networks should be held responsible for the widespread copyright infringement on their networks, and he's afraid his company, Interact-TV, could be affected too."

John Borland. Top Court to Hear Landmark P2P Case Tuesday. News.com. March 28, 2005.

See also:
John Borland. FAQ: Betamax--Tech's Favorite Ruling. News.com. March 28, 2005.

Katie Dean. Supreme Showdown for P2P's Future. Wired News. March 28, 2005.

Saul Hansell and Jeff Leeds. A Supreme Court Showdown for File Sharing. The New York Times. March 28, 2005.

Jon Healey. High Court Prepares for Case Against File Sharing. LATimes.com. March 28, 2005.

Marcia Coyle. Justices to Weigh Key Copyright Case. Law.com. March 21, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

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Grafedia Connects the Web and Offline World

"What if the internet extended beyond computers and high-speed connections, with web pages expanding down city streets and onto the sides of buildings?

"This is the vision behind an interactive new media project called grafedia, which enables folks to make the world their canvas by publicly posting e-mail addresses or keywords that, when punched into certain mobile phones or an e-mail account, retrieve corresponding images.

"Created by John Geraci, a graduate student in New York University's interactive telecommunications program, grafedia is part public art, part advertisement and part subversion. It's also a newfangled take on old-fashioned graffiti.

Rachel Metz. It's Not Graffiti, It's Grafedia. Wired News. March 25, 2005.

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Clear Channel Plans to Podcast

"Clear Channel plans to take first steps toward extending its radio brands through podcasting, as part of a new coherent Internet strategy set to unfold over the next several months at radio’s largest operator."

Paul Heine. Clear Channel To Embrace Podcasting. Billboard RadioMonitor. March 25, 2005.

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Pez Dispensers Go Digital

"Rap impresario 50 Cent may be riding atop the Billboard charts on the strength of his hit single 'Candy Shop,' but music lovers of all kinds will soon be able to mix their passions for beats and sweets if one gadget maker's plans come to fruition.

"That's right, the candy market's best-known handheld device, the iconic Pez dispenser, is about to go digital. Under a recently granted licensing agreement with Pez Candy, a gadget design company Lincoln West Studios will soon begin selling MP3 players modeled after the big-headed plastic treat sleeves."

Matt Hines. Pez to Dispense MP3s Instead of Candy. News.com. March 25, 2005.

See also:
Pez MP3. No Longer Invisible. March 24, 2005.

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March 28, 2005

Mavericks Owner Funds Grokster Defense

Broadcast.com billionaire and Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban has announced that he will finance Grokster's defense against MGM's peer-to-peer lawsuit, which is expected to be argued in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday, March 29.

Cuban, who sold Broadcast.com to Yahoo for $5.7 billion and is now president of HDNet, a provider of high-definition TV programming, wrote in a blog entry Saturday that he had agreed to fund the software company's defense after he was approached by the Electronic Frontier Foundation and others.

Steven Musil. Mark Cuban to Finance Grokster Defense. News.com. March 27, 2005.

See also:
Blog Maverick. Let the Truth Be Told…MGM vs Grokster. March 26, 2005.

MercuryNews.com. Is a Software Maker or Distributor Obliged to Build Anti-theft Protections, Like Encryption, Into Its Design?. March 27, 2005. (Editorial)

Joan Biskupic. Online File Sharing to Face Judicial Test. USA Today. March 27, 2005.

P2PNet.com. Crux of Big Music's Problems. March 25, 2005.

Grant Gross. P-to-P Case May Have Far-Reaching Impact. PC World. March 25, 2005.

The Economist. Grokster and StreamCast Face the Music. March 24, 2005. (Editorial)

Julie Hilden. File Sharing Goes Before Supreme Court. CNN.com. Feb. 16, 2005.

Electronic Frontier Foundation. MGM v. Grokster archive. No date.

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Forrester Analyst Dissects Yahoo 360

"The Yahoo! team has done an excellent job thinking through key details of how to not only integrate blogs and social networking, but also how to pull in elements from the Yahoo! network.

"Central to the whole service is the concept that you want to communicate and connect with the people that you already know, rather than try to meet new people. Your home page on the service shows the most recent content published by people within your network. This might be a blog post, a photo album, review, or an updated profile item.

"This fundamental concept of linking people through their updated 'stuff' is what makes Yahoo! 360 unique – and inherently will drive usage of the service higher than traditional social networks. In essence, the content is being pushed to you by the service."

Forrester. First Look at Yahoo! 360. March 24, 2005.

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World's First Podcast-Only Novel Released

"At three miles below the surface of the Earth, where the rocks are so hot they burn bare skin, something has been waiting for centuries. Waiting ... and guarding.

"That's part of the description of what is being billed as the world's first 'podcast' novel, 'EarthCore,' written by Scott Sigler of San Francisco.

"Mr. Sigler, who narrates his novel, which was first published in 2001, plans to release an hour of audio each week, creating a format similar to weekly television suspense shows with continuing storylines, such as '24' and 'Battlestar Galactica.'"

No author. 'Podcast-only' Novel Released. San Jose Business Journal. March 24, 2005.

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March 26, 2005

P2P @ SXSW

"Somewhere between the live music showcases on Sixth Street and the endless schmoozing that ran well past midnight, the deep-fried drunkfest known as South by Southwest also squeezed in some discussion of technology and how it's changing the music industry.

"In the tradition of the annual Austin music festival, which ended last weekend, panels covered both the industry and artistic side of the music game. Labels and managers, after all, are just as interested as the artists themselves in how the internet, digital downloading and other technologies are turning the music business on its head."

Michael Grebb. P2P: Music's Death Knell or Boon?. Wired.com. March 22, 2005.

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DRM and 'Trusted Computing'

"If you have recently bought an IBM ThinkVantage computer, a Dell Optiplex, or one of a whole range of laptops from Toshiba, HP/Compaq or Samsung then you may have got more for your money than you realised.

"Inside your shiny new PC is an extra chip called the trusted platform module (TPM) that can be used for a range of hardware-based security features.

"Eventually the TPM will be built into the main processor itself, and if the trusted computing group has its way then you will find one in every piece of hardware you own, from mobile phones to TV set top boxes to children's toys."

Bill Thompson. What Price for 'Trusted PC Security'?. BBC News. March 18, 2005.

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March 25, 2005

PSP Begins Challenging iPod for Handheld Supremacy

"Hope you enjoyed your 15 minutes, iPod. Sony, the company that invented the modern handheld entertainment industry 20 years ago, moves to reclaim the throne with the Sony PSP, a media device that plays music, movies and games and looks great.

"Flat, encased in black plastic and metal and highlighted by a pair of clear plastic shoulder buttons the PlayStation Portable exemplifies the Sony's aesthetic: a savvy combination of state-of-the-art circuitry and techno-design that screams, 'Buy me!'"

Tom Loftus. Sony Gets it Right With New PSP. MSNBC News March 24, 2005.

See also:
David Becker. Game Fans Clamor for PSP. News.com. March 24, 2005.

Andrew D. Arnold. First Look: The PSP. Time.com. March 24, 2005.

Mike Musgrove. Sony Begins Handheld-Game Adventure. WashingtonPost.com. March 23, 2005.

IGN.com. Sony PSP: The Gadget. March 23, 2005.

Arik Hesseldahl. Sony PSP Great For Games, Not Much Else. News.com. March 23, 2005.

Jesse Antonio Vargas. PSP, I Love You: For Gamers, The Date Has Finally Arrived. WashingtonPost.com. March 23, 2005.

Susan B. Shor. PSP: Great for Gaming, Mediocre for Multimedia. TechNewsWorld. March 21, 2005.

David Becker. PSP No One Trick Pony. News.com. March 21, 2005.

Rob Pegoraro. Sony's PSP Wows, but Only if You Stick to the Games. WashingtonPost.com. March 20, 2005.

Update: Robert MacMillan. PSP: A Real Life Pause Button. WashingtonPost.com. March 24, 2005.

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Warner Brothers Reenters Blogosphere

"After getting into some trouble for its early marketing practices in the blogosphere, Warner Brothers Records is dipping its toes in the blog waters once again. The company will sponsor podcasts of the Eric Rice Show and provide exclusive audio content from one of its bands.

"The Eric Rice Show, which is produced by Rice and three of his colleagues, features audio musings on entertainment, technology, and culture. Podcasting, the practice of publishing extended audio recordings in a Web feed format, still reaches a very small audience, but many expect it to take off as digital music players proliferate."

Zachary Rodgers. Warner Brothers Sponsors Podcaster. ClickZNews. March 22, 2005.

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Ireland's Cinemas Go All Digital

"Digital Cinema Limited (DCL), the Irish subsidiary of the digital cinema technology firm Avica Europe, will be installing new technology into 500 screens in 105 sites throughout the country at a cost of EUR40 million, making Ireland the first country in the world to convert all cinemas to a digital format from 35mm film."

Deirdre McArdle. Irish Cinemas Go Digital. ElectricNews.net. Mrach 22, 2005.

See also:
Laura Rohde. Ireland Putting Digital Films in Every Cinema. PC World. March 21, 2005.

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Study: P2P Usage Declines

"About 36 million Americans—or 27% of internet users—say they download either music or video files and about half of them have found ways outside of traditional peer-to-peer networks or paid online services to swap their files, according to the most recent survey of the Pew Internet & American Life Project.

Mary Madden and Lee Rainie. Music and Video Downloading Moves Beyond P2P. Pew Internet and American Life Project. March 23, 2005.

Mary Madden and Lee Rainie. Music and Video Downloading Moves Beyond P2P (.pdf) March 2005.

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British Man Accused of Copyright Infringement

"A British man who runs a Web site that allegedly once supported the BitTorrent peer-to-peer application is facing the threat of being sued by four major U.S. movie studios.

"Kevin Reid has been accused of copyright infringement by Paramount Pictures, Twentieth Century Fox, Universal City Studios and Warner Bros. The studios filed a lawsuit in a U.S. court earlier this month claiming that copyright-protected films have been uploaded and downloaded from bds-palace.co.uk, which Reid runs.

"Reid has not yet been formally named as a defendant in the lawsuit. However, lawyers representing the four labels have served him with legal papers asking him to reach a settlement."

Graeme Wearden. U.K. Man Threatened with BitTorrent Lawsuit. News.com. March 18, 2005.

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March 24, 2005

New Music Video Download Services

"Fans will be able to build libraries of their favorite music videos because of deals set to be announced Wednesday (March 16) involving digital entertainment companies CinemaNow and MediaPass Network.

"CinemaNow announced agreements with Warner Music Group, Epitaph Records and TVT Records to sell music videos on a download-to-own basis.

"This marks the first time music videos will be made available specifically for Microsoft's Windows Mobile-based secure devices, a category that includes Portable Media Centers, Pocket PCs and Smartphones from many different manufacturers."

Chris Marlowe. Download Deals Play Music Videos. Yahoo! News. March 20, 2005.

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March 23, 2005

Yahoo Acquires Flickr

"Yahoo has purchased online photo-sharing service Flickr, less than a week after the Internet giant launched a beta test of a new blogging tool.

"Vancouver, British Columbia-based Flickr lets users upload digital photos from computers and camera phones, put together photo albums, and post photos to blogs, among other things. "

Jim Hu. Yahoo Buys Photo-Sharing Site Flickr. News.com. March 20, 2005.

See also:
Flickr Blog. Yahoo Actually Does Acquire Flickr. March 20, 2004.

Update: Stefanie Olsen. Yahoo's Game of Photo Tag. News.com. March 22, 2005.

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March 22, 2005

Religious Podcasting Takes Hold

"Godcasting is the latest advancement in online religion, in which preachers convert their sermons to audio to be heard on portable digital audio devices.

"Using iPods or any portable MP3 player, 'podcasting' lets people download audio programs that can be listened to whenever they like. It's a form of audio syndication that musicians, businessmen, tech talk show hosts and political commentators like Al Franken have already adopted."

Kathleen Murphy. Godcasting May Be Portable Players' First "Killer App". The Baptist Standard. March 18, 2005.

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Sprint Introduces Video Ring Tones

"Sprint is offering music video ring tones to customers who use some multimedia phones, the company said this week.

"The service is available now on Sanyo's MM-5600 multimedia phone and will be released for other multimedia handsets later.

"Customers will be able to download music videos and store them on their phones. The videos then play when subscribers get calls, Sprint said."

Dinesh C. Sharma. Sprint: Forget Audio Ring Tones, Try Video Ringers. News.com. March 16, 2005.

Sprint. A First in the United States: Music Videos Now Rock Sprint PCS Vision Calls. (Press Release.) March 14, 2005.

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March 21, 2005

Anti-P2P Senator Will Lead New IP Subcommittee

"Orrin Hatch, the senator who once said the recording industry should be able to destroy music pirates' PCs, will be in charge of a new Senate panel responsible for writing copyright laws.

"Hatch, a Utah Republican, on Thursday was formally named chairman of the Senate Intellectual Property subcommittee. It's responsible for overseeing the U.S. Copyright Office and drafting legislation and treaties relating to copyright and patent laws."

Declan McCullagh. Anti-P2P Lawmaker Gets Top Senate Spot. News.com. March 17, 2005.

See also:
David McGuire. Hatch to Head Senate Panel on Copyright. WashingtonPost.com. March 17, 2005.

U.S. Senate. Committee on the Judiciary.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

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Japan's Cell Phone Users Turn Pages

"Your eyes probably hurt just thinking about it: Tens of thousands of Japanese cell-phone owners are poring over full-length novels on their tiny screens.

"In this technology-enamored nation, the mobile phone has become so widespread as an entertainment and communication device that reading e-mail, news headlines and weather forecasts -- rather advanced mobile features by global standards -- is routine.

"Now, Japan's cell-phone users are turning pages."

Yuri Kageyama. Japan Cell-phone Users Turn to Literature. Boston.com. March 18, 2005.

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March 19, 2005

Will Grokster Case Suffocate Legitimate Innovation?

"As the bitter debate over computer file sharing heads toward the Supreme Court, the pro-technology camp is growing increasingly anxious.

"Some technologists warn that if the court decides in favor of the music and recording industries after hearing arguments in the MGM v. Grokster case on March 29, the ruling could also stifle a proliferating set of new Internet-based services that have nothing to do with the sharing of copyrighted music and movies at issue in the court case.

"Some of those innovations were on display here at the Emerging Technology Conference, attended by about 750 hardware and software designers. The demonstrations included Flickr, a Canadian service that has made it possible for Web loggers and surfers to easily share and catalog millions of digital photographs."

John Markoff. As File Sharing Nears High Court, Techies Worry. News.com. March 17, 2005.

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New iPodder 2.0 Available

"The nascent market of podcasting got a boost this week with the latest release of iPodder 2.0.

"The new version of the popular podcasting client sports a slicker look among its long list of feature improvements, which developers argue is proof positive that podcasting technology is now mature and ready to be taken seriously.

"Podcasting, a term derived from Apple's iPod, makes use of RSS enclosures to allow users to listen and subscribe to audio content much the same way they can with a text blog. The technology can be played on any MP3-capable device."

Sean Michael Kerner. iPodder 2.0 Release Elevates Podcasting. InternetNews.com. March 17, 2005.

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March 18, 2005

K. Matthew Dames' Presentation on Social Software

On Thursday, K. Matthew Dames, SNTReport.com's executive editor, co-chaired the "Communities & Collaboration" track at Computers in Libraries 2005. Dames also gave the first presentation in that track, "Social Software 101," which is available in .pdf format below.

Editor's Note: I was very excited about this conference because I believed that the program Steven Cohen and I created contained some of the most valuable material in the entire conference. From the feedback I have received thus far, it seems that the attendees left each session with a lot of fresh ideas about using digital collaboration tools in their workplaces. If today's organizers and speakers were able to spur some of our audience to begin testing these tools for personal use, seek to implement them in the workplace, or merely spur enough curiosity to warrant further investigation, the track was a success.

I would like to thank all the people that attended Computers in Libraries 2005, and I also would like to congratulate Information Today on its 20th year as organizer of CIL.

There are some people, however, for which I reserve a special thanks. Thank you to Will Richardson (editor of Weblogg-ed), Aaron Schmidt (editor of Walking Paper), Michael Stephens (editor of Tame the Web), Megan Fox, and Blake Carver (editor of LISNews.com) for contributing a wealth of rich content and ideas to Thursday's sessions.

Thank you to Nancy Garman, Information Today's Director of Conference Program Planning, and Jane Dysart, CIL 2005 program chair, for their organizational guidance.

And a huge thank you to Steven Cohen, editor of Library Stuff. It was an honor working with you, a pleasure to finally get to know you, and I sincerely hope we can work together again to advance the information sciences and the profession called librarianship.

K. Matthew Dames. Social Software 101. (.pdf). March 17, 2005.

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FAST Launches Search for Mobiles

"Searching from a mobile device is about to get a whole lot easier, thanks to a new mobile search service from FAST. Called 'amsearch,' the service promises to provide mobile users relevant search results from within their carrier's networks, including applications such as ringtones.

"The msearch initiative is based on FAST's Enterprise Search Platform (FAST ESP) and empowers mobile carriers to deliver search results from within their own network's content as well as going outside of their network when appropriate to deliver relevant results."

Sean Michael Kerner. FAST Into New Mobile Search. InternetNews.com. March 15, 2005.

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March 16, 2005

BitTorrent's Strength Focuses on Legitimate Use

"Most file-sharing programs aren't the most upstanding citizens of the computing world. Yes, the entertainment industry hates them for the way they're used to download movies and albums without paying -- but many of these programs also fail to treat their own users well, often installing an unadvertised, unwanted load of advertising and spyware.

"BitTorrent is different. This free, open-source program offers a spyware- and nuisance-free installation. And while it is certainly handy for downloading movies and other copyrighted material for free, it's also increasingly used to distribute software and entertainment legally.

"This makes BitTorrent (www.bittorrent.com) not only a fascinating test case for legal experts, but it also looks a lot like the logical fusion of peer-to-peer file-sharing and traditional downloading. It's too robust to stamp out with lawsuits, but too effective not to adopt for commercial use."

Rob Pegoraro. BitTorrent May Prove Too Good to Quash. WashingtonPost.com. March 13, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

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March 14, 2005

Viral Marketing Flourishes Through Entertainment

"If you had Internet access last fall, odds are that someone sent you a link to JibJab Media's irreverent cartoon "This Land," a musical parody of the presidential race. Now the Internet is a-tingle with short video clips meant to repeat the phenomenon.

"Organizations as disparate as Burger King and Greenpeace are producing offbeat video, hoping it will prove so entertaining that people will forward links to one another around the Web - and cut through the clutter of marketing messages bombarding Americans. But will this 'viral' technique just create new clutter online?"

Natives.Catching the Online Cartoon Virus. The New York Times. March 13, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

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March 12, 2005

Yahoo! Offers Mobile RSS

"Yahoo Inc. on Thursday launched a service that allows mobile phone users to access news and other information either from the portal's personalized news and information service or from websites that offer RSS content syndication.

"The new service extends the Sunnyvale, Calif., company's My Yahoo desktop service to mobile devices, which the company has targeted as a growth area for its Internet services. In addition, users can access content from websites that the support really simple syndication, or RSS, a lightweight format based on extensible markup language that's designed for sharing headlines and other Web content, such as weblogs."

TechWeb News. Yahoo Launches Mobile RSS News Feed. InternetWeek.com. March 10, 2005.

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March 11, 2005

Net Pirates Plead Guilty

"The U.S. Department of Justice said Tuesday that three men pleaded guilty to criminal copyright infringement, as part of what attorneys called the largest multinational Net piracy investigation to date.

"The investigation, called 'Operation Higher Education,' has been conducted in 12 countries, prosecutors said. The three men pleaded guilty to being part of organized groups including Fairlight and Kalisto, both of which specialized in distributing pirated copies of computer and video games."

John Borland. Three Convictions in Net Piracy Sweeps. News.com. March 8, 2005.

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Debate Over Downloading

"Copyright infringement may not sound like a hot topic, but for the generation of Americans born in the Internet age, the ability to download music and films off the Internet has brought the issue front and center, along with confusion, thousands of lawsuits and now a Supreme Court case.

"The entertainment industry is suing makers of software that allow computer users to find and download files from each other's computers, not just Web sites.

"The question for the Supreme Court: How to protect copyrights without stifling the innovation that has brought new technologies such as MP3 players and TiVo?"

Terence Smith. Downloading Debate. Online NewsHour. March 7, 2005.

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Virgin Radio Offers Daily Podcast

"Virgin Radio is making highlights of its breakfast show available for digital audio players in what it says is a first for 'podcasting'.

"The station began making its Pete and Geoff show available to download on Wednesday. It says it is the first UK station to podcast a daily show."

No author. Virgin Radio Starts Daily Podcast. BBC News. March 9, 2005.

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Napster Offers Consumers Free Digital Music 'To Go'

"Digital music download service Napster is launching its 'Napster To Go Cafe Tour' in four U.S. cities to promote its new subscription service.

"Napster will visit coffee shops and clubs in New York, Austin, Los Angeles and Nashville, where it will give away a thousand MP3 players and Napster subscriptions. Napster will take over the locales for a night with signs, t-shirts, Napster coffee cups, and an old-fashioned jukebox. It's promoting the giveaways as 'free fills & refills' of digital music and coffee, getting the word out via radio promotions and flyers."

Kevin Newcomb. Napster Takes Its Show on the Road. ClickZNews. March 8, 2005.

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March 10, 2005

China Hosts Anti-Piracy Events

"About 100 Chinese music celebrities gathered at Beijing's Capital Stadium Saturday night standing on a huge CD-shape platform and singing for public support in the country's fight against rampant music piracy. The stadium was nearly full, and organizers said 150 million more watched on television.

"Pop stars sang their hit songs and occasionally urged their fans not to buy pirated products. Organized by the central government and associations in entertainment circles, the concert was just one of a series anti-piracy events going on in Beijing Saturday, aiming to show officials' and entertainers' determination to hit hard on piracy. Events included a forum, a Beijing anti-piracy declaration and a public destruction of pirated products.

"'If Beijing fails to solve piracy soon, we will not deserve to host the Olympics in 2008,' said Feng Xiaogang, a Chinese director who was recently named the country's proponent of copyright protection."

Xinhua. Officials, Entertainers Stage Events to Fight Piracy. Peoples Daily Online. Feb. 27, 2005.

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Podcasting As A Sales Tool?

"Podcasting is all of the talk right now, but can it perform as a sales tool as well? Recent examples prove that it certainly can."

Rok Hrastnik. Podcasting as a Sales Tool. marketingstudies.net. March 8, 2005.

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March 09, 2005

Lines Blur Between Net Radio & P2P

"A new generation of start-ups is taking a page from Apple Computer's iTunes playbook, allowing Net radio listeners to draw their programming at will from one another's hard drives.

"At the head of a movement that could transform online radio, Live365 and start-up Grouper are the latest to blur these lines between Internet radio and online song-swapping, with an alliance aimed at turning the older companies' stable of amateur broadcasters into the hubs of peer-to-peer communities.

"The model looks to Apple's iTunes software, which lets people on the same network, such as in a dorm or office building, listen to songs from one another's music collections. Grouper's peer-to-peer service lets people stream songs at will to one another over the open Internet."

John Borland. Start-ups Blur Lines Between Radio, Music Swapping. News.com. March 4, 2005.

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March 08, 2005

Digital Revolution Reaches the Airwaves

"From satellite to podcasts, programming is exploding -- but the fight for profits will be ferocious.

"How fast is technology turning radio upside down? Ask Brian Ibbott. Last September, when the wannabe Denver deejay started playing music on the Internet, the term for what he was doing -- podcasting -- had been around for two weeks. These days the 35-year-old produces a half-hour show of popular songs called Coverville. Some 9,000 devotees download it three times a week to play on -- what else? -- their iPods.

"For all the hullabaloo it's generating, podcasting is not even close to being a business yet. While startups such as Odeo and The Podcast Network are providing technological support and creating a podcasting network, right now Ibbott has barely enough ads to cover expenses, and most podcasters work for free."

Heather Green et al. The New Radio Revolution. BusinessWeekOnline. March 3, 2005.

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Infinity Will Stream Radio on Web

"Radio broadcaster Infinity is making 11 of its news and news-talk stations available online and will have its existing national and local sales forces sell commercial spots on the streams. Infinity Broadcasting is a unit of Viacom.

"'We have a very aggressive sales strategy that we'll be rolling out in the next couple of weeks as we move toward launch,' said David Goodman, president of marketing at Infinity. 'We really believe that we have a tremendous opportunity to dominate the at-work audience.'

"Industry-watchers have painted the move as an acknowledgement of the competitive environment that could be dragging audience away from radio broadcasting."

Pamela Parker. Infinity to Stream, Sell Ads Online. ClickZNews. March 3, 2005.

See also:
Heather Green et al. The New Radio Revolution. BusinessWeek Online. March 3, 2005.

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March 07, 2005

Recipe for Podcasting

"Podcasts are reinventing talk radio on the Web. These homemade audio downloads have become popular since they were introduced last year. Pontificate on your political opinions, praise your favorite bands, interview your hero -- the possibilities are limitless.

"Podcasts were created by fans of the Apple iPod, but you don't need an iPod or a Mac to make your own. Properly configured, the average Linux distribution can podcast with the best of them. Here's how."

Johnathon Williams. Podcasting from Linux. Newsforge. March 2, 2005.

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March 05, 2005

Library Offers Audio Books on iPod Shuffle

"Checking out a new iPod now applies to more than shopping trips or web browsing. This week the South Huntington Public Library on Long Island, New York, became one of the first public libraries in the country to loan out iPod shuffles.

"For the past three weeks, the library ran a pilot program using the portable MP3 devices to store audio books downloaded from the Apple iTunes Music Store. They started with six shuffles, and now are up to a total of 10. Each device holds a single audio book.

Cyrus Farivar. Library Shuffles Its Collection. Wired News. March 3, 2005.

See also:
National Public Radio. iPod Shuffle at a Public Library. Talk of the Nation. March 3, 2005.

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March 04, 2005

Groups Urge Supreme Court to Protect File-Sharing

"Backed by powerful technology groups and a handful of artists, file-swapping software companies on Tuesday asked the U.S. Supreme Court to reject proposals from the entertainment industry that could put them out of business.

"Record labels and Hollywood studios, seeking to overturn lower court rulings shielding file-swapping companies, have asked the court to rule that businesses distributing products 'predominately' devoted to copyright infringement should be held legally responsible for that illegal activity."

John Borland. P2P Companies Ask High Court for Help. News.com. March 1, 2005.

See also:
Grant Gross. Showdown Looms for P2P Networks. PC World. March 1, 2005.

Dawn C. Chmielewski. Intel Urges High Court to Protect File-Sharing. SilconValley.com. March 2, 2005.

Alex Veiga. Leading Scientists Back File-Sharing Firms. ABC News. March 1, 2005.

Jefferson Graham. Tech Industry Outlines File-Sharing Argument. USA Today. March 1, 2005.

Jonathan Krim. Artists Break With Industry on File Sharing. WashingtonPost.com. March 1, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

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March 03, 2005

O'Reilly Network Interviews Lessig

"What do you get when you mix P2P, inexpensive digital input devices, open source software, easy editing tools, and reasonably affordable bandwidth? Potentially, you get what Lawrence Lessig calls remix culture: a rich, diverse outpouring of creativity based on creativity. This is not a certain future, however. Peer-to-peer is on the verge of being effectively outlawed. Continuation of the current copyright regime would mean that vast quantities of creative content will be forever locked away from remix artists.

"Lessig is joining the battle for the remix future on several fronts: the court battle on the legality of P2P; another legal battle to free 'orphan works' from their copyright gulag; rolling out new Creative Commons 'sampling licenses' with the help of big-name artists like David Byrne; and supporting the 'free culture' work of Brazilian musician and culture minister Gilberto Gil toward a society based on freedom of culture.

"In an extensive phone interview, I talked with Professor Lessig about all of these issues. Lessig will expound on many of these same topics in his upcoming keynote at O'Reilly's Emerging Technology Conference, March 14-17 in San Diego."

Richard Koman. Remixing Culture: An Interview with Lawrence Lessig. O'Reilly Network. Feb. 24, 2005.

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VoIP Experiences Growing Pains

"I want to start by saying I do not want to hear about how one or two readers out there have these VoIP systems and they work flawlessly. I have had good experiences intermittently too. But all too often, the network simply hiccups and you sound like you are on the worst sort of cellular connection.

"What makes this worse is that entire companies have hooked up to these things, with the same results. I'm always amused when a call center in India has one of these systems and it's so overloaded that you can't understand a thing, since the sound is so muffled."

John Dvorak. The Problem with VoIP Phones. PC Magazine. Feb. 24, 2005.

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March 02, 2005

Podcasting's Challenges

"Remember the Web in 1994? Lots of pictures of pet cats and long lists of people's favorite junk foods.

"Podcasting is in the same place today as the Web was in 1994. These personal radio broadcasts, designed to be downloaded to an iPod or similar MP3 player, are homespun, rough-edged, and -- let's be honest -- not all that riveting.

"One problem is that, much like the Web before advertising and e-commerce, there's no money in podcasting yet. I doubt we would have seen Google, eBay, CNN.com, or Mapquest emerge if the Web had remained a commerce-free zone. Ads and transactions on the Web gave everyone an incentive to produce high-quality websites, from start-ups like eBay to giant media corporations like CNN to individuals like Harry Knowles, who runs the movie insiders' site Ain't It Cool News."

Scott Kirsner. Podcasting Faces Growing Pains. Boston Globe. Feb. 28, 2005.

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The 'Copyfight' Battle

"There will be no winners if we do not sort out copyright, argues columnist Bill Thompson. But let us not forget moral rights.

"Amidst all the 'will they?, won't they?' excitement over whether European patent law should be updated, and whether the version currently on offer will allow US-style software patents, it would be easy to forget that another, bigger, battle continues around the world.

It is the 'copyfight' - the continuing dispute over what sort of legal protection creative people or the companies that employ them should have over the ways in which their works are used."

Bill Thompson. The Copyright 'Copyfight' Is On. BBC News. Feb. 18, 2005.

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Kanoodle Moves Into RSS Feed Advertising

"Kanoodle, a search-advertising specialist, wants to help turn blogging into small business.

"On Monday, the company introduced a self-service system that lets online publishers pair advertising with their RSS feeds. Called BrightAds RSS (after the technology format known as Really Simple Syndication), the service takes advantage of Kanoodle's keyword advertising system to match Web content to relevant ads. Once a publisher signs up, an advertising link will piggyback on its syndicated feed sent to third-party news readers.

"And with the help of Moreover Technologies, the service will offload a publisher's infrastructure demands of delivering RSS feeds to hundreds or thousands of readers. Moreover's technology will do the work."

Stefanie Olsen. Firm Eyes RSS Feeds as Ad Vehicle. News.com. Feb. 28, 2005.

See also:
Pamela Parker. Kanoodle Expands RSS Ads to Smaller Publishers. ClickZNews. Feb. 28, 2005.

Kanoodle. Kanoodle Announces 'BrightAds RSS' - First Self-Service RSS Feed Monetization and Distribution Service, in Partnership with Moreover Technologies. (Press Release. Feb. 28, 2005.

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March 01, 2005

Business Week Interviews del.icio.us Creator

"Josh Schachter is a true techie. Though the 30-year-old New Yorker is a programmer at a financial-services company, in his off hours he writes a blog and works on his own software as a hobby. When he runs into a problem, Schachter's answer is to cobble together some software to fix it.

"Which is exactly what he did a little over two years ago. As Schachter began collecting links he wanted to write about for his blog, he needed a place to store them. By the end of 2003, Schachter had turned his own creation into a service called del.icio.us."

Heather Green. A Tag Team's Novel Net Navigation. Business Week Online. Feb. 28, 2005.

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Wireless Mail Will Rescue the Handheld

"For several years, handheld sales were weak. This is because they were in need of a new killer app.

"When handhelds were first introduced, most people bought them for personal information management. Millions of people gave up their Day Runners and bought a Palm Pilot.

However, just about everyone who wants to keep track of their schedule and address book with a handheld has already bought one. This is why the handheld market leveled off -- and even declined a bit -- for a couple of years. Most of the handhelds being sold were going to people who were upgrading.

Then something came along that gets people in droves to go out and get handhelds: wireless email.

Ed Hardy. The New Handheld Killer App Found at Last. Brighthand. Feb. 24, 2005.

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Interview With Founder of Blogdigger

"As I’ve mentioned in the past, Blogdigger is one of my favourite RSS search engines, and since I had the chance to interview Greg Gershman, founder of Blogdigger itself, I couldn’t let this chance go by."

Sid Yadav. Interview With Greg Gershman, Founder of Blogdigger. The Daily Rundown. Feb. 22, 2005.

Editor's note: Greg Gershman also keeps notes on the development of Blogdigger at his Blogdigger Development Blog.

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MPAA Files More Piracy Lawsuits

"Hollywood studios launched a new round of legal action Thursday, aimed in part at people swapping versions of nominated films in Sunday's Academy Awards ceremony.

"As with previous rounds of lawsuits filed by the Motion Picture Association of America, the group's executives declined to say how many people were targeted in the lawsuits or where the suits were filed. They cited several award-nominated films--including 'Sideways,' 'The Incredibles' and 'Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind'--as being involved in the lawsuits.

"The MPAA is several months into an aggressive new legal campaign against unauthorized film trading, which has resulted in several key file-swapping hubs being taken offline.

John Borland. Studios Target Oscar Film Swappers. News.com. Feb. 24, 2005.

See also:
Reuters. Hollywood Files More Web Lawsuits. CNN Money. Feb. 24, 2005.

John Borland. MPAA Files New Film-Swapping Suits. News.com. Jan. 26, 2005.

John Borland. File Swapping vs. Hollywood. News.com. Jan. 25, 2005.

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February 28, 2005

Palm Soon to Ice HotSync

"Since the first Palm Pilot, handhelds running the Palm OS have communicated with desktop computers via HotSync, its self-developed method of information synchronization. This will soon come to an end.

"PalmSource is going to switch to SyncML, a widely used, open standard for information synchronization."

Ed Hardy. PalmSource Moving Away from HotSync. Brighthand. Feb. 22, 2005.

Related:
Daniel Robinson. PalmSource Sees Future on Phones. Computing. Feb. 17, 2005.

See also:
Ed Hardy. PalmOne May Be Committing Itself to Wi-Fi. Brighthand. Feb. 23, 2005.

Uwe Hansmann, et al. SyncML Applications. Informit.com. Dec. 12, 2003.

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Flickr CEO Interviewed

"Flickr boasts 270,000 users, four million photos, 30 percent monthly growth in users, and 50 percent monthly growth in photos. And these numbers don't even begin to tell the story. Flickr is simply the manifestation of the perfect storm of camera phones, consumer broadband, blogs, RSS, and folksonomy tags.

"Flickr is part of something else too, something radical: the massive sharing of what we used to think of as private data. Photos, bookmarks, and journals used to be considered personal. The social networking revolution--which encompasses everything from Flickr and del.icio.us to blogs and wikis to P2P itself--encourages us to share everything."

Richard Koman. Stewart Butterfield on Flickr. O'Reilly Network. Feb. 4, 2005.

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February 26, 2005

Spyware Exposes Blogs to Attacks

"Hackers are using blogs to infect computers with spyware, exposing serious security flaws in self-publishing tools used by millions of people on the Web.

"The problem involves the use of JavaScript and ActiveX, two common methods used to launch programs on a Web page. Security experts said malicious programmers can use JavaScript and ActiveX to automatically deliver spyware from a blog to people who visit the site with a vulnerable Web browser.

"Spyware tools also have been hidden inside JavaScript programs that are offered freely on the Web for bloggers to enhance their sites with features such as music. As a result, bloggers who use infected tools could unwittingly turn their sites into a delivery platform for spyware."

Stefanie Olsen. Spyware Infiltrates Blogs. News.com. Feb. 23, 2005.

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February 25, 2005

Russian Police Investigate MP3 Site

"A Russian digital-music site offering high-quality song downloads for just pennies apiece is the target of a criminal copyright investigation by the local police, recording industry groups said Tuesday.

"AllofMP3.com has been operating for several years, asking consumers to pay just 2 cents per megabyte of downloads--usually between 4 cents and 10 cents per song. Alongside the catalogue available at traditional stores like Apple Computer's iTunes, the site offered access to songs from the Beatles and other groups that haven't yet authorized digital distribution.

"The Russian site claimed it had licenses to do so from a local clearing house, but record labels have maintained that the licenses weren't valid. After long-standing complaints, the Moscow City Police Computer Crimes division completed an investigation earlier this month and recommended that prosecutors charge the site's operators with criminal copyright infringement."

John Borland. MP3s for Pennies? Russian Cops Say No. News.com. Feb. 22, 2005.

See also:
International Federation of the Phonographic Industry. Recording industry Welcomes Police Investigation of Allofmp3.com. (Press Release.) Feb. 22, 2005.

John Leyden. Russian Police Probe Cheap Downloads Site. The Register. Feb. 22, 2005.

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February 24, 2005

Podcasting: How Amateurs May Soon Rule the Airwaves

"'People think I'm this poseur guy from MTV, but I don't care,' says Adam Curry, the former VJ whose long blond locks once mesmerized teenyboppers across the globe. 'I've always had this total dual life as a geek and a celebrity.'

"Curry, 40, is the brains behind iPodder, a tiny application that he believes has the power to challenge commercial radio. iPodder is the bastard offspring of the blog and the Apple MP3 player. It combines the hyperactive talkiness of blogs and the hipness of iPods into something utterly new: the podcast. iPodder uses the blog syndication tool RSS to automatically download homebrew radio shows, podcasts, directly into a portable MP3 player.

"Welcome to podcasting, the medium that promises a future where anyone can make radio, instead of just listen to it. The biggest podcast audiences now number in the mere tens of thousands. Yet real radio, the kind with bona fide mass audiences, is starting to use the technology to make its shows available for download.

"The podcasting scene is reminiscent of the early, heady days of blogging, circa 2001, a time before Wonkette made the cover of The New York Times Magazine. Like bloggers in the good old days, podcasters are obsessively internecine and gloriously, honestly unprofessional."

Annalee Newitz. Adam Curry Wants to Make You an iPod Radio Star. Wired. March 2005.

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Tension Builds Over Use of High Tech

"In 2002, a young software programmer in Seattle named Bram Cohen solved a vexing Internet problem: how to get large computer files such as home movies or audio recordings of music concerts to travel rapidly across cyberspace.

"Among the benefits of the invention, called BitTorrent, was that millions of users could quickly see lengthy amateur videos documenting the devastation of the December tsunami in the Indian Ocean, helping to spur an outpouring of charitable aid.

"But BitTorrent also is wildly popular because the technology makes it easier to freely trade Hollywood movies and television shows, putting it in the cross hairs of the entertainment industry.

Jonathan Krim. High-Tech Tension Over Illegal Uses. WashingtonPost.com. Feb. 22, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

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iMesh P2P Network Moves Toward Release

"For more than six months, Israel's iMesh has been the strangest of beasts in the file-swapping world: a fully functioning peer-to-peer network operating with the blessing, albeit temporary, of the recording industry.

"That status is coming slowly to an end. The company is working to build a record-label-approved peer-to-peer service, using song-filtering company Audible Magic's technology to help turn unauthorized music trades into revenue for record labels.

"Originally expected by the end of last year, the song-sales service is taking longer than predicted. Company executives declined to comment on the details of the service, but said that progress on the new service has been satisfactory."

John Borland. iMesh Almost Ready to Become Paid File-Swap Network. News.com. Feb. 17, 2005.

See also:
John Borland. Record Labels Settle With Israeli P2P Company. News.com. July 20, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

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A New View of the News

"Want to stay up on the latest news but think Google News is dry and boring? For something a little more visual, try 10x10. The site lets viewers scour the top headlines using photos, which combine to create a broad snapshot of the world every hour on the hour.

"News at a glance has never been so literal, thanks to information architect Jonathan Harris, 25, creator of the site. 10x10 takes the most common words from major news outlets like BBC World Edition and New York Times International and couples them with pictures. The site lets users interactively search for the top stories by scrolling over pictures and the words associated with them.

"The idea for 10x10's design and ever-changing content came to Harris while traveling in Greece. He started to wonder "what a moment in the world would look like," and it was from this question that he came up with the idea for 10x10."

David Cohn. A Fluid Look at the News. Wired News. Feb. 21, 2005.

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February 23, 2005

Groups Challenge Broadcast Flag Rules

"Mike Godwin, the legal director for Public Knowledge, a digital-rights advocacy group in Washington, is a fan of Showtime's new drama series 'Huff.' So three weeks ago, when he missed the season finale, he decided to download it to his personal computer.

"To Mr. Godwin, the time-consuming download (and the file's poor quality) indicated that the rampant piracy of digitized broadcast programs - a threat Hollywood has long warned against - was hardly imminent. But to the Federal Communications Commission and the Motion Picture Association of America, cases like this one suggest a future of widespread illegal file-sharing that must be stopped before it begins."

"The debate will be presented in oral arguments tomorrow before the District of Columbia Circuit for the United States Court of Appeals in a lawsuit brought by Public Knowledge and others against the F.C.C., challenging a new regulation that is intended to prevent such bleeding of television content onto the Internet."

Tom Zeller Jr. Federal Effort to Head Off TV Piracy Is Challenged. News.com. Feb. 21, 2005.

See also:
Ed Felton. Broadcast Flag in Court. Freedom to Tinker. Feb. 21, 2005.

Electronic Frontier Foundation. Broadcast Flag "Just As Important As Grokster". Deep Links. Feb. 18, 2005.

Electronic Frontier Foundation. EFF's HDTV-PVR Cookbook. No date

Update: Declan McCullagh. Court Questions FCC's Broadcast Flag Rules. News.com. Feb. 22, 2005. (A federal appeals court questions whether the FCC has authority to undertake such sweeping regulation.)

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:49 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

NGA Considers Restricting Access to Maps

"Officials at the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency want to bar the public from viewing the agency's aeronautical and navigational data and publications, a decision that has upset many who use that information. Some librarians, commercial mapmakers and public-interest group members say they will launch a campaign to retain access.

"Without seeking public comment, NGA officials announced plans in November 2004 to stop selling and distributing the aeronautical and navigational data because of copyright concerns and worries about terrorist attacks. Last December, however, they said they would seek comments before making a final decision.

"Jim Mohan, an NGA spokesman, said the agency is considering the action partly because an increasing number of foreign source providers are claiming intellectual property rights or warning agency officials that they intend to copyright their source material."

Frank Tiboni. A Publishing Dilemma. FCW. Feb. 7, 2005.

See also:
National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency. NGA Invites Public Comment on Proposal to Remove Aeronautical Information from Public Sale and Distribution. (.pdf) (Press Release.) Dec. 3, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:09 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

February 22, 2005

Cryptographers to Hollywood: Design DRM to Fail

"Movie industry representatives at RSA 2005 in San Francisco today called on the IT industry for help in thwarting illegal file sharing before the problem threatened its revenues. But they were told that they must recognise the limitations of digital rights management in their fight against digital piracy.

"Speaking on the RSA conference panel Hollywood's Last Chance - Getting it Right on Digital Piracy, Carter Laren, security architect at Cryptographic Research, noted that cryptography is 'good at some problems, such as transmitting data so it can't be eavesdropped or even authentication, but it can't solve the content protection problem. If people have legitimate access to content, then you can't stop them misusing it.

"'Anyone designing content protection should design for failure and if it fails update it,' he added."

John Leyden. Cryptographers to Hollywood: Prepare to Fail on DRM. The Register. Feb. 17, 2005.

See also:
Cryptography Research. Cryptography Research Security Experts to Speak at RSA Conference 2005. (Press Release.) Feb. 14, 2005.

Michael A. Einhorn and Bill Rosenblatt. Peer-to-Peer Networking and Digital Rights Management: How Market Tools Can Solve Copyright Problems. (.pdf) Cato Institute. Feb. 17, 2005.

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Apple Updates Multimedia Programs

"The most important letter in Apple's alphabet must be 'i' -- not just for its iMac and iBook computers, but for its flock of i-named multimedia applications. ITunes, iPhoto, iMovie and iDVD -- sold with the Garage Band music mixer in a bundle called iLife -- turn a Mac into the center of a digital lifestyle, letting people tap into digital music, photography and movies with uncommon ease.

"Apple updated this set of programs last month with the release of iLife '05 and added a second set of "iApps," called iWork '05. Like many software-suite updates, these two only offer sweeping changes in one of their constituent applications. In iLife, the signature release is a much-improved iPhoto; in iWork, the marquee attraction is Pages, Apple's first new publishing program in years."

Rob Pegoraro. Apple Dots Some More 'i's. WashingtonPost.com. Feb. 20, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:20 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Workshare Launches Free Tool for Hidden Data

"When it comes to Microsoft Office documents, there is often a lot more in them than meets the eye. Most people don't realize that when two or more people collaborate on a Word, Excel, or PowerPoint document, hidden information--such as deleted text, names of authors, and revision marks--are sometimes unintentionally left in final drafts.

"A company called Workshare Technology now offers a free safety net from the potential embarrassment of a public display of these hidden and forgotten comments and changes. The company's Trace application sends out an alert if hidden information, also known as metadata, is embedded in a Microsoft Office file. When hidden data is identified, a dialogue box pops up from your system tray alerting you. Clicking on the alert message generates a report of all the hidden data inside the file.

"Workshare Trace, announced early this month, is available for download now."

Tom Spring. Free Tool Identifies Hidden Data in Office Docs. PC World. Feb. 14, 2005.

See also:
Workshare. TRACE! Beta by Workshare. (Press Release.) Feb. 7, 2005.

Workshare. Workshare Launches Workshare Professional Release 4. (Press Release.) Feb. 7, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:10 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

February 21, 2005

Podcasting: A New Voice in Media

"From a chenille-slipcovered sofa in the basement of their friend Dave's mom's house at the edge of a snow-covered field, Brad and Other Brad, sock-footed pioneers in the latest technology revolution, are recording 'Why Fish,' their weekly show.

"Clutching a microphone and leaning over a laptop on the coffee table, they praise the beauty of the Red River, now frozen on the edge of town, and plug an upcoming interview with a top-ranked professional walleye fisherman. Then they sign off.

"Their show, mostly ad-libbed, is a podcast, a kind of recording that, thanks to a technology barely six months old, anyone can make on a computer and then post to a Web site, where it can be downloaded to an iPod or any MP3 player to be played at the listener's leisure.

"Since August, when Adam Curry, a former MTV video jockey, and David Winer, an early Web log writer, developed the podcasting technology, 3,075 podcasts have sprung up around the world, according to a Web site, Ipodder.org, that offers downloads of podcasting software."

Kate Zernike. Tired of TiVo? Beyond Blogs? Podcasts Are Here. The New York Times. Feb. 19, 2005.

Editor's note: SNTReport.com has been tracking podcasting technology since its inception. Selected previous stories are available here, here, and here.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:54 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

10 Copyright Myths Explained

"An attempt to answer common myths about copyright seen on the net and cover issues related to copyright and USENET/Internet publication.

"Note that this is an essay about copyright myths. It assumes you know at least what copyright is -- basically the legal exclusive right of the author of a creative work to control the copying of that work. If you didn't know that, check out my own brief introduction to copyright for more information."

Brad Templeton. 10 Big Myths About Copyright Explained. Templeton.com. No date.

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:35 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

AOL Updates Winamp Copy-Prevention Features

"America Online is disabling a feature of its popular music software that had been used to evade copy-prevention features of digital music services, the company said Friday.

"The company's Winamp software was identified by bloggers this week as part of a process that transformed copy-protected music downloads into songs that could be burned by the thousand to CD. The tool had potentially affected any subscription service that used Microsoft's media format, including Napster, Virgin Music and even America Online's own music subscription plan.

"AOL programmers are taking a series of steps to prevent its software from being used in this way, a representative said."

John Borland. AOL Blocks Music-Copying Feature. News.com. Feb. 17, 2005.

See also:
John Borland. Napster Hack Leads to Free Downloads. News.com. Feb. 15, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:06 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

February 19, 2005

EFF Creates Endangered Gizmos List

"Endangered animals lists are familiar to those who care about nature, but now technology has its own list of gadget 'species' under threat of extinction.

"High on the endangered list is the file-sharing network, Morpheus, which is about to fight for survival in court.

"The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) list highlights what it says is the grip industry holds over gadgets."

No author. Gizmos Under Threat of Extinction. BBC News. Feb. 18, 2005.

See also:
Electronic Frontier Foundation. Endangered Gizmos List.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:35 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

February 18, 2005

Next Generation Web Searches

"In less than a decade, Internet search engines have completely changed how people gather information. No longer must we run to a library to look up something; rather we can pull up relevant documents with just a few clicks on a keyboard. Now that 'Googling' has become synonymous with doing research, online search engines are poised for a series of upgrades that promise to further enhance how we find what we need.

"New search engines are improving the quality of results by delving deeper into the storehouse of materials available online, by sorting and presenting those results better, and by tracking your long-term interests so that they can refine their handling of new information requests.

"In the future, search engines will broaden content horizons as well, doing more than simply processing keyword queries typed into a text box. They will be able to automatically take into account your location--letting your wireless PDA, for instance, pinpoint the nearest restaurant when you are traveling. New systems will also find just the right picture faster by matching your sketches to similar shapes. They will even be able to name that half-remembered tune if you hum a few bars."

Javed Mostafa. Seeking Better Web Searches. ScientificAmerican.com. Feb. 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

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3G Linux Phone Boasts New Features

"Several leading mobile technology players are cooperating on a project to explore Linux's potential as the major software component in smart phones of the future.

"At the 3GSM World Congress taking place here this week, Infineon Technologies, Samsung and embedded-Linux specialist Trolltech said they have created a 3G, or third-generation, smart phone built around the Linux operating system.

"The prototype uses Linux software from MontaVista Software, a company that creates versions of the open-source operating system that can be embedded into special-purpose computing devices such as telecommunications equipment. The prototype features services such as video calling and streaming, Web browsing, stereo speakers and Java-based 3D gaming."

Andrew Donoghue. 3G Linux Phone Allows Video Calling, Web Browsing. News.com. Feb. 15, 2005.

See also:
CNET News.com Staff. Cell Phones Sound Off with New Skills. News.com. Feb. 16, 2005.

Stephen Shankland. MontaVista Aims to Simplify Cell Phone Linux. News.com. Feb. 7, 2005.

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TCP/IP Pioneers Win Turing Award

"Late in the summer of 1973, two young scientists in the nascent field of computer networks hunkered down in a conference room of the Cabana Hyatt Hotel in Palo Alto, Calif., a clean but bland stopping place for salesmen and the parents of students at nearby Stanford University. Their goal was to thrash out a way to make different, isolated computer networks talk to each other.

"They wrote, they sketched, they argued, all the while passing a yellow legal pad back and forth to capture ideas as they crystallized.

"When they emerged two days later, they knew they had the makings of a solid technical paper. What they did not know was that they had created the essential underpinnings of today's vast and sprawling Internet.

"For the work that began on that yellow pad, the Association for Computing Machinery plans to announce Wednesday that Vinton G. Cerf and Robert E. Kahn will receive the 2004 A. M. Turing Award, widely considered to be the computing field's equivalent of the Nobel Prize."

Katie Hafner. Laurels for Giving the Internet Its Language. News.com. Feb. 15, 2005.

See also:
Association for Computing Machinery. Internet Pioneers Cerf and Kahn to Receive ACM Turing Award. (Press Release.) Feb. 16, 2005.

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:30 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Napster Denies Flawed Copy Protection

"Less than three weeks after Napster Inc. began touting its all-you-can-rent music subscription service, the company finds itself refuting Internet claims that its copy-protection measures are flawed.

"The company posted a message this week, saying the service's digital music tracks are no more susceptible to unauthorized copying than any other licensed music service.

"The statement comes after word surfaced on the Internet about how subscribers of Napster To Go, which lets users play an unlimited number of tracks on their computer or on certain portable devices for about $15 a month, could make permanent copies of the songs."

Associated Press. Napster Refutes Flawed Protection Claims. SeattlePI.com. Feb. 16, 2005.

See also:
Sue Zeidler. Users Bypass Copy Protection on Napster To Go. WashingtonPost.com. Feb. 16, 2005.

John Borland. Napster Hack Leads to Free Downloads. News.com. Feb. 15, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

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February 17, 2005

Cell Phone Industry Eyes Entertainment Downloads

"With a covetous eye on the success of portable music players, mobile phone makers are going after would-be iPod buyers by building high-quality players into their handsets.

"Sony Ericsson announced Monday it would soon market music-player mobiles under its parent's Walkman brand, drawing on the music catalogue of a sister company, Sony BMG, the world's No. 2 record company.

"And Nokia Corp., the world's leading phone maker, announced an alliance with Microsoft Corp. to allow mobile subscribers to load music from a PC onto their phones - much the way that a digital music player works."

Laurence Frost. Mobile Phone Industry Eyes Music Downloads. WashingtonPost.com. Feb. 14, 2005.

See also:
Chris Marlowe. Ring-a-Ding Ding for Mobile Music. Reuters. Feb. 15, 2005.

Sony Ericsson. Sony Ericsson to Offer Exciting Mobile Music Solution in Collaboration with Sony Group Companies. (Press Release.) Feb. 14, 2005.

Nokia. Microsoft and Nokia Collaborate to Help Ensure Consumers Can Enjoy Digital Music Anywhere. (Press Release.) Feb. 14, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:48 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

February 16, 2005

Musicians Don't Make Money From Copyright

"Digital technologies are often said (1) to enable a qualitatively new engagement with already existing cultural materials (for example through sampling and adaptation); and, (2) to offer a new disintermediated distribution channel to the creator. A review of secondary data on music artists’ earnings and eight in–depth interviews conducted in 2003–04 in Britain and Germany indicate that both ambitions have remained largely unfulfilled. The article discusses to what extent the structure of copyright law is to blame, and sets out a research agenda."

Martin Kretschmer. Artists' Earnings and Copyright: A Review of German and British Music Industry Data in the Context of Digital Technologies. First Monday. Jan. 2005.

See also:
Mary Madden. Artists, Musicians and the Internet. (.pdf). Pew Internet & American Life Project. Dec. 5, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:40 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

February 15, 2005

The Next Music Format

"Classic-rock fan George Petersen doesn't need another copy of Pink Floyd's "Dark Side of the Moon" or Cream's "Disraeli Gears." He has spent the past four decades buying and re-buying his favorite music in a succession of new formats: vinyl, 8-track, cassette, compact disc, Super Audio CD, DVD-Audio.

Enough is enough. The basement is full.

"With tonight's 47th annual Grammy Awards in Los Angeles drawing attention to the ever-shifting world of the recording arts, Petersen and many other music-biz insiders agree that, in the next decade or so, the CD will very likely be surpassed as the album format of choice.

"'The new format is no format,' predicted Petersen, a 24-year industry veteran who also owns a record label, a recording studio and a music-publishing company. 'What the consumer would buy is a data file, and you could create whatever you need. If you want to make an MP3, you make an MP3. If you want a DVD-Audio surround disc, you make that.'"

Sean Daly. 10 Million iPods, Previewing the CD's End. WashingtonPost.com. Feb. 13, 2005.

See also:
Dinesh C. Sharma. Study: Fee-based Music Gains on Swapping. News.com. Feb. 10, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:50 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

New Web Tools Make Online Work Easier

"This scenario is all too familiar to office workers who collaborate electronically on projects: E-mails get passed around with differing versions of documents-in-progress attached. Instant messages whizz by. Web sites are cited, then lost. It's often a jumbled mess, with no central online location for shared data. There must be a better way.

"A new crop of tools aims to help turn the Web - be it on the public Internet or a company network - into much more than a collection of documents one visits like a museum: Look, but don't touch.

"'We're turning the Web into a conversation,' said Glenn Reid, chief executive and founder of Five Across Inc.

"Reid's startup and several other companies will offer their visions for accomplishing that on stage at the DEMO conference in Arizona, an annual showcase of tech innovation."

Associated Press. New Tools Making Online Work Easier. MarketWatch.com. Feb. 13, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

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Ignite Eases Digital Content Delivery

"A collaboration tool launched on Monday is designed to ease the distribution of large files for enterprises.

"Ignite Technologies Inc. of Dallas introduced its Ignite Communicator service, which aims to deliver any type of digital content such as video, graphical presentations and software to users regardless of their networking or computer capacity.

"Ignite Communicator, for example, could help an enterprise reach mobile users connecting over less reliable networks or to partners or customers with varying levels of access, Ignite officials said."

Matt Hicks. Service Aims to Ease Digital Content Delivery. eWeek. Feb. 7, 2005.

See also:
Jason Meserve. Ignite Helps Deliver Big Files. NetworkWorldFusion. Feb. 7, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:53 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

February 14, 2005

MPAA Attacks P2P Again

"A Dallas federal court has ordered file-swapping site LokiTorrent.com to shut down and provide Hollywood lawyers with access to its full server logs, including data that could expose hundreds of thousands of people to copyright lawsuits.

"The Motion Picture Association of America said Thursday that it had won a quick court victory against LokiTorrent, and was launching a new round of actions against other online piracy hubs. The data provided by the onetime file-swapping hub would provide 'a roadmap to others who have used LokiTorrent to engage in illegal activities,' the trade group said.

"Hard numbers on the site's traffic are hard to come by. However, according to researchers at the Delft University of Technology, LokiTorrent was responsible for more than 800,000 downloads in the month of October alone."

John Borland. Court: Hollywood Gets P2P Giant's Server Logs. News.com. Feb. 10, 2005.

See also:
Ashlee Vance. MPAA Closes Loki. The Register. Feb. 10, 2005.

Elizabeth Millard. MPAA Wins File-Sharing Suit. CIO Today. Feb. 11, 2005.

John Borland. Movie Blackout for P2P Networks?. News.com. Feb. 10, 2005.

Motion Picture Association of America. MPAA Member Studios File Second Round of Lawsuits Against Major P2P Server Operators That Facilitate Global Movie Piracy. (Press Release.) Feb. 10, 2005.

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:55 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Yahoo Rebrands Its Music Service

"Yahoo has renamed its online music service Yahoo Music.

"The service had been operating under the brand name Launch, which was acquired by Yahoo in 2001. But now, Yahoo wants to showcase all its music products and services under a single brand, the company said. The service already has begun operating with a new logo.

Yahoo Music offers streaming audio, music videos, Internet radio and news covering various genres of music."

Dinesh C. Sharma. Yahoo Music--the Service Formerly Known as Launch. News.com. Feb. 11, 2005.

See also:
Yahoo! Inc. Yahoo! to Rebrand LAUNCH, the Internet's #1 Music Destination, as Yahoo! Music. (Press Release.) Feb. 9, 2005.

Jim Hu and Melanie Austria Farmer. Yahoo Thinks Entertainment with Launch Buy. News.com. June 28, 2001.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

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February 11, 2005

Grokster Implications Run Deep

"Over the next few months, the Supreme Court and--likely--Congress will resume a debate over rules that could determine whether consumers will continue to enjoy the benefits of many of the gadgets CNET covers.

"The debate is specifically about what kind of legal liability--if any--technology manufacturers, financiers, Internet service providers, journalists and others should have if their actions 'induce' another to commit copyright infringement.

"Congressional action this year will largely be shaped by what the Supreme Court does in the pending case involving Grokster, the peer-to-peer software used by millions. While the case may appear to be simply about illegal file trading, its implications are far deeper."

Gigi Sohn. Getting Real About the Grokster Case. News.com. Feb. 8, 2005.

See also:
John Borland. Supreme Court to Hear P2P Case. News.com. Dec. 10, 2005.

John Borland. Judge: File-swapping Tools are Legal. News.com. April 25, 2003.

Mark Cuban. Grokster and America's Future. News.com. Feb. 2, 2005.

Edward W. Felten. Splitting the Grokster Baby. Freedom to Tinker. Feb. 8, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

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Symposium Examines File-Sharing Networks

"Ferraris, guns and alcohol are all legal, even though manufacturers know their wares could be used to break the law.

"So should a similar standard apply to Internet users who share - or some would say, 'steal' - digital music?

"Legal scholars interested in copyright law discussed that question Saturday at a symposium put on by the Northern Kentucky Law Review."

Reid Forgrave. File-Sharing Networks Examined. Cincinnati.com. Feb. 6, 2005

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

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February 10, 2005

Media Campaign Intensifies As Grokster Case Nears

"Garret the Ferret is one hip copyright crusader. The cartoon character urges young cybercitizens toward ethical downloading and--in baggy jeans and a gold 'G' medallion--reminds them that copying and sharing software is uncool.

"He is also a byproduct of the long-roiling public relations battle between copyright owners, who say they are threatened by digital piracy, and technology advocates opposed to strict controls on digital media copying and on software that make piracy so easy.

"With the Supreme Court scheduled next month to hear a pivotal case pitting copyright holders (represented by MGM Studios) against the makers of file-sharing software (Grokster and StreamCast Networks), participants are putting their message machines into high gear."

Tom Zeller. Messages Grow Manic as Piracy Nears High Court. News.com. Feb. 7, 2005.

See also:
Declan McCullagh. Supreme Court Sets Date for File-Sharing Case. News.com. Jan. 21, 2005.

John Borland. Supreme Court to Hear P2P Case. News.com. Dec. 10, 2004.

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:46 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

The Power of Tagging

"Erik Benson, 28, is a man with plans -- 28 plans. He's posted these aspirations for the whole Web to see at '43 Things,' a site he and some friends launched at the beginning of 2005. The purpose of the site: Anyone can post their goals, resolutions and grand designs, and meet others who share the same ambitions.

"There are currently 119 other people on 43things.com decreeing their pledge to do a start-up that makes it past that two-year threshold.

"But what's intriguing about 43 things isn't the voyeuristic itch it scratches, as we get to see so many people baring their heart's desire. What makes the site work is how it connects all these people to each other. By a simple software tweak known as tagging, this site and many others, like the photo site Flickr and the bookmark-sharing system del.icio.us, have found a new way to organize information and connect people. The surprise is that the organizing itself is unorganized -- and yet it works."

Katharine Mieszkowski. Steal This Bookmark!. Salon. Feb. 8, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: Salon.com normally requires a paid subscription, but you can view articles if you register for a free day pass.)

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:42 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Podcasting Allows More Voices to be Heard

"After getting a taste of the radio business in college, software designer Craig Patchett never lost his interest in broadcasting. But without a job in radio, it seemed likely to remain one of those unfulfilled passions - until something called 'podcasting' came along.

"Now, Patchett's creating shows and sending them out to the masses every day - not over the airwaves to radios but over the Internet, from his personal computer in Carlsbad, Calif. His listeners download his shows to their iPods and other digital music players.

"Patchett, 43, is among a growing number of people getting into podcasting, which is quickly becoming another of the Internet's equalizing technologies."

Matthew Fordahl. 'Podcasting' Lets Masses Do Radio Shows. Boston Globe. Feb. 7, 2005.

See also:
National Public Radio. 'PodCasting' to Music, Talk Fans Online. Day to Day. Feb. 1, 2005.

Steve Rubel. Pondering Podvertising Possibilities. iMediaConnection. Feb. 8, 2005.

Cindy L. Chick. Invasion of the Podcasters. LawLibTech. Feb. 2, 2005.

On the Media. Podcasting. Jan. 7, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:38 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

February 09, 2005

NY Times Interviews MPAA Chief

Deborah Solomon had the opportunity to interview Dan Glickman.

"As the new head of the Motion Picture Association of America, do you find it hard to follow in the steps of Jack Valenti, who was so flamboyant?

"It's true, no one knows who I am, but I am hoping that will change.

"Do you have any other ambitions?

"The big substantive issue for me right now is antipiracy, fighting those who want to get the content of movies free.

"Are we talking about school kids watching movies online? Or organized-crime lords?

"We are talking about an awful lot of people worldwide who are engaged in criminal activity. We need to educate kids so they understand the value of intellectual property."

Deborah Solomon. Going Hollywood. The New York Times. Feb. 6, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:45 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

February 08, 2005

French Teacher Fined for File Sharing

"A schoolteacher was fined 10,200 euros (13,300 dollars) for uploading and downloading music on the Internet in France's first big case designed to deter other peer-to-peer pirates.

"The 28-year-old teacher was ordered by a court in the Paris suburb of Pontoise to pay the money to copyright companies after being found guilty of illegally transferred 30 gigabytes of music files -- the equivalent of around 10,000 songs, or 614 albums."

Associated France Press. French Teacher Fined 10,200 Euros for Downloading Music. Yahoo! News. Feb. 2, 2005.

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:48 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

February 07, 2005

MP3 Founder to Launch New Digital Music Service

"Michael Robertson, the outspoken entrepreneur who helped set off the early digital music wars with his MP3.com site, said Wednesday that he is getting back in the online music business.

"Robertson, now chief executive both of Linux software company Linspire and Net-calling service SIPphone, said he wanted to give consumers--particularly those who use Linux-based computers--a broader choice of stores. His service would set itself apart from others by providing music without any copy protection added, he said.

"True to form, Robertson is launching a few barbs along with the new service, which will be unveiled at his Desktop Linux Summit conference in San Diego next week."

John Borland. MP3.com Founder Returns to Music Biz. News.com. Feb. 2, 2004.

Update: Matt Hines. MP3tunes.com Shuns Digital Rights Management. News.com. Feb. 9, 2005. (Michael Robinson launched MP3tunes.com on Wednesday. The songs are for sale in MP3 format without any digital rights management technology, which means the music can be copied without restrictions on any portable player that supports this standard.)

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:56 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

February 03, 2005

Activists Work to Save 'Eyes on the Prize'

"A group of file-sharing activists is practicing a little civil disobedience of its own in order to bring the documentary series Eyes on the Prize to a wider audience.

"As Wired News first reported, Eyes on the Prize, the 14-part series chronicling the civil rights movement, can no longer be broadcast on television and has never been released on DVD because of copyright restrictions.

"Old VHS tapes that remain in schools and libraries were the only way to view the landmark series, until now. Downhill Battle enlisted the help of a group called Common Sense Releasers to digitize the series and convert it to MPEG-4 format for distribution on the internet. The group hopes people will organize community screenings of the series around the country."

Katie Dean. Eyes on the Prize Hits P2P. Wired News. Jan. 27, 2005.

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Library Allows Users to Copy E-Books

"For audio-book addicts, the King County Library System has something for you and you don't even have to set foot in a library.

"Last November, the county library became the first in the nation to allow people to download audio 'e-books' to home computers.

"An e-book can be downloaded from the library's Web site onto a computer and either burned to a CD or transferred to an MP3 player.

"For free."

Susan Gilmore. King County Library Lets You Copy its E-books. The Seattle Times. Jan. 31, 2005.

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:19 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

February 02, 2005

The Future of Music

"On February 13, thousands of musicians from around the world will gather in Los Angeles at the Grammy Awards to celebrate music circa 2005.

"But the celebration won't hide the war that's going on. Record labels are threatened by technologies that give fans access to music in ways no one ever planned. They plead with Congress for more laws to control the fans.

"Activist organizations such as the Electronic Frontier Foundation and Public Knowledge (on whose boards this columnist sits) are fighting back. They (we) demand an end to the war, and the attack on innovation that it represents."

Lawrence Lessig. Why Wilco Is the Future of Music. Wired. Feb. 2005.

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February 01, 2005

MPAA Sues Additional P2P Users

"Hollywood studios filed a second round of lawsuits against online movie-swappers on Wednesday, stepping up legal pressure on the file-trading community.

"The Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) also made available a new free software tool so parents can scan their computers for file-swapping programs and for movie or music files which may be copyrighted.

"The group said its lawsuits were targeting people across the United States, but did not say how many people were being sued."

John Borland. MPAA Files New Film-Swapping Suits. News.com. Jan. 26, 2005.

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TV File Sharing Gains Popularity

"Isaac Richards didn't think of himself as a rebel, or a shock to the well-lubricated system of the television industry. He was merely unhappy with the cable box provided by his local operator.

"Dismayed by the sluggish channel-changing capability and the sparsely informative program guide, he decided to build a better cable box from scratch. Today, nearly three years since Mr. Richards, a 26-year-old computer software programmer in Willoughby, Ohio, embarked on his quest, hundreds of thousands of do-it-yourself television viewers are using the free software program he wrote, MythTV, to turn desktop personal computers into customized cable boxes, complete with the ability to record shows, surf the Web and strip out unwanted commercials.

"Millions of viewers are now watching illegal copies of television programs - even full seasons copied from popular DVD's - that are flitting about the Internet, thanks to other new programs that allow users to upload and download the large files quickly."

Lorne Manly and John Markoff. Steal This Show. The New York Times. Jan. 30, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

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January 29, 2005

RIAA Sues 717 More File Sharers

"The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) said Thursday that it had filed 717 new lawsuits against alleged file-swappers, including 68 unnamed people at universities."

John Borland. RIAA Sues 717 File-Swappers. News.com. Jan. 26, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

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January 28, 2005

eXeem Public Beta Released

"Underground programmers hoping to capitalize on the BitTorrent file-swapping community on Friday unveiled highly anticipated software that some peer-to-peer advocates believe could blunt recent legal attacks from Hollywood.

"Called eXeem, the software aims to merge the speedy downloads of BitTorrent with the powerful global search capabilities of Kazaa or eDonkey. The first public version of the program was released by a company called Swarm Systems but has been associated with SuprNova, a Web site that, until recently, drew millions of people seeking free content online through the popular BitTorrent software."

John Borland. eXeem Opens New File-Swapping Doors. News.com. Jan. 21, 2005.

See also:
Sean Michael Kerner. BitTorrent P2P Trackers on The Move. InternetNews.com. Jan. 25, 2005.

Editor's note: See also SNTReport's prior story on eXeem software.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

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Napster Mulls Movie Downloads

"Digital-music service Napster is considering remaking itself to offer movie downloads too.

"Speaking at the Midem music conference in Cannes this week, Napster CEO Chris Gorog said the company is considering offering movies alongside its current catalog of some 1 million music tracks.

"'We are currently considering moving into video, particularly to tap the younger video game generation,' the Financial Times quoted him as saying. 'I do think that while there are huge players in the delivery of movies like Sky, there could be a role for Napster.'"

Jo Best. Napster Eyes Movie Downloads. News.com. Jan. 24, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

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January 27, 2005

WebEx to Offer Free Remote PC Access

"WebEx Communications Inc, best-known for its online meeting service, is moving more aggressively into online services for the small business and consumer markets. Its first target will be remote access for Windows PCs.

"On Monday, the San Jose, Calif., company will announce a service called MyWebExPC that lets users access a remote computer's desktop through a Web browser.

"WebEx will be battling existing remote-access offerings such as Citrix Online LLC's GoToMyPC service and Symantec Corp.'s pcAnywhere software."

Matt Hicks.WebEx Enters Remote PC Access Market. eWeek. Jan. 21, 2005.

See also:
Joris Evers. WebEx Readies Remote Access App. PC World. Jan. 24, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

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January 26, 2005

Tech Companies Urge High Court to Protect Innovation

"Several large technology corporations will urge the U.S. Supreme Court today to continue to shield businesses and innovators from legal responsibility if their products or services are used by consumers for illegal acts.

"The companies, including industry giants Microsoft Corp., Yahoo Inc., Google, America Online Inc. and Apple Computer Inc., will argue in court filings that the innovations that have helped fuel U.S. economic growth could grind to a halt if protections from liability were stripped away.

"At issue is the continuing popularity of Internet file-sharing services, whose software lets users swap digital music, videos and software regardless of whether they are copyrighted works that should be paid for each time they are sent to another consumer."

Jonathan Krim. Tech Firms to Seek Legal Protection From Pirating. WashingtonPost.com. Jan. 24, 2005.

See also:
U.S. Supreme Court. On Writ of Certiorari: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer v. Grokster, Ltd.. (.pdf) Jan. 24, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

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January 24, 2005

Online Music Stores Go Mainstream

"Online music stores broke into the mainstream in 2004, with more than 200 million tracks sold in the United States and Europe, a tenfold increase from the previous year, according to data released Wednesday.

"Among well-known brands like iTunes and Napster, the number of online music stores quadrupled to more than 230 in 2004, according to the report from the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI) trade group. The number of songs available online has doubled to about 1 million songs.

"The IFPI said research firm Jupiter expects the $330 million online music market to double in 2005."

Reuters. Online Music Stores Break Into Mainstream. News.com. Jan. 19, 2005.

See also:
International Federation of the Phonographic Industry. IFPI Report Sees the Digital Music Market Taking Off in 2005. (Press Release.) Jan. 19, 2005.

IFPI:OS. Digital Music Report. (.pdf) Jan. 2005

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

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January 22, 2005

California Bill to Outlaw P2P

"A bill introduced in California's Legislature last week has raised the possibility of jail time for developers of file-swapping software who don't stop trades of copyrighted movies and songs online.

"The proposal, introduced by Los Angeles Sen. Kevin Murray, takes direct aim at companies that distribute software such as Kazaa, eDonkey or Morpheus. If passed and signed into law, it could expose file-swapping software developers to fines of up to $2,500 per charge, or a year in jail, if they don't take 'reasonable care' in preventing the use of their software to swap copyrighted music or movies--or child pornography.

"Peer-to-peer software companies and their allies immediately criticized the bill as a danger to technological innovation, and as potentially unconstitutional."

John Borland. State Bill Could Cripple P2P. News.com. Jan. 18, 2005.

See also:
No author. California Senator Goes After P2P. Red Herring. Jan. 18, 2005.

Jason Schultz. Induce -- California Style. EFF Deep Links. Jan. 18, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

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A P2P Manifesto

"Marco Montemagno, an Italian new mediacommunication expert, entrepreneur and blogger, who has worked and collaborated with some of the most established media corporations including Italy's RAI and Murdoch's Sky TV network, has just published online a notable P2P manifesto, in which he shares his uncensored view of what the majors (established media) should expect from P2P and its unstoppable growth.

"Montemagno central tenet is that P2P is unstoppable, good, useful, effective and a major disruptive technology able to breach into the oligarchy of established media business."

Robin Hood. Why P2P File Sharing Is Good: The P2P Manifesto Content Delivery And Distribution. Robin Good. Jan. 17, 2005.

Attribution: SNTReport.com first discovered news of the P2P Manifesto through a posting in Slashdot, edited by Rob Malda.

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Study Shows Online Music Stores Fall Short

"Online music stores like Apple Computer's iTunes have been a boon to fans and the beleaguered music industry, but many of them still have a long way to go, according to new research released Tuesday.

"A study from market research firm Shelley Taylor & Associates blasts music stores for confusing navigation and locking users into proprietary formats and music players.

"'As a result, users' initial enthusiasm is being deflated as they realize they have been conned--there are more limitations imposed on legitimate digital downloads, media players and portable devices than advertised,' Taylor said."

Reuters. Study: Online Music Stores Falling Short. News.com. Jan. 18, 2005.

See also:
Shelley Taylor & Associates. New Study Accuses Music Download Services of Spreading Latest Consumer Disease: Digital Deficit Disorder. (Press Release.) Jan. 18, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

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January 21, 2005

A Roundup of Photo Sharing Services

"These days, nearly everyone has a digital camera or camera phone. And many new online services offer varying features for people who want to share their pictures, post them to blogs, or tag or comment on others' photos.

"Here's a roundup of four of the best of these services."

Daniel Terdiman. Photo Sites Share and Share Alike. Wired News. Jan. 17, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

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NFL Game Broadcasts Coming to IPods

"Audio content provider Audible on Tuesday struck a deal with the National Football League to offer recordings of games on portable music players.

"Under terms of the agreement, Audible.com will offer MP3-compatible audio broadcasts of the Super Bowl and conference championship games. Listeners can download the entire broadcast, or selected highlights, the morning after the game.

"Consumers can download the games, from NFL.com, Audible.com and other online retailers, onto their MP3 players, including Apple Computer's iPod, Audible a said."

CNET Staff. NFL Games Heading to Your iPod. News.com. Jan. 18, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

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January 20, 2005

Current State of Copyright Framework

As reported in SNTReport.com recently, BayTSP announced FirstSource, an automated system that identifies the first users to upload copyright or trademark-protected content to P2P file sharing networks.

SNTReport.com also reported the legal and monetary issues surrounding documentary filmmaker's inability to broadcast or sell copies of Eyes on the Prize.

"The two news items offer a nice pair of brackets in which to frame the current state of copyright affairs. On the one hand, the public is denied the opportunity to view one of the most compelling histories of modern American life produced in the last 30 years because copyright restrictions make it financially unfeasible to broadcast it. On the other hand, actual copyright violation continues unabated, giving rise to an entire market niche devoted to the task of stamping it out. Is there any way to look at this situation in which it is not a complete mess?"

"The tragedy that a socially enriching documentary series like 'Eyes on the Prize' might fall victim to a copyright snafu seems like the kind of thing that could be addressed by selective tweaking of copyright laws. Perhaps a waiver for materials deemed 'educational' or a weakening of restrictions on the protections granted to archival footage. When do the benefits to society from increased access to information outweigh the financial interests of those who own the copyrights? In an ideal world, this is the kind of question that a democratic society could debate and answer to its own satisfaction."

"But we do not live in an ideal world. We live in a world where lobbyists for entertainment corporations routinely get the laws rewritten to serve their own profit-seeking special interests, and where trend lines reveal that copyright protections are only increased, never weakened."

Andrew Leonard. Eyes on Your Copyrighted Prize. Salon. Jan. 5, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: Salon.com normally requires a paid subscription, but you can view articles if you register for a free day pass.)

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January 19, 2005

Pew Survey Evaluates Future of Internet

"Technology experts and scholars foresee a bigger role for the internet in people's personal and work lives in the next decade.

"A wide-ranging survey of technology leaders, scholars, industry officials, and analysts finds that most internet experts expect attacks on the network infrastructure in the coming decade as the internet becomes more embedded in everyday and commercial life.

"In addition, there was notable agreement among the 1,286 experts in this survey that in the next 10 years the internet will be more deeply integrated in our physical environments and high-speed connections will proliferate – with mixed results. They believe the dawning of the blog era will bring radical change to the news and publishing industry and they think the internet will have the least impact on religious institutions.

Pew Internet and American Life Project. Internet Evolution. Jan. 9, 2005.

Susannah Fox, et al. The Future of the Internet. (.pdf) Pew Internet and American Life Project. Jan. 9, 2005.

Pew Internet and American Life Project.Technology Experts and Scholars Foresee a Bigger Role for the Internet in People's Personal and Work Lives in the Next Decade. (Press Release) Jan. 9, 2005.

See also:
Princeton Survey Research Associates. Internet Experts Web Survey. (.pdf) Dec. 6, 2004.

Elon University/Pew Internet and American Life Project. Predictions Database. Imagining the Internet. Jan. 9, 2005.

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:55 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Streamload Offers 10GB of Storage, Free

"A company called Streamload is offering consumers a free 10 gigabyte online storage locker for multimedia files, potentially raising the stakes for larger companies such as Yahoo and America Online.

"Streamload typically provides online storage space for a price, making it one of the few companies to survive in that business through the dot-com shakeout. However, it is increasingly competing with larger companies that offer online homes for digital photographs, and even the huge archive space provided by Google's Gmail service.

"Company executives say the offer of big online storage lockers, once used only by advanced computer users, is now more relevant to a broader public that has large collections of digital photographs and MP3 files."

John Borland. Company Offers 10GB of Net Storage, for Free. News.com. Jan. 14, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

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January 18, 2005

New Service Identifies First P2P Uploads

"File traders who seed peer-to-peer networks with copyrighted material can be identified and traced, according to a US company.

"BayTSP, based in California, US, monitors peer-to-peer (P2P) trading networks using a technique called software 'spidering'. The new software, called FirstSource, allows it to determine which user first uploaded a particular file for trading. It does this by mimicking the behaviour of a user on a massive scale - sending out multiple requests for a file extremely quickly. It deduces the culprits by assuming that only they will have the full 100% of the file, having uploaded the original."

Will Knight. Peer-to-Peer 'Seeders' Could be Targeted. New Scientist.com. Jan. 14, 2005.

No author. BayTSP Launches New Service That Identifies First Uploads To EDonkey, Bit Torrent P2P File-Sharing Networks. Mi2N.com. Jan. 11, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

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January 17, 2005

Altnet Seeks Licensing Fees From P2P Competitors

"A software company and its parent are claiming they hold patent rights to widely used Internet song-swapping technology, and they are demanding that several file-sharing networks obtain licenses in order to continue operating.

"Attorneys for Altnet Inc. and its parent company, Sherman Oaks, Calif.-based Brilliant Digital Entertainment Inc., sent letters to several U.S.-based file-swapping firms -- including Lime Wire LLC, BearShare operator Free Peers Inc. and Mashboxx -- claiming that the companies were using patented technology in their products. The letter doesn't explicitly threaten a lawsuit but does invite the firms to 'discuss licensing opportunities.'

"'You could call it a warning. We call it an offer to license our technology,' said Lawrence M. Hadley, counsel for Altnet and Brilliant Digital.

"A valid patent would give the firm a tight hold on a popular means of identifying and trading digital copies of music, movies and software, just as a fledgling industry has sprung up to turn file sharing into a commercial enterprise."

David McGuire. Patents Pressed Against File-Sharing Networks. WashingtonPost.com. Jan. 13, 2005.

See also:
John Borland. Altnet Seeks Patent Royalties From P2P. News.com. Jan. 12, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:15 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

January 15, 2005

Is That A Bunny in Your Pocket?

"'Call Girl' is getting a whole new meaning.

"Playboy has found a new way to peddle its nudie pictures to gawkers on the go: over their cell phones. Last month Playboy joined the growing legion of porn purveyors marketing to handheld devices when it launched iBod, nude photos sized for the iPod Photo.

"The company won't say when the cellular centerfolds will be available or how customers will be charged, only that they're on the case."

David Epstein. Playboy Goes for Hard Cell. Daily News. Jan. 12, 2005.

See also:
Richard Shim. Playboy's Free Come-on Turns iPod into iBod. News.com. Dec. 17, 2004.

Ben Charny. Barely Legal? Strip Poker Hits Cingular Phones. News.com. Jan. 6, 2005.

Evan Hansen. XXX, on a Small Screen Near You. News.com. Dec. 30, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

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January 13, 2005

World's Smallest P2P Application

"In a bid to demonstrate the futility of trying to ban peer-to-peer file-sharing networks, a computer scientist has written the shortest P2P program ever.

"Like all P2P applications, Tiny P2P, written by Edward Felten of Princeton University in New Jersey, establishes a network between PCs on which files can be transferred without using a central server. Members of the network make content on their hard drives available to everyone else.

"Felten is concerned that Congress might revive a piece of legislation called the Induce Act, which would outlaw file-sharing networks, and he wrote Tiny P2P to make a point."

No author. Simple Programs Make File Sharing Inevitable. NewScientist.com. Jan. 8, 2005.

See also:
Iain Thomson. Boffin Writes World's Smallest P2P Application. IT Week. Jan. 7, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

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January 12, 2005

K. Matthew Dames Gives Presentation on Fair Use

K. Matthew Dames, executive editor of SNTReport.com, is presenting a talk in Washington, DC this afternoon entitled "Fair Use in the Digital Age." The talk will analyze Section 107 of the copyright law, including where fair use falls within the copyright landscape, how information professionals can properly analyze the law, and how the nature of fair use has changed as the dominant information format has evolved from analog to digital. Today's presentation is part of a brown bag lecture series on information law and policy issues that Dames will be moderating throughout the winter and early spring of 2005.

Series Description: Once a legal backwater that interested only specialists, information law issues are now considered central to the nation’s communications, legal and economic infrastructure. While information law is more important than ever, information professionals often lack the necessary knowledge and tools to navigate the thicket of laws, regulations, treaties and policies.

This brown bag luncheon series will address some of the most important legal and policy issues that information professionals face today. Sponsored by the DC Chapter of SLA, National Capitol Chapter (NCC) of AIIM, the Washington DC Chapter of SCIP, Northern Virginia Chapter of ARMA, Federal Law Librarians’ SIS, Adobe Systems Inc., and STG International, this series will identify information professionals’ responsibilities, providing a forum for discussing and resolving some of the profession’s most important issues, sharing resources for further research and problem-solving.

The sessions will be moderated by K. Matthew Dames, JD, MLS, an information policy expert who teaches information law at Syracuse University’s School of Information Studies. A comprehensive set of handouts will be created for each topic and posted to the DC/SLA website and SNTReport.com.

Schedule: Join us on the second Wednesday of each month, January through April 2005, as we explore copyright, fair use, licensing digital resources, digital rights management, and open access.
Session 1, January 12, 2005: Copyright & Fair Use
The copyright doctrine of fair use has become critically important in the digital age, yet it remains one of copyright law’s most misunderstood and misapplied doctrines. During this first luncheon meeting, we will analyze what fair use means, including:
- Translating the law into plain English
- Establishing a system for determining whether fair use applies
- Discussing whether fair use remains viable given the changes in the law over the last decade.

Session 2, February 9, 2005: Licensing Digital Resources

Session 3, March 9, 2005: Digital Rights Management

Session 4, April 13, 2005: Open Access

Site & Registration Details:The brown-bags will begin promptly at 12 noon (12:00 pm – 2:00 pm) at the AeA David Packard Conference Center, 601 Pennsylvania Ave., NW, North Bldg - Suite 600 (Metro: Archives/Navy Memorial) in Washington, DC. Space is limited, so register early at the AIIM National Capitol Chapter website.

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January 11, 2005

PC World's Legislative Year in Review

"For good or ill, Congress kept to its usual snail's pace on a number of controversial issues ranging from digital copyright to spyware; other government agencies, however, made up for some of the slack.

"Congress tried. It really did. And it came so close on several issues--spyware and digital copyright most prominently. But though a number of bills were proposed, and some were even passed by the House or the Senate, very few actually became law. The Federal Communications Commission, the Supreme Court, and the Department of Justice, however, were all busy bees.

"Below, I run through six of the year's major topics, what's been decided, the considerable amount still left on the to-do list for 2005--and my guess as to how much of that list Congress will actually get to this year."

Anush Yegyazarian. Legislative Year in Review: All Talk, Little Action. PC World. Jan. 6, 2005.

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January 08, 2005

Exeem to Launch Decentralized, Searchable Network

"Just weeks after legal attacks crippled the popular BitTorrent file-swapping community, an underground programmer from its ranks has stepped forward to announce new software designed to withstand future onslaughts from Hollywood.

"Dubbed Exeem, the software has already been distributed in a closed beta, or early test format, by the creators of the SuprNova.org Web site, which was until late last month the most popular hub for the BitTorrent file-swapping community.

"Last week, the head of that now-defunct site, a man known as 'Sloncek,' officially announced the Exeem project in an interview on the NovaStream Webcasting network. He said that it would be a modified version of the popular BitTorrent technology, but transformed into a decentralized, searchable network similar to Kazaa or eDonkey."

John Borland. A New Hope for BitTorrent?. News.com. Jan. 5, 2005.

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January 07, 2005

Entertainment Industry Sees Piracy as Major Threat

"People working in the entertainment industry see digital piracy as a major threat to their businesses, according to a new study by ,In-Stat/MDR.

"In a survey of film and TV industry workers, nearly half said illegal theft of entertainment content threatened their bottom lines, In-Stat said Tuesday. About 27 percent of those surveyed said they had already lost revenue because of piracy. The survey was taken by 1,806 people working in the variety, broadcasting, cable and news sectors.

"The entertainment industry is trying to grapple with illegal downloading of music from the Internet, as well as file sharing and the use of peer-to-peer software. These efforts got a boost last month, when the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to hear a case on whether companies that produce file-sharing software can be held legally responsible when people use their products to swap copyrighted material.

Dinesh C. Sharma. Piracy Hits Hollywood in the Wallet. News.com. Jan. 4, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:43 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

January 05, 2005

LokiTorrent Fights Back at MPAA

"The latest peer-to-peer site to come into the legal crosshairs of the motion-picture industry promised this week to fight, and put out a virtual hat to finance its legal fund.

"LokiTorrent, a Web site and index of files available through a peer-to-peer technology known as BitTorrent, posted a letter from the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) on its site on Tuesday. The letter states that the MPAA has filed suit in district court in Texas against the site and demands that Loki Torrent cease linking to video files that could infringe on studios' copyrights.

"LokiTorrent is the latest file-sharing site to run into the legal guns of the motion picture industry. Several peer-to-peer sites disappeared from the Internet earlier this month, after the MPAA filed suits against them."

Robert Lemos. LokiTorrent Fights MPAA Legal Attack. News.com. Dec. 30, 2004.

See also:
Jim Wagner. BitTorrent Operator Bites Back at MPAA. InternetNews.com. Dec. 30, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:26 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

EMI, Sony BMG Partner for New Music Formats

"In a bold move to pave the way for more widespread licensing of music publishing rights, EMI Music Publishing and Sony BMG Music Entertainment have entered an umbrella agreement that sets working guidelines for clearing rights to new digital music delivery opportunities on phones, PCs, digital cable systems and emerging physical configurations.

The pact, announced Dec. 17, which pairs the world's top publishing house and the second-largest record company globally, promises to drive the clearance of thousands of copyrighted works for new distribution formats.

"The deal covers North American rights for master ring tones and ringbacks; DualDisc, the new two-sided music format that combines CD and DVD functionality; digital video distribution, including video-on-demand services and video downloads; multi-session audio discs like copy-protected CDs; and 'locked' content for hard drives and storage media that consumers may 'unlock' by purchasing the tracks or albums online."

Reuters. EMI, Sony BMG Ink Digital Music Pact. News.com. Dec. 20, 2004.

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January 04, 2005

HMV, Microsoft Partner for Music Service

"British music giant HMV on Wednesday announced plans to launch a digital music service next year, using software being developed by Microsoft.

"Music downloads from the service will be compatible with the Windows Media Audio standard and usable by more than 75 portable players currently on the market, HMV said. Portable players, as well as the service software, will be sold in the company's stores and online. The service is slated to launch in the second half of 2005.

"Microsoft applications under development for the service include a customized jukebox that will let users select, purchase and manage their music online--all in one place. HMV said it intends to spend about $19 million (10 million pounds) on the download service and initial marketing."

Dinesh C. Sharma. HMV Taps Microsoft for Help With Music Service. News.com. Dec. 22, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:16 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

January 03, 2005

A Look Back at 2004

"In the legislative battle over copyright and file swapping, you might assume the entertainment industry's lobbyists are sitting fat and pretty.

"Nothing could be further from the truth, and the constellation of forces in Washington could be ripe for a redrawing, said Declan McCullagh--one of the many columnists who offered CNET News.com readers insight and analysis of the major tech events of 2004."

Charles Cooper. Year in Review:Politicos in the Crosshairs. News.com. Dec. 25, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:54 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

December 22, 2004

BitTorrent Reacts to MPAA's Pressure

"BitTorrent 'hubs' that publish lists of movies, TV shows and other free downloads suddenly went dark this weekend, in a major victory for Hollywood that highlights vulnerabilities in technology behind the world's busiest peer-to-peer network.

"Last week, the Motion Picture Association of America launched a series of worldwide legal actions, aimed at people who ran the infrastructure for BitTorrent networks being used to distribute movies and other copyrighted materials without permission.

"The MPAA's actions have put pressure on a short list of large Web sites that had served as hubs for the BitTorrent community and that had operated for months or even years. Many of those sites have now vanished almost overnight, including the SuprNova.org site that was by far the most popular gathering point for the community, serving more than a million people a day, according to one academic study.

John Borland. BitTorrent File-Swapping Networks Face Crisis. News.com. Dec. 20, 2004.

See also:
Peter Svensson. Popular File-Sharing Site Shuts Down. eWeek. Dec. 20, 2004.

Johan Pouwelse. The BitTorrent P2P File-Sharing System. The Register. Dec. 18, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:56 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

December 20, 2004

Eight Copyright Myths Exposed

"A handful of myths have spawned practices, particularly among bloggers and Website owners, that turn copyright law on its head. These myths are rooted in the assumption that everything is up for use online unless and until proven otherwise. Those myths and that ease have fostered a presumption of entitlement that causes Netizens to treat the Internet (and non-electronic sources as well) as a buffet spread of photos, articles, sounds and multi-media files free for the plucking and posting.

"Despite all the media attention to recent lawsuits cracking down on unauthorized music downloads, these myths are still in surprisingly widespread circulation. In the past six months, otherwise educated people have asserted eight different fallacies to me as if they were law. Every one of them has the potential to lead the ill-informed into the land of copyright infringement, where even a short stay can carry a whopping price tag.

"Note: The discussion below will use the term 'permission' to include both explicit permission from the copyright holder and any legally imputed permission, whether due to the work being in the public domain or through fair use, the exercise of the special reproduction right granted to libraries and archives under 17 U.S.C. Section 108, or the limited instructional exemption granted by 17 U.S.C. Section 110. Also, this discussion addresses only works created in the United States or otherwise subject to U.S. copyright law."

Kathy Biehl. Bloggers Beware: Debunking Eight Copyright Myths of the Online World. LLRX.com. Dec. 16, 2004.

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Apple iTunes Sells 200 Million Songs

"Apple Computer on Thursday said it has now sold more than 200 million songs through its iTunes Music Store--and it has new plans to keep the sales trend continuing upward.

"It took the company 11 months to sell its first 50 million songs and then another four months to get to 100 million songs. Three months later, the company hit 150 million, and it took just two months to get to 200 million.

"Apple has not only kept its sales growing, but it has maintained a commanding share of the online sales market, despite stepped-up competition from stores using Microsoft's Windows Media file format. The company also faces an uphill battle to convert those still using free file-swapping services such as Kazaa."

Ina Fried. iTunes Hits 200 Million Download Mark. News.com. Dec. 16, 2004.

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December 18, 2004

MPAA Targets P2P Network Operators

"The Motion Picture Association of America launched a new legal campaign Tuesday targeting the BitTorrent and eDonkey file-swapping networks, two technologies widely used to trade movies online.

"Ratcheting up its previous online antipiracy efforts, the Hollywood group is working with law enforcement agencies in the United States and Europe to target and arrest individuals who play a critical role in the functioning of each type of network.

"Criminal actions have already been filed in Europe, including the seizure of seven Net-connected servers, with their operator still wanted by French police, a representative of the French government said."

John Borland. MPAA Targets Core BitTorrent, eDonkey Users. News.com. Dec. 14, 2004.

See also:
Xeni Jardin. Hollywood Wants BitTorrent Dead. Wired News. Dec 14, 2004.

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December 16, 2004

Video for Podcasting

"With the success of podcasting -- a recent technology that lets anyone subscribe to and play back audio feeds on an iPod -- the natural next step is technology that can do the same with video.

"First a podcasting primer: It works much the same way as syndication of content through RSS or Atom, except that instead of text from blogs or news sites, podcasting sends songs directly to iPods or other MP3 players.

"Now comes video. Already, there are rudimentary applications like Vogbrowser, which offers video feeds to which people can subscribe, much like they do with RSS feeds. There are more products like this on the way."

Daniel Terdiman. Video Feeds Follow Podcasting. Wired News. Dec. 7, 2004.

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December 14, 2004

High Court to Hear MGM-Grokster case

"The Supreme Court, accepting urgent pleas from the recording and film industries, agreed on Friday to decide whether the online services that enable copyrighted songs and movies to be shared freely over the Internet can be held liable themselves for aiding copyright infringement.

"For the entertainment industry and for everyday consumers, the case is likely to produce the most important copyright decision since the Supreme Court ruled in 1984 that the makers of the videocassette recorder were not liable for violating the copyrights of movies that owners of the devices recorded at home.

"The earlier decision, Sony Corporation of America v. Universal City Studios, ushered in one technological revolution. The new case, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios v. Grokster Ltd., No. 04-480, comes as another is already well under way. More than 85 million copyrighted songs and a smaller but rapidly growing number of movies are downloaded from the Internet every day by people using file-sharing services."

Linda Greenhouse. Justices to Hear Case on Sharing of Music Files. The New York Times. Dec. 11, 2004.

See also:
John Borland. Supreme Court to Hear P2P Case. News.com. Dec. 10, 2004.

Ashlee Vance. The Supremes Prep for P2P Battle Royal. The Register. Dec. 10, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

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Canada Buries Copyright Myths

"The intense lobbying for stronger copyright legislation in response to music downloading, which culminated in last month's lobby day on Parliament Hill, is premised on three key pillars. First, that the Canadian recording industry has sustained significant financial losses in recent years due to decreased music sales. Second, that those losses can be attributed to peer-to-peer file sharing. Third, that the losses have materially harmed Canadian artists. The time has come to acknowledge that each of these pillars is a myth.

"Last week's column addressed the first two pillars. It documented how CRIA has been inconsistent in its claims of financial losses. The column also demonstrated how peer-to-peer file sharing is at best only marginally responsible for the losses that have been sustained in recent years.

"Following last week's column, readers highlighted yet more factors including a significant decline in the number of new releases issued over the past five years and the view that the CD sales decline simply reflects broader economic conditions.

"Against this backdrop, along with news that shipments of CDs in Canada jumped by more than 12 per cent in the six-month period following the Federal Court of Canada's file sharing decision, it is time to slay the third peer-to-peer myth — that Canadian artists have been materially harmed by the decline in revenue."

Michael Geist. Time Music Industry Focused on Product. Toronto Star. Dec. 6, 2004.

See also:
Michael Geist. Numbers Don't Crunch Against Downloading. Toronto Star. Nov. 29, 2004.

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December 11, 2004

A Clever Way to Promote Mobile Marketing

"The Incredibles has so far racked up over $200 million in U.S. ticket sales, gathered another $60 million overseas, and broken into the top 50 all-time-domestic blockbusters.

"But what's really incredible about this animated superhero movie isn't just the box office. It's the way co-creators at The Walt Disney Co. and Pixar Animation Studios have marketed the film over mobile devices. Pick up your phone or log onto Disney Mobile, the company's cell-centric Web site, and you can download two dozen Incredibles wallpaper graphics, two new video games and three dozen custom-made ring tones--including one of villain Syndrome growling, 'What, you expected a cute little ring?'

"It's a clever way to promote the movie--but perhaps just as importantly, it's a strong new revenue stream for both content and service providers. As the cell phone companies have expanded their presence among youth markets, other businesses are discovering that the mobile format is a great way to reach kids, and that these young consumers are willing and able to spend serious money over the phone."

David M. Ewalt. An 'Incredible' Marketing Ploy. Forbes.cm. Nov. 30, 2004.

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Video Games As a Broadcast Medium

"Alex St. John is nothing like his hit games.

"They are mesmerizing lullabies, transporting you into a relaxed state with their repetitive sounds, images and puzzles. The co-founder of game producer WildTangent Inc., on the other hand, is a booming bear of a man who clobbers you with one grand pronouncement after another.

"'There are more people playing WildTangent games right now on the Internet than there are people playing games on the PlayStation 2 online,' St. John declared during an interview over lunch in the District. 'So I made gaming a broadcast medium.'

"All told, WildTangent says its games, offered as a mix of free and premium versions, have been played more than 150 million times in the past six months."

Leslie Walker. Where the Game Is the Medium. WashingtonPost.com. Dec. 2, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

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December 09, 2004

Reflections on the 108th Congress

At the Chicago Association of Law Libraries November meeting, Mary Alice Baish, American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) Associate Washington Affairs Representative, spoke on "The 108th Congress Draws to an End: the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly."

"I’d like to give you an overview of our core issues during the past two years—from the perspective of what was good, what was bad, and what was really ugly.

"I’m going to cover them under four broad categories: First, appropriations. Second, copyright and digital rights management. Third, the USA Patriot Act. And fourth, access to government information."

Mary Alice Baish. The 108th Congress: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly. (.pdf) American Association of Law Libraries. Nov. 17, 2004.

Attribution: SNTReport.com first discovered news of Mary Alice Baish's presentation through a posting in LibraryLaw Blog, edited by Mary Minow.

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December 07, 2004

Pew Survey Addresses File-Sharing

"The battle over digital copyrights and illegal file sharing is often portrayed as a struggle between Internet scofflaws and greedy corporations. Online music junkies with no sense of the marketplace, the argument goes, want to download, copy and share copyrighted materials without restriction. The recording industry, on the other hand, wants to squeeze dollars - by lawsuit and legislation, if necessary - from its property.

"A survey released yesterday by the Pew Internet and American Life Project, an arm of the Pew Research Center in Washington, aims to change that. The report, 'Artists, Musicians and the Internet,' combines and compares the opinions of three groups: the general public, those who identify themselves as artists of various stripes (including filmmakers, writers and digital artists) and a somewhat more self-selecting category of musicians.

"Most notably, it is the first large-scale snapshot of what the people who actually produce the goods that downloaders seek (and that the industry jealously guards) think about the Internet and file-sharing."

Tom Zeller Jr. Pew File-Sharing Survey Gives a Voice to Artists. The New York Times. Dec. 6, 2004.

Mary Madden. Artists, Musicians and the Internet (.pdf) Pew Internet and American Life Project. Dec. 5, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

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"W3C10" Gathering Looks Back, Looks Forward

"Internet luminaries gathered in Boston Wednesday to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), honor its founder, Director and Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee, and look forward to another decade of innovation.

"Speakers at the gathering recounted, in sometimes excruciating detail, the events leading to the creation of the Web and the W3C, which has promoted a long line of key Web standards, including HTML (Hypertext Markup Language) and XML (Extensible Markup Language). Experts, including representatives of leading technology firms, also looked forward to future developments backed by the W3C, including the Semantic Web, which will allow users to access and connect more types and sources of data online.

"Berners-Lee was the star of the gathering, and he used the occasion to focus attention on W3C's ongoing work, including the Semantic Web, a World Wide Web extension that greatly expands the information types and relationships between information that can be represented online."

Paul Roberts. W3C Focuses on Future at 10th Anniversary Meeting. InfoWorld. Dec. 2, 2004.

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December 06, 2004

Firefox Uses Creative Commons Search Engine

"There are probably not many that are familiar with the new search engine for finding material online that can be used without paying royalty or clearing copyright issues. Finding this kind of material is naturally of great interest to e.g. people in the media who need to know if they can use a given text, photo or stream etc. without risking a lawsuit.

"Since September a beta version of a Creative Commons search engine has been available that lets you search for just this kind of thing.

"This new search engine has not been launched in a big way, but in the new web browser FireFox 1.0 from Mozilla, it has high visibility: In the search box in the upper right corner, the Creative Commons search engine is right there among Google, Yahoo!, Amazon, Ebay and Dictionary.com!"

Lars Vage. Creative Commons Search Engine in the New FireFox. Pandia. Dec. 2, 2004.

See also:
Creative Commons. Creative Commons Unique Search Tool Now Integrated into Firefox 1.0. (Press Release) Nov. 22, 2004.

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December 04, 2004

Record Companies Befriend Napster Creator

"As a teenager, Shawn Fanning brought free music to the masses, creating the Napster file-swapping program and unleashing a technological genie that granted the wishes of fans seeking virtually any song at any time - gratis. Now, the recording industry is turning to the college dropout turned cult hero, with dreams of putting the genie back in its bottle.

"The major record corporations, who accused Mr. Fanning's Napster of ravaging CD sales and weakening the underpinnings of the industry, now say that a licensed file-sharing system could bolster their position in their legal fight against piracy as well as increase digital music sales.

"Mr. Fanning, now 24 and part of a new venture called Snocap, has lately written software that would recognize songs being made available on a peer-to-peer network and let copyright holders set terms for its price and its use by consumers who wish to download them."

Jeff Leeds. Music Industry Turns to Napster Creator for Help. The New York Times. Dec. 3, 2004.

See also:
John Borland. Napster Founder Unveils Funding, Label Support. News.com. Dec. 2, 2004.

John Borland. Music Rebels Seek to Tame P2P. News.com. Nov. 16, 2004.

John Borland and Stefanie Olsen. Napster's Fanning Has Snocap-ped Vision. News.com. Jan. 2, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

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December 02, 2004

Podcasting Emerges as New Killer App

"Apple's wildly popular iPod music player is really becoming pervasive — and no longer confined to music.

"It has lent its name to a hot new technology dubbed 'podcasting'. In recent months, podcasting sites have spread across the internet like bushfire. What is it? Think of it as time-shifted radio. Talk shows, news reports, educational material, sporting news, agriculture reports, music shows, even sex talk – they're all being offered as podcasts.

"That means they're formatted as MP3 files and set up for downloading or streaming via the internet. No longer are you tied to the schedule of your favourite broadcaster: listen at any time on your Mac or Windows PC."

David Frith. Podcasting Takes Off. AustralianIT. Nov. 30, 2004.

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December 01, 2004

Music Companies Support P2P File-Sharing

"Three major recording companies have agreed to make their music available to be shared and sold over a new online file-swapping service that aims to lure music fans away from rival services where trading of music and movies remains unfettered.

"Universal Music Group, Sony BMG Music Entertainment and Warner Music Group - three of the four major recording companies - have licensed their catalog of music to Saratoga Springs, N.Y.-based Wurld Media, the firm said Wednesday.

"Wurld Media plans to launch its file-sharing software, dubbed Peer Impact, early next year.

"The company said it would allow consumers to buy and share music, video and other content, while ensuring 'that artists and rights holders receive their due compensation for each file shared on the network.' The company added that the service would only distribute media that is licensed or in the public domain."

Alex Veiga. 3 Giants Create New Online Music Service. WashingtonPost.com. Nov. 26, 2004.

See also:
Katie Dean. P2P Tilts Toward Legitimacy. Wired News. Nov. 24, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

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November 30, 2004

Recording Industry Battles Kazaa in Australia

"The next chapter in the global legal battle between the recording industry and file-sharing services began in Sydney, Australia on Monday when the owners of the hugely popular Kazaa software went to trial to defend against civil copyright infringement charges.

"The entertainment industry already has sued file-sharing services in the United States. Two federal courts in California have cleared Grokster Ltd. and StreamCast Networks Inc. of liability, though the industry has appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court.

"Michael Geist, a law professor at the University of Ottawa, said the U.S. cases should not directly affect the outcome of the Australian lawsuit, but all share the principle that a software developer is not directly responsible for the activities of its users, just as Xerox cannot be blamed for copying done on its machines."

Mike Cooper. Recording Industry, File-Share Face Off. WashingtonPost.com. Nov. 26, 2004.

See also:
Reuters. Kazaa Heads to Court for File-Swap Trial. News.com. Nov. 28, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

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November 29, 2004

Rip & Burn Made Legal

"While the music industry attempts to shutter peer-to-peer services in court and in Congress, one company is using P2P networks to promote and pay artists.

"Shared Media Licensing, based in Seattle, offers Weed, a software program that allows interested music fans to download a song and play it three times for free. They are prompted to pay for the 'Weed file' the fourth time. Songs cost about a dollar and can be burned to an unlimited number of CDs, passed around on file-sharing networks and posted to web pages."

Katie Dean. File Sharing Growing Like a Weed. Wired News. Nov. 22, 2004.

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Actor Fined For Film Piracy

"Warner Bros. has secured a $309,600 judgment against an actor for allegedly making promotional 'screener' copies of 'The Last Samurai' and 'Mystic River' available for bootleg DVD copying and unauthorized Internet trading, the studio said Tuesday.

"Studio officials say Carmine Caridi, a former recurring actor on 'NYPD Blue,' has refused to respond to their civil suit for copyright infringement, forcing them to ask the U.S. District Court in Los Angeles to enter a default judgment of $150,000 per film and $9,600 in attorney fees.

"Judge Stephen Wilson granted that request, adding that the defendant's conduct was 'particularly egregious' because of the intentional and deliberate nature of the infringement."

Jesse Hiestand Actor Must Pay $309,600 in Film Piracy Case. WashingtonPost.com. Nov. 24, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

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November 22, 2004

Copyright Bill May Wait Till After Holidays

"Marybeth Peters, the U.S. register of copyrights, told a conference here (.pdf) that the so-called Induce Act would not be part of the slew of legislation--including key spending measures--that Congress is expected to vote on before leaving for next week's Thanksgiving holiday.

"'I don't think you'll ever see database protection,' said Peters, who has been involved in closed-door negotiations this fall over copyright legislation. 'Something else you won't see this year is something known as the Induce Act.'

"The database bill would create a new intellectual property right for collections of information, while the Induce Act would prohibit inducing anyone to violate copyright law."

Declan McCullagh. Anti-P2P Bill May Slip Past Legislative Rush. News.com. Nov. 18, 2004.

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RIAA Continues P2P Lawsuits

"The Recording Industry Association of America has filed new lawsuits against 761 people who allegedly use peer-to-peer software to trade music files without permission, the trade group announced this week.

"The lawsuits included users of the eDonkey, Limewire, and Kazaa services, as well as 25 people using university Internet connections to distribute music files.

"American University in Washington, D.C., Boston College, Iowa State University, and the University of Massachusetts were among the college networks used by those sued."

Grant Gross. RIAA Files New Lawsuits. PCWorld. Nov. 19, 2004.

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November 20, 2004

Wilco Speaks on P2P Music Sharing

"Giving away an album online isn't the way most artists end up with gold records. But it worked out that way for Wilco.

After being dropped from Reprise Records in 2001 over creative conflicts surrounding Yankee Hotel Foxtrot, the Chicago-based band committed what some thought would be suicide -- they streamed it online for free.

"By conventional industry logic, file sharing hurts the odds for commercial success. Wilco front man Jeff Tweedy disagrees. Wired News caught up with him during his current tour to find out just what makes Wilco so wired."

Xeni Jardin. 'Music Is Not a Loaf of Bread'. Wired News. Nov. 15, 2004.

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November 19, 2004

Congress May Act on Copyright Bill

"Several lobbying camps from different industries and ideologies are joining forces to fight an overhaul of copyright law, which they say would radically shift in favor of Hollywood and the record companies and which Congress might try to push through during a lame-duck session that begins this week.

The Senate might vote on HR2391 (.pdf), the Intellectual Property Protection Act, a comprehensive bill that opponents charge could make many users of peer-to-peer networks, digital-music players and other products criminally liable for copyright infringement. The bill would also undo centuries of 'fair use' -- the principle that gives Americans the right to use small samples of the works of others without having to ask permission or pay.

"The bill lumps together several pending copyright bills including HR4077, the Piracy Deterrence and Education Act, which would criminally punish a person who 'infringes a copyright by ... offering for distribution to the public by electronic means, with reckless disregard of the risk of further infringement.' Critics charge the vague language could apply to a person who uses the popular Apple iTunes music-sharing application."

Michael Grebb. Senate May Ram Copyright Bill. Wired News. Nov. 16, 2004.

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Wirehog Blends Social Networking and File Sharing

"Two rapidly growing Internet technologies in recent months have been social networks and peer-to-peer (P2P) file sharing. Now three whiz kids have coupled those technologies together with a program released this week called Wirehog.

"Wirehog is a P2P application that works in conjunction with thefacebook.com, a social networking Web site for more than 250 colleges and universities.

Programs like Kazaa emphasize searching: You want a file and you search everyone's computer on the P2P network to find it. 'There's no searching involved with Wirehog,' says co-creator Mark Zuckerberg. 'It's about sharing interesting personal files with your friends.'"

John P. Mello Jr. Wirehog P2P Melds Social Networks and File-Sharing. TechNewsWorld. Nov. 16, 2004.

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November 18, 2004

MPAA Files First Copyright Infringement Lawsuits

"The trade group that represents movie studios filed its first round of lawsuits Tuesday against people who allegedly share copyright films on the internet. The Motion Picture Association of America declined to say where the lawsuits were filed or how many people were targeted.

"The civil lawsuits ask for damages. Individuals may be liable for up to $150,000 per film traded on the net.

"The MPAA said it hopes to give studio-supported companies like CinemaNow and Movielink, which sell movie downloads, a better chance to survive without free peer-to-peer services hampering their businesses."

Katie Dean. Movie Studios Sue File Traders. Wired News. Nov. 16, 2004.

See also:
Gary Gentile. Film Trade Group Files Anti-Piracy Suits. San Jose Mercury News. Nov. 17, 2004.

Cynthia L. Webb. Hollywood's One Strike Policy. WashingtonPost.com. Nov. 17, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

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Gates and Jobs Battle Over Entertainment

"Steven P. Jobs, Apple's chairman, boasted that the iPod has become the 'Walkman of the 21st century.'

"It dominates its market in a way that no Apple product has done in a generation, raising the possibility that the company is becoming more than just a purveyor of computers with high design and low market share. If Apple continues to ride the wave of digital consumer electronics products, it may become the Sony of the 21st century.

"For that to happen, however, Mr. Jobs must do what he failed to do last time: prevail over his old nemesis, Bill Gates, who sees entertainment as Microsoft's next great frontier. Microsoft is working hard to make sure that the iPod is less like the Walkman and more like the Betamax, Sony's videocassette format that was defeated in the marketplace by VHS."

Saul Hansell. Gates vs. Jobs: The Rematch. News.com. Nov. 14, 2004.

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November 17, 2004

Grokster Offers Streaming Web Radio Service

"File-swapping company Grokster is teaming up with newcomer Mercora to distribute an advanced streaming radio service to the peer-to-peer crowd.

"Beginning immediately, Grokster will offer its users a co-branded version of Mercora which allows people to search for and listen to music by specific artists.

"The service, called Grokster Radio, does not allow people to download tunes, but it lets users stream and listen to high-quality versions of specific songs--even music that is not available through download software like Apple Computer's iTunes."

John Borland. Grokster Teams With P2P Radio. News.com. Nov. 15, 2004.

See also:
Tony Smith. Grokster Touts 'Legal, Licensed' P2P Music Share System. The Register. Nov. 15, 2004.

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November 16, 2004

Adobe to Unveil New Acrobat and Reader

"Put away the red pen, because publishing software giant Adobe Systems plans to change the way businesses share comments on documents.

"The software maker is set to announce on Monday new versions of Acrobat and Reader, the company's main tools for creating and viewing files based on the PDF (Portable Document Format) standard.

"New features include expanded collaborative functions intended to improve the exchange of information between businesses and customers or partners."

David Becker. Adobe to Update PDF Tools. News.com. Nov. 14, 2004.

See also:
David Morgenstern. Adobe Beefs Up Acrobat Reader in Version 7.0. eWeek. Nov. 15, 2004.

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November 09, 2004

FoneShare: World’s First Mobile Content Sharing Application

"Cell phones are learning to share files, but the earliest efforts don't nearly resemble the peer-to-peer renegades like Napster and Kazaa that the designers have in mind.

"FoneShare, an application introduced two weeks ago by NewBay Software, does let people share their collections of ring tones, graphics, games, songs, movie trailers and other wireless extras with strangers. FoneShare will debut next year as a subscription service, running over privately owned and operated cellular networks, and the sharing will be done via Web sites controlled by a wireless operator, said NewBay Chief Executive Paddy Holahan.

"That's a far cry from Napster, which was free, let people choose from digital music libraries stored on untold millions of personal computers, and relied heavily upon the anonymity of the public Internet."

Ben Charny. P2P for Cell Phones: Reach out and Share Something. News.com. Nov. 3, 2004.

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November 06, 2004

China To Implement Copyright Draft Legislation

"The National Copyright Administration will soon implement a draft regulation on administrative protection of copyrights on information networks, to better protect Internet-based work and prevent piracy.

"The draft regulation, worked out by the administration and the Ministry of Information Industry, aims to further bring China's copyright protection closer to international standards, sources from the administration said at a hearing yesterday in Beijing.

"The draft regulation applies to the administrative protection of dissemination rights on Internet-based services. And these services refer to loading, saving, transmitting, linking, searching and other functions through the Internet, the draft regulation states."

Cui Ning. Regulation to Protect Copyrights on Networks. China Daily. Nov. 5, 2004.

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November 05, 2004

Creative Commons Offers Creative Copyright

"This issue of Wired magazine includes a copy of The Wired CD, a collection of 16 songs produced under the Creative Commons License. The licenses come from Creative Commons, the innovative nonprofit founded by Wired columnist and Stanford Law School professor Lawrence Lessig.

"The songs on this CD use one of two Creative Commons licenses.The Noncommercial Sampling Plus license permits noncommercial file-sharing and noncommercial sampling. That means, first, that you can swap the songs on a peer-to-peer network (just don't sell them). And second, that you can sample from them, mash them up, use them to make something fresh - and then share that work, too (though again, you can't sell it). The Beastie Boys, Chuck D, and My Morning Jacket opted for the Noncommercial Sampling Plus license.

"The other 13 artists on the CD went a step further and released their songs under the more expansive Sampling Plus license. Like the noncommercial version, it allows file-sharing. But it also allows commercial use of samples - meaning you can insert a slice of these songs into your own composition and then try to sell the new track. The only restrictions: Use in advertisements is not permitted, and the new work must be 'highly transformative' of the original (translation: A flagrant rip-off like 'Ice Ice Baby' doesn't cut it)."

"More details on the licenses and their permissions are available at creativecommons.org/wired."

Thomas Goetz. Sample the Future. Wired. Nov. 2004.

See also:
Eric Steuer. The Remix Masters. Wired. Nov. 2004.

Hilary Rosen. How I Learned to Love Larry. Wired. Nov. 2004.

Julian Dibbell. We Pledge Allegiance to the Penguin. Wired. Nov. 2004.

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November 03, 2004

Avaya, Polycom Announce New Videophone

"Avaya, a communications software, systems and services company, has announced a new Internet Protocol-based video-conferencing offering for businesses. The Avaya Video Telephony Solution, Desktop Edition, (.pdf) stems from a partnership with conferencing technology specialist Polycom.

"The offering integrates the Avaya IP Softphone, an application that works as an office phone on a computer, with the Polycom ViaVideo camera and microphone. It also ties in instant messaging and presence features.

"Avaya and Polycom aimed for simplicity. Callers log on the business network (via a broadband or wireless LAN connection) and make video calls that can be muted, forwarded, transferred or placed on hold."

Colin C. Haley. Avaya, Polycom Dial in Videoconferencing. InternetNews.com. Nov. 1, 2004.

See also:
Ben Charny. New Videophone Highlights Dropping Prices. News.com. Nov. 1, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

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November 02, 2004

Suspected Music Pirate Goes to Court

"Lawyers for music industry players claimed that Stephen Cooper received 'hundreds of millions of hits' per year to his allegedly illegal music download site, MP3s4free.net, as the long-awaited federal court case against the retired policeman kicked off Monday in Sydney.

"The case first came to the court system's attention on Oct. 17 of last year, when Music Industry Piracy Investigations (MIPI), which suspected Cooper of music copyright infringement, raided his premises.

"Music industry lawyers say the Web site was first identified as a copyright law violator in December 2002, after it was picked up by MIPI's Internet surveillance activities."

Abby Dinham. Alleged Pirate Faces Labels in Australian Court. News.com. Oct. 26, 2004.

See also:
Abby Dinham. Expert Witness Embarrassed on the Stand in Cooper Copyright Case. ZD Net Australia. Oct. 29, 2004.

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November 01, 2004

DivX Networks to Offer Net Video-on-Demand

"Internet video bad boy DivX Networks is poised for a breakthrough deal that would see two major Hollywood studios announce support for its technology by Christmas, a top executive at the company said Tuesday.

"DivX already has a partnership with News Corp.'s 20th Century Fox to encode films for an airline movie-rental service. Now its video file format will be used in planned Internet video-on-demand services that would be available to consumers by the first half of 2005, DivX President Shahi Ghaman told CNET News.com.

"According to Ghaman, at least two unnamed studios are now planning to use DivX for so-called progressive download scans, allowing consumers to purchase movies directly from the Internet without going through the video store or cable and television networks."

Michael Kanellos and Evan Hansen. DivX Networks Touts New Studio Deals. News.com. Oct. 26, 2004.

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RIAA Introduces Digital Sales Awards

"It might not be the same as having a big gold record on the wall, but the Recording Industry Association of America has issued its first gold, platinum, and multiplatinum certifications for digital downloads.

"The awards are a sign of a maturing online music market, and a clear message that the business has a long way to go before reaching full mainstream status.

"The standards for reaching certification are much lower online, reflecting the fact that far fewer consumers buy music online, and that online sales remain just a small fraction of the overall music business."

John Borland. From Gold Records to Gold MP3s. News.com. Oct. 27, 2004.

See also:
Andy Sullivan. OutKast Tops First Digital-Music Sales Awards. Reuters. Oct. 27, 2004.

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:43 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Billboard to Rank Ring Tones

"Billboard magazine now sees ring tones as worth including in its venerable top-seller listings.

"The music industry magazine will soon be publishing a list of best-selling ring tones, alongside its more traditional categories, like best-selling album.

"Ring tones are among the biggest hits in the market for cell phone services and content.

Ben Charny. Billboard Chimes in on Ring Tones. News.com. Oct. 26, 2004.

See also:
National Public Radio. Cell Phone Ring Tones Top the Charts. All Things Considered. Oct. 28, 2004.

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October 29, 2004

Are We Ready for Podcasting?

"Every so often someone comes up with a new idea that depends upon another not fully developed new idea. So the two ideas get put together and also get a cool name. This is followed by a manic period where the new idea is extolled as the next big thing.

"In this fashion, we have been introduced to podcasting—the next big thing. Too bad it's a kludge that doesn't work as advertised unless you have a Macintosh and an iPod.

"The podcasting concept, in its most boiled-down form, is as follows. You attach a simple audio stream to an RSS feed (typically from a blog) and distribute audio feeds as they are created. With the original concept, an audio feed is designed to be grabbed in such a way that it will queue itself in iPod audio format and download itself to the iPod.

"But since the world consists of 95 percent PC users, how does all this really work?"

John C. Dvorak. Podcasting: Not Ready for Prime Time. PC Magazine. Oct. 25, 2004.

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MP3 Site Settles Copyright Suit

"The Recording Industry Association of America has reached a $10 million legal settlement with a Spanish company that briefly offered MP3s online for just pennies a song.

"The trade group on Monday said four people associated with Puretunes.com, which operated only briefly in mid-2003, collectively agreed to pay $500,000 in damages, while the holding company responsible for the Web site's operations will be responsible for $10 million.

"The company initially said it had acquired the rights to the songs legally through overseas licensing authorities. The RIAA disagreed and sued the company not long afterward."

John Borland. MP3 Site Settles for $10 Million with RIAA. News.com. Oct. 25, 2004.

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Napster Accepts PayPal Online Payment

"Digital music service Napster announced Monday that customers in the United States, the United Kingdom and Canada can now pay for tunes using PayPal.

"Napster users can choose to pay their monthly subscriptions or buy individual tracks and albums using the online payment service, the companies said.

"Subscribers can select the new payment option when they enter billing information. If they don't already have a PayPal account, they can set one up while registering for the service, Napster said."

Dinesh C. Sharma. Napster Befriends PayPal. News.com. Oct. 25, 2004.

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October 28, 2004

Court Overturns Lexmark DMCA Ruling

"In a closely watched case involving the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, a federal court has ruled that a small North Carolina company can continue selling a chip that makes it possible to use refilled toner cartridges in Lexmark printers.

"Static, which sells printer parts and other business supplies, has been defending a lawsuit brought by Lexmark, the No. 2 maker of printers in the United States. The suit claims the Smartek chip violates the DMCA, and Lexmark hopes the case will slam the brakes on the toner cartridge remanufacturing industry and compel consumers to buy its cartridges.

"The case has gotten a lot of attention because it's one of the first to test the limits of the DMCA, which Congress enacted in 1998 to limit Internet piracy."

Declan McCullagh. Ruling on Refilled Printer Cartridges Touches DMCA. News.com. Oct. 26, 2004.

See also:
U. S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit. Lexmark International, Inc. v. Static Control Components, Inc.. (.pdf). Oct. 26, 2004.

Electronic Frontier Foundation. Lexmark v. Static Control Case Archive.

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New iPod Holds Photos and Music

"Apple Computer introduced its next generation iPod music player, which has the ability to display digital images as well as play songs.

"The new iPod Photo will be able to store up to 25,000 wallet-size digital images and display them on a television via a cable. It comes with 40-gigabyte or 60-gigabyte disk storage, capable of storing up to 15,000 songs.

"Apple also introduced a special black edition of the iPod, which has the signatures of members of the rock band U2. The company said it would begin selling a complete collection of U2's music for $149 next month from the iTunes Internet music store.

John Markoff. Newest iPod From Apple Holds Photos and Music. The New York Times. Oct. 27, 2004.

See also:
Ina Fried and John Borland. Apple Unveils Color iPod, U2 Edition. News.com. Oct. 26, 2004.

Sebastian Rupley. New iPod Plays Photos. PC Magazine. Oct. 26, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

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Amazon Hosts Akimbo's Video-On-Demand

"Akimbo on Monday launched its video-on-demand service and signed on Amazon.com as its official retailer.

"The privately held company, based in San Mateo, Calif., makes the Akimbo Player, a set-top box that delivers hundreds of videos to television by way of Internet downloads. Seattle-based Amazon will be the exclusive retailer of the player through December, according to the company.

"The Akimbo Service, available by monthly subscription of about $10, hosts thousands of on-demand and largely niche programs, which are constantly updated and can range from yoga how-tos and CNN news to children's shows and surfing videos."

Stephanie Olsen. Akimbo Debuts Video on Demand on Amazon. News.com. Oct. 25, 2004.

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October 27, 2004

Would Kerry Dismantle DMCA?

"In a barely noticed remark last week, Democratic presidential nominee John Kerry said he might support defanging the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA)--the unpopular law that has prompted take-to-the-street protests from the geek community.

"If Kerry is serious, that would be a remarkable metamorphosis on a law that the Senate approved without one dissenting vote. It would also be remarkable because, contrary to what Kerry and President Bush tell you, few differences exist between the two White House hopefuls on nearly any topic imaginable."

Declan McCullagh. Would President Kerry Defang the DMCA?. News.com. Oct. 25, 2004.

See also:
Dawn Kawamoto. Bush, Kerry Weigh In on Tech Issues. News.com. Oct. 21, 2004.

Declan McCullagh. Bush vs. Kerry on Tech. News.com. June 28, 2004.

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October 26, 2004

Click and Search

"As our hard drives fill up with thousands then tens and hundreds of thousands of digital snapshots, we're all going to face the same basic challenges as the Bettmann Archive. A digital camera is an enticement to take more snaps than you can keep track of. With the price of digital storage plummeting even as our time seems to become ever more valuable, it's cheaper to store the lot of them than to weed out the clunkers.

"But having thousands of photos on a hard disk or DVD-ROM is the equivalent of throwing Bettmann's images into the air and letting them flutter to the ground. Our only hope is that the army of engineers laboring in labs around the world can come up with a better way."

David Weinberger. Point. Shoot. Kiss It Good-Bye. Wired. October 2004.

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October 25, 2004

Record Labels Now Embrace P2P

"Amid the recent collapse of talks over the Induce Act in Congress, record labels are closing in on deals to enable several new peer-to-peer services to emerge -- with the sanction of major record labels that have so far derided P2P as a haven for piracy.

"At a panel held Wednesday by the Cato Institute, a libertarian think tank in Washington, at least one record industry representative predicted that such sanctioned P2P services will start to proliferate in the next several months.

"According to Mitch Glazier, senior vice president of government relations and legislative counsel at the Recording Industry Association of America, the new services will be consumer-friendly and enable the portability that digital music consumers demand, all without running afoul of copyright law."

Michael Grebb. Toe-to-Toe Over Peer-to-Peer. Wired News. Oct. 21, 2004.

See also:
Federal Trade Commission. FTC to Host Two-day Peer-to-Peer File-Sharing Workshop. Oct. 15, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

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AOL Downloads Movies

"America Online launched a promotion Thursday that lets subscribers of its broadband service download full-feature films for free through Movielink.

"The promotion expands on an existing deal between the two companies that allows AOL members to rent downloaded movies for 99 cents a title.

"Under the new program, the companies will make 10 'classic titles,' including 'Steel Magnolias' and 'Against All Odds,' available for free in the first month. In subsequent months, five movies will be offered. Once downloading is complete, customers have 30 days to watch the film and 24 hours to complete it, once viewing begins."

CNET staff. AOL Offers Broadband Subscribers Free Flicks. News.com. Oct. 21, 2004.

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Digital Entertainment Takes a Road Trip

"Your digital home entertainment system is about to take a road trip.

"Consumer electronics makers are racing to find new offerings, from wireless music downloads at gas stations to digital TV, to entertain American families when they're stuck in traffic, driving home for the holidays, or just out for a ride.

"Some of the efforts to transplant digital media technology from PCs and home entertainment centers are still on the drawing board, companies said at a technology conference. But other changes are likely to start appearing in new cars and SUVs as early as next year."

Declan McCullagh. Digital Home Entertainment Hits the Road. News.com. Oct. 19, 2004.

See also:
Declan McCullagh. Car Crazy: Microsoft in the Driver's Seat. News.com. Oct. 21, 2004.

David Becker. TVs, Cameras Top Holiday Plans. News.com. Oct. 18, 2004.

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October 23, 2004

What Crisis? CD Shipments Rise

"CD shipments are surging this year, but not enough to erase previous years' declines in the music business, according to the Recording Industry Association of America.

"The record industry's trade group said the value of shipments of all music at the midpoint of 2004 had climbed nearly 4 percent compared to the previous year. The industry has shipped 10 percent more CDs to retail outlets than last year, showing a strong increase in demand.

"But that growth does not mean that the industry can let up in its years-long legal attacks on file swapping and other digital copying, executives said."

John Borland. CD Shipments Surge After Lean Years. ZDNet. Oct. 20, 2004.

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October 22, 2004

Stewart's Blast Explodes Across the Web

"When comedian Jon Stewart blasted the hosts of CNN's 'Crossfire' on the cable TV program, he ignited a frenzy of online activity.

On Friday night, the star of Comedy Central's 'The Daily Show with Jon Stewart' angered his 'Crossfire' hosts Tucker Carlson and Paul Begala, saying they promote partisan political debate. The online transcript and video clips of the program immediately became an overnight sensation among Web surfers, bloggers and pundits alike.

As of midday Tuesday, online video hosting site IFilm said, more than 670,000 people had downloaded the CNN clip from its site. The clip runs for about 13 minutes.

Matt Hines. Jon Stewart 'Crossfire' Feud Ignites Net Frenzy. News.com. Oct. 19, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

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October 21, 2004

Microsoft Announces Multi-Integrated Collaboration Tool

"Microsoft Corp. announced an early beta of a new rich client for its Live Communications Server product designed to unite instant messaging with telephony and video, and to embed such technologies in other applications.

"Code-named 'Istanbul,' the company is demonstrating the new Office-based technology at the Fall 2004 VON conference here this week and seeking testers for a managed beta program.

"Istanbul will replace Windows Messenger as the preferred client for Live Communications Server, though Windows Messenger will continue to be included within the Windows operating system, Microsoft officials said."

Dennis Callaghan. Microsoft Adds Voice, Video to IM Client. eWeek. Oct. 19, 2004.

See also:
Juan Carlos Perez. Microsoft Announces LCS Client. Computerworld. Oct. 19, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:55 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Starbucks Launches Digital Music Service

"Starbucks announced it will add computer kiosks in stores in Austin, Texas and Seattle where customers can burn music CDs for about US$10 while waiting for their Frappuccino.

"Initially, the company will install the self-service touch-screen kiosks at 30 stores in Austin and 15 stores in Seattle by the end of the month. Willie Nelson is scheduled to headline a concert for the Austin kickoff on November 14.

"But the Seattle-based coffee retailer eventually plans to add the new 'music bars' nationwide as part of its plan to leverage its well-known name and chain of more than 8,300 stores to reach beyond coffee beans for profits."

Bob Keefe. Starbucks To Add Kiosks Where Customers Can Burn CDs. E-Commerce Times. Oct. 15, 2004.

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October 20, 2004

Is iPod a Worm in the Apple?

"Apple now makes more from its top line from iPod sales than from any single line of its computers. By revenue, the PowerBook notebook line is Apple's second most important product, accounting for $419 million, or just less than 18%, of sales for the quarter.

Now don't get me wrong. I love the iPod. Two of those 7.3 million units are mine. But as much of a success as it has been for Apple, the iPod could also turn out to be an Achilles heel."

Arik Hesseldahl. The IPod In Perspective. Forbes.com. Oct. 15, 2004.

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October 18, 2004

MP3 Withers Under iPod's Weight

"After years as the unrivaled king of the digital-media world, the venerable MP3 music format is losing ground to rival technologies from Microsoft and Apple Computer.

"MP3 is still the overwhelming favorite of file traders, but the once-universal format's popularity has been going quietly but steadily down in personal music collections for the last year. According to researchers at The NPD Group's MusicWatch Digital who track the contents of people's hard drives, the percentage of MP3-formatted songs in digital-music collections has slid steadily in recent months, down to about 72 percent of people's collections from about 82 percent a year ago."

John Borland. Is MP3 Losing Steam?. News.com. Oct. 15, 2004.

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Google to Add IM to Its Arsenal?

"Google watchers abuzz about the search darling's new desktop tool are already betting on its next product: instant chat.

"Such speculation isn't new, but it has gained legs as some intriguing facts have come to light this week. First, although few people seem to realize it, Google already owns an instant-messaging (IM) client called Hello that it picked up this summer with its acquisition of photo-sharing service Picasa."

Stefanie Olsen. Will Google Say Hello to IM?. News.com. Oct. 15, 2004.

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October 16, 2004

UCLA Quarantines P2P Violators

"UCLA has developed a new process of identifying and disciplining copyright infringers on peer-to-peer networks, providing schools with another tool to crack down on illegal file sharing.

"Jim Davis, the university's associate vice chancellor of information technology, testified last week about the UCLA Quarantine project before the House Subcommittee on Courts, the Internet and Intellectual Property.

"The school developed a system that automatically alerts students to copyright violations. Since it debuted in the spring, the system has been successful, according to Davis."

Katie Dean. UCLA File Swappers in Quarantine. Wired News. Oct. 13, 2004.

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October 15, 2004

Justice Department Seeks New Antipiracy Powers

"The U.S. Justice Department recommended a sweeping transformation of the nation's intellectual-property laws, saying peer-to-peer piracy is a 'widespread' problem that can be addressed only through more spending, more FBI agents and more power for prosecutors.

"In an extensive report (.pdf) released Tuesday, senior department officials endorsed a pair of controversial copyright bills strongly favored by the entertainment industry that would criminalize 'passive sharing' on file-swapping networks and permit lawsuits against companies that sell products that 'induce' copyright infringement.

"Tuesday's report was not focused exclusively on Internet piracy: It also included recommendations about responses to trademark infringements, trade secret violations and fake pharmaceuticals. But the Internet-related bills it endorses are at the heart of the ongoing political battle pitting Hollywood and the music industry against the computer industry, 'fair use' advocates and librarians."

Declan McCullagh. Justice Dept. Wants New Antipiracy Powers. News.com. Oct. 12, 2004.

See also:
Katie Dean. Ashcroft Vows Piracy Assault. Wired News. Oct. 14, 2004.

The Hon. Attorney General John Ashcroft. Prepared Remarks: Release of the Report of the Department of Justice's Task Force on Intellectual Property. Oct. 12, 2004.

Department of Justice. Attorney General John Ashcroft Announces Recommendations of the Justice Department's Intellectual Property Task Force. Oct. 12, 2004.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:47 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Microsoft Launches Windows XP Media Center

'PC makers, working with Microsoft, set course for consumers' living rooms on Tuesday, launching a slew of new Media Center PCs.

"Dell, Gateway, Hewlett-Packard, Sony and Toshiba all introduced their latest Media Center PCs, wrapped around Microsoft's Windows XP Media Center 2005 operating system. The latest version of the multimedia-oriented OS features a special user interface for tasks such as playing movies.

"While the latest Media Centers are PCs at heart, the manufacturers say the machines will function more like entertainment devices that can record, show TV programs, and play DVD movies or music CDs. However, unlike before, the machines will be more adept at acquiring and sharing files with other devices around the home."

John G. Spooner. Media Centers on parade. News.com. Oct. 12, 2004.

See also:
Microsoft. Microsoft and Partners Announce New Era of Digital Devices Enabling Consumers to Take Entertainment Throughout the Home and On the Go. Oct. 12, 2004.

Jennifer LeClaire. Gates Launches New Era with XP Media Center 2005. E-Commerce Times. Oct. 12, 2004.

Harry McCracken. Digital Entertainment Anywhere. PCWorld Techlog. Oct. 12, 2004.

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Lycos Plans Social Networking Site

"Lycos plans to launch a social networking site that, unlike many of its competitors, is more focused on letting users communicate with people they already know than on letting users get to know strangers. The company plans to release a test version of the site this week.

"Called Circles, the site will be announced officially at the DigitalLife conference in New York City and can be found online at circles.lycos.com.

"Circles lets users share a variety of things via the site, including text, photos, video and audio clips, and greeting cards."

Juan Carlos. Lycos Builds Web Circles. PCWorld. Oct. 13, 2004.

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October 14, 2004

Supreme Court Refuses to Hear Net Privacy Case

"The Supreme Court on Tuesday let stand let stand a lower court decision holding that the recording industry can't force internet service providers to turn over the names of users trading music files online, effectively stopping one of the legal tactics of the music business as it tries to stamp out piracy.

"The case (.pdf) pitted the Recording Industry Association of America against Verizon Internet Services, which earlier had challenged a 2002 copyright subpoena stemming from a provision in the controversial Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1998.

"Tuesday's loss came as a blow to the entertainment industry, which has tried to use litigation as a way to deter alleged copyright infringement on peer-to-peer networks."

Michael Grebb. Music Industry Spurned by Court. Wired News. Oct. 12, 2004.

See also:
Electronic Frontier Foundation. No "Fishing License" for the RIAA. Deep Links. Oct. 12, 2004.

No author. Subpoenas Snubbed in File-Sharing Fight. Red Herring. Oct. 12, 2004.

Gina Holland. High Court Won't Hear Music Sharing Case. SiliconValley.com. Oct. 12, 2004.

Cynthia Webb. Supremes Quietly Change Piracy Debate. WashingtonPost.com. Oct. 13, 2004.

Update: WashingtonPost.com Supreme Court Internet Privacy Decision. Oct. 14, 2004. (Transcript of chat between Post writer David McGuire and Verizon vice president and associate general counsel Sarah Deutsch. Verizon was the lead party in the fight over keeping subscribers' identities private from entertainment companies seeking to sue for copyright infringement.)

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:58 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

October 13, 2004

An Alternative to Current Copyright Law

"Getting rights OK'd can be frustrating for artists, be they authors seeking to quote an essay or documentary filmmakers who've got snippets of pop songs playing in the background of key scenes. Artists and scholars who believe the current copyright system unduly stifles creativity are pushing a less restrictive alternative that they call the Creative Commons.

"Driving the movement is the belief that we all benefit when creative minds are free to expand upon others' work — that public discourse is hurt when too much of it is weighed down by the baggage of commerce.

"'The (Creative) Commons encourages sharing and makes explicit that creativity depends on easy access to raw materials,' said Siva Vaidhyanathan, a New York University professor critical of current copyright laws. 'Right now, you have to assume you're going to get in trouble if you quote from somebody extensively or build upon a previous expression.'"

Anick Jesdanun. Movement Seeks Copyright Alternatives. Yahoo! News. Oct. 10, 2004.

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October 12, 2004

Podcasting Brings Convenience to Internet Audio

"For anyone who loves listening to the wide variety of internet audio programming, but can't always listen to their favorite shows when they're scheduled or take the time to download them manually, help has arrived.

"Known as podcasting, the technology is a new take on syndicated content feeds like RSS and Atom. But instead of pushing text from blogs and news sites to various content aggregators like FeedDemon and Bloglines, podcasting sends audio content directly to an iPod or other MP3 player.

"'It's aggregating audio content, but it's taking one extra step, in that it's putting it on your device,' said Adam Curry, who built the first podcasting aggregator, known as iPodder. 'Not only do these devices play it, but you don't have to put it there yourself. It just happens automatically.'"

Daniel Terdiman. Podcasts: New Twist on Net Audio. Wired News. Oct. 8, 2004.

See also:
Phillip Torrone. How-To: Podcasting (aka How to Get Podcasts and Also Make Your Own). Engadget. Oct. 5, 2004.

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October 11, 2004

Movie & Record Companies Ask High Court to Rescue Their Industries

"Hollywood studios and record companies on Friday asked the United States Supreme Court to overturn a controversial series of recent court decisions that have kept file-swapping software legal, saying that letting the lower court rulings stand would badly undermine the value of copyrighted work.

"The decisions have been among the biggest setbacks for the entertainment industry in the past several years, as they have tried to quell the rampant exchange of copyrighted materials over peer-to-peer networks such as Kazaa and Morpheus."

Editor's Note: Former Whitewater prosecutor Kenneth W. Starr and former Bill Clinton impeachment counsel David E. Kendall are representing the entertainment industry in this matter.

John Borland. Hollywood Takes P2P Case to Supreme Court. News.com. Oct. 8, 2004.

See also:
U.S. Supreme Court. Petiton for Certiorari: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer v. Grokster, Ltd.. (.pdf). Oct. 8, 2004.

Electronic Frontier Foundation. MGM v. Grokster Case Archive.

John Borland. Judges Rule File-Sharing Software Legal. News.com. Aug. 19, 2004.

U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer v. Grokster, Ltd.. (.pdf). Aug. 19, 2004.

John Borland. Judge: File-Swapping Tools Are Legal. News.com. April 25, 2003.

U.S. District Court for the Central District of California. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer v. Grokster, Ltd.. (.pdf). April 25, 2003.

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INDUCE Act Dies on Congress Floor

"A bill that would make it easier to sue online file-trading networks like Kazaa appeared on Friday to have died a quiet death, but other copyright bills sought by the entertainment industry continued to advance.

"The Senate Judiciary Committee declined late on Thursday to take up a bill that would hold liable anyone who 'induces' others to reproduce copyrighted material, a move observers said all but assures it would not become law this year."

Reuters. Copyright Bill Dies in Senate as Others Advance. News.com. Oct. 8, 2004.

See also:
Brooks Boliek. Induce Act Stalls as Compromise Talks Break Down. The Hollywood Reporter. Oct. 8, 2004.

Keith Regan. Congressional Action on Induce Act Could Be in Jeopardy. TechNewsWorld. Oct. 7, 2004.

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Nintendo DS Includes Wireless Download Capability

"Nintendo President Satoru Iwata revealed on Thursday that the company's dual-screen DS handheld gaming console can download game data wirelessly, then play it back.

"The Nintendo DS's greatest features are its revolutionary control schemes, such as the touch-sensitive screen and the microphone input," Iwata said during a press conference at CEATEC, a large technology conference taking place here this week. "And its other major feature is the wireless connection. With it, we're going to revolutionize the way that games are played."

Hirohiko Niizumi. Nintendo Handheld to Feature Wireless Downloading. News.com. Oct. 7, 2004.

See also:
Yuka Obayashi. Nintendo Says 12 DS Games to Debut in Japan. Reuters. Oct. 7, 2004.

David Smith. Nintendo DS American Launch Lineup. PC Magazine. Oct. 8, 2004.

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WiFi Hotspot Operators Beware of Patent Lawsuits

"Wi-Fi hotspot operators must pay $1,000 a year, or face a lawsuit from a patent enforcement firm.

"Acacia Technologies Group says it is enforcing a patent it says covers the methods that wireless ISPs, WLAN aggregators and other Wi-Fi networks use to redirect users to a common login Web page. The company claims it owns the technology behind gateway page redirection.

"The Newport Beach, Calif.-based company is sending out information packets to Wi-Fi operators informing them of the patent claim and including a licensing agreement. Companies have 30 days to ask questions, sign the licensing pact, or prove to Acacia that the wireless operator is not infringing the patent."

Ed Sutherland. Hotspot Operators Face Patent Lawsuits. InternetNews.com. Oct. 8, 2004.

See also:
Nancy Gohring. Hotspot Operators Face New Patent Fee Demand. WiFi Networking News. Oct. 5, 2004.

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October 09, 2004

Microsoft CEO Claims iPod Music is Stolen

"It's official. All iPod users are music thieves - according to Microsoft CEO Steve 'Monkey Boy' Ballmer.

"The most common format of music on an iPod is 'stolen'," he told reporters in London today, according to a Silicon.com report.

"Ballmer conveniently ignores not only that there are many non-Apple music players out there, on which there are probably as many, if not more 'stolen' songs."

Tony Smith. Most Songs on iPods 'Stolen' - Microsoft CEO. The Register. Oct. 4, 2004.

See also:
John Lettice. iPod Owners Very Honest, Not Thieves At All, says MS. The Register. Oct. 8, 2004.

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October 08, 2004

Record Industry Using Net to Extend Reach

"When R.E.M.'s 'New Adventures in Hi-Fi' was released, music buyers yawned -- it was the start of a steady decline in U.S. album sales for R.E.M. as hip-hoppers and pop divas eclipsed the band.

"The record industry itself didn't do much better, as sales overall shrank from its halcyon days of routine multi-platinum hits. Record labels are quick to blame Internet piracy; many fans point to high CD prices instead.

"In 2004, both R.E.M. and the record industry are turning to the Internet to reverse their fortunes.

"Today, the band releases its 13th major album, 'Around the Sun' -- but for hundreds of thousands of fans, there's no suspense. They've already listened to the entire album for free on the Internet over the past two weeks, and with the band's label's encouragement."

Frank Ahrens. Record Labels Aim for Net, Hope to Score. WashingtonPost.com. Oct. 5, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

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Sony Ericsson Predicts Slow Growth for Mobile Devices

"Japanese-Swedish mobile phone maker Sony Ericsson said on Tuesday it expects slower growth in the global handset market next year.

"Replacement sales in rich markets, which has powered the market this year as consumers are trading in their old phones for new models with color screens and built-in cameras, may not be such a major force next year, said Miles Flint, president of the three-year-old joint venture between Sony and Ericsson.

"The phone market will be dominated by current models, although 2005 will be the first year of volume sales of handsets that can work on third generation (3G) networks, for fast multimedia services like video telephony and song downloads."

Santosh Menon. INTERVIEW: Sony Ericsson Chief Sees Slower Growth. Reuters. Oct. 5, 2004.

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An Alternative to iPods

"As the trading of MP3 files ate into music sales, Damon Dash, the 33-year-old entrepreneur behind Roc-A-Fella Records, turned his hip-hop music company into a platform to sell other, more profitable products.

"Now Mr. Dash is taking his celebrity and music-infused marketing approach to a product line closer to the source of his troubles: MP3 files. In November, he will introduce a line of MP3 players under the name Rocbox, including one aimed squarely to compete with Apple Computer's iPod.

"Mr. Dash hopes to distinguish the Rocbox players from other players on the market by weaving images of them into videos for artists of his label, and put tags promoting them on his clothing. While details haven't been worked out yet, buyers of the player will have access to exclusive bits of Roc-A-Fella music."

Saul Hansell. Battle of Form (and Function) in MP3 Players. The New York Times. Oct. 4, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

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October 07, 2004

AT&T; Offers Music Service

"In the first foray by a U.S. wireless carrier into the online music market, AT&T; Wireless is launching a service that lets subscribers buy songs using their cell phones and later download them to a computer.

"Until now, mobile music sales have centered on ringtones, the song snippets used to customize ringer and other sounds on mobile phones.

"At Tuesday's launch, mMode Music Store will offer roughly 750,000 tracks priced at 99 cents each. Full albums will start at $9.99."

Alex Veiga. AT&T; Wireless Launching Music Service. MSNBC News. Oct. 5, 2004.

See also:
John Borland. AT&T; Wireless Opens Mobile Music Store. News.com. Oct. 4, 2004.

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Balance Between Copy Protection and Technical Innovation

"A computer scientist at Princeton University, Edward Felten, took part in a contest sponsored by the Recording Industry Association of America to test technology for guarding music against piracy. He and his students quickly found flaws in the new antipiracy software and prepared to publish their results.

"But when the RIAA learned of the plan, it threatened to sue under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). Congress passed it back in 1998 to block hackers from breaking copy protection. And they wisely included a provision designed to let researchers such as Felten carry out their important work. Still, the RIAA deemed Felten's line of study too sensitive.

"The lesson many scientists drew was that copyright protection takes priority over research."

Heather Green. Commentary: Are The Copyright Wars Chilling Innovation?. BusinessWeekOnline. Oct. 11, 2004.

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October 06, 2004

Coral Seeks to Corral Copyright

"A consortium of technology companies hopes to create a common antipiracy language, ending the Babel of copy-proofing technologies that has rendered much digital content and hardware incompatible.

"The Coral Consortium, to be announced Monday, will initially draw on support from giants such as Hewlett-Packard, Matsushita Electric Industrial, Philips Electronics, Samsung Electronics, Sony and Twentieth Century Fox, along with digital rights management (DRM) company InterTrust Technologies."

John Borland. Tech Powers Seek Antipiracy Accord. News.com. Oct. 3, 2004.

See also:
Coral Consortium. Coral Call to Action. No date.

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October 05, 2004

RIAA Files 762 More P2P Lawsuits

"The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) has filed 762 new lawsuits against alleged file-traders using P-to-P (peer-to-peer) services, with the total number of lawsuits filed since September 2003 now reaching more than 5,500.

"The 762 lawsuits announced Thursday included 32 people at 26 U.S. universities who allegedly used their university networks to distribute music files on P-to-P networks."

Grant Gross. RIAA Files 762 New File-Trading Lawsuits. InfoWorld. Oct. 1, 2004.

See also:
Brooks Boliek. Music Industry Files More Piracy Lawsuits. Reuters. Oct. 1, 2004.

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October 04, 2004

Mobile Devices Miss the Mainstream

"BlackBerrys and Bluetooth share an embarrassing trait -- these two uses of wireless technology have remained stubbornly irrelevant to many mainstream users, despite the benefits they might offer and the hype they often get in the press.

"Many busy executives have become utterly dependent on the always-on e-mail access provided by Research In Motion Ltd.'s BlackBerry handhelds, but these devices' high costs and business-oriented features haven't constituted an attractive bundle for people who mostly use their cell phones to talk."

Rob Pegoraro. BlackBerry, Bluetooth Miss a Shot to Move Into More Hands. WashingtonPost.com. Oct. 3, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

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October 02, 2004

Telecoms and Tech Companies Unite on Induce Act

"The Business Software Alliance, along with the Computer Systems Policy Project and the Information Technology Industry Council have informed Senators Orrin Hatch (R-UT) and Patrick Leahy (D-VT) in no uncertain terms what's wrong with the Induce Act and what is needed for any bill that expands copyright liability."

Electronic Frontier Foundation. BSA to Hatch -- We're with the Tech & Telecom Industries on Induce. Sept. 30, 2004.

See also:
Tom Zeller. Panel Considers Copyright Bill. The New York Times. Sept. 30, 2004.

Business Software Alliance, Computer Systems Policy Project, Information Technology Industry Council. S.2560, The "Inducing Infringement of Copyrights Act of 2004". (.pdf). Sept. 29, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

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October 01, 2004

Piracy Deterrence and Education Act of 2004 Passed By House

"In a move that takes aim at file-swapping networks, the U.S. House of Representatives voted to boost penalties for online piracy and increase federal police powers against Net copyright infringement.

"By voice vote, politicians on Tuesday approved a sweeping copyright bill that would make it easier for the FBI and federal prosecutors to investigate and convict file swappers. Other sections criminalize unauthorized recordings made in movie theaters and encourage the Justice Department to target Internet copyright infringement.

"Opponents had mounted an unsuccessful, last-ditch campaign earlier in the day to urge House leaders to remove the Piracy Deterrence and Education Act from the floor schedule."

Declan McCullagh. House Votes To Target P2P Pirates. News.com. Sept. 28, 2004.

See also:
Ted Bridist. House Votes to Make Video Cameras in Movie Theaters a Federal Crime. Technology Review. Sept. 29, 2004.

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September 30, 2004

MSN Ends Outlook Access to Hotmail

"Citing a rise in spam abuse, Microsoft Corp.'s MSN division has ended free access to its Hotmail Web-based e-mail service through the Outlook and Outlook Express clients.

MSN had offered its 187 million active Hotmail users the ability to read and send e-mail through the e-mail clients rather than a Web interface using a protocol called Web-based Distributed Authoring and Versioning, or WebDAV.

"News users wanting to make use of WebDAV will have to pay for the service, said Brooke Richardson, product manager for MSN's communications services. MSN plans to transition current WebDAV users to subscription plans in the next few months as well."

Matt Hicks. MSN Ends Hotmail's Free Outlook Access. eWeek. Sept. 27, 2004.

See also:
Stefanie Olsen. Hotmail To Wean Users From Free Export Tool. News.com. Sept. 26, 2004.

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September 29, 2004

California May Terminate P2P Use

"California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger has ordered the State CIO to come up with a policy for the use of peer-to-peer (P2P) file-sharing applications by state personnel.

"While the order prohibited the use of state resources to illegally download copyrighted material, it specifically allowed for legitimate uses of the controversial software -- in moderation.

"Today California is taking a stand against use of state resources for illegal downloading of this material and standing in support of the work of these talented Californians," Schwarzenegger said in a statement.

Schwarzenegger said he wants to make sure that state computers aren't used to contribute to what he called 'huge losses of revenue to the state's valuable entertainment industry.'"

Susan Kuchinskas. California To Set P2P Policy. InternetNews.com. Sept. 20, 2004.

The Hon. Arnold Schwarzenegger. Executive Order S-16-04 by the Governor of the State of California. Sept. 16, 2004.

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See and Hear All Evil

"For the longest time, the recording labels viewed digital music as something that could hurt them with hurricane force but made no efforts to adjust to this new reality, let alone exploit it. Finally, they were persuaded to license their works to online music sellers. Apple's iTunes Store, which sells songs for 99 cents a shot, became a template for a mini-industry that clearly represents the future of music. Microsoft opened its own long-awaited online outlet earlier this month. And just last week Yahoo dropped $160 million to buy Musicmatch and its store.

"This summer provided a clue to further harnessing the force of digital nature. For three weeks, Real Networks tried to lure new customers by slashing prices to 49 cents a song and $4.99 per album. Since Real paid the full royalty load to the labels (almost 70 cents a tune), the company lost money on every transaction. CEO Rob Glaser says that the company did get new customers, but here's the real news: Real sold six times as much music and took in three times as much money."

Steven Levy. Music Companies Are In Denial. Newsweek. Sept. 27, 2004.

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September 28, 2004

EBay Allows You to Share the Love

"Internet giant EBay is joining the online music parade with a service that offers a slight twist for customers -- sharing hit songs earns rewards, not lawsuits.

The service, powered by Tennessee startup PassAlong Networks , lets customers share samples of their favorite tunes with friends and neighbors.

"And for every 10 songs that those friends purchase, the sender receives a free song."

Benny Evangelista. EBay Links With PassAlong to Offer New Music Service. San Francisco Chronicle. Sept. 23, 2004.

See also
BusinessWire. PassAlong Networks Debuts Music Download Service; Launches First Digital Music Store on eBay Offering Major Label Catalogs; Consumers Rewarded for Legally Sharing Music . Forbes.com. Sept. 23, 2004.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:32 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Downloading Via Subscription Service

"Long before Sir Richard Branson dreamed of becoming the latest billionaire with a reality TV show, before he started his cellphone company, his airline and his record label, he sold music from the Virgin Record Shop on Oxford Street in London. When he began in 1971, of course, music was presented as grooves pressed into a vinyl disk.

"Today, Sir Richard starts a new music store, VirginDigital.com, this time selling music as streams of bits to be downloaded from the Internet. Virgin becomes the first major music retailer to enter the download market, which has been dominated by Apple Computer and other technology companies.

"What's interesting is that Virgin is putting its biggest emphasis on its subscription service, rather than on selling songs one at time for 99 cents a track, as Apple and Microsoft do.

"It is betting that new customers will join its Virgin Music Club for a $7.99 monthly fee to listen to an unlimited amount of music from Virgin's one-million-track library on their computers."

Saul Hansell. Music Sites Ask, 'Why Buy If You Can Rent?'. The New York Times. Sept. 27, 2004.

See also:
John Borland. Virgin Launches Online Music Service. News.com. Sept. 26, 2004.
Sue Zeidler. Virgin Launches New Digital Music Service. Reuters. Sept. 27, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

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September 27, 2004

Conservatives Slam INDUCE Act

"The American Conservative Union, the nation's oldest conservative group, has become the latest and most vocal critic of an anti-file-swapping bill that foes say could target products like Apple Computer's iPod.

"The ACU, which holds influential Republican activists and former senators on its board of directors, is running newspaper and magazine advertisements that take a humorous jab at the so-called Induce Act -- and slams some conservative politicians for supporting it."

Declan McCullagh. Conservative Group Savages Anti-P2P Bill. News.com. Sept. 24, 2004.

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Movable Type Upgrades Platform

"New authoring features in Movable Type 3.1 give users more control over the performance as well as the look and display of their blogs. The result is a polished and powerful personal publishing system that begins to blur the line between mere blogging software and a Web content management system.

"However, it took longer to install Movable Type 3.1 than it has taken to install competing products, including Microsoft Corp.'s SharePoint Services and Traction Software Inc.'s TeamPage 3.5. This is because the Movable Type software lacks a graphical installer and has poor documentation."

Anne Chen. Movable Type 3.1 Burnishes Blogs. eWeek. Sept. 20, 2004.

See also:
Henry Baltazar. TeamPage System Blogs On. eWeek. Sept. 20, 2004.

Jim Louderback.
Nokia and Six Apart Team on Mobile Blogging
. eWeek. Sept. 9, 2004.

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September 24, 2004

Tax Downloads?

"Pop piracy should be decriminalised and the music industry should realise that efforts to stop illegal downloading are doomed, a conference has been told.

"Instead the music industry should embrace file-sharers, said technology journalist and author Andrew Orlowski in a keynote speech at the Interactive @ In The City conference being held in Manchester. One way could be the addition of a small surcharge to net subscription fees which could be shared among artists whose music is being downloaded."

Mark Ward. Call to Legalise File-Sharing With Taxes BBC. Sept. 22, 2004.

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MySpace Premieres New R.E.M. Album

"MySpace.com, the leading social networking portal, announced today the exclusive debut of R.E.M.'s new album, Around the Sun, before its release in stores on October 5. This represents the first exclusive premiere of an album on a social networking portal.

"Using MySpace.com, R.E.M. and Warner Bros. Records are leveraging the reach of nearly 4 million users while adding a new dimension to the way music is marketed to fans by introducing a new album to a preexisting, highly interactive online community that can spread the word virally."

Chris Marlowe. MySpace Basks in R.E.M. 'Sun'. Reuters. Sept. 20, 2004.

See also
No author. MySpace Launches Exclusive Album Premiere of R.E.M.'S Around the Sun. Yahoo! Finance. Sept. 21, 2004.

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September 23, 2004

Interview with "Father of the Web"

"Perhaps for some, being credited with inventing the World Wide Web would be more than enough as far as life accomplishments go. But for Sir Tim Berners-Lee, it's merely the beginning of something even more fulfilling.

"The man who was named by Time magazine as one of the 100 greatest minds of the 20th century is now busy channeling his energies into the work of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), a standards body he founded and now directs.

"Moments after delivering a keynote address at the SpeechTek Conference in New York earlier this week, Sir Tim sat down with internetnews.com to discuss the state of the Web browser market, the growth of the Semantic Web and some of the challenges facing the W3C."

Ryan Naraine. Tim Berners-Lee, Director, W3C. internetnews.com. Sept. 17, 2004.

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September 22, 2004

Compilation CD for Sharing

"Next month, songs by the Beastie Boys, David Byrne and 14 others will appear on a compilation CD whose contents are meant to be copied freely online, remixed or sampled by other artists for use in their own new recordings.

"'The Wired CD: Rip. Sample. Mash. Share.' was compiled by the editors of Wired magazine, of San Francisco, as an experimental implementation of a new kind of intellectual-property license called Creative Commons.

"In this case, all 16 participants are allowing their work to be shared on the Internet. Wired Editor in Chief Chris Anderson describes Creative Commons as a way of declaring that the recordings come with 'some rights reserved,' as opposed to the traditional 'all rights reserved.'"

Eathan Smith. This Compilation CD Is Meant To Be Copied and Shared. Wall Street Journal Online. Sept. 20, 2004.

See also:
Brian Braiker. Take My Music . . . Please. Newsweek. Oct. 5. 2004.

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Microsoft Checking Software Licenses

"Microsoft is trying to get to know its pirates a little better.

"The software maker has launched a pilot program in which some visitors to the main Windows download page are being asked to let the software maker check to see whether their copy of the operating system is licensed.

"Visitors do not have to partipate in the program to get their downloads. They'll also get their downloads if they do participate and their copy of Windows turns out to be unlicensed. But Microsoft said the program is a first step in trying to provide a better experience for customers using legitimate copies of Windows."

Ina Fried. Microsoft: Can We Check Your Software License?. News.com. Sept. 17, 2004.

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September 21, 2004

Groups Seek Public Hearings on Induce Act

"Today, EFF joined a broad coalition of public interest and industry groups in sending a strong message (.pdf) to Congress regarding the highly controversial Inducing Infringement of Copyrights Act (S. 2560): Slow down."

Electronic Frontier Foundation. Broad Coalition to Congress on Induce Act: Whoa There! Not So Fast. Deep Links. Sept. 17, 2004.

See also:
Public Knowledge. Public Knowledge Joins Widespread Opposition to Copyright Legislation. Sept. 17, 2004.
Public Knowledge. Public Knowledge Statement on Copyright Office Draft Legislation. Sept. 10, 2004.
Public Knowledge. Resource Room for the Inducing Infringement of Copyrights Act of 2004.

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September 20, 2004

Earthlink Provides New File Sharing Program

"A new file-sharing program hit the Net late Wednesday, posted by none other than Internet service provider EarthLink.

"The software, hosted on an out-of-the-way corner of the company's research and development site, is aimed at showing that a technology commonly used in Internet phone calls can be adapted to create a peer-to-peer network.

"On the research page, the company outlines a vision of creating voice over P2P, video services using peer-to-peer, and other applications, all based on the Net-calling standard."

John Borland. Earthlink Tests File-Sharing Program. News.com. Sept. 16 2004.

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September 18, 2004

XM Radio to Launch Internet Radio Station

"Satellite radio operator XM Radio on Wednesday announced plans to launch an online music service.

"The Washington, D.C.-based company said the service, dubbed XM Radio Online will launch sometime in early October and operate commercial-free, just as its satellite programming does. XM will charge $7.99 per month for unlimited listening and offer a discount rate of $3.99 to subscribers of its existing radio services.

"The company's main business is a commercial-free radio service that's used with its portable satellite radio receivers, which are designed for use in homes and cars."

Matt Hines. XM Radio Tunes In Online Music Service. News.com. Sept. 15, 2004.

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Yahoo! Acquires Musicmatch Online Jukebox

"In a move to expand its role in the online music business, Yahoo announced yesterday that it would buy Musicmatch, a company that sells music online, for $160 million.

"The move puts Yahoo in direct competition with Apple Computer's iTunes, Microsoft's new music store and RealNetworks in the small but growing market for online downloads of music.

"'Music is one of the most-used applications on the Web,' said Dan Rosensweig, Yahoo's chief operating officer. 'Our objective is to be the leading player in the digital music world.'"

Saul Hansell. Yahoo to Challenge iTunes With New Acquisition. The New York Times. Sept. 15, 2004.

See also:
Matt Hines. Yahoo to Buy Musicmatch for $160 million. News.com. Sept. 14, 2004.

Jefferson Graham. Yahoo Breaks into Music with Musicmatch Purchase. TechNewsWorld. Sept. 15, 2004.

Update: John Borland. Yahoo to Launch its Own Music Player. News.com. Sept. 17, 2004. (Yahoo is planning on launching its own online music service by the end of this year, using Musicmatch's customers to approach separate audiences.)

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:34 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

New Software Allows P2P Among Private Groups

"Welcome to the world of legal online music ambiguity. Say hello to Grouper.

"Grouper - a temporarily stealth software project - has gone up for download and instantly created a confusing divide between the old world and the new. Unlike most P2P software that shares music and other files with world+dog, Grouper focuses on sharing files between friends. Users can set up mini-P2P networks and open up their photos, music, movies and documents.

"This approach seems much more similar to old-style content swapping where friends handed each other a mixed CD or recording of the UT versus Texas A&M; football game, just with a techie twist."

Ashlee Vance. New P2P Software Could End Illegal Music Squabbles. The Register. Sept. 13, 2004.

See also Raymond Blijd. The Grouper Exception. P2Pnet.net. Sept. 16, 2004.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:15 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

September 16, 2004

OMB Seeks to Sweep Away P2P Use

"Federal chief information officers received a reminder this week that peer-to-peer file sharing is an activity that, in most cases, should not be tolerated on federal networks.

"A Sept. 8 memo from Karen Evans, administrator for information technology and e-government in the Office of Management and Budget, asked CIOs to monitor and enforce federal policies on employees' use of P2P technology. The memo cites no recent incidents or statistics on P2P file sharing by federal employees."

Florence Olsen. OMB: Clamp Down on P2P. FCW.com. Sept. 14, 2004.

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September 13, 2004

Anti-Piracy Technology for Video

"NDS, STMicroelectronics and Thomson said on Friday they will develop new encryption technology to foil video piracy, a $3.5 billion problem for broadcasters and movie studios.

"The anti-piracy technology, known as the secure video processor platform, is designed for media companies to protect their content from unauthorized copying and redistribution."

No author. Tech Firms Announce Video Anti-Piracy Technology. Reuters. Sept. 10, 2004.

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September 11, 2004

Musicians Using Internet to Introduce and Share Music

"Downloading music from the Internet is not illegal. Plenty of music available online is not just free but also easily available, legal and — most important — worth hearing.

"That fact may come as a surprise after highly publicized lawsuits by the RIAA against fans using peer-to-peer programs like Grokster and eDonkey to collect music on the Web.

"But the fine print of those lawsuits makes clear that fans are being sued not for downloading but for unauthorized distribution: leaving music in a shared folder for other peer-to-peer users to take. As copyright holders, the labels have the exclusive legal right to distribute the music recorded for them, even if technology now makes that right nearly impossible to enforce.

"While the recording business litigates and lobbies over music being given away online, countless musicians are taking advantage of the Internet to get their music heard. They are betting that if they give away a song or two, they will build audiences, promote live shows and sell more recordings."

Jon Pareles. No Fears: Laptop D.J.'s Have a Feast. The New York Times. Sept. 10, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

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September 10, 2004

House Judiciary Committee Approves P2P Bill

"People who illegally share copyrighted music and movies over the Internet could be jailed for up to five years under a bill approved by a powerful congressional panel today.

"The Piracy Deterrence and Education Act of 2004 is one of a handful of measures gathering steam in Congress that target the practice of Internet file sharing, which record companies blame for playing a part in a $2 billion dollar decline in yearly CD sales since 2000. The House Judiciary Committee approved the measure by voice vote, clearing it for debate in the full House.

"Congress has done little thus far to address Internet file-swapping, but that could change in the next few months as lawmakers in both houses consider a clutch of measures that target either individual downloaders or the companies -- like Kazaa and eDonkey -- that distribute the file-swapping software."

David McGuire. House Panel Moves to Criminalize Spyware, Net Piracy. WashingtonPost.com. Sept. 8, 2004.

Cynthia L. Webb. Congress Puts Hooks in Spyware, Copyright Crooks. WashingtonPost.com. Sept. 9, 2004.

See also:
Roy Mark. House Panel Gets Tough on Spyware, P2P Piracy. Internetnews.com. Sept. 8, 2004.
Public Knowledge. HR 4077, The Piracy Deterrence and Education Act of 2004.
Public Knowledge. Public Knowledge Reacts to House Judiciary Committee Approval of Copyright Bill. Sept. 8, 2004.
Electronic Frontier Foundation. A Better Way Forward: Voluntary Collective Licensing of Music File Sharing.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

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RIAA Sued Over Patent

"Altnet, a company that sells music and other digital goods through file-swapping services, sued the Recording Industry Association of America on Wednesday for alleged patent infringement.

"The company, a subsidiary of Brilliant Digital Entertainment, contends that the RIAA has been infringing on one of its patents in the course of copyright enforcement efforts inside peer-to-peer networks. Overpeer, a copyright company owned by Loudeye, and MediaDefender, also are named in the lawsuit.

"The patent infringement suit comes as one of the sideshows in an ongoing legal battle over peer-to-peer networks that has led to piracy charges against technology companies and antitrust claims against record companies, and that now appears to be headed ultimately to Congress for resolution."

John Borland. P2P Company Sues RIAA Over Patent. News.com. Sept. 8, 2004.

See also:
Business Wire. Brilliant Digital Entertainment and Altnet File Suit Against Infringers of Its "TrueNames'' Patent. Sept. 8, 2004.

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September 08, 2004

For Students, iPods Replace Soda

Remember the big controversy a few years ago about high schools and school districts signing revenue deals with Coke, Pepsi and other soft drink companies? The current wave of tech sponsorship may be the natural extension of that trend.

"It's no secret that college campuses are hotbeds of technology innovation, so it shouldn't be surprising that universities are among the first to try out new gadgets and applications. Many of these have direct educational benefits--for example, high-speed wireless video offers students the chance to watch a lecture that they couldn't attend in person.

"But campuses are also beginning to resemble consumer technology marketing labs, with school-backed programs pushing gadgets and services that may have only a tenuous connection to the classroom."

Marguerite Reardon. Big Tech on Campus. News.com. Sept. 6, 2004.

See also:
CNet. Tech Specs of the Top 50 Universities.

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Netflix and Tivo Partner to Deliver Digital Entertainment

"Netflix and TiVo are about to join forces making it possible for customers to download movies over the Net to their television. Later this month the companies plan to unveil a simple but significant partnership that could shake up the media world. Subscribers who belong to both services will be able to download their Netflix DVDs over the Internet directly into the TiVo boxes in their homes, instead of receiving them in the mail.

"Hollywood will be watching closely to make sure copyright protections aren't hacked, which could lead to its biggest nightmare: high-quality versions of its movies released freely onto the Internet.

"Cable customers could prefer the larger Netflix selection and download movies to their TiVo boxes using cable's own pipes. Unlike the phone companies, which are regulated as 'common carriers' and forbidden from discriminating against customers or content, cable firms don't have to accommodate their rivals' traffic on their networks. But if cable closes the door to the Netflix downloads, customers could migrate to the phone industry's broadband offering, DSL."

Brad Stone. I Want a Movie! Now!. Newsweek. Sept. 13, 2004.

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September 07, 2004

Skype (and VoIP) Picks Up

"Skype, a made-up term that rhymes with "tripe," is the most popular and sexiest application of VoIP, which doesn't rhyme with anything. VoIP - sometimes pronounced letter by letter, like C.I.A., and at other times as a word - stands for voice over Internet protocol. Essentially, it is a way of allowing a computer with a broadband connection to serve as a telephone.

"This new form of conveying voice messages has so many advantages over traditional systems that the whole telecommunications industry is scrambling to see how fast it can shift traffic onto the Internet. AT&T;, for example, is no longer recruiting new home customers, but it is offering many new VoIP services. Dozens of other companies - new ones like Vonage and established ones like Verizon - are selling VoIP services, too."

Editor's note: As it celebrates its first birthday, Skype -- long a Windows-only application -- now has made its Web phone application available for the Mac platform. Skype for Mac is in beta testing now (version 0.8) and requires the Panther operating system (Mac OS X version 10.3 or higher). (Sorry, Jaguar users, you get no love.) Skype also runs on the Linux and PocketPC platforms.

James Fallows. In Internet Calling, Skype Is Living Up to the Hype. The New York Times. Sept. 5, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

See also:
Rob Pegoraro. It Takes Time to Judge the True Impact of New Technology. WashingtonPost.com. Sept. 5, 2004.

Roy Mark. Congress Hangs Up on VoIP for 2004. Internetnews.com. Sept. 3, 2004.

Washington Post. Make Phone Calls Online. Aug. 29, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

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September 06, 2004

Copyright Office Drafts New Version of P2P Bill

"A hotly contested wrangle in Congress over how to outlaw file-swapping networks just took a new twist.

"The U.S. Copyright Office has drafted a new version of the Induce Act that it believes will ban networks like Kazaa and Morpheus while not putting hardware such as portable hard drives and MP3 players on the wrong side of the law.

"The Copyright Office's four-page 'discussion draft,' appears to back away from the broad sweep of the original Induce Act by making it more difficult for companies to be found liable for copyright violations. It says anyone who 'intentionally induces' copyright violations can be found liable, with 'induce' defined as one or more 'affirmative, overt acts that are reasonably expected to cause or persuade another person or persons' to violate copyright law."

Declan McCullagh. Copyright Office Pitches Anti-P2P Bill. News.com. Sept. 2, 2004.

See also:
Mike Godwin. Sept. 3 Letter to Copyright Office Regarding S2560. Public Knowledge. Sept. 3, 2004.

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September 04, 2004

FSU Tunes Up Its Student Body

"In an effort to prevent illegal file sharing on campus, Florida State University is on the verge of finalizing a deal with Apple Computer, Inc. -- a deal that would provide free iTunes software to students and allow them to download music for 99 cents per song.

"Carl Baker, the director of university computer systems at the FSU Academic Computing and Network Services Department, was appointed chair of a committee charged with finding a way to stop illegal file sharing on campus. The committee, known as the Online Music Committee, was created this spring semester and is made up of members of FSU's administration and a small group of students."

Erica Rodriguez. FSU to sign deal with Apple. FSU View. Aug. 26, 2004.

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September 01, 2004

Strategic Plan for Electronic Health Records

"The Bush administration has released a strategic plan for every U.S. citizen's health information to be stored in an 'electronic health record' central database within ten years.

"Each person would have a 'personal health record,' an electronic file the individual would manage, that could exchange information with the EHR database.

"The PHR would contain information on a person's insurance plan, prescriptions, allergies, medical history, and conditions such as asthma or diabetes."

Mark S. Sullivan. Medical Records May Go Online. PC World. Aug. 23, 2004.

See also:
United States Department of Health & Human Services. HHS Fact Sheet--HIT Report At-A-Glance. July 21, 2004.
White House Press Secretary. Transforming Health Care for All Americans. May 27, 2004.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:34 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Microsoft to Offer Music Service

"When Microsoft unveils its online music store later this week, the first song offered should be Dave Brubeck's 'It's Déjà Vu All Over Again.' For Microsoft, taking a trail blazed by others - then trying to dominate the market - is a familiar tune.

With the opening on Thursday, Microsoft will land itself in a market that Apple Computer pioneered more than a year ago with its iTunes online music store, in much the same way that it took on Netscape in the Web browser business and Sony in the market for console game machines.

"As a storefront on the MSN online service, Microsoft's music service will offer song tracks for downloading to personal computers and portable music players."

Laurie J. Flynn. Can Microsoft Beat iTunes With a Store of Its Own?. The New York Times. Aug. 30, 2004.

See also John Borland and Jim Hu. MSN Music: It's Really About Windows. ZDNet.com. Aug. 30, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

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August 30, 2004

Software Captures Music from Satellite Radio

"Catching Blondie's reunion tour broadcast at 4 in the morning wasn't an option for XM Satellite Radio subscriber Scott MacLean. 'I was missing concerts that were being broadcasted when I was asleep or out,' he said.

"So the 35-year-old computer programmer from Ottawa, Ontario, wrote a piece of software that let him record the show directly onto his PC hard drive while he snoozed.

"The software, TimeTrax, also neatly arranged the individual songs from the concert, complete with artist name and song title information, into MP3 files.

"Then MacLean started selling the software, putting him in the thick of a potential legal battle pitting technically savvy fans against a company protecting its alliance--and licensing agreements--with the music industry."

Reuters. MP3 Tool Pulls Satellite Radio Into Piracy Fight. News.com. Aug. 27, 2004.

Update: Paul Festa. XM Radio Pulls PC Hardware Amid Piracy Concerns. News.com. Aug. 30, 2004. (XM Radio discontinues radio receiver that could be outfitted with TimeTrax, software that allows unit users to record songs onto their PC hard drive; unit is being sold on eBay.)

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 08:38 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

August 28, 2004

FBI Targets Copyright Violators

"Federal authorities searched computers in six locations yesterday in an attempt to disrupt a network used to trade copies of movies, software, games and music.

"The Justice Department said the searches represented the first time that so-called peer-to-peer networks had been singled out for a criminal enforcement action under copyright law.

"The department has stepped up enforcement of copyright law this year, but until now it has focused on organizations known as warez groups, which steal copies of movies and other materials to make them available to downloaders."

Saul Hansell. U.S. Searches Computers, Trying to Disrupt Piracy. The New York Times. Aug. 26, 2004.

See also
Peter Kaplan and Andy Sullivan. U.S. Raids Net Song Swappers in Copyright Crackdown. Reuters. Aug. 25, 2004.

Attorney General John Ashcroft. Digital Gridlock Announcement. Aug. 25, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

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August 27, 2004

New Proposal for 'Induce Act'

"Electronics manufacturers and some Internet providers are mounting a counterattack to a copyright bill intended to ban peer-to-peer networks and that could also imperil devices like Apple Computer's iPod.

"That measure, called the Induce Act, has been widely panned by the technology industry. Now some groups, including SBC Communications, Verizon Communications and the Consumer Electronics Association, are fighting back with their own proposal that will be sent to Capitol Hill on Tuesday afternoon.

"Their proposal, dubbed the 'Don't Induce Act,' (.pdf) is designed to provide the Senate with an alternative that's less threatening to the industry. It is far narrower, saying that only someone who distributes a commercial computer program 'specifically designed' for widescale piracy on digital networks could be held liable for copyright violations."

Declan McCullagh. Industry Offers Alternative to P2P Bill. News.com. Aug. 24, 2004.

See also Katie Dean. Copyright Bill Needs Big Changes. Wired News. Aug. 25, 2004.

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RIAA and Colleges Address Illegal File Sharing

"Colleges and universities across the country are taking new steps to fight rampant Internet music piracy by beefing up their education efforts, offering legal music downloading options and stiffening penalties for illegal file sharing, according to a report released today.

"The report, which was prepared by a coalition of higher education institutions and the recording industry, said that schools are adopting new policies as well as technological and educational measures to ensure that students have access to online music without resorting to illegal downloads."

Jonathan Krim. Justice Dept. to Announce Cyber-Crime Crackdown. WashingtonPost.com. Aug. 25, 2004.

See also:
Katie Dean. Music Services Score an A-Plus. Wired News. Aug. 24, 2004.
Cynthia L. Webb. Online Music Goes Back to School. WashingtonPost.com. Aug. 24, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

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August 26, 2004

Software Maker Exposes Metadata

"Workshare, a specialist in collaboration software built around Microsoft Office applications, is aiming to alert businesses to the danger of hidden data lurking in their documents.

"The company launched Metadatarisk.org, a Web site with information on the dangers posed by hidden metadata in documents.

"The site includes Metafind, a downloadable tool for automatically analyzing and exposing metadata in documents posted on a given Web site."

David Becker. Software Maker Exposes Hidden Data. News.com. Aug. 23, 2004.

See also Jim Wagner. Scrubbing Content Metadata. Internetnews.com. Aug. 23, 2004.

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August 25, 2004

Download Before You Buy

"In June 2003, Best Buy transferred ownership of the Musicland Group to a private investment company, asking for nothing but the investors' assumption of Musicland's debt and lease obligations.

"Just over a year later, Musicland, of Minnetonka, Minn., has named Zimmerman Partners in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., to handle its account, with billings estimated at $50 million. The two companies are poised to execute the next step in a turnaround plan: makeovers for the 900 stores that Musicland runs under the Sam Goody, Media Play and Suncoast Motion Picture brands, which collectively sell CD's as well as entertainment products ranging from DVD's to movie posters to books.

"The strategy envisions stores that embrace the Internet's role in music sales and emulate the loungelike atmosphere of chains like Barnes & Noble and Starbucks."

Nat Ives. Musicland Looks to the Internet. The New York Times. Aug. 24, 2004.

See also Richard Shim. Starbucks, HP Queue Up Music Coffeehouses. News.com. March 16, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 06:58 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

August 21, 2004

Court Rules in Favor of File-Sharing Companies

"The makers of two leading file-sharing programs are not legally liable for copyrighted works swapped online by their users, a federal appeals court ruled (.pdf) in a blow to the entertainment industry.

"Among other reasons, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit said Grokster Ltd. and StreamCast Networks Inc., unlike the original Napster LLC, were not liable because they don't have central servers pointing users to copyrighted material.

"The panel noted that the software firms simply provide tools that let individual users share information over the Internet, regardless of whether that shared information is copyrighted."

Associated Press. Appeals Court Ruling Favors File-Sharing. WashingtonPost.com. Aug. 20, 2004.

See also John Borland. Judges Rule File-Sharing Software Legal. News.com. Aug. 19, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:21 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Software Revives Music Sharing

"A group of anonymous programmers has released new software that allows music to be swapped via Apple Computer's popular iTunes jukebox.

"Like an older piece of software called MyTunes, the newly released OurTunes allows a person to browse complete iTunes libraries on other computers and download songs, either in MP3 or the AAC format preferred by Apple.

"Songs purchased from the iTunes music store and wrapped in Apple's copy-protection technology cannot be traded. OurTunes works only among computers that share a network, however."

John Borland. Hackers revive iTunes music sharing. News.com. Aug. 19, 3004.

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August 20, 2004

P2P Network Serves Students

"I2hub, the supercharged file-swapping network that has run for months on the university Internet2 network, is aiming to solidify its hold on campuses, with new businesses targeted at students.

"The I2hub founders have acquired a small online textbook exchange and are tying it into the file-swapping service, hoping that students will start reselling books to each other instead of using local bookstores. With this, and other similar student-focused services, they're aiming to turn the file-swapping traffic into a more traditional--and potentially profitable--hub of campus activities."

John Borland. Supercharged College P2P Project Expands. News.com. Aug. 16, 2004.

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Now Apple is Really Ticked Off

"RealNetworks on Tuesday unveiled its 'Freedom of Choice' marketing push, featuring 49-cent singles, $4.99 albums and a message that it has the only music store compatible with both iPods and portable devices based on Windows Media. The result: a major challenge to Apple Computer, a boost for Windows Media, and a new imperative for music labels to back Apple rivals to break down compatibility barriers."

Forrester Research. Commentary: RealNetworks Lobs Another Grenade. News.com. Aug. 17, 2004.

See also:
John Borland. RealNetworks Slashes Song Prices. News.com. Aug. 17, 2004. (RealNetworks has kicked off a digital music marketing campaign by highlighting Harmony, a new iPod-compatible technology, and offering song downloads from its music store for 49 cents for a limited time.)

John Borland. Can Glaser and Jobs Find Harmony? News.com. Aug. 17, 2004.

Update: John Borland. Real Curtails Half-price Music Sale. Sept. 9, 2004. (RealNetworks closed down its three-week promotional campaign, selling more than three million singles.)

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 08:05 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Johansen Strikes Again

"Jon Lech Johansen, the Norwegian hacker famous for cracking DVD encryption, says he has cracked Apple AirPort Express.

"Johansen has revealed the public key that Apple AirPort Express, a wireless networking protocol, uses to encrypt music sent between iTunes and a wireless base station.

"AirPort Express was released in June 2004 as a small wireless bridge from a personal computer to a stereo. Details of the AirPort Express codes were also published on Johansen's weblog, which is called So Sue Me."

Lars Pasveer. Hacker Takes Bite Out of Apple's iTunes. News.com. Aug. 12, 2004.

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August 18, 2004

Microsoft Details Compatability Problems

"Microsoft has issued a list of nearly 50 software applications and games that may encounter problems with its Windows XP Service Pack 2 update.

"Microsoft details the various issues that people may face when they install the SP2 package, which was released to PC manufacturers earlier this month.

"A range of applications are listed in the Microsoft report, including several of the software maker's own products, along with antivirus tools, Web server software and a handful of games."

Matt Hines. Microsoft Lists SP2 Conflicts. News.com. Aug. 16, 2004.

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August 14, 2004

P2P Networks Distribute Windows Update

"Peer-to-peer advocacy group Downhill Battle has made a copy of Microsoft's Windows XP Service Pack 2 available at a site called SP2torrent.com through the BitTorrent file-sharing system.

"'Now is a crucial time to demonstrate ways that peer-to-peer can be useful,' according to co-founder Nicholas Reville. 'We are facing a situation where Congress is seriously considering outlawing peer-to-peer for all intents and purposes.'

"Reville was referring to the Induce Act, a bill before Congress that says 'whoever intentionally induces any violation' of copyright law is liable for that infraction. Downhill Battle also used peer-to-peer technology to distribute video of the congressional hearings on the Induce Act."

Ina Fried. Windows Update Hits File-Sharing Networks. News.com. Aug. 10, 2004.

See also Alfred Hermida. File-Sharers Offer Windows Update. BBCNews. Aug. 10, 2004.

UPDATE: Ina Fried. Group Cites Microsoft Tthreat, Says No SP2 Over P2P. News.com. Aug. 13, 2004. (Downhill Battle has stopped distributing Microsoft's Windows XP Service Pack 2 update following a DMCA threat from the software maker.)

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:33 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (1)

August 13, 2004

Variety of Secrets Exposed Through Use of MP3s

"Private photographs, confidential financial documents and even military secrets have joined the list of files that computer users can download as they scour the Internet.

"'One way files are being offered is by people bringing work home from the office and putting it on their home computers where they have a P2P application installed,' said Rick Wallace, who last month launched the SeeWhatYouShare.com web site.

"'At the office, their computer is behind a firewall that protects the network, but many do not have that protection at home and it can lead to great security lapses.' As more inexperienced users look for MP3 music clips, movies, television shows, pornography and computer programs, they often leave the digital door to their computers wide open."

Christopher Borowski. Computer Users Share Private Files with Their MP3s. Reuters. Aug. 9, 2004.

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August 12, 2004

New IM Collaboration Service for Businesses

"Five Across Inc. will launch an instant messaging (IM) product for business users on Monday that the startup vendor hopes will be a workplace alternative to free, consumer-oriented, public IM services and pricy enterprise-class IM systems.

"Five Across' InterComm basic IM software can be downloaded and run for free over the vendor's IM network, a model similar to the one adopted by providers of consumer-oriented, public IM services, such as America Online Inc.'s AIM, Yahoo Inc.'s Messenger and Microsoft Corp.'s MSN Messenger.

"Unlike consumer-oriented IM services, which are at their core geared toward casual use by individuals in a nonwork environment, the InterComm product contains a raft of workgroup features designed to allow business users to collaborate on documents, communicate and share files."

Juan Carlos Perez. New IM Service for Business Users Launched. InfoWorld. August 9, 2004.
See also Laura Blackwell. InterComm Fuses Messaging, Collaboration. PCWorld. Aug. 9, 2004.

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Web Services Standard Proposed to Promote Interoperability

"A consortium of major technology companies, including newfound allies Microsoft and Sun Microsystems, submitted a proposed new standard intended to promote interoperability between Web applications.

"The specification would provide a framework for applications to exchange and decipher messages, a key requirement for interoperability.

"Lack of interoperability has been one of the key factors in slowing down the expected boom in Web services, with many important applications unable to exchange data with one another."

David Becker. Sun, Microsoft Join on Web App Standard. News.com. Aug. 10, 2004.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:08 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

August 10, 2004

Apple Really Blindsided

"RealNetworks' RealPlayer program once defined digital multimedia online -- it was the only way to listen to scratchy Web radio or watch grainy Web video. Today Apple's iPod holds a similar role in the MP3-player market -- it's the gadget everybody seems to want.

"Both of these products were recently updated: Apple's newest iPod adds the best design features of the iPod mini, while RealPlayer 10.5 adds the unprecedented feature of iPod compatibility."

Rob Pegoraro. RealPlayer's iPod-Compatible Update 'Stunned' Apple. WashingtonPost.com. Aug. 8, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 07:57 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

August 09, 2004

States Continue Pressuring File Trading Companies

"A group of 46 state attorneys general sent a deeply critical letter to file-sharing companies Thursday, asking them to take stronger action on privacy and intellectual-property violations.

"Thursday's letter asked makers of file-sharing software to take 'meaningful steps' to prevent the dissemination of child pornography, invasion of privacy and copyright infringement. The group stopped short of citing specific legal action that states might take against companies but said they could target individuals using file-swapping networks for fraudulent purposes."

Kudos to News.com, which continues to chronicle the entertainment industry's moves to legislate copyright at the state level, in addition to it's increased efforts at the federal level.

Back in March, SNTReport.com cited a News.com report that outlined how the entertainment industry was assisting the states in portraying peer-to-peer networking companies as manufacturers of defective or potentially dangerous products. If classified in such a manner, file sharing products would have to bear extensive warning labels, and aggrieved copyright owners may be able to win damages from the products' manufacturers under state product liability statutes, in addition to any damages available pursuant to federal copyright infringement laws.

Additionally, Borland's article chronicles a trend amongst law enforcement officials and legislators at both the state and federal levels to portray P2P networks as harbors for adults who trade freely in child pornography. If such activity does occur on P2P networks, it is reprehensible and should be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.

But these allegations have been offered by entertainment industry lobbyists, then spoon-fed to state and federal officials -- almost always without the slightest shred of study or independently verifiable evidence. Clearly, the entertainment lobby has a vested interest in such a campaign, and any of their claims that concern copyrighted works always should be held to the strictest scrutiny.

Unfortunately, state and federal officials often fail to investigate such claims before acting.

John Borland. State AGs Warn File-Sharing Companies. News.com. Aug. 5, 2004.

See also:
Declan McCullagh, et al. P2P Faces New Legal Scrutiny from States. News.com. March 15, 2004.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 08:36 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

August 04, 2004

Music Presented at the Cellular Level

"First there was the ring tone. Then the camera. Now the music player.

"In its relentless push to add features to cellphones, the wireless industry is preparing to make affordable new phones that can store and play full-length downloaded music tracks.

"Motorola's announcement last week that it is working with Apple Computer to make phones that can store and play iTunes music tracks is the first major indication that the convergence of the portable music player and the inexpensive cellphone is finally upon us. The Motorola music phone will be on the market next year."

Laurie J. Flynn. The Cellphone's Next Makeover: Affordable Jukebox on the Move. The New York Times. Aug. 2, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 07:31 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

August 03, 2004

Combating Intellectual Property Theft

"File-swapping wasn't such a big deal when all you had to lose was a lousy download. But ever since the RIAA has gotten serious about making people pay for what they play, it's a different story.

"The RIAA is one of the industry groups that have joined forces with a Justice Dept. task force formed to combat intellectual-property theft.

"The task force is chaired by David Israelite, deputy chief of staff and counselor to Attorney General John Ashcroft. In contrast to the RIAA, which has focused on filing civil lawsuits against accused pirates, Israelite can slap scofflaws with criminal charges."

Patricia O'Connell. Piracy and "Economic National Security". BusinessWeek Online. August 2, 2004.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:57 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

August 02, 2004

The New File Swapping

"Think of them as eBay crossed with Napster, then injected with Friendster DNA. The newest social networking services merge three powerful Web functions - auctioning, file-sharing, and friend-of-a-friend socializing - to build digital barter economies. Unlike first-gen social networks, these communities are about more than getting laid and getting paid. These "social swap nets" help like-minded members pool digital resources - music, movies, games, even hardcover books.

Mediachest and SongBuddy are two early examples. They're still small (and size matters when it comes to a well-stocked "sharing pool"), but their very existence points to a new era in networked transactions, one in which online exchanges become more useful.

Xeni Jardin. Friends With Benefits. Wired. Aug. 2004.

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July 30, 2004

RIAA Wins Preliminary Victory

"A federal judge has handed a preliminary victory to the recording industry by granting its request to unmask anonymous file swappers accused of copyright infringement.

"U.S. District Judge Denny Chin ruled (.pdf) Monday that Cablevision, which provides broadband Internet access in Connecticut, New Jersey and New York, can be required to divulge the identities of its subscribers sued over copyright violations.

"This ruling is the latest decision to clarify what legal methods copyright holders may use when hunting down people who are trading files on peer-to-peer networks."

Declan McCullagh. Judge: RIAA can unmask File Swappers. News.com. July 27, 2004.

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July 27, 2004

Senate Hears Opposition Involving Induce Act

"The Senate heard strong opposition from the technology industry on Thursday about a bill (.pdf) that would hold tech companies responsible for creating devices that could be used to pirate digital content.

"In its current form, the bill proposes to slap technology companies for making any device that could 'induce' or encourage buyers to make illegal copies of songs, movies or computer programs. But technology companies say it would kill innovation and potentially outlaw some of the most popular devices, including Apple's iPod.

"The Business Software Alliance surprised some observers, as the group initially supported the bill but is now asking for clarifications to protect innovation. Representatives of IEEE and NetCoalition, which represents Internet companies and Internet service providers, also expressed opposition to the bill."

Katie Dean. Techies Blast Induce Act. Wired News. July 23, 2004.

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July 26, 2004

Popular Source Code Offered on Usenet

"An online group claiming to have the source code for two popular computer programs for sale opened its doors for business again. An e-mail message that claims to come from 'larry hobbles' and the Source Code Club was sent to the Full-Disclosure security discussion list.

"The message says that the group has moved operations to Usenet, where interested customers can buy the source code for the Dragon intrusion detection system (IDS) software from Enterasys Networks and peer-to-peer server and client software from Napster, now owned by Roxio.

"While Roxio owns the rights to the original Napster code being sold by the club, the current Napster online service does not use any code from the original, free music swapping service and is not affected by the alleged theft."

Paul Roberts. Stolen Code Shop Back in Business. PCWorld. July 19, 2004.

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July 23, 2004

Controversy Surrounds Piracy Study

"A study (.pdf) released two weeks ago by the Business Software Alliance, which estimated the yearly losses from software piracy at $29 billion, has managed to stir real passion.

"The piracy study has become an issue because of a copyright bill, introduced in the Senate last month, that is strongly supported by the business alliance.

"In a letter last week to the Business Software Alliance, the heads of two other trade groups, who oppose the Senate bill, wrote that the results of the software piracy study were deeply troubling."

Steve Lohr. Software Group Enters Fray Over Proposed Piracy Law. The New York Times. July 19, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

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Website Deciphers Government Documents

"While legislators in Washington work to outlaw peer-to-peer networks, one website is turning the peer-to-peer technology back on Washington to expose its inner, secretive workings.

"But outragedmoderates.org isn't offering copyright music and videos for download. The site, launched two weeks ago, has aggregated more than 600 government and court documents to make them available for download through the Kazaa, LimeWire and Soulseek P2P networks in the interest of making government more transparent and accountable.

"Steven V. Aftergood, director of the Project on Government Secrecy at the Federation of American Scientists, says the site answers a growing demand from the public to examine original source documents."

Kim Zetter. Downloading for Democracy. Wired News. July 19, 2004.

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July 20, 2004

EBay Offers Downloadable Music

"Online auctioneer eBay Inc. is offering downloadable music through selected sellers in a six-month test to decide whether to join other major companies in the marketing digital media.

"Sellers chosen for the pilot would have to ensure copyright protection for the content and meet service-level agreements. Music buyers would not be allowed to resell the files on eBay.

"The trial follows Apple Computer Inc.'s announcement this week that it has passed the 100-million mark for downloads from its iTunes Music Store."

Antone Gonsalves. EBay Tests Audience For Online Music. TechWeb. July 15, 2004.

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July 14, 2004

MP3 Blogs Unearth Forgotten Musical Gems

"A new genre of Web sites that offer an eclectic mix of free music downloads may not be strictly legit, but the sites' creators say they're doing the beleaguered record industry a favor.

"Named for the MP3 music format and the popular self-published Web sites known as blogs, they are part online mixtape, part diary, and part music magazine.

Well-known blogs include Soul Sides, which has underground hip-hop and forgotten R&B; The Tofu Hut, whose offerings range from gospel artists Blind Mamie and A.C. Forehand to rockabilly performer Carl Perkins to soul god Donnie Hathaway; and Said the Gramophone, which has indie rock, folk music and hip-hop."

Adam Pasick. Livewire: MP3 Blogs Serve Rare Songs, Dusty Grooves". Reuters. July 11, 2004.

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The Game of Numbers

"Just a day after the BSA came out with their misleading report on software 'piracy', the MPAA needed to follow suit by releasing their own misleading study on the impact of movie downloads.

"On the numerical side, this is really a survey, so they're not making up numbers... just conclusions. They found that 50% of people they surveyed claimed to have downloaded 'copyrighted content' last year.

"First off, that's a ridiculous question. If you visit just about any website you've downloaded 'copyrighted content.'"

Techdirt. MPAA's Turn To Mislead With Statistics. July 8, 2004.

See Also. Techdirt. BSA's Latest Made Up Software Piracy Numbers Parroted By The Press. July 7, 2004.

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July 09, 2004

Multimedia Messaging

"Through Multimedia Messaging Service (MMS), mobile users share video, stereo-quality audio and other forms of rich media. This could include short home movies you shoot on your camera phone, photo snapshots, even audio clips you download from your wireless provider or from the Web.

"Media-rich messages can be sent to or from a mobile device or by way of the Web on your computer. That means if you're out on the road, you can send an MMS to someone else who's back in the office, or vice versa. The technology makes a wide array of personal entertainment services possible. Film trailers, music preview services, mobile photoblogging, audioblogging and videoblogging are also made possible with MMS. Using your MMS-capable handset, you can capture and publish multimedia to a Weblog from wherever you are in the world."

Xeni Jardin. Saying Yes to MMS. MSN.com. No date.

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July 05, 2004

New Chief at MPAA

"Dan Glickman will replace Jack Valenti as the head of the Motion Picture Association of America - Hollywood's powerful lobbying organization and the shaper of laws that critics say may stifle technology in the name of preventing piracy.

"Valenti officially stepped down after nearly 40 years on the job. He will continue as chief executive until Glickman takes over.

Glickman, a moderate Democrat who served in Congress for 18 years and then served as the Secretary of Agriculture during the Clinton administration, will begin his tenure Sept. 1. During much of his tenure in Congress, he was both a member of the House Judiciary Committee and the Copyright and Intellectual Property Subcommittee."

Katie Dean. Movie Lobby Group in New Hands. Wired News. July 1, 2004.

See also:
Brooks Boliek. Glickman Relishes Role as Hollywood Mouthpiece. Reuters, July 1, 2004.
Lisa Friedman. Ex-agriculture Secretary Succeeding Valenti. Los Angeles Daily News. July 1, 2004.
Art Brodsky. Public Knowledge Reacts to Selection of Dan Glickman as New MPAA president. Public Knowledge. July 1, 2004.
John Borland. Jack Valenti's Curtain Call. News.com. June 21, 2004.

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July 03, 2004

Whither Kazaa?

"When a federal judge shut down Napster in 2001, Kazaa parent Sharman Networks quickly stepped in as the replacement of choice, signing up millions of users and even surpassing its predecessor in some respects. Since then, however, newcomers such as eDonkey and BitTorrent have been coming on strong amid reports that millions of people are logging off Sharman's network.

"Although it's too early to draw broad conclusions about Sharman's future, experts said many people appear to be shopping more intently than ever for file-swapping alternatives that incorporate improvements in peer-to-peer technology that have not yet made it onto Kazaa."

John Borland. Does Kazaa Matter?. News.com. June 30, 2004.

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Canada Shelters ISPs from Copyright Infringement

"Internet service providers cannot be held liable for the copyright infringement of their subscribers, even when a cached copy of a work is held on local servers, a Canadian court has ruled.

"The decision on Wednesday marked an important victory for the country's ISPs, which were worried about being held legally or financially responsible for subscribers' use of peer-to-peer and other music downloading services."

John Borland. Canadian ISPs Win on Copyright Ruling. News.com. June 30, 2004.

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July 01, 2004

Pirate Act Moving Toward House

"Consumer groups jeered and recording and movie industry groups cheered the easy passage in the Senate of legislation that would allow civil suits against alleged file swappers.

"The Pirate Act of 2004 would allow the Department of Justice to provide greater legal support to content owners who feel their copyrights have been infringed upon online. Under current laws, copyright holders may onlypursue criminal suits against file swappers, which can result in jail time. If approved by the House, the new law would allow civil suits, which can result in financial penalties.

"Following its passage in the Senate, the legislation was sent to the House Judiciary Committee and it is still unclear as to when the Pirate Act will reach the floor of the House for a vote."

Mark S. Sullivan. File Swappers May Face Civil Suits. PC World. June 29, 2004.

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June 30, 2004

Alliance Demonstrates P2P Commercial Potential

"Veteran rocker Steve Winwood has partnered with 'Access Hollywood' in an experimental marketing alliance intended to demonstrate the commercial potential of file-sharing networks such as Kazaa, according to people involved in the project.

"The deal is one of the first to use sponsored downloads to support commercial music on the same peer-to-peer networks that the music industry has blamed for an explosion in piracy and weak CD sales in recent years.

"The major record labels are so afraid of file sharing that they're missing the opportunity,' said Bruce Forest, a principal in Jun Group, which brokered the unusual marketing alliance and helped place the free tracks on Web networks."

Reuters. Promo Uses P2P Networks To Sell Songs. News.com. June 29, 2004.

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June 29, 2004

SimDesk's Alternative to Microsoft Office

"SimDesk Technologies is the first company to provide access for people to tap into their programs from whichever computer they happen to be using without needing Microsoft's full-blown Office Suite.

"Individuals can log on to the SimDesk Web site, use basic programs, including word processing, email, and spreadsheet packages, and store their stuffon the company's computers.

"Because much of the software and all the data are kept on SimDesk servers, schools, libraries and community centers are able to use older hardware rather than buy fast new machines every few years."

Peter Burrows. A Sweet Deal in Suite Software. Business Week Online. July 5, 2004.

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June 24, 2004

Send Voice Mail As E-Mail

"Nextel is offering a new service that allows its cell phone subscribers to record a voice message and send it to anyone with an e-mail address. NextMail builds on the company's popular push-to-talk service, which allows Nextel users to radio each other by pressing a button on the side of the phone instead of dialing a number."

"The push-to-talk service is a lucrative one for Nextel, whose customers pay more per month on average than those of other cellular companies, in part because its business customers want the walkie-talkie feature. Push-to-talk is used by more than 90 percent of Nextel's 13.4 million subscribers."

Yuki Noguchi. Nextel Offers Voice Memos Sent as E-Mail.WashingtonPost.com. June 22, 2004

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

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Proposed Law Targets P2P Networks

“New legislation introduced late Tuesday by a group of powerful U.S. senators would let artists and entertainment companies sue creators of products, such as peer-to-peer software and copying programs, that ‘induce’ copyright violations.

“Senate Judiciary Committee chairman Orrin Hatch, clearly targeting Peer-to-Peer vendors, claims his bill focuses on companies that profit by encouraging children and teenagers to infringe copyrights.

"Hatch stated ‘It is illegal and immoral to induce or encourage children to commit crimes and tragically, some corporations now seem to think that they can legally profit by inducing children to steal. Some think they can legally lure children into breaking the law with false promises of free music.'

"On the other hand, P-to-P United, calls the bill ‘horrible public policy.’ The measure could stifle the development of future technologies that could be used for copyright infringement but have substantial legitimate uses."

Grant Gross. Copying Programs Could Be Outlawed. PC World. June 23, 2004.

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June 22, 2004

Copyright Bill Targets Technology

"A forthcoming bill in the U.S. Senate would, if passed, dramatically reshape copyright law by prohibiting file-trading networks and some consumer electronics devices on the grounds that they could be used for unlawful purposes.

"The proposal, called the Induce Act, says 'whoever intentionally induces any violation' of copyright law would be legally liable for those violations, a prohibition that would effectively ban file-swapping networks like Kazaa and Morpheus. In the draft bill seen by CNET News.com, inducement is defined as "aids, abets, induces, counsels, or procures" and can be punished with civil fines and, in some circumstances, lengthy prison terms.

"The bill represents the latest legislative attempt by influential copyright holders to address what they view as the growing threat of peer-to-peer networks rife with pirated music, movies and software."

Declan McCullagh. Antipiracy Bill Targets Technology. News.com. June 17, 2004.

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June 21, 2004

Aligning IT with Business Goals

"The relationship between management and IT has always been dysfunctional. When times are good, the bosses praise IT. When money gets tight, the front office sees IT as the villain, spending precious resources.

"Adding fuel to the fire was the article published last year in the Harvard Business Review called 'IT Doesn't Matter' by Nicholas Carr. The article asserts that IT has reached a point where it has become a commodity. The competitive advantage a business was once able to realize from IT has diminished significantly.

"This is the beginning of a new period in IT where the focus shifts from the technology to the business process itself.

"This shift is defined by one of the current technology buzz phrases: Service Oriented Architecture (SOA). It is the means to create a competitive advantage through cooperation and synthesis between management and IT. SOA means looking at IT from a strategic perspective, integrating IT functionality into the business goals, and allowing end users access to as much data as possible."

Michael Pelletier. An Introduction to SOA. Darwin. June, 2004.

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June 11, 2004

Apple Sends Music Across the Air

On the same day that Apple Computer announced a fix to its greatest security threat in several years, the company also announced the debut of a new wireless product that allows music and file sharing.

"AirPort Express, due in July, features both analog and digital music outputs to connect to speakers or sound systems. The device also plugs directly into a wall outlet, with no need for additional cables or power adapters, which Apple said should make it appealing to travelers as well as to those who want to stream music in their homes.

"Like Apple's existing AirPort Extreme products, the Express uses the 802.11g wireless standard. Music is streamed from an iTunes-equipped PC or Mac that uses a technology Apple is calling AirTunes."

Ina Fried. Apple's AirPort Adds Home Music Streaming. News.com. June 7, 2004.

Leander Kahney. Apple Pumps Music Through Air. Wired News. June 7, 2004.

Apple Computer. AirPort Express.

Apple Computer. AirTunes.

Apple Computer. iTunes.

Ina Fried. Apple Patches "Critical" OS X Flaw. News.com. June 7, 2004.

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June 10, 2004

The Future of Music

"The future playback of recorded music will not be tied to physical media (e.g., compact discs) or singular virtual players (e.g., iPods), but to many objects with shapes and sizes designed to appeal to our tactile relationships with music and, at the same time, to have the features of a virtual music device. I imagine these being called Playbacks.

"Playbacks may look like CDs. Many will cost about the same cost as a CD. But, Playbacks will be everywhere, appearing as all kinds of things. Some will look like traditional recorded media (CDs, tapes, LPs), but some will look utterly different."

The Ear Reverends. The Future of Music Playback. June 6, 2004.

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June 08, 2004

The New Music Marketing

"Today's music fan interacts with a "community" that is far larger than anyone ever dreamed possible before the widespread personal use of the Internet. This social networking is changing the way people market and sell music and it's doing so on a global scale.

"Here's how: One fan hears a song and 'tells' a dozen others online. Each in turn sends the information (and sometimes the entire song file) to another dozen people, and so on. If the song's hook is catchy and universal enough, the artist can reach thousands of fans in a matter of seconds. It's fast, it's easy, it's free, and it's global.

"Does this viral communication bring any income for that artist (or songwriter, or publisher, or manager, or agent, or distributor, or record label)? No. But does it provide vital publicity that has the potential to sell singles, albums, concert tickets and merchandise? Absolutely."

eMediaWire. Social Networking and Music Marketing: MySpace.com is Putting It All Together. June 5, 2004.

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June 05, 2004

UK Economist Rails Against Record Industry

"he copyright lobby has acquired its power because it has persuaded creative people that it defends their interests. I remember upbraiding a colleague who was using pirated software: I argued that we had a common concern to protect intellectual property. But I was mistaken. The law protects computer programs but not the ideas of a think-tank. That is why software businesses are well endowed and think-tanks are not, except for those that lend support to arguments such as those of Mr Munns.

"The claim by the music business to maintain control of every subsequent exploitation of its product has no more moral basis than the claim of a think-tank to control every subsequent expression or development of its ideas. Or the right of Trinity College, Cambridge, to approve every application of calculus, the invention of Isaac Newton, its late employee. Far from stimulating creative effort, such restrictions would paralyse it. The unreasonable nature of the assertion and its unenforceability reinforce each other. This pretty much describes the music industry's situation. So it will be the first industry to be genuinely transformed by the internet."

John Kay. The Music Industry Needs to Change the Record. FT.com. June 2, 2004.

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June 04, 2004

RIAA Seeks to Restrict Legal Copies

"Record labels say CD sales have plummeted as a result of copies--and copies of copies. Now the labels are testing technology that would limit the number of times a CD, or its copy, could be burned.

"Tools under review by the major labels would limit the number of backups that could be made from ordinary compact discs and prevent copied, or 'burned,' versions from being used to create further copies, according to Macrovision and SunnComm International, rival companies that are developing competing versions of the digital rights management software."

"Such anticopying efforts have met with consumer resistance in the past, but if the labels have their way, it may be that not only CDs, but also iTunes-style digital downloads, will be restricted."

(Editor's Note: Jenny Levine, editor of The Shifted Librarian, points out that the industry seems willing to allow corporate partners to give away downloads, but will not allow the same opportunity for libraries.)

John Borland. Labels to Dampen CD Burning?. News.com. June 2, 2004.

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Nokia Phone Addresses "Moblogging" Phenomenon

"Nokia has begun shipping the 7610 -- a camera phone with video-editing and mobile-blogging features -- in Europe, Africa and the Asia-Pacific region.

"The 7610 phone can capture, edit, store, print and send pictures and videos. The handset comes with a Kodak application designed to let users upload pictures to a virtual photo album on the Web. Images can be printed using a Bluetooth connection to a compatible printer or at kiosks at Nokia stores and other photo shops.

"Nokia also recently announced a site called Lifeblog that lets subscribers archive cell phone photos in chronological order, along with other data, including text, video and audio, using a personal mobile Web log."

Dinesh C. Sharma. Nokia Releases "Moblog" Camera Phone. News.com. June 1, 2004.

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June 03, 2004

Inside the Courtroom at the P2P Corral

"At first, the RIAA’s strategy to sue individual users of peer-to-peer networks generated a stir, but, since last fall, most cases have quietly disappeared in private settlement agreements for sums averaging $3000.

"A recent court hearing offered a view into what might happen if these cases did not end in settlement negotiations and instead proceeded to trial. Inside the courtroom, the attorneys for the recording industry outnumbered defendants by a two-to-one margin, and the disparity of resources and expertise between the sides only continued to widen."

Berkman Briefings. Inside the Courtroom: The Music Industry Takes on the Uploaders. May 27, 2004.

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June 02, 2004

MPAA Still Has No Successor

(Editor's Note: Valenti's successor is a critical appointment in the social software landscape because the Motion Picture Association, along with the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), has consistently sought to curtail peer-to-peer networking and file sharing through the courts and Congress.)

"For two years Jack Valenti, the venerable, 82-year-old chairman of the Motion Picture Association of America, has been trying to retire.

"After nearly four decades as Hollywood's leading lobbyist, the silver-haired former adman and White House adviser announced in March that he would be gone within a few months. But those months have passed, summer approaches and the association is nowhere close to finding Mr. Valenti's successor.

Doesn't anyone want to run the M.P.A.A.?"

Sharon Waxman. Hollywood's Casting Problem: Who Will Run the M.P.A.A.?. The New York Times. May 30, 2004.

(Editor’s Note 2: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

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June 01, 2004

Entertainment Industry Pushes "Pirate Act" to Kill P2P

"A proposal that the Senate may vote on as early as next week would let federal prosecutors file civil lawsuits against suspected copyright infringers, with fines reaching tens or even hundreds of thousands of dollars.

The so-called Pirate Act (S. 2237) is raising alarms among copyright lawyers and lobbyists for peer-to-peer firms, who have been eyeing the recording industry's lawsuits against thousands of peer-to-peer users with trepidation. The Justice Department, they say, could be far more ambitious."

Declan McCullagh. Pirate Act Raises Civil Rights Concerns. News.com. May 26, 2004.

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The Skype's the Limit

"The peer-to-peer strategy used by Skype is very similar to that of the Internet file-sharing systems, such as the original Napster, that have become the bane of the music industry. Indeed, the creators of Skype are largely the same team that unleashed Kazaa, the music-sharing program perhaps most loved by music swappers and most reviled by music corporations.

"But in reality, the key Skype team members are hardly radicals out to destroy the telephone as an instrument of profit. Despite their nonconformist markings, they’re simply ambitious businessmen intent on changing the economics of making a phone call."

Skype also has announced that it expand its service to include a paid service that will connect Skype calls to regular phones.

All of Skype's innovations could go for naught, however, if the U.S. does not resolve a potentially horrific thicket of regulatory issues.

Roxanne Khamsi. Skype Beyond the Hype. Technology Review. June 2004.

Eric Hellweg. Untangling Internet Telephony. Technology Review. May 28, 2004.

Colin McClelland. Skype Creator Promises Official VOIP Program Release. eWeek. May 19, 2004.

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May 27, 2004

File Sharing Battles Continue

Mere days after our luddites and legislation posting, SNTReport.com has learned that Italy's parliament has voted in favor of imposing jail sentences of up to three years on anyone caught uploading or downloading unauthorized copyrighted material to and from the Net. The legislation makes Italy one of the first countries to enact legislation that specifically criminalizes file sharing and P2P activities.

While several credible studies have published recently have provided reliable evidence that file sharing and peer-to-peer networking are not the sole -- or even primary -- causes of the music industry's lost revenue, Leigh Phillips's brief story in Digital Media Europe suggests that today's children are simply doing other things.

"Under-25s spend much more money per year on mobile products than on music. Manifestly, this is not simply a case of youngsters downloading music instead of purchasing CDs, it is a wholesale shift in mindset and way of life from earlier generations," said Phillips. "The mobile, to many young people, maintains a place in their life that pop music did for my generation and that of my parents. There was a survey published last year that found that UK teens are also spending far less on cigarettes and chocolate than preceding generations. What are they spending the money on? Why, mobile phones, of course.

"Thus, this shows, once more, that what is affecting music sales is so much broader than the issue of downloading and piracy."

Leigh Phillips. Mobile Phones are the New Rock and Roll. Digital Media Europe. May 24, 2004.

Tony Smith. Italy Approves 'Jail for P2P Users' Law. The Register. May 20, 2004.

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May 25, 2004

What Happens When Luddites Write Online Law

"A congressional hearing on Internet porn last week illustrates what happens when politicians try to ban technology they don't like or understand.

"The topic of Thursday's meeting of the House of Representatives' consumer protection subcommittee was a bill intended to require that programs like Kazaa and Grokster obtain parental consent before installation. The only problem: The bill that Stearns and his colleagues suggest as a solution is so broadly worded that it regulates far more than just peer-to-peer applications."

Declan McCullagh. Bad Laws, Bad Code, Bad Behavior. News.com. May 10, 2004.

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May 19, 2004

P2P Passes Photos

"OurPictures plans to launch its service for letting subscribers share pictures over the Internet but without the constraints of e-mail attachments or Web sites. The idea behind the service, which is set to conclude a three-month test, is that subscribers can post pictures to a network of fellow subscribers who transfer the pictures directly from one computer to another."

Paul Festa. Point, Click and Swap -- Digital Photos Go P2P. News.com. May 17, 2004.

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May 07, 2004

Digital Lifestyles on the Horizon

"Sony and Apple are looking closely at a long-predicted future, when digital 'convergence' potentially allows traditionally separate hardware and software markets to merge into a single device that can surf the Net, play movies, music and video games, and serve as the brain of a network that distributes that content to subsidiary devices around a home.

"The signs that this convergence is taking root are growing daily, driven by fast-rising adoption rates for broadband Internet services, home networking advances, and growing use of digital media such as video games and online music."

John Borland. Apple, Sony On a Collision Course?. News.com. May 5, 2004.

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May 05, 2004

Musicians Discuss Views on File Sharing

The Pew Internet & American Life Project presented at a conference some early findings of an online survey it did of more than 2,700 musicians to gather their views on copyright and file-sharing issues.

Among other things, these musicians are very divided about the problems and marketing potential of online file-sharing systems and they are not sure the recording industry campaign against illegal downloading will help them. Many of these artists themselves share some of their songs for free online and find that it helps them sell more CDs, draw bigger concert audiences, and get more playing time on commercial radio.

The survey of musicians and songwriters was conducted online between March 15 and April 15. While the sample for this survey is not representative or projectable to the entire population of musicians and songwriters, it brings many more voices into the debates about copyright laws, the impact of online music swapping, and the long-term prospects for the music industry.

Pew Internet & American Life Project. Pew Ineternet Project Data Memo: Preliminary Findings from a Web Survey of Musicians and Songwriters. (.pdf) May 2004.

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File Sharing: The Sequel

Granted, the iTunes and iPod music distribution model is pretty decent for both consumers and artists. Let us forget, for a moment, that the downloading model turns what historically has been a music sale (which is covered by copyright law's first sale doctrine) into a music lease (which is not covered by federal copyright law, and instead is handled as a contract between buyer and seller, often with no negotiation and take-it-or-leave-it terms.)

The current downloading model reintroduces the single to American music buyers, and, at least in the case of iTunes, gives buyers relatively free reign to transfer their leased songs across different players (i.e. from computer to car to home stereo).

What the iTunes model doesn't really allow for right now, though, is capturing live performances. And many of the best artists -- Clapton, Prince, Dave Matthews Band, Parliament -- often give their best performances live. eMusicLive gives buyers the opportunity to capture these performances in an authorized fashion.

It will be interesting to see how much money the musicians make from this venture, particularly since it seems that live performances will again be the way that musicians make their money. Let's face it: radio is so tightly programmed that it is virtually impossible for new songs to get play on the airwaves, although satellite radio ventures like XM Radio and Sirius may provide some opportunities. Further, most of the music is laden with samples of pre-existing work, making it harder for many songwriters to make a living by peddling tunes.

And theft, whether it be on the Web or on the street, always hampers revenue flow.

As a result, the live performance has become even more important as a way for musicians to earn money.

Associated Press. 'Dude! This Thing Is Awesome!'. Wired News. April 29, 2004.

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May 03, 2004

Making Money From the Commons

"Allan Vilhan is a musician who has yet to hit it big in the United States. In part, that's because Vilhan lives in Filakovo, a small town in Slovakia's Cerova Vrchovina highlands. By day, he runs his family's restaurant. In his spare time, he mixes beats. A year ago, after completing his first full-length album, he put MP3s of all the songs online and encouraged fans to listen for free. Nevertheless, to date he's recorded a profit of more than $1,000.

"Vilhan is making money because he hosts his songs at Magnatune.com, an Internet music distributor that replaces standard "all rights reserved" copyright language with "some rights reserved" licenses drafted by Creative Commons. Magnatune demands payment when the music is used for commercial purposes.

"Creative Commons is like a marketing tool," says Magnatune founder John Buckman, who has grossed $180,000 for 126 musicians since May 2003. "Free distribution generates exposure, and that builds commercial demand, which is where the real money is."

Andy Raskin. Giving It Away (for Fun and Profit). Business 2.0. May 2004.

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April 27, 2004

Apple's Role in Spurring Social Software

Yesterday and Sunday, The New York Times on the Web published a pair of stories that deftly chronicle how the entertainment and computing industries are converging, as the proliferation of social software such as WiFi, peer-to-peer networking, and handheld devices continues to force both industries to evolve.

At the center of this convergence is Apple. The computer company, during the second tenure of Chairman Steve Jobs, has remained a distant second to Microsoft in terms of personal computer operating system market share. But recently, Apple has been at the forefront of several several social software initiatives that make the company vitally relevant. Through its AirPort system, Apple was one of the first companies to offer and simplify WiFi access through the personal computer. Apple is at the center of SubEthaEdit, a collaborative editing platform that allows all users to type anywhere in the text without locking parts of the text for other users. SNTReport.com was one of the first publications to cover this technology when Steve Arnold wrote a feature story about it in March.

And there is the iPod, Apple's wildly successful handheld device. Apple now sells more iPods than it does computers, and the device (along with the iTunes Music Store) perhaps singlehandedly legitimized the market for downloaded music. The company introduced the iPod Mini, a smaller version of the iPod, in January to great industry acclaim and customer demand.

Perhaps most importantly, Apple has made its hardware and software easily compatible with the Windows operating system: the iPod runs on both platforms, and Apple's computers generally interface well with networks that run the Windows platform.

Evelyn Nussenbaum. Technology and Show Business Kiss and Make Up. The New York Times on the Web. (Free registration required). April 26, 2004.

John Markoff. Oh, Yeah, He Also Sells Computers. The New York Times on the Web. (Free registration required). April 25, 2004.

Steven Arnold. A Mac Collaborative Editor Breaks New Ground. SNTReport.com. March 2, 2004.

(n.b. The Times places stories in their fee-based archives after seven days.)

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Music Downloads Rise

The Pew Internet & American Life Project released a report Sunday that suggests that the future of music distribution is through online means.

"The number of those who say they download music online remains well below the peak levels that we tracked in the spring of 2003, but there was some growth in those who reported music downloading in our February survey. The data also shows growth since last November in usage of some of the smaller file-sharing applications, such as iMesh, BitTorrent, and eMule.

In the most recent survey, we found that 18% of Internet users said they download music files. That is a modest increase from the 14% of Internet users who reported in a survey just before last Christmas that they downloaded music files online. But it is still considerably below the 29% who said they had done this when we surveyed in the spring of 2003."

Pew Internet & American Life Project. 14% of Internet Users Say They No Longer Download Music Files. April 25, 2004.

David McGuire. Americans Head Back Online For Music. The Washington Post. April 25, 2004.

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April 26, 2004

DOJ Begins Sweep to Protect Entertainment Industry

Last week, the United States Department of Justice officially began assisting the entertainment industry in its fight against file sharing and peer-to-peer networks with its implementation of Operation Fastlink.

U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft describes Operation Fastlink as "the largest, most far-reaching and most aggressive enforcement action ever undertaken against the criminal core of digital theft, including theft of movies, music, games, business and educational software on the Internet."

Last Thursday's sweep identified more than 100 people in the United States and nine other countries involved in the "theft" of more than $50 million worth of music, movies and software, according to an Associated Press story.

No arrests were made Thursday, but several arrests will be forthcoming, said Ashcroft.

Operation Fastlink is the first Justice Department enforcement action since Ashcroft announced the formation of an Intellectual Property Task Force inside the Department. According to Ashcroft, the DOJ sweep was made with the assistance and approval of private sector entertainment industry companies.

"These investigations benefit from the important assistance provided by various intellectual property trade associations, including the Business Software Alliance, the Entertainment Software Association, the Motion Picture Association and the Recording Industry Association of America," said the Attorney General. "We thank them for their cooperation."

Associated Press. U.S. Moves Against Online Pirates. Wired News. April 23, 2004.

Brooks Boliek. Justice Dept. Nets Pirates in 'Fastlink' Raids . The Hollywood Reporter. April 23, 2004.

Dinah Greek. Cyber-cops Arrest Trio in Piracy Crackdown. Computing. April 23, 2004.

The Hon. Attorney General John Ashcroft. Prepared Remarks: Operation Fastlink Announcement. Department of Justice. April 22, 2004.

Department of Justice. Justice Department Announces Internet Piracy Sweep. (Press release.) April 22, 2004.

Update: Matt Hines. Feds Convict Warez Pirate. News.com. Dec. 28, 2004. (The DOJ landed its first conviction against an American defendant trapped via Operation Fastlink. Jathan Desir, 26, of Iowa City, has pleaded guilty to charges related to his role in a criminal enterprise that distributed pirated software, games, movies and music over the Internet.)

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April 22, 2004

Music Industry Seeks to Nail Down P2P

Palisade Systems, a network security company, has announced that it will launch PacketHound 3.0 this week, a software package this week that is designed to identify and block copyrighted songs as they are being traded online.

PacketHound is created by Audible Magic, a California-based software company, pursuant to a strategic partnership the two firms created in September 2003. The software has triggered interest in Washington, D.C., and skepticism in the peer-to-peer world and among some students and universities, according to a News.com story.

The the song-filtering software is backed strongly by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), the large record companies' main lobbying organization. The announcement of PacketHound's release comes just a day after it became widely known that the RIAA had discontinued its amnesty program (.pdf) for file sharers. The policy change came to light in court papers RIAA filed in California, according to a second News.com story.

John Borland. New Tool Designed to Block Song Swaps. News.com. April 21, 2004.

Matt Hines. RIAA Drops Amnesty Program. News.com. April 20, 2004.

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April 03, 2004

File Sharing Doesn't Hurt CD Sales

According to a News.com story, researchers at Harvard University and the University of North Carolina tracked music downloads for more than four months in 2002, matching data on file transfers with actual market performance of the songs and albums being downloaded. The conclusion? "Even high levels of file-swapping seemed to translate into an effect on album sales that was "statistically indistinguishable from zero," they wrote.

"We find that file sharing has only had a limited effect on record sales," wrote the study's authors wrote. "While downloads occur on a vast scale, most users are likely individuals who would not have bought the album even in the absence of file sharing."

John Borland. Music Sharing Doesn't Kill CD Sales, Study Says. News.com. March 29, 2004.

Felix Oberholzer and Koleman Strumpf. The Effect of File Sharing on Record Sales: An Empirical Analysis. (.pdf).

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If You Can't Beat 'Em, Profit From Them

[Editor's Note 1: Wired Magazine broke this story in October with a profile of BigChampagne, but it is worth reviewing now, given the music industry's continued courtroom and legislative assault on file sharing and P2P networks.]

"While the music industry publicly flays Kazaa and other file-swapping services for aiding piracy, those same services provide an excellent view of what's really popular with fans.

"Record-label executives discreetly use BigChampagne and other services to track which songs are traded online and help pick which new singles to release. They increasingly use such file-sharing data to persuade radio stations and MTV to give new songs a spin or boost airplay for those that are popular with downloaders.

"Some labels even monitor what people do with their music after they download it to better structure deals with licensed downloading services. The ultimate goal is what it always has been in the record business: Sell more music.

...

"I definitely don't like to spin it that piracy is OK because we get to look at the data. It's too bad that people are stealing so much music,'' said Jeremy Welt, Maverick [Records'] head of new media. "That said, we would be very foolish if we didn't look and pay attention to what's going on.''

[Editor's note 2: Maverick is Madonna's record company, and the company's use of P2P networks in order to boost or protect sales has a history beyond BigChampagne. Last year, Maverick posted dummy copies of songs from the Madonna's American Life album that repeatedly asked "What the f*%! do you think you're doing?"]

Dawn C. Chmielewski. Music labels use file-sharing data to boost sales. The Mercury News. March 31, 2004.

Jeff Howe. BigChampagne is Watching You. Wired. October 2003.

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April 02, 2004

Oh, Canada! P2P Sharing is Legal

A federal court in Canada has ruled that people who share copyrighted works on peer-to-peer networks are not liabile for copyright infringement.

The decision (.pdf) was issued in response to a motion by the Canadian Recording Industry Association (CRIA) that sought permission to identify more than 25 people who allegedly were swapping musical works across P2P networks.

The CRIA had filed the motion as a prerequisite to suing those people for copyright infringement, much like its American counterpart, the Recording Industry Association of America, has been doing for much of the past year.

The crux of CRIA's motion was about privacy, particularly the circumstances under which Canadian Internet service providers (ISPs) would be forced to divulge the identity of their subscribers in response to allegations of illegal file swapping. In a highly anticipated decision, Canada's Federal Court denied the CRIA motion and in doing so, issued a decision that went far beyond the core privacy issue and greatly influenced the country's copyright law.

"No evidence was presented that the alleged infringers either distributed or authorized the reproduction of sound recordings. They merely placed personal copies into their shared directories which were accessible by other computer user via a P2P service," wrote Judge Konrad von Finckenstein as part of his reasoning. "Thus, downloading a song for personal use does not amount to infringement."

"I cannot see a real difference between a library that places a photocopy machine in a room full of copyrighted material and a computer user that places a personal copy on a shared directory linked to a P2P service," von Finckenstein added. "In either case the preconditions to copying and infringement are set up but the element of authorization is missing."

While the Federal Court ruling affects only the law within the country of Canada, it is sure to be studied by lawyers in other countries, including lawyers in the United States, who may seek to use some of the decision's legal theory in future court battles with the entertainment industry.

The Federal Court decision comes just days after News.com reported that the record industry had begun to take its fight against file sharing international.

This decision was the second major copyright ruling issued by a Canadian court this month. On March 4, the Canadian Supreme Court ruled that the Law Society of Upper Canada, the self-governing body for lawyers in Ontario, does not infringe copyright when a single copy of a reported decision, case summary, or statute is made by the Great Library in accordance with its access policy. The Court added that the Law Society did not authorize copyright infringement by maintaining a photocopier in the Great Library. (The Library had posted a notice warning that it would not be responsible for any copies made in infringement of copyright.)

When the Supreme Court decision was announced, Michael Geist, a law professor at the University of Ottawa, made a keen observation about the evolution of Canadian copyright law.

"Copyright is no longer viewed as being primarily about large-scale commercial infringement claims that do not resonate with the average person," wrote Geist in a Toronto Star story. "Rather, copyright is now very personal, focusing on the work, creativity, and activities of millions of individuals — including judges — who will increasingly question standards of what is right and wrong through the lens of their own actions.

"As society has shifted in its view of copyright, so, too, have Canadian courts," continued Geist. "The result is a genuine revolution in the state of Canadian copyright law that will manifest itself long after the current battle over peer-to-peer file sharing has been resolved."

UPDATE: Faultline. Music Biz Appeals Canada File Sharing-is-Legal Ruling. The Register. April 19, 2004.

Janet McFarland. Ruling Deals Blow to Music Industry. The Globe & Mail. April 1, 2004.

John Borland. Judge: File Sharing Legal in Canada. News.com. March 31, 2004.

Matt Hines. File-Sharing Lawsuits Go Abroad. News.com. March 30, 2004.

Canadian Federal Court. BMG Canada, Inc. v. John Doe. 2004 FC 488. March 31, 2004.

Michael Geist. Low-Tech Case Has High-Tech Impact. Toronto Star. March 22, 2004.

Canadian Supreme Court. The Law Society of Upper Canada v. CCH Canadian Limited. 2004 SCC 13. March 4, 2004.

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As if DOJ Didn't Have Enough to Do

"The Justice Department said Wednesday it has formed an intellectual-property task force to analyze how the department addresses issues like piracy of software, music and movies.

"Led by David Israelite, deputy chief of staff and counselor to the attorney general, the task force will also recommend what the Justice Department should do in the future to combat unauthorized use of copyright material."

Xeni Jardin. Feds Crank Up Heat on P2P. Wired News. March 31, 2004.

Update: Department of Justice. Atorney General Ashcroft Announces Creation of Intellectual Property Task Force. (Press release.) March 31, 2004.

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March 30, 2004

Congress Looking to Kill P2P

Members of Congress may be leading a bipartisan effort that would give federal prosecutors the authority to prosecute people that use peer-to-peer networks, and collect fines and other monetary damages from those users.

Wired News reported last week that members of the House Judiciary Committee have been circulating a draft bill that "would make it much easier for the Justice Department to pursue criminal prosecutions against file sharers by lowering the burden of proof."

The bill also would seek penalties of fines and prison time of up to ten years for file sharing, according to the story.

Additionally, Sens. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) and Patrick Leahy (D-Vermont) have drafted and introduced a separate bill, named the Protecting Intellectual Rights Against Theft and Expropriation Act of 2004 (or "Pirate Act"), that would give federal prosecutors the ability to collect monetary damages from persons who are liable for copyright infringement. Currently, copyright law allows only the copyright owner to recover monetary damages.

"Peer-to-peer file sharing software has created a dilemma for law-enforcement agencies. Millions of otherwise law-abiding American citizens are using this software to create and redistribute infringing copies of popular music, movies, computer games and software," said Hatch. "It is critical that we bring the moral force of the government to bear against those who knowingly violate the federal copyrights enshrined in our Constitution. The bill I join Senator Leahy in sponsoring today will allow the Department of Justice to supplement its existing criminal-enforcement powers through the new civil-enforcement mechanism. As a result, the [Department of Justice] will be able to impose stiff penalties for violating copyrights, but can avoid criminal action when warranted."

Hatch and Leahy have been longtime members of the Senate Judiciary Committee, the committee that has jurisdiction over intellectual property matters. The House Judiciary Committee also has jurisdiction over intellectual property legislation passed in the junior house of Congress.

This legislative initiative is another in a string of several recent efforts to criminalize the use of peer-to-peer networks. On March 19, we analyzed a separate news item that reported an initiative by states' attorneys general to portray the makers of peer-to-peer software as manufacturers of defective products. Under such a legal theory, the manufacturers could be held liable under state product liability laws.

Additionally, the Wired News story points out that the entertainment industries "are pushing to portray P2P networks as dens of terrorists, child pornographers and criminals -- a strategy that would make it more palatable for politicians to pass laws against products that are very popular with their constituents."

Protecting Intellectual Rights Against Theft and Expropriation Act of 2004

Xeni Jardin. Congress Moves to Criminalize P2P. Wired News. March 26, 2004.

Declan McCullagh, et al. P2P Faces New Legal Scrutiny from States News.com. March 15, 2004.

United States Senate, Committee on the Judiciary. Protecting Creative Works in a Digital Age.

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March 19, 2004

States Looking to Lock Up P2P

Once the exclusive domain of federal prosecutors, strategies aimed at shutting down peer-to-peer networks are now being studied by state attorneys general, according to a March 15 California Attorney General Bill Lockyer was discovered. The letter, which was leaked to peer-to-peer networking companies, "demands that peer-to-peer companies do a better job of protecting customers from numerous 'known risks' of their products and warns them against developing features that would hinder police from pursuing criminals such as copyright infringers," according to the News.com report.

By using such language, the states may be trying to portray peer-to-peer networking companies as manufacturers of defective or potentially dangerous products. If classified in such a manner, file sharing products would have to bear extensive warning labels, and aggrieved copyright owners may be able to win damages from the products' manufacturers under state product liability statutes and federal copyright infringement laws.

In addition to being home to a vast number of entertainment companies whose intellectual property may be illegally traded on peer-to-peer networks such as Kazaa, California also has some of the most stringent product liability laws in the country.

Officials from the Motion Picture Association appear to been involved in drafting a portion of the letter, the News.com report continues. "[It] should 'come as no surprise to anybody that we talked to attorneys general, particularly the chief law enforcement officer in California, because of the impact that illegal file copying and stealing has on motion pictures and sound-recording industries, the lifeblood of California,'" MPAA Vice President for state legislative affairs Van Stevenson said to News.com.

If the states were to get involved in copyright issues by investigating and bringing legal action against file sharing companies, it would mark the second time over the past decade that the entertainment industries sought to use or affect state law in order to enforce or influence copyright law, an area governed by federal statute. Previously, a coalition led in part by the entertainment industries sought to pass the Uniform Computer Information Transactions Act (UCITA) in all 50 states.

If passed as a uniform law, UCITA would have created new rules for software licensing, online access and other transactions in computer information that would have been detrimental to consumers' rights. In the end, most states' attorneys general opposed UCITA, as did a coalition that included library associations, law professors, and consumer advocacy groups.

To date, UCITA has been implemented as law only in Maryland and Virginia.

Declan McCullagh, et al. P2P Faces New Legal Scrutiny from States. News.com. March 15, 2004.

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March 18, 2004

RSS as File Transfer Mechanism

Andew Grumet, an MIT-educated computer programmer, has developed a piece of software that allows people to serve very large files over the Internet in much shorter time periods than would be possible even with the fastest Internet connection. The software is especially useful for transferring large mutlimedia files across the Web.

According to a Wired News article, Grumet's software meshes two social networking technologies: RSS and BitTorrent. "The hybrid system is meant to eliminate both the publisher's need for fat bandwidth, and the consumer's need to wait through a grueling download," writes Wired News's Paul Boutin.

"BitTorrent is a peer-to-peer file-sharing system that optimizes bandwidth usage to enable its users to take full advantage of broadband connections, downloading a DVD's worth of data in hours rather than days," continues Boutin. "RSS (Really Simple Syndication) is an XML-based protocol used to serve news headlines and weblog entries in a streamlined, organized format that lets users subscribe to "feeds" of their favorite content."

Paul Boutin. Speed Meets Feed in Download Tool. WiredNews.com. March 15, 2004.

Andrew Grumet. Getting Started with BitTorrent + RSS in Radio [BETA]. Grumet.net. March 11, 2004.

Andrew Grumet. Experimenting with BitTorrent and RSS. Technology at Harvard Law. No date.

Bram Cohen. Introduction. BitTorrent. No date.

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February 25, 2004

Online Collaboration Borne From Multiplayer Game

As written about in eWeek, this premise sounds very interesting:

"Ludicorp Research & Development Ltd. unveiled its Web collaboration application, called Flickr, during a preview this week for attendees of the O'Reilly Emerging Technology Conference being held here. The Vancouver-based company plans to launch next week a public beta of Flickr.

"Rather than focusing on making connections, as in many social-networking sites, or simply on real-time communication, Flickr embraces the idea of instant media sharing ... Its initial focus: real-time photo sharing and collaboration." Next is sharing video and audio clips, and "collaborating to create new music and sounds that also could be exported."

Now, many of the virtual reference or courseware products on the market feature some of Flickr's core features (chat, instant messaging, file sharing), but I don't think any of them do it simultaneously and in real time.

But librarians can do simpler things right now: for example, encode short multimedia training or tutorial sessions in MP3 files and make them available directly from the library server.

If you know any library that is doing work like this, let us know.

Matt Hicks. "Online Collaboration Borne From Multiplayer Game." eWeek. Feb. 12, 2004.

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February 24, 2004

How File Sharing Works

"In this article, you will learn about the differences between Gnutella and Napster that allow Gnutella to survive today despite a hostile legal environment."

Do you know of any library that is using P2P networking or file sharing to serve patrons? Let us know.

Marshall Brain. "How File Sharing Works." Howstuffworks.com. No Date.

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