SNT Report.com home

August 12, 2005

Legal Challenge Likely for Wiretap Ruling

"An FCC ruling that internet telephony services must provide the same built-in wiretapping capabilities as conventional phone companies has civil libertarians feeling burned.

"While the full text of the ruling has yet to be released, critics say the announcement marks a significant expansion of the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act, or CALEA, which drew a line between 'information services' and phone networks."

Ryan Singel. Critics Slam Net Wiretapping Rule. Wired News. Aug. 11, 2005.

See also:
Federal Communications Commission. FCC Requires Certain Broadband and VoIP Providers to Accommodate Wiretaps. (.pdf) (Press Release.) Aug. 5, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:55 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Oxford Dictionary Adds IT-Based Words

"The Oxford English Dictionary added new words including 'podcast' and 'phishing,' saying they are now part of the English language, as it published its second edition today.

"The words, which refer to music downloading and Internet fraud respectively, are part of a list of new additions that reflect the growing influence of technology on daily life."

Bloomberg News. Oxford Dictionary Adds Words Including 'Phishing,' 'Podcast'. Aug. 10, 2005.

See also:
Kieren McCarthy. Net Speak Makes Oxford English Dictionary. The Register. Aug. 11, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:43 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

August 11, 2005

An Open Access Webliography

Adrian K. Ho and Charles W. Bailey Jr. have created an Open Access Webliography which includes a comprehensive range of useful freely available internet resources related to the open access movement.

Attribution: SNTReport.com first discovered news of this Webliography through a posting in Open Access News, edited by Peter Suber.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:49 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

August 04, 2005

RSS to Influence OA Journal Publishing

"Here’s my prediction. The increasing popularity of blogs and RSS feeds will drive an increase in open-access professional journal publishing and will force many traditional, print-based publishers to consider offering at least some form of electronic distribution.

"The reason being is that the online open-access model can reach a wider audience at a faster rate than traditional print publishing can – and blogs and RSS feeds enable this to happen even more."

The Industrial Librarian. Why Blogs & RSS Feeds Will Help Drive Open-Access Journal Publishing. Aug. 1, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:46 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

July 22, 2005

Congress Forges Ahead to Extend Patriot Act

"The House voted Thursday to extend permanently virtually all the major antiterrorism provisions of the USA Patriot Act after beating back efforts by Democrats and some Republicans to impose new restrictions on the government's power to eavesdrop, conduct secret searches and demand library records.

"The legislation, approved 257 to 171, would make permanent 14 of the 16 provisions in the law that were set to expire at the end of this year.

"The remaining two provisions - giving the government the power to demand business and library records and to conduct roving wiretaps - would have to be reconsidered by Congress in 10 years.

Eric Lichtblau. House Beats Back Challenges to Patriot Act. The New York Times. July 22, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:55 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

July 21, 2005

Libraries Offer Another Service to Users: Downloading

"Naperville Public Library soon will offer patrons the chance to download audiobooks and e-books from its Web site for free.

"And the technology may just be the start of bigger things, experts predict, with DVD and music downloads probably not far behind."

Amy BoeremaThe Library's Next Step: Books You can Download. Yahoo! News. July 19, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:44 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

July 20, 2005

K. Matthew Dames Gives Virtual Presentation

K. Matthew Dames, managing partner of Seso Group Digital Information Advisors and the executive editor of SNTReport.com and Search & Text Mining Report, is this month's speaker for SLA's Virtual Seminar series. Dames will present the second part of a two-part series on digital collaboration projects for information professionals, "Launching A Digital Collaboration Project." The second session is Webcast live at 2:00 EST on July 20.

(The first session was Webcast on July 6, and can be viewed via an SLA Replay.)

Attendance & Registration
Want to view Dames' presentation live? Check the SLA Virtual Seminar page for more information. If you have any additional questions, e-mail SLA at learning@sla.org or call the Professional Development Center at (703) 647-4925.

This session will be taped and available for viewing within one week of the Webcast.

Description
Whatever you call it – digital collaboration, social software, social networking – working across the Web is about more than technology or devices. Ultimately, it is about developing a community of practice where people readily share their information and knowledge, regardless of distance.

Many clients and end-users will suggest that the trend toward using digital collaboration lessens the need for librarians and other information professionals. Instead, the opposite is true: online information sharing increases the need for librarians as facilitators, researchers, and knowledge managers. With some work and initiative, technology-savvy Info Pros can position themselves inside their organizations as critically important team members at a time when their value is being questioned.

This two-part series looks at the tools and issues involved in creating an effective digital collaboration environment, and shares some ideas on how best to establish a digital collaboration initiative within an organization. The first part of the series, part of SLA's Virtual Learning Series, will explain the tools and terminology of digital collaboration, and how different organizations are using these tools to improve productivity and knowledge sharing.

Slides
K. Matthew Dames. Launching A Digital Collaboration Project. (.pdf, 1.8 MB) July 20, 2005.

Coming in August 2005
Stephen E. Arnold. The Google Legacy (Tetbury, Gloucester: United Kingdom. Infonortics, 2005)

Webliography

The American Customer Satisfaction Index.

Basecamp

Salesforce.com

Google Labs

Google Short Message Service

Google Mobile

Google Code

Blogger

Functioning Form. Battle for the Web OS. July 12, 2005.

Fred Vogelstein. Gates vs. Google: Search and Destroy. Fortune. May 2, 2005.

Charles Ferguson. What's Next for Google. TechnologyReview.com. January 2005.

Relax, Everything Is Deeply Intertwingled. Weblications. Dec. 20, 2004.

Troutgirl. Google Is Good for Web Dev. Dec. 18, 2004.

Kuro5hin. Web-Apps Are the Legacy of the Future. Oct. 25, 2004.

Jon Udell. Under Gmail’s Hood. InfoWorld. Oct. 22, 2004.

Kottke.org. GoogOS, the Google Operating System. April 6, 2004.

Topix.net Weblog. The Secret Source of Google's Power. April 4, 2004.

Tim O'Reilly. Inventing the Future. O'Reilly Networks. April 9, 2002.

Martha K. Heyman. Building Successful Relationships with IT Professionals. Information Outlook. April 2001.

PaulGraham.com. The Other Road Ahead. Sept. 2001.

Adam Bosworth. Microsoft's Vision for XML. Infoloom. No date.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 09:00 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

July 18, 2005

Renewal of Patriot Act Up for Vote

"Before Congress leaves Washington for its annual recess next month, both the House and the Senate are expected to vote to renew police powers that were granted in the 2001 Patriot Act and are scheduled to expire at the end of the year.

"Among the most controversial provisions up for renewal is the FBI's power to demand sensitive information on American citizens from businesses with only an order issued under the secretive Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act.

"Separate bills advancing in the House and Senate extend this provision—Section 215 of the Patriot Act—with modifications."

Caron Carlson. Bills Extend Patriot Provision. eWeek. July 18, 2005.

See also:
Declan McCullagh. Can Bush Carry the Day?. News.com. July 18, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:53 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Yahoo, UC Berkeley Establish Research Facility

"Yahoo announced Friday that it has established a research lab with the University of California at Berkeley.

"Yahoo Research Labs-Berkeley will begin operations in August and concentrate on new technologies for search, social and mobile media."

Dawn Kawamoto. Yahoo, UC Berkeley Team on Research. News.com. July 15, 2005.

See also:
Verne Kopytoff. Yahoo Cements UC Partnership. San Francisco Chronicle. July 15, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:45 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Efforts to Peek at Paid Content

"Popular wisdom holds that you can find anything on the Web. And if you're looking for information on products, transportation schedules, or tourist attractions, it's probably true.

"But there is a vast body of knowledge hidden either in the so-called deep Web that browsers can't find or in those archaic but wonderful repositories called books.

"Two factors combine to make so much valuable and authoritative information inaccessible."

Stephen H. Wildstrom. The Web Hits the Stacks. BusinessWeek. July 14, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:23 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

July 16, 2005

Fujitsu Develops Bendable Electronic Paper

"Fujitsu has developed what it claims is the world's first electronic paper that can be flexed, can display colour images and can do so when the power is turned off.

"The key to Fujitsu's e-paper is a film substrate that's sufficiently flexible to allow the paper to be bent, but rugged enough to prevent the image from distorting.

"And, unlike today's LCD panels, the image doesn't distort when it's pressed."

Tony Smith. Fujitsu Creates 'First' Colour, Non-volatile e-Paper. July 13, 2005.

DeviceForge.com. Electronic Paper Maintains Images Without Power. July 13, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:50 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

July 15, 2005

Law Librarians Show Value

"In 1995 Baker & McKenzie fired all 10 members of its main library staff in Chicago, asserting that the move would save money and thrust its lawyers into the digital era. Fearing for their jobs, law librarians across the country mobilized to prove they were more than mere shelvers and shushers.

"Contrary to popular expectations, the digital age didn't supplant print. It complemented it. And it hasn't rendered librarians obsolete, either."

Heather Smith. Don't Count Out Law Librarians. The American Lawyer. July 14, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 08:50 AM | Send to a friend!

Story Time Goes Digital

"For all those parents whose voices have grown hoarse sounding out the rhymes in their child's favorite picture book 'just one more time,' some reinforcements have arrived.

"One More Story is a new online library where children can choose a book - complete with narration, highlighted text, and the book's original illustrations - and listen as they read along on the computer."

Chelsea Waugaman. Read The Story Again? CSMonitor.com. July 11, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 08:47 AM | Send to a friend!

iPod May Save Books

"At the South Huntington Public Library in South Huntington, N.Y., one of the most popular programs doesn’t involve books (in the strictest sense), or even reading (in the strictest sense). The big hit? Books on iPod.

"That folks can pick up a gadget approximately the size of a cigarette lighter at their local library, programmed with a current bestseller for their listening pleasure, is the realization of countless sci-fi movies and Philip K. Dick novels. Apple’s immensely popular iPod is making consumers more comfortable with the idea of downloading audiobooks and listening on-the-go. So could DABs—which are more accessible, hip and cost-effective than traditional formats like cassettes and CDs—be the next big thing?"

Rachel Deahl. iPod to the Rescue: Can Digital Audio Save Publishing? The Book Standard. June 29, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 08:12 AM | Send to a friend!

Newspapers Face Cost Challenges

"Newspaper publishers face economic problems common to many information industries: the fixed costs of creation are large, and the incremental costs of serving additional users are small. This leads to competition that results in prices so low they do not cover overall costs.

"Price deflation leads to firms collapsing and consolidating. Market power stabilizes or raises prices. And then, another wave of entry occurs, often through new technology, and a new cycle begins.

"In the process, the information industry is becoming among the most unstable of business sectors."

Eli Noam. Bad News for News. FT.com. July 14, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:56 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

July 14, 2005

House Panel Agrees to Limits on Patriot Act

"The Republican-led House Intelligence Committee approved Democratic provisions yesterday that would place modest controls over the ways the FBI can monitor terrorism suspects under the Patriot Act.

"Three other amendments that Democrats had proposed failed, including one that would have blocked investigators from getting records from libraries or bookstores."

Katherine Shrader. House Panel OK's Changes in Patriot Act. Boston Globe. July 14, 2005.

See also:
Eric Lichtblau and Carl Hulse. Lawmakers Agree to Renew Patriot Act. The New York Times. July 14, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:55 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Technorati Becomes Global Public Utility

"When former Federal Communications Commission chairman Michael K. Powell watched television coverage of the London bombings last week, he noticed that most of the significant pictures didn't originate from professional photographers employed by news agencies. They came from witnesses at the scene using cell phones and digital cameras to document the tragedy.

"'Journalists are trained not to be emotional, like a doctor doesn't fall in love with his patients,' Powell said. 'But people experiencing a tragedy can convey what actually happened while at the same time express deep emotion and engage in spirited storytelling.

"'A photo of someone climbing up through train wreckage is extremely powerful. A reporter rolling up to the scene behind a police line can rarely give you that.'"

Adam L. Penenberg. Technorati: A New Public Utility. Wired News. July 14, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:50 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Group Establishes Public Libraries in China

"A group of Chinese-Americans is financing public libraries in towns and villages in China.

"The effort has led to the creation of more than 60 libraries, and is intended to bridge the gap between rich and poor in the world's most populous nation."

Mike O'Sullivan. Chinese-Americans Establish Libraries in China. VOA News. July 13, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:32 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

July 13, 2005

Firm Sues Internet Archive's Wayback Machine

"A Philadelphia health-care advocacy company is suing operators of the Wayback Machine in a case experts described as one of the first legal challenges to Internet archiving.

"Healthcare Advocates contends the Internet Archive, a San Francisco nonprofit that runs the Wayback Machine, botched Healthcare's request to block access to archived materials from its Web site during a trade secrets dispute in 2003."

Kevin Coughlin. Philadelphia Health Care Advocacy Firm Sues Search-engine Operators. NJ.com. July 12, 2005.

See also:
Tom Zeller Jr. Web Archive Sued Over Use in Another Suit. News.com. July 12, 2005.

The Patry Copyright Blog. The Way Back Machine and Robots.txt. July 12, 2005.

United States District Court. Healthcare Advocates, Inc. v. Harding, Early, Follmer & Frailey, et al. (.pdf) July 8, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:55 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

July 12, 2005

Chairman Introduces Bill to Extend Patriot Act

"The Republican chairman of the House Judiciary Committee introduced a bill yesterday that would make the controversial USA Patriot Act permanent, but he balked at including some new powers sought by the Bush administration.

"The bill proposed by Rep. F. James Sensenbrenner Jr. (R-Wis.) largely gives the Justice Department what it has requested in the review of the Patriot Act antiterrorism law, which was enacted weeks after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. The proposal includes 16 provisions set to expire at the end of this year unless they are renewed or made permanent by Congress."

Dan Eggen. Permanent Patriot Act Proposed. WashingtonPost.com. July 12, 2005.

See also:
Jesse J. Holland. House, Senate Chiefs Spar on Patriot Act. WashingtonPost.com. July 11, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:55 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

July 11, 2005

States Continue to Use MATRIX Program

"When the federal government in April stopped funding a database that lets police quickly see public records and commercially collected information on Americans, privacy advocates celebrated what they saw as a victory against overzealousness in the fight against terrorism.

"But a few states are pressing forward with a similar system, continuing to look for ways to quickly search through a trove of data -- from driver's license photos to phone numbers to information about people's cars. Their argument in seeking to keep the Matrix database alive in some form: it's too important for solving crimes to give up on."

David Royse. Police Still Using Matrix-type Database. BusinessWeek Online. (Press Release.) July 10, 2005.

See also:
American Civil Liberties Union. ACLU Applauds End Of “Matrix” Program. April 15, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:49 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

EPIC Urges FTC to Investigate Online Data Brokers

"The Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) asked the Federal Trade Commission to crack down on online data brokers that sell information to consumers.

"In a complaint filed on Friday, EPIC singled out Intelligent E-Commerce (IEI), a search engine optimization and pay-per-click advertising consultancy that also seems to operate BestPeopleSearch.com.

"In its complaint, EPIC referred to two cases in which stalkers used private investigators to locate victims and murder them. But EPIC said BestPeopleSearch did worse: It offers access to information that even licensed PIs shouldn't be able to get."

Susan Kuchinskas. EPIC Fighting Online Phone Record Sales. InternetNews.com. July 8, 2005.

See also:
Electronic Privacy Information Center. EPIC Online Investigation Complaint. July 8, 2005.

Jonathan Krim. Online Data Gets Personal: Cell Phone Records for Sale. WashingtonPost.com. July 8, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:48 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

July 09, 2005

OCLC Launches Reference Service Pilot

"Over the next few months, a series of pilot projects will expand OCLC’s Open WorldCat project into a full-featured, Web-integrated library service.

"In December 2004, OCLC opened WorldCat, its master union catalog of library holdings, to Google, Yahoo! Search, and other outlets.

"Initially, the material accessible to the Web search engines was books and monographs. With the new eSerials pilot project, OCLC will begin expanding content to electronic journal collections."

Barbara Quint. OCLC Pilots Traditional Libraries into Web Services. Information Today. July 5, 2005.

See also:
Online Computer Library Center. How the Open WorldCat Program Works.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:33 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

July 08, 2005

A Lifecycle Approach to Electronic Records

"Forget gigabytes or even terabytes.

"The National Archives and Records Administration’s creation of a permanent online archive of its electronic records is one of the few projects anywhere in which data storage is measured by the petabyte — a quadrillion bytes — and that is what fascinates Steve Hansen.

"But the project is significant not just for its mammoth size. It is the highest-profile example of the growing trend of information lifecycle management, a strategy for managing records from their creation to their use to how they are archived."

Alice Lipowicz. Long Live E-Records!. Washington Technology. July 5, 2005.

See also:
David Talbot. The Fading Memory of the State. Technology Review. July 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:51 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

July 07, 2005

Orphan Works Roundtables Registration Procedure

The U.S. Copyright Office announced the procedure necessary to participate in the upcoming Orphan Works roundtables.

Interested parties must submit a written request, including a one-page summary of issues to the Copyright Office by July 15th.

U.S. Copyright Office. Orphan Works Notice of Public Roundtables. (.pdf) July 7, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:53 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Bill Proposal to Strengthen FOIA

"A political odd couple, backed by an unusual coalition of advocacy groups and news organizations, is looking to crack down on government officials who ignore public requests for information.

"Sens. Patrick J. Leahy (D-Vt.) and John Cornyn (R-Tex.) are pushing a package of legislative proposals that would create, for the first time, penalties for agencies that ignore Freedom of Information Act requests.

"They also want to create a position for an independent arbiter -- an ombudsman for FOIA -- who would help referee conflicts between the public and the government while requiring departments to provide more information on how quickly they process requests."

Brian Faler. Openness Law May Get Muscle. WashingtonPost.com. July 6, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:50 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

July 06, 2005

K. Matthew Dames Gives SLA Virtual Presentation

K. Matthew Dames, managing partner of Seso Group Digital Information Advisors and the executive editor of SNTReport.com and Search & Text Mining Report, is this month's speaker for SLA's Virtual Seminar series. Dames will present a two-part series on digital collaboration projects for information professionals, with the first live session being Webcast at 2:00 EST on July 6. and the second live session being Webcast at 2:00 EST on July 20.

Attendance & Registration
Want to view Dames' presentation live? Check the SLA Virtual Seminar page for more information. If you have any additional questions, e-mail SLA at learning@sla.org or call the Professional Development Center at (703) 647-4925.

This session will be taped and available for viewing within one week of the Webcast.

Description
Whatever you call it – digital collaboration, social software, social networking – working across the Web is about more than technology or devices. Ultimately, it is about developing a community of practice where people readily share their information and knowledge, regardless of distance.

Many clients and end-users will suggest that the trend toward using digital collaboration lessens the need for librarians and other information professionals. Instead, the opposite is true: online information sharing increases the need for librarians as facilitators, researchers, and knowledge managers. With some work and initiative, technology-savvy Info Pros can position themselves inside their organizations as critically important team members at a time when their value is being questioned.

This two-part series looks at the tools and issues involved in creating an effective digital collaboration environment, and shares some ideas on how best to establish a digital collaboration initiative within an organization. The first part of the series, part of SLA's Virtual Learning Series, will explain the tools and terminology of digital collaboration, and how different organizations are using these tools to improve productivity and knowledge sharing.

Slides
K. Matthew Dames. Digital Collaboration: Tools & Terms. (.pdf, 2.7 MB) July 6, 2005.

Webliography
Covad. "The Ringing" (Flash movie; Flash Player required.)

Salesforce.com: Hosted customer relationship management tool, with contact management, marketing campaign budgeting and analysis, and mobile and wireless capability.

Bloglines: Hosted RSS and news aggregator.

37Signals: Developer of several hosted business tools, including Backpack (a collaborative online planner and to-do list), and the highly regarded Basecamp (hosted project management application).

Thomas Bleha. Down to the Wire. Foreign Affairs. May/June 2005. ("Once a leader in Internet innovation, the United States has fallen far behind Japan and other Asian states in deploying broadband and the latest mobile-phone technology.")

Heather Green and Robert D. Hof. Picking Up Where Search Leaves Off. BusinessWeek Online. April 11, 2005. ("The time-saving trend of "tagging" is luring legions of Web surfers -- and Yahoo! ")

Daniel Terdiman. Folksonomies Tap People Power. Wired News. Feb. 1, 2005. ("The job of tags isn't to organize all the world's information into tidy categories. It's to add value to the giant piles of data that are already out there.")

Technorati: A blog index.

SNTReport.com: Seso Group LLC publication that finds, filters, summarizes important digital collaboration news six days each week.

Search & Text Mining Report: Seso Group LLC publication that finds, filters, summarizes important news about the business, technology, and law of search and search engines. Published five days each week.

Micro Persuasion: Blog of public relations executive Steve Rubel.

GM FastLane: "The FastLane blog is where you can come to read the latest, greatest musings of GM leaders on topics relevant to the company, the industry and the global economy, and -- most of all -- to our customers and other car enthusiasts."

Charlene Li. Blogging: Bubble or Big Deal? Forrester Research. Nov. 5, 2004.

Mark Pilgrim. What Is RSS? O'Reilly XML.com. Dec. 18, 2002.

Jeff Tyson. How Instant Messaging Works. HowStuffWorks. No date.

Robert Kaye. Next-Generation File Sharing with Social Networks. O'Reilly Open P2P. March 5, 2004.

Miriam Rainsford. A Musician's Take on File Sharing, DRM, and Copyleft Licensing. O'Reilly Open P2P. June 10, 2003.

Wikipedia. Founded in 2001, Wikipedia bills itself as "the free-content encyclopedia that anyone can edit."

JotSpot: A Wiki web application development through a " Microsoft Word style editing" interface. For a demonstration of JotSpot's capabilities, please see Jon Udell's Flash movie. (Flash Player required.)

Federal Communications Commission. Voice Over Internet Protocol: Frequently Asked Questions. May 24, 2005.

vSkype: Skype plugin that allows users to see who they are talking to while sharing applications, spreadsheets or photos in real time. (Windows only)

IPDrum. Its IPdrum Mobile Cable connects Skype to a mobile telephone via the mobile telephone network - allowing Skype users true mobility and worldwide calling for local rates.

Heather Wilson. Gaming for Librarians: An Introduction. (.pdf) VOYA. February 2005.

K. Matthew Dames. Commentary on New iTunes Cell Phone. SNTReport.com. July 5, 2005.

Fred Vogelstein. Gates vs. Google: Search and Destroy. Fortune. May 2, 2005. ("Bill Gates is on a mission to build a Google killer. What got him so riled? The darling of search is moving into software—and that's Microsoft's turf.")

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 09:00 AM | Send to a friend!

July 05, 2005

Hurst Addresses TIFF Archive Debate

While catching up on some back reading, I discovered that Jill Hurst-Wahl has addressed an issue that should interest many who are involved in digitization, digital libraries, or preservation. Why does the library community insist on having images encoded in the Tag Image File Format (TIFF) instead of a high-quality file encoded in the much more popular (and portable) Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) format?

Jill and I discussed this recently while on a site visit to Kirtas Technologies, which produces a high quality book scanner that includes a Canon digital camera that shoots images at an astounding 16 megapixels. If you have that sort of quality, do you really need a TIFF image?

Digitization 101. Mega JPEG files vs. TIFF. June 30, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 08:59 AM | Send to a friend!

July 01, 2005

Congress Debates PATRIOT Sunset

"U.S. Justice Department officials sparred with critics of the Patriot Act on Thursday in a debate over whether the expiring portions of the law should be renewed at the end of the year.

"When Congress rushed to enact the legislation in the weeks after Sept. 11, 2001, certain sections were set to expire. Now politicians are trying to decide whether to renew the 16 sections scheduled to sunset (.pdf) Dec. 31.

"A pair of Justice Department representatives speaking on Thursday's panel, held at the Capitol by the Internet Caucus Advisory Committee, stressed what they called the importance of renewing the law."

Anne Broache. Feds Push for Full Renewal of Patriot Act. News.com. June 30, 2005.

See also:
American Library Association. American Library Association (ALA) Announces Preliminary Findings of Study Measuring Law Enforcement Activity in Libraries. (.pdf) (Press Release.) June 30, 2005.

CRS Report for Congress. USA PATRIOT Act Sunset: Provisions That Expire on December 31, 2005 (.pdf) June 10, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:54 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

June 30, 2005

Publishers Seek Delay for Google's Digitization Plans

"The Association of American Publishers has asked Google to suspend for six months its plan to digitize books from the collections of several major research libraries and make them searchable online.

"AAP Vice President for Legal and Governmental Affairs Allan R. Adler told the Chronicle of Higher Education that the group made the request in a June 10 letter that stopped short of calling for the project to 'cease and desist.' 'We’ve simply asked for a six-month moratorium to facilitate discussion,' said Adler.

"Adler said in the June 21 Chronicle that the letter was prompted by AAP members’ concern that they have not 'gotten satisfactory answers to their questions about copyright infringement.' It requested a meeting between Google executives and leaders of the publishing association."

American Libraries Online. Publishers’ Group Seeks Six-Month Delay in Google Library Project. June 22, 2005.

See also:
Jeffrey R. Young. Publishers' Group Asks Google to Stop Scanning Copyrighted Works for 6 Months. The Chronicle of Higher Education. June 21, 2005.

Editor's note See also SNTReport.com's prior stories here and here and here on concerns over Google's digitization.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:33 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Study: A Switch to Digital Publishing

"The vast majority of UK research material will be available in electronic form by 2020.

"According to a study (.pdf) commissioned by the British Library, 90% of newly published work will be available digitally by this time.

"Only half of this will also be available in print form, with just 10% of new titles available only in print."

BBC News. Publishing Makes Shift to Digital. June 29, 2005.

See also:
The British Library. Publishing Output to 2020. Jan. 29, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:10 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

June 29, 2005

France's Cultural Counter-Attack Against Google

"The French, concerned that the internet is in danger of becoming the exclusive preserve of the English language, are responding to Google's project to put 15 million books and documents online with their own French version.

"The French are far from relaxed about their creative treasures, and especially the contents of La Bibliothèque Nationale de France (BNF), their National Library.

"With the Google Print project planning to put 4.5 billion pages of English onto the web, France has decided to do something similar with French, though on a smaller scale."

David Reid. French Answer to Google Library. BBC News. June 25, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:30 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

June 27, 2005

Upcoming Public Roundtables on Orphan Works

The Copyright Office announced that it will be holding three upcoming public roundtable discussions on orphan works.

The dates and locations are as follows:

  • Tuesday, July 26, 2005 - Washington, D.C.
  • Wednesday, July 27, 2005 - Washington, D.C.
  • Tuesday, August 2, 2005 - Berkeley, California

U.S. Copyright Office. Copyright Office Announces Public Roundtable Discussions on Orphan Works. June 24, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:55 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Senator Takes Speaks Out Against Patriot Act

"If the U.S. government resorts to rifling through library records without a search warrant, libraries will no longer be sanctuaries of learning where people can freely think and read, U.S. Sen. Barack Obama told the American Library Association Saturday.

"Obama said he is working diligently to make sure the country has a Patriot Act that helps track down terrorists without trampling on civil liberties. He told the applauding crowd at McCormick Place he hopes the U.S. Senate will follow the U.S. House's lead by passing a provision that would require federal agents to obtain a search warrant before going through library records and e-mails."

Rummana Hussain. Obama Fears 'Big Brother' Over Our Shoulders. Chicago Sun-Times. June 26, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:32 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

June 24, 2005

Internet Access at Libraries Keeps Getting Better

"Nearly all libraries around the country have free public Internet access and an increasing number are offering wireless connections, according to a study (.pdf) released Thursday by the American Library Association here.

"The study, which was conducted by researchers at Florida State University, found that 98.9 percent of libraries offer free public Internet access, up from 21 percent in 1994 and 95 percent in 2002.

"It also found that 18 percent of libraries have wireless Internet access and 21 percent plan to get it within the next year."

Gretchen Ruethling. Almost All Libraries in U.S. Offer Free Access to Internet. The New York Times. June 24, 2005.

See also:
Anick Jesdanun. Libraries Rationing Internet Use. Houston Chronicle. June 23, 2005.

John C. Bertot, et al. Public Libraries and the Internet 2004: Survey Results and Findings. (.pdf) Information Use Management and Policy Institute. June 1, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:45 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

June 23, 2005

Google Print Draws Flack from Publishers

" Publishers have finally had a chance to look at some of the details of Google's Print for Libraries project, a massive effort to digitize books that some publishers fear could violate copyright laws.

"So far, many publishers don't like what they see -- and they want Google to agree to a six-month moratorium.

Burt Helm. A New Page in Google's Books Fight. BusinessWeek Online. June 22, 2005.

See also:
Gary Price. Publishers Group Asks Google To Halt Scanning For 6 Months. SearchEngineWatch. June 21, 2005.

Daniel Brandt. Google-eyed U.Michigan Gives Away its Library. GoogleWatch.org. June 19, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:33 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

June 21, 2005

Study Contradicts Government Disclosure of Library Searches

"Law enforcement officials have made at least 200 formal and informal inquiries to libraries for information on reading material and other internal matters since October 2001, according to a new study that adds grist to the growing debate in Congress over the government's counterterrorism powers.

"In some cases, agents used subpoenas or other formal demands to obtain information like lists of users checking out a book on Osama bin Laden. Other requests were informal - and were sometimes turned down by librarians who chafed at the notion of turning over such material, said the American Library Association, which commissioned the study."

Eric Lichtblau. Libraries Say Yes, Officials Do Quiz Them About Users. The New York Times. June 20, 2005.

See also:
American Library Association. American Library Association (ALA) Announces Preliminary Findings of Study Measuring Law Enforcement Activity in Libraries. (Press Release.) June 20, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:50 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

June 20, 2005

Libraries: The Future Digital Resource Center

"Several years ago journalist John Lenger told a remarkable story in the Columbia Journalism Review about teaching a journalism class at Harvard’s extension school. He asked his young students to write a story about a Harvard land deal that occurred in 1732, but after a week of research, most came back with almost nothing substantial to report.

"The problem: They had done most of their research using the Internet, walking right past Harvard’s library and archives, where the actual information could be found.

"When Lenger questioned their research methods, one student replied that she assumed that anything that was important in the world was already on the Internet."

Michael Rogers. Turning Books Into Bits. MSNBC News. June 19, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:53 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Groxis Launches Pilot to Bridge Deep Web

"Groxis, a provider of search clustering and visualization technology, launched the Grokker Research Pilot (.pdf) designed to act as the interface between 'deep Web' content, the kinds of information not indexed by regular Web crawlers.

"Thanks to business relationships with providers of proprietary content, which often requires a paid subscription, the Grokker Research platform will offer them a permission- or royalty-based model for distributing their content on the Web."

Susan Kuchinskas. Groxis Opens Deep Web to Business, Schools. InternetNews.com. June 20, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:39 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

June 18, 2005

Will Google Adhere to Library Privacy Policies?

" A contract (.pdf) between Google and the University of Michigan released publicly on Friday contains no provisions for protecting the privacy of people who will eventually be able to search the school's vast library collection over the Internet.

"Google announced plans late last year to digitize and index as many as 7 million volumes of material from the University of Michigan to make them searchable on the Internet as part of its Google Print service, a searchable index of books.

"While the library projects have prompted copyright concerns from university groups and publishers, privacy issues are the latest wrinkle in Google's plans to expand the universe of Web-searchable data."

Elinor Mills. Privacy Issues with Google Library Search. News.com. June 17, 2005.

See also:
University of Michigan and Google, Inc. Cooperative Agreement between the University Library and Google. (.pdf) Dec. 14, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:51 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

June 17, 2005

Commentary on the USA Patriot Act

"How much do you trust your government? That's a question that all of us have to ask, perhaps the more often the better.

"In 1787, Thomas Jefferson, one of the founders of the United States and its third President, wrote to Abigail Adams sentences that may seem incredible to many people today:

"'The spirit of resistance to government is so valuable on certain occasions, that I wish it to be always kept alive. It will often be exercised when wrong, but better so than not to be exercised at all. I like a little rebellion now and then. It is like a storm in the atmosphere.'"

Scott Granneman. Your Fingerprints are Everywhere. The Register. June 16, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:45 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

June 16, 2005

House Votes Down Patriot Act Provision

"The House voted Wednesday to block a provision of the USA Patriot Act that makes it easier for federal investigators to review the records of libraries and book stores on national security grounds.

"Critics of the new federal power approved in the aftermath of the Sept. 11 attacks said it was an excessive grant of authority to the Federal Bureau of Investigation and Justice Department that threatened privacy and fundamental Constitutional rights.

"Those who challenged the provision, a coalition of both liberals and conservatives, said the 238-to-187 House vote should send a message to the administration that lawmakers are leery of maintaining all elements of the law even as President Bush seeks to renew the act."

Carl Hulse. House Blocks Provision for Patriot Act Inquiries. The New York Times. June 16, 2005.

See also:
Richard B. Schmitt. House Acts to Curb Patriot Act. LATimes.com. June 15, 2005.

Andrew Taylor. House Votes to Limit Patriot Act Rules. SFGate.com. June 15, 2005.

David R. Mark. To Push For Renewal Of The Patriot Act, Bush Spins Patriot Act Convictions. Blogcritics.org. June 15, 2005.

Bernie Sanders. Sanders Passes Critical Legislation to Amend Patriot Act and Protect Americans’ Reading Records. (Press Release.) June 15, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:55 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

June 15, 2005

N.Y. Public Library Starts Digital Library

"The New York Public Library announced Monday that it is making 700 books — from classics to current best sellers — available to members in digital audio form for downloading onto PCs, CD players and portable listening devices."

Associated Press. New York Library Offers Audio Downloads. MSNBC. June 13, 2005.

See also:
N.Y. Public Library. Kafka or Clancy for your Headphones: The NY Public Library Offers Digital Audio Books for MP3 players and Computers. (Press Release.) June 13, 2005.

Update: Reuters. N.Y. Library Audio Book Project Snubs iPod. News.com. June 14, 2005. (The files are based on Microsoft copyright protection software and will not work on Apple's iPod.)

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:39 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

June 14, 2005

Why Teens Aren't Coming to the Library

"When trying to figure out how to make libraries more attractive to teens, young adult librarians might ask themselves: “What are teens doing when they aren’t at the library?” Part of the answer is likely to be that they’re playing games.

"I don’t mean bridge, Monopoly, or Trivial Pursuit. The games that teens are playing are far geekier, more imaginative and interesting, and harder to find. Whether it be computer and video games or role playing and collectible card games, teens are playing and libraries are missing out. Because most librarians are not part of the gaming culture, this article is an introduction, opening a window to that world so that libraries can offer its delights to teens."

Heather Wilson. Gaming for Librarians: An Introduction. (.pdf) VOYA. February 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 08:25 AM | Send to a friend!

June 13, 2005

Why PowerPoint (Usually) Can't Suck Enough

We'll concede that this posting has little to do with digital and online collaboration, but since many in our audience are information scientists also, we just had to present it. -- Ed.

"Sometimes the best presentation is... no presentation. Ditch the slides completely. Put the projector in the closet, roll the screen back up, and turn the damn lights back on!

"Especially if the slides are bullet points. Or worse... paragraphs.

"Or if critical data is presented in a form that leads to brain-death, talked about by [information presentation and usability expert Edward] Tufte in this Wired article, and in more detail in his book, The Cognitive Style of PowerPoint.

Passionate. Stop Your Presentation Before It Kills Again! June 8, 2005.

See also:

Edward Tufte. PowerPoint Is Evil. Wired. September 2003.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 08:57 AM | Send to a friend!

Are Search Engines Still Inadequate?

"Search engines are so powerful. And they are so pathetically weak.

"When it comes to digging up a specific name, date, phrase or price, search engines are unstoppable. The same is true for details from the previously concealed past. For better and worse, any information about any of us--true or false, flattering or compromising--that has ever appeared on a publicly available site is likely to be retrievable forever, or until we run out of electricity for the server farms.

"Yet for anything but simple keyword queries, even the best search engines are surprisingly ineffective."

James Fallow. Enough Keyword Searches. Just Answer My Question. News.com. June 12, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:50 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Elsevier Seeks to Improve Library Relationships

"The new director of library relations at Elsevier, Tony McSean, has admitted that it needs to improve relationships with information professionals, and is calling for a new era of co-operation.

Mark Chillingworth. Elsevier Seeks to Build Bridges. Information World Review. June 10, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:11 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

June 11, 2005

Google Library Project Webcast

"On June 15, EDUCAUSE is offering a free webcast (advance registration required, however) featuring Reg Carr from Oxford and John Price Wilken from the University of Michigan speaking out the progress of the Google digitization programs at those institutions."

USC E-Resources Update. EDUCAUSE Webcast!. June 9, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:39 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

June 10, 2005

Patriot Act Political Battle Heats Up

"In seemingly short order, discussion around the Patriot Act has shifted from defense to offense.

"Just two months ago, when Congress set out to consider renewal of the antiterrorism law, civil libertarians were hopeful they could rein in aspects that they felt went too far.

"Now, supporters of an enhanced Patriot Act appear to be making headway as they push to give the FBI new powers."

Linda Feldmann. Patriot Act, Part II: The Political Tug of War Intensifies. Christian Science Monitor. June 10, 2005.

See also:
U.S. Department of Justice. Fact Sheet: USA PATRIOT Act Provisions Set for Reauthorization. April 5, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:50 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Scientific Journals Welcome Change

"Seven years ago, Michael Eisen, an assistant professor of genetics and development at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, proposed a program to link experimental data from his lab to relevant pieces of scientific literature.

"He and his postdoctoral adviser, Pat Brown, fully expected cooperation from Stanford Library, which hosts a large number of scientific journals. 'Instead,' Eisen recalled, 'we were told that the articles we wanted belonged to the publishers and we should basically piss off.'

"It had never occurred to Eisen that publishers could own scientific literature. He was offended by the idea that scientists could be wronged by copyright. This went double for the public, whose tax dollars pay for much of the scientific research undertaken today."

Adam L. Penenberg. Academic Journals Open to Change. Wired News. June 9, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:50 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Gartner Identifies Over-Hyped IT Security Threats

"Don’t believe the hype about some of the computer security threats emphasized in industry and the media, two Gartner Research analysts said today.

"Lawrence Orans, a principal research analyst, and John Pescatore, vice president and research fellow, told attendees at the Gartner IT Security Summit in Washington, D.C., not to fear going ahead with projects that use voice over IP technology, Virtual Private Networks over the Internet and wireless hot spots.

"The computer-security experts also advised their audience not to waste time or money on products they don’t need to meet federal regulations and protect against malware on mobile devices."

Michael Arnone. Gartner: Relax About Overhyped Security Threats. FCW. June 7, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:34 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

June 09, 2005

Archivist Creates BBS Documentary

"Before America Online, Friendster, forums and blogs, geeks communicated with one another in a clunky and pedestrian way that was the precursor to all subsequent forms of online communication.

"It was called a bulletin board system, or BBS, and was essentially a virtual living room where people hooked up remotely to chat, exchange freeware or play computer games, albeit at a really slow speed.

"Anyone nostalgic for those halcyon days can now thank digital archivist and filmmaker Jason Scott for BBS: The Documentary, a five-and-a-half-hour paean to the era when computers were named Stacy and Lisa, and tech loyalists fought bitter battles over the superiority of Ataris to Amigas."

Kim Zetter. How Humble BBS Begat Wired World. Wired News. June 8, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:47 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

GPO Releases Report on Metadata Specifications

"GPO is working with the library community on a national digitization plan, with the goal of digitizing a complete legacy collection of tangible U.S. Government publications. The objective is to ensure that the digital collection is available, in the public domain, for no-fee permanent public access through the FDLP.

"The project will ensure that the collection is digitally reformatted for preservation purposes. The digital preservation masters and the associated metadata will be preserved in the GPO electronic archive (in addition to any other places that the materials might be held), and there will be no-fee public access to the content through derivative files on GPO Access."

U.S. Government Printing Office. Report on the Meeting of Experts on Digital Preservation: Metadata Specifications. June 8, 2005.

See also:
U.S. Government Printing Office. Report on the Meeting of Experts on Digital Preservation: Metadata Specifications. (.pdf) (Revised Report.) June 2, 2005.

U.S. Government Printing Office. Report on the Meeting of Experts on Digital Preservation: Metadata Specifications. (.pdf) (Original Report.) June 14, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:27 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

June 08, 2005

Senate Panel Agrees to Expand and Renew Patriot Act

"The U.S. Senate intelligence committee on Tuesday sided with the White House by proposing broad new subpoena powers for the FBI to use in counterterrorism and counterintelligence investigations, officials said.

"After hours of secret deliberations, the oversight panel voted 11-4 to send to the full Senate a proposal that would give the FBI the power to subpoena without judicial approval a wide range of personal documents ranging from health and library records to tax statements.

"The legislation approved by the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence also would make permanent intelligence-related sections of the USA Patriot Act that are scheduled to expire at the end of the year."

Reuters. Senate Panel OKs Sweeping FBI Subpoena Powers. June 7, 2005.

See also:
Associated Press. Senate Intelligence Committee Approves New FBI Powers in Patriot Act. USA Today. June 7, 2005.

American Civil Liberties Union. Senate Panel Considering Patriot Act Expansion Bill in Secret; ACLU Says Fixes, Not Expansions, Are Needed. June 7, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:55 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

June 07, 2005

Creative Commons Debuts Law Program

Creative Commons' Science Commons division has announced the formation of the Open Access Law Program (OALP). According to OALP's home page, the project "supports 'open access' to legal scholarship."

The project seeks to provide free access to scholarly literature without undue copyright and licensing restrictions. "This project is one part of the Science Commons Publishing Project," continues the notice "which itself is working to support open access to scholarly research in a wide range of disciplines including agriculture, entomology, biology, anthropology and now law.

According to Corante's Donna Wentworth, the seeds for what would become OALP were planted in March, when Stanford law professor Lawrence Lessig became upset about having to relinquish all of his copyright rights as a condition of submitting a journal article to the Minnesota Law Review. Lessig, who is chairman of the board of directors of Creative Commons, has vowed to avoid submitting another journal article to any law review that refuses to recognize Creative Commons' Attribution Non-Commercial license.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 09:00 AM | Send to a friend!

Worrisome Politics Behind .xxx Domain

"Now that pornographers have a domain name suffix reserved exclusively for them, look for politicians to become more eager than ever before to target sexually explicit Web sites.

"Last week, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers approved the creation of .xxx, a kind of virtual red-light district that's scheduled to go live by the end of the year.

"Permitting sexually explicit material online is, of course, only objectionable among advocacy groups that would love to outlaw anything as daring as 'Heather Has Two Mommies.' (Nobody is forced to click on links pointing to raunch and ribaldry, after all.)

"But the politics of .xxx are more complex--and worrisome."

Declan McCullagh. The Politics of .xxx. News.com. June 6, 2005.

See also:
Declan McCullagh. Porn-friendly '.xxx' Domains Approved. News.com. June 1, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:04 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

June 06, 2005

German Publishers to Rival Google Print

"When the online retailer Amazon.com came calling a year ago to sign up German publishers for a digital indexing project, one book executive urged a strategy of polite rebuffs.

"Then this year, when Google started wooing publishers to sign on for its own digital book project, that German executive, Matthias Ulmer, decided the time was ripe to seize control with a homegrown counterattack.

"Now Mr. Ulmer and a five-member task force of the German book trade association Börsenverein are organizing their own digital indexing project, Volltextsuche Online. "

Doreen Carvajal. German Publishers Plan Challenge to Google Print. The New York Times. June 5, 2005.

See also:
Gary Price. German Publishers Plan Major Book Digitization Project. SearchEngineWatch. June 5, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:15 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Filmaker Preserves Culture Via Podcasts

"A filmmaker who has been collecting digital artifacts for 25 years is amassing the world's largest collection of podcasts, though he has little interest in actually listening to them.

"Jason Scott, a 34-year-old documentary filmmaker from the Boston area, has saved and cataloged more than 340 GB of online amateur radio since he started in February.

"Scott is currently monitoring and archiving some 1,500 podcasters using a $300 computer running a handwritten script that automatically downloads audio files to cheap hard drives."

Ryan Singel. Collector's Trove of Podcasts. Wired News. June 2, 2005.

See also:
ASCII by Jason Scott. All of the Podcasts. Feb. 26, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:20 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

June 04, 2005

Anonymous Library Patrons

"As fans of classic radio and TV know, the Lone Ranger wore a mask to hide his identity from the outlaws he brought to justice. While the people he helped asked, "Who was that masked man?" the audience knew that John Reid was safe only because his mask afforded him privacy.

"Privacy has come a long way since that show was first popular. As technology for making and breaking codes has improved, our ability to keep secrets has waxed and waned. One constant, however, is the fact that you can't retrieve information that you've never stored.

"Like the Lone Ranger's mask, a good information retention policy can safeguard personal identity information. Librarians want to be sure that patrons will return what they borrow, and they want statistics that quantify the library's value to its community. Librarians also want to protect customers' privacy; we usually don't keep personally identifiable information unless we have to."

Ben Ostrowsky. Anonymous Library Cards Allow You to Wonder, 'Who Was That Masked Patron?'. Computers in Libraries. June 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:28 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

June 03, 2005

Amazon.com Slides Into Publishing

"What is Amazon up to these days? Are they the friend or foe of the independent writer?

"Amazon's recent purchase of two companies (Booksurge and Mobipocket) hints at a future business strategy geared not only to the long tail concept but also self-publishing in general."

Kuro5hin. Amazon.com, Ebooks and "Chump Change." May 16, 2005.

See also:
O'Reilly Radar. Self Publishing Changes All the Rules? April 24, 2005.

Tim O'Reilly. What Do You Think About Self-Published Books? O'Reilly Developer Blogs. April 15, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 08:25 AM | Send to a friend!

Open Access Momentum Continues to Grow

"'Sorry, but this article is available only to subscribers.' Try to view a science journal article online and, more often than not, that is the message you will see. This is not just a problem for members of the public - scientists and medical practitioners face it every day.

"There are so many science journals that no library can afford to subscribe to them all. The internet has the potential to give researchers instant access to all the information they need, but this potential is not exploited because scientific journals still operate a subscription-based model inherited from the days of print publishing."

Matthew Cockerill. Access All Articles. Guardian Unlimited. June 2, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:37 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

June 02, 2005

PubSub Launches PubSub Government

"PubSub has launched a new service today called PubSub Government today that allows the user to quickly track news and blog postings about the U.S. Federal government as well as all state governments."

Gary Price. PubSub Launches New Service. SearchEngineWatch. June 1, 2005.

See also:
PubSub. Pubsub Demonstrates the Power of Prospective Search with U.S. Government Watching Tool. (Press Release.) June 1, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:50 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

June 01, 2005

June 3rd: FEC Political Blogs Comment Deadline

"Web loggers, who pride themselves on freewheeling political activism, might face new federal rules on candidate endorsements, online fundraising and political ads, though bloggers who don't take money from political groups would not be affected.

"Draft rules from the Federal Election Commission, which enforces campaign finance laws, would require that paid political advertisements on the Internet declare who funded the ad, as television spots do.

"Similar disclaimers would be placed on political Web sites, as well as on e-mails sent to people on purchased lists containing more than 500 addresses. The FEC also is considering whether to require Web loggers, called bloggers, to disclose whether they get money from a campaign committee or a candidate and to reveal whether they are being paid to write about certain candidates or solicit contributions on their behalf."

Dawn Withers. FEC Treads Into Sticky Web of Political Blogs. Chicago Tribune. May 31, 2005.

See also:
Peter Overby. Campaign Finance Rules for Political Bloggers?. National Public Radio. May 26, 2005.

Federal Register. Federal Election Commission: Internet Regulations. April 4, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:48 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Davis Library Adds Interactive IM Service

"Davis Library patrons no longer need to go to the reference desk when they need help. They can make like teenagers everywhere and IM.

"To make its reference librarians more accessible, UNC's research library has added instant messaging to its interactive online services.

"'IM a Librarian,' a service previously offered at other campus libraries, provides patrons a way to quickly get answers to their research questions. Special software used by the library makes the service compatible to queries coming from AOL Instant Messenger, Yahoo! Messenger and MSN Messenger."

Joe Margolis. I Think (I Need Library Reference Help), Therefore IM. HeraldSun.com. May 30, 2005.

Editor's note: See also SNTReport.com's prior story featuring librarians using IM at UNC Chapel Hill.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:22 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

May 31, 2005

Amid Controversy, Google Print Launches

"Google opened the door to its online library late Thursday with the launch of a book-specific search page.

"Print.Google.Com makes official the search goliath's project to digitize the world's books. But the launch drew backlash from the Association of American University Presses, in the form of an open letter focusing on Google Library, a service that went live in December."

Susan Kuchinskas. Google Print Goes Live. InternetNews.com. May 27, 2005.

Related:
Gary Price. SafeSearch Doesn't Work On Google Print & Can Full Book Preview Prevention Be Hacked?. SearchEngineWatch. May 27, 2005.

See also:
Gary Price. New Interface Available: Search Only Material in the Google Print Database. SearchEngineWatch. May 26, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:37 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

May 27, 2005

Patriot Act Debate to Continue

"The Senate Intelligence Committee failed to reach final agreement on Thursday on a proposal that would expand the Federal Bureau of Investigation's powers to demand records and monitor mailings in terror investigations, but officials said they were confident that the committee would come to a consensus on the issue.

"The committee met in private for two and a half hours amid continuing complaints from civil liberties advocates and some Democrats that the proposal would give federal investigators too much power to conduct 'fishing expeditions' in pursuing terrorism leads.

"Senate Republican leaders and the Bush administration, who are backing the proposal, say it provides the F.B.I. with essential tools in fighting terrorism."

Eric Lichtblau. Little Progress in Bid to Extend Patriot Act. The New York Times. May 27, 2005.

See also:
American Libraries Online. Patriot Act Extension Debated at Closed Congressional Meeting. May 27, 2005.

National Public Radio. Pushing for an Enhanced Patriot Act. Talk of the Nation. May 26, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:55 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Librarian Echos Real-Life Patriot Act Consequences

"It was a moment that librarians had been dreading.

"On June 8, 2004, an FBI agent stopped at the Deming branch of the Whatcom County Library System in northwest Washington and requested a list of the people who had borrowed a biography of Osama bin Laden. We said no.

"We did not take this step lightly. First, our attorney called the local FBI office and asked why the information was important. She was told that one of our patrons had sent the FBI the book after discovering these words written in the margin: 'If the things I'm doing is considered a crime, then let history be a witness that I am a criminal. Hostility toward America is a religious duty and we hope to be rewarded by God.'

"We told the FBI that it would have to follow legal channels before our board of trustees would address releasing the names of the borrowers."

Joan Airoldi. Librarian's Brush With FBI Shapes Her View of the USA Patriot Act. USA Today. May 25, 2005.

See also:
Nicole Brodeur. Deming's Defender of Words. Seattle Times. April 25, 2005.

Update: National Public Radio. Washington Library Tested by Patriot Act. Morning Edition. June 2, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:54 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

May 26, 2005

Senators Address International IP Piracy

"U.S. senators urged the Bush administration on Wednesday to increase pressure on Russia and China to respect copyright law, warning that those nations have become havens for movie and software piracy.

"Orrin Hatch, the Utah Republican who chairs the Senate copyright subcommittee, made one of the most ominous statements to date about what might happen if unfettered piracy continues.

"James Mendenhall, the acting general counsel for the U.S. Trade Representative, said his colleagues are hosting a delegation from China this week to talk in part about copyright law."

Declan McCullagh. Senators Urge International Copyright Crackdown. News.com. May 25, 2005.

See also:
U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary. Testimony of James Mendenhall. May 25, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:35 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Database Hackers Explain Intent

"Three young hackers under investigation for unlawfully accessing personal information on thousands of people in a LexisNexis database have characterized their act as a cyberjoyride that got out of hand.

"The hackers, ages 16, 19 and 20, spoke with Wired News by phone Monday and said that in January and February they accessed LexisNexis data -- which included the Social Security number, birth date, home address and driver's license number of numerous celebrities and hacker friends -- to claim bragging rights, rather than to steal identities or sell the information to identity thieves, as some published reports have stated."

Kim Zetter. Database Hackers Reveal Tactics. Wired News. May 25, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:31 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

May 25, 2005

Study: Few Fortune 100 Sites Optomize SEO

"A new survey of Fortune 100 companies reveals that relatively few of them make a serious effort to optimize their Web sites to receive high search rankings on Yahoo! or Google.

"The study, by the search engine optimization (SEO) marketing firm OneUpWeb, is the company's third look at the search campaigns of the biggest brands in American industry, following surveys in 2002 and 2004.

"This year's model finds some increase in the number of big names using SEO to get better natural search results: OneUpWeb detected that 13 of the Fortune 100 are expending a lot of effort to optimize their pages, compared to nine last year and only three in 2002."

Brian Quinton. Study: Big Brands Slow to Adopt Search Engine Optimization. DirectMag.com. May 24, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:54 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Benefits of Open Access, Source Software & Standards

"Open access, open source software, and open standards are three concepts that have been receiving increased attention lately in the library world. Open access is seen by some as a possible solution to the increasing price of serials and as a way for governmental funding agencies to receive a better return on investment.

"Open source software can benefit libraries by lowering initial and ongoing costs, eliminating vendor lock-in, and allowing for greater flexibility.

"Open standards allow for interoperability to exist between diverse library resources and eases data migration between systems."

Edward M. Corrado. The Importance of Open Access, Open Source, and Open Standards for Libraries. Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship. Spring 2005.

Attribution: SNTReport.com first discovered news of these numerous benefits through a posting in Library Link of the Day, edited by John Hubbard.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:33 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

May 24, 2005

K. Matthew Dames Discusses Search & Information Architecture

K. Matthew Dames will speak Tuesday, May 24 at the FedWeb 2005 conference. The conference, which takes place at George Mason University's School of Public Policy in Arlington, Virginia, brings practical solutions to Goverment Web Professionals.

Dames' speech is entitled Optimizing Search Without Search: The Importance of Information Architecture.

"Many Web managers spend lots of time and money trying to buy the best search engine to help users find information on their site. But the use of a search engine is often a sign that the site has failed at its core mission: getting the right information to the right people at the right time. The key to improving information retrieval often has more to do with the site's information architecture -- things like navigation schemes, labeling, and metadata -- than what search technology the site owner buys.

"This session will discuss how good information architecture (IA) can help your users find the information they need, and even how IA can improve the quality of the results that your existing or future search engine gives to viewers."

K. Matthew Dames. "Optimizing Search Without Search: The Importance of Information Architecture" (.pdf) FedWeb 2005. May 24, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 09:00 AM | Send to a friend!

AAUP Poses Questions & Concerns to Google

"A group of academic publishers called Google Inc.'s plan to scan millions of library books into its Internet search engine index a troubling financial threat to its membership.

"The Association of American University Presses said in a letter to Google that the online search engine's library project "appears to involve systematic infringement of copyright on a massive scale."

"The association, which represents 125 nonprofit publishers of academic journals and scholarly books, asked Google to respond to a list of 16 questions seeking more information about how the company plans to protect copyrights."

Michael Liedtke. Publishers Protest Google Library Project. Yahoo! News. May 24, 2005.

See also:
Jeffrey R. Young. University-Press Group Raises Questions About Google's Library-Scanning Project. The Chronicle of Higher Education. May 23, 2005.

Burt Helm. A Google Project Pains Publishers. BusinessWeek Online. May 23, 2005.

BusinessWeekOnline. The University Press Assn.'s Objections. May 23, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:42 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Groups Vow to Battle Patriot Act Provisions

"Civil liberties groups said on Monday they were alarmed at new provisions (.pdf) to be considered in Congress this week to strengthen the government's ability to seize private records without judicial review.

"Officials from the American Civil Liberties Union, the Open Society Institute and the Center for Democracy and Technology said in a telephone conference call the new provisions to the USA Patriot Act would allow the FBI to secretly demand medical, tax, gun purchase, travel and other records without needing to get approval from a judge."

Alan Elsner. Records Search Plan Alarms Civil Liberties Groups. Reuters. May 23, 2005.

See also:
Center for Democracy and Technology, et al. Joint Letter in Opposition to Proposal. (.pdf) May 23, 2005.

U.S. Senate. Title I- Repeal of Sunset on Certain Authorities. (.pdf) May 13, 2005.

Senate Select Committee. Summary of Draft Working Copy. (.pdf) May 11, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:41 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

May 23, 2005

Electronic Reserves Stir Copyright Dispute

"There's been a change in Ellen Lichtenstein's study patterns.

"For half her classes this past year, she no longer had to visit a library to get the reading materials professors had placed on reserve. Instead, she only needed Internet access and a password.

"And publishing companies are worried precisely because of that ease and convenience - it's another way for publishers to lose sales."

Anick Jesdanun. A Different Sort of Campus Copyright Fight. MSNBC News. May 21, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:55 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

May 21, 2005

Copyright Group Addresses Digital Media Issues

"The Section 108 Study Group held its inaugural meeting at the Library of Congress on April 14-15. The goal of the group, named after the section of the U.S. Copyright Act that provides limited exceptions for libraries and archives, is to prepare findings and make recommendations to the Librarian of Congress by mid-2006 for possible alterations to the law that reflect current technologies.

"The U.S. Copyright Office will then hold public hearings before submitting recommendations to the U.S. Congress. This effort will seek to strike the appropriate balance between copyright holders and libraries and archives in a manner that best serves the public interest."

Digital Preservation Program. Group Convenes to Study Exceptions to Copyright Law for Libraries and Archives. (Press Release.) May 13, 2005.

Attribution: SNTReport.com first discovered news of this study group through a posting in ResourceShelf, edited byGary Price.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:49 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Library to Require Fingerprint ID System

"Before long, patrons wanting to use Naperville Public Library System computers without a hassle will have to prove their identity with a fingerprint.

"The three-library system this week signed a $40,646 contract with a local company, U.S. Biometrics Corp., to install fingerprint scanners on 130 computers with Internet access or a time limit on usage.

"The decision, according to the American Library Association, makes Naperville only the second library system in the country to install fingerprint scanners. Library officials say the added security is necessary to ensure people who are using the computers are who they say they are."

James Kimberly. Library Card? Check. Fingerprint? Really?. Chicago Tribune. May 20, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:45 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Quick Overview of Search Engines

"I often meet people who don't understand how search engines gather their information. They know what they are and understand the importance of being indexed and listed on them - well some do - but the minute you start talking about spiders and the like, they freeze up.

"Freeze no more. This article aims to shed some uncertainty you may have about search engines. After all, if you want to benefit from being listed on search engines, you'd better know how they work."

Gallianno Cosme. How Do Search Engines Work?. Search Engine Guide. May 19, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:12 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

May 20, 2005

California Senate Approves Anti-RFID Bill

"The California Senate has approved the first legislation in the country to block state and local government agencies from issuing identification cards containing radio frequency identification tags.

"In a May 16 29-7 vote, the senators passed SB 682, the Identity Information Protection Act, which prohibits California public agencies from issuing ID cards containing 'a contactless integrated circuit or device that can broadcast personal information or enable personal information to be scanned remotely.' The description covers RFID devices and tags, among others."

Alice Lipowicz. Calif. Throws up RFID Roadblock. GCN. May 19, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:51 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Tagging: Alternate Organizational Systems

"Without Google, Yahoo, and their brethren, using the Web would be like wandering through a library where a prankster has restacked the books at random. Still, sorting through thousands or millions of pages spurted out by a search engine can be nearly as overwhelming.

"Imagine instead being able to call on the group judgment of other users, people who are constantly skimming the latest Web content and arranging the best stuff into neatly labeled piles.

"It's called tagging, and it's going on at a handful of free websites--Delicious, Flickr, Furl, and Rojo, among others--where members are voluntarily classifying and categorizing thousands of pieces of content each day."

Wade Roush. Tagging Is It. Technology Review. June 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:50 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

May 18, 2005

Senate Committe to Review Patriot Act Renewal

"A Senate committee said on Tuesday it would start the process of renewing the USA Patriot Act, which expanded security powers after the Sept. 11 attacks, but ran into criticism for holding the meetings in secret.

"The Senate Select Committee on Intelligence said it would hold a closed markup session on Thursday, the first legislative step toward a reauthorization vote long sought by Republicans including President Bush.

"The American Civil Liberties Union accused the committee of rushing the process and said lawmakers could use their secret proceedings to enhance the Bush administration's subpoena powers and its authority to conduct searches and surveillance.

Reuters. Senate Panel to Start Work on Renewing Patriot Act. ABC News. May 17, 2005.

See also:
American Civil Liberties Union. Senate Committee to Review Controversial Patriot Act Legislation in Secret; Draft Legislation Hidden from Public. (Press Release.) May 17, 2005.

National Public Radio. Senate Committee Reviews Patriot Act Renewal. All Things Considered. May 17, 2005.

David Cole. The Missing Patriot Debate. The Nation. May 12, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:50 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

May 16, 2005

University Library Goes Digital

"Students attending the University of Texas at Austin will find something missing from the undergraduate library this fall.

"Books.

"By mid-July, the university says, almost all of the library's 90,000 volumes will be dispersed to other university collections to clear space for a 24-hour electronic information commons, a fast-spreading phenomenon that is transforming research and study on campuses around the country."

Ralph Blumenthal. College Libraries Set Aside Books in a Digital Age. The New York Times. May 14, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:50 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Google Library Project May Expand to Europe

"Mom and pop investors got a rare opportunity to question Google Inc. 's top executives Thursday, but most chose generally upbeat topics of inquiry at the search engine's first shareholder meeting.

"Google's executives used the opportunity to address the company's potential for growth abroad, its competition against Yahoo and Microsoft and its efforts to keep employees motivated.

"Many of Thursday's questions were routine. But a few elicited some nuggets of new information."

Verne Kopytoff. Google Shareholders Meet for First Time. SFGate.com. May 13, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:15 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

May 13, 2005

FirstGov.gov Provides RSS Library

A U.S. Government RSS Library is now available providing a central location to feeds on agriculture, consumer, cyber security, data and statistics, education, federal personnel, health, international relations, military affairs, forests, and science.

FirstGov.gov. U.S. Government RSS Library.

Attribution: SNTReport.com first discovered news of the U.S. Government RSS Library through a posting in beSpacific, edited by Sabrina I. Pacifici.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:50 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Dutch Allow Access to All Academic Research

"Scientists from all major Dutch universities officially launched a website on Tuesday where all their research material can be accessed for free. Interested parties can get hold of a total of 47,000 digital documents from 16 institutions the Digital Academic Repositories.

"No other nation in the world offers such easy access to its complete academic research output in digital form, the researchers claim.

"Obviously, commercial publishers are not amused."

Jan Libbenga. Dutch Academics Declare Research Free-for-All. The Register. May 11, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:47 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Google to Increase Global Presence

"Google Inc.'s top executives said yesterday that they are focused on aggressively increasing the search engine's business abroad, particularly in Europe, Japan, and China, where the number of new Internet users is growing faster than in the United States.

"Speaking at Google's first annual meeting since going public, chief executive Eric E. Schmidt told shareholders he anticipated that the company, which gets almost all of its revenue from advertising sales, would see a shift that would reflect its increasing global presence. The company's latest financial results show that it generates slightly less than two-thirds of its revenue domestically."

David A. Vise. Google to Focus on Expanding Its Business Overseas. WashingtonPost.com. May 13, 2005.

See also:
Doug Young. Google Steps Up Fight for the China Market. Reuters. May 11, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:39 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

May 12, 2005

Google Scholar Expands to All Libraries

"Today, the 'small' Google Scholar pilot that went live in February – allowing about 30 libraries and institutions to provide direct links to articles found in the Google Scholar database – is being expanded.

"Now, ANY library or institution that has the proper link resolving software can hook into Google Scholar and provide direct links to articles found via a GS search.

"You can find all of the details here. Google also is releasing a help page for the service."

Gary Price. Google Scholar is Now Open to All Libraries. SearchEngineJournal. May 10, 2005.

Update: Jeffrey R. Young. More Than 100 Colleges Work With Google to Speed Campus Users to Library Resources. The Chronicle of Higher Education. May 11, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:53 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Factiva Broadens RSS Use

"Factiva customers will have an additional option for receiving results from their track current awareness searches—an Enterprise RSS feed via NewsGator online and NewsGator Microsoft Outlook.

"This enterprise version of RSS requires you to be a Factiva subscriber to receive updates and that the feeds are limited to NewsGator as the aggregator. Factiva’s Editor’s Choice feeds will also be available in NewsGator premium products beginning in early June. However, Factiva customers will not pay to download and use the NewsGator Business Subscriptions product."

Marydee Ojala. Factiva Expands Its RSS Feed Capabilities in a Deal with NewsGator. Information Today NewsBreaks. May 9, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 07:49 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

May 11, 2005

Stanford Launches GATT Digital Library

"For scholars interested in international commerce over the past 50 years, April 19 was a big day. On that day, the GATT Digital Library — a collection of 30,000 public documents and 200 reports related to the workings of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, or GATT — was uploaded online at http://gatt.stanford.edu. The library is the culmination of a six-year project to digitize and archive the GATT archives.

"The GATT executive-congressional agreement goes back to 1947, when several countries decided to reduce tariffs and establish international trade rules. After several rounds of modifications, the GATT was succeeded by the World Trade Organization, or the WTO, in 1993."

Rose Jenkins. Stanford, WTO Partnership Places Trade Documents Online. Stanford Daily. May 10, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:27 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

May 10, 2005

Congress to Closely Examine Patriot Act

"Congress is returning to the controversial topic of whether to renew key portions of the Patriot Act.

"Both the Senate and House of Representatives have scheduled hearings on Tuesday that are part of an extended process of reviewing the portions of the 2001 law that are scheduled to expire on Dec. 31. Many of those 16 portions deal with computer and Internet surveillance."

Declan McCullagh. Congress Plans Scrutiny of Patriot Act. News.com. May 9, 2005.

See also:
Frank Davies. Debate on Renewal of Patriot Act has Civil Tone. Philadelphia Inquirer. May 9, 2005.

News Staff. ACLU Urges Congress to Modify "Sneak and Peek" Patriot Act Power. Government Technology. May 9, 2005.

Frank Davies. Patriot's Second Act Opening. San Jose Mercury News. May 9, 2005.

Declan McCullagh. The Next Chapter in the Patriot Act. News.com. April 4, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:53 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

GPO, LOC to Utilize Web Harvesting

"Government Printing Office officials, who have a significant role in preserving government information, want to capture fugitive publications, which are documents that federal agencies have published on the Web but for which no copy or record exists in GPO's database.

"To recover such documents for preservation, GPO officials are interested in new software technologies such as Web harvesting, and they are reviewing proposals from companies that make such software.

"Web harvesting, sometimes called crawling or spidering, is more than searching for and discovering information. Harvesting techniques are used for downloading code, images, documents and any files essential to reproduce a Web site after it has been taken down."

Aliya Sternstein. Fugitive Documents Elude Preservationists. FCW. May 9, 2005.

See also:
Susan M. Menke. GPO and its Collection of Last Resort. GCN.com. April 20, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:32 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

UCLA Libraries to Phase Out Print Subscriptions

"University of California libraries feeling the heat of the budget crisis will cut collections in an effort not to burn holes in their pockets. No information will be lost to UC students though, as long as they have access to the Internet.

"'The library is carrying out the first cancellation project as part of a multi-year plan to eliminate subscriptions to print when we license access to the electronic equivalent, said Cynthia Shelton, associate university librarian for collection management and scholarly communication, in a statement on the UCLA Library Web site."

Josh Blitstein. Libraries Cut Many Print Publications. Daily Bruin. May 6, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:06 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

May 09, 2005

Federal Court Overturns Broadcast Flag

"In a stunning victory for hardware makers and television buffs, a federal appeals court has tossed out government rules that would have outlawed many digital TV receivers and tuner cards starting July 1.

"The U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit ruled Friday that the Federal Communications Commission did not have the authority to prohibit the manufacture of computer and video hardware that doesn't have copy protection technology known as the 'broadcast flag.' The regulations, which the FCC created in November 2003, had been intended to limit unauthorized Internet redistribution of over-the-air TV broadcasts."

Declan McCullagh. Court Yanks Down FCC's Broadcast Flag. News.com. May 6, 2005.

See also:
Electronic Frontier Foundation. Federal Appeals Court Scraps FCC's Broadcast Flag Mandate. Breaking News. May 6, 2005.

U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. American Library Association, et al., v. Federal Communications Commission and United States of America. (.pdf) May 6, 2005.

Electronic Frontier Foundation. Waving Flags of Victory. Deep Links. May 6, 2005.

Electronic Frontier Foundation. American Library Association v. Federal Communications Commission. No date.

Declan McCullagh. Are PCs Next in Hollywood Piracy Battle?. News.com. Nov. 5, 2003.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:55 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Orphan Songs Caught in Bottleneck

"In late 1946, glamorous Savannah Churchill, the Alicia Keys of her day, recorded the ballad "I Want to Be Loved (But Only by You)" for Manor Records, a New Jersey-based independent label.

"Other such Manor releases as Deek Watson & his Brown Dots' reading of '(I Love You) For Sentimental Reasons' -- later a hit for Nat 'King' Cole and Sam Cooke -- also clicked with the record-buying public.

"But 58 years later, Manor Records is a mystery. Music historians say anyone who wants permission to reissue those discs will find that the paper trail to the ownership of Manor has disappeared. The Manor discs, in other words, are 'orphan works.'"

Bill Holland. Copyright Office Seeks Authors of 'Orphan Songs'. Reuters. May 6, 2005.

See also:
Glushko Samuelson Intellectual Property Law Clinic Response to Notice of Inquiry on the Issue of "Orphan Works". (.pdf) March 24, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:38 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

May 06, 2005

Search Inside the Book Tools

"Google, Amazon and others offer really useful 'search inside the book' tools, but they're not always the easiest features to use. Here's a closer look at getting the most from online book search services."

Gary Price. Going Under Cover with Book Search Tools. SearchEngineWatch. May 4, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:02 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

May 05, 2005

Lou Rosenfeld Updates IA Roadmap

Lou Rosenfeld, co-author of Information Architecture for the World Wide Web (2nd Ed., O'Reilly & Associates, 2002), announces on his blog that he has updated his enterprise information architecture roadmap. It is the first published update to the roadmap since he published the first edition (.pdf) in 2003.

"I've finally found a little time to update my Enterprise IA Roadmap. Although it's the basis for the design section of my EIA seminar, I'm hopeful that anyone who is dealing with the "silo" problem might find it useful, seminar or not. If nothing else, it's a decent straw man to get people thinking differently about how to organize information inside a large, distributed, and politicized enterprise setting."

LouRosenfeld.com. Updated Enterprise IA Roadmap. (.pdf) May 3, 2005.

Related:
Iain Barker. What is Information Architecture? KM Column. May 2, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 07:04 PM | Send to a friend!

May 04, 2005

Tagging Gets the Blog Treatment

"'You're It!,' a new blog on tagging, began publishing April 26, 2005. The masthead is a "who's who" of the blogosphere, including Christian Crumlish, Clay Shirky, Jon Lebkowsky, and David Weinberger.

About the tagging phenomenon, Lebkowsky says:
"The real zinger for me was realizing that tagging or folksonomy is yet another manifestation of our evolution from hierarchical systems to more later, emergent, and empowering network/grassroots approaches. Here we’re talking about a populist approach to taxonomy: rather than fit our thinking into authoritative closed classification schemes, we can create our own through tagging, and in social tagging environments we can negotiate new, more nuanced ways to map meaning and relationship through shared, emergent classification systems."

Jon Lebkowsky. Introduction: Jon Lebkowsky. You're It. May 3, 2005.

Related:
Tony Hammond, et al. Social Bookmarking Tools (I): A General Review. D-Lib Magazine. April 2005.

Joshua Porter. Folksonomies: A User-Driven Approach to Organizing Content. User Interface Engineering. April 26, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 12:29 PM | Send to a friend!

NSF to Fund Digital Initiatives

"The National Science Foundation's Information and Intelligent Systems Division plans to award up to $12 million in grants for basic research related to digital government, universal access and digital libraries in fiscal 2006."

Florence Olsen. NSF to Fund Digital Government. FCW. May 2, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:48 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

May 03, 2005

ALA Sponsors Copyright Event in New York

The Office of Information Technology Policy (OITP) of the American Library Association and Columbia University are co-sponsoring a conference “Correcting Course: Rebalancing Copyright for Libraries in the National and International Arenas.”

From the Introduction:
"'Correcting Course'" offers a high-level briefing on developments in the United States and in international venues affecting the balanced interpretation and application of copyright. It promotes a renewed activism in support of fair use and the full complement of copyright exceptions and limitations which enable libraries to serve their communities. This conference will bring together influential and committed thinkers and activists who view a balanced application of copyright and the advancement of fair use as fundamental to the future health of libraries and the communities they serve."

Confirmed speakers include Fred von Lohmann of the Electronic Frontier Foundation; and Siva Vaidhyanathan, assistant professor at New York University and author of The Anarchist in the Library.

The conference occurs Thursday, May 5, 2005 through Saturday, May 7, 2005 on the Columbia University campus in New York City.

The registration fee is $150.00, which includes meals.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology in our New Afternoon Edition. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 04:03 PM | Send to a friend!

May 02, 2005

Quantifying the Value of Information Organization

"Imagine we’re starting work on the user registration functionality of a web site. After conducting a thorough set of user tests, we discover that half of all users who attempt to register can’t successfully complete the process. Those who do register find the process very frustrating. Fixing the registration process to eliminate any frustration would be important, right? Not necessarily.

"How does an improved registration process help the business? How does increasing the number of registrations help the bottom line, either immediately or in the long term? If we can’t answer these questions, why should our organization invest any resources to fix it?"

Jared M. Spool. Identifying the Business Value of What We Do. User Interface Engineering. April 15, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology in our New Afternoon Edition. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 01:14 PM | Send to a friend!

Folksonomies Help Information Organization

"Many of the design teams we talk to face the same major issue: how to organize the information on their sites. From creating navigation schemes to developing site hierarchies to refining checkout sequences, it’s highly important for design teams to organize information effectively for their users.

"One of the most common strategies for organizing content is to place it in a taxonomy. Although taxonomies are common, it can be difficult for design teams to implement them.

"Folksonomies, a new user-driven approach to organizing information, may help alleviate some of the challenges of taxonomies. Sites with folksonomies include two basic capabilities: they let users add “tags” to information and they create navigational links out of those tags to help users find and organize that information later."

Joshua Porter. Folksonomies: A User-Driven Approach to Organizing Content. User Interface Engineering. April 26, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology in our New Afternoon Edition. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 01:12 PM | Send to a friend!

Music Expands IR Research

"Sun Microsystems has unveiled a technology that will recommend songs to users based on an analysis of the music that they already enjoy.

"The technology analyses features such as rhythm and beat strength to categorise the music. It then searches for files with similar attributes."

Tom Sanders. Sun Unveils All-knowing Music Library. vnunet.com. April 29, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:31 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

April 30, 2005

France Gains EU Support Against Google

"France's decision to create an online repository of European literature got critical backing from five other European nations this week when the heads of Germany, Hungary, Italy, Poland and Spain joined French President Jacques Chirac in asking for support from the European Union.

"European media reported that a letter signed by the leaders asks EU President Jean-Claude Juncker and European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso to coordinate the effort and, more importantly, cut a check to fund it. The letter comes after the national libraries of 19 European nations agreed to support the plan as well."

Robert MacMillan. Google Unites Europe. WashingtonPost.com. April 29, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:37 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

GPO's Policies Have Ripple Effect on Libraries

"The Government Printing Office prints some of the nation's best-known publications: the Congressional Record, the Ronald Reagan funeral condolence books, the U.S. budget, the Sept. 11 commission report--even your passport.

"At its peak in the 1980s, before the days of Web sites and e-documents, the office printed more than 35 million documents a year, sending copies to libraries across the country, some of which kept everything the GPO produced and made it available to anyone who asked.

"But now to cut costs, government agencies are increasingly putting documents online rather than printing them and do not always provide an electronic copy to the GPO.

Dawn Withers. Librarians Worry Important Information is Being Lost. Chicago Tribune. April 29, 2005.

See also:
Aliya Sternstein. Librarians Air Frustrations. FCW.com. April 27, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:39 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

April 29, 2005

Terrorists Booked Flights at Library

"The Bush administration revealed on Thursday that some of the September 11 hijackers booked their tickets on the Internet using a computer in a college library in New Jersey.

"The disclosure by Ken Wainstein, U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia in testimony to the House of Representatives subcommittee on crime, terrorism and homeland security, was intended to bolster the government's argument that Congress should renew a law allowing it to seize library and bookstore records."

Alan Elsner. 9/11 Hijackers Booked Airline Tickets at Library. Reuters. April 29, 2005.

See also:
Alan Elsner. Congress Pressed to Renew Library-Search Powers. Reuters. April 28, 2005.

U.S. House of Representatives Committee on the Judiciary. Sensenbrenner Statement Regarding Today’s Revelation that 9/11 Hijackers Used U.S. Public Libraries Prior to 9/11. (.pdf) (Press Release.) April 28, 2005.

U.S. House of Representatives Committee on the Judiciary. PATRIOT Act Oversight Hearing Thursday on “Roving Wiretaps” and the “Library” Provision. (.pdf) (Press Release.) April 27, 2005.

Deroy Murdock. Check This Out. National Review Online. April 25, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:53 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

AMD Attempts to Bridge Digital Divide

"Over dinner on a spring night in 2000, Hector de Jesus Ruiz, the new chief executive of Advanced Micro Devices Inc., popped an unexpected question to one of his deputies: 'Have you ever made a difference in your life?'

"AMD, known mostly as a computer chip maker perennially in the shadow of giant Intel Corp., recently unveiled a pared-down personal computer that costs roughly $200 in an ambitious drive to get computers with Internet access into the hands of 50 percent of the world's population by 2015."

Jonathan Krim. Bringing the Internet To the Whole World. WashingtonPost.com. April 29, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:21 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

April 28, 2005

European Libraries Retaliate Against Google

"Nineteen European national libraries have joined forces against a planned communications revolution by Internet search giant Google to create a global virtual library, organisers said Wednesday.

"The 19 libraries are backing instead a multi-million euro counter-offensive by European nations to put European literature online."

TurkishPress.com. European Libraries Join Forces Against Google Global Virtual Library. April 27, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:46 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

April 27, 2005

Brewster Kahle Seeks Universal Access to All Knowledge

"Nine years ago, Brewster Kahle embarked on a project of monumental proportions: archiving the internet. A recent profile in Slate reminded us that it's probably time to check in with Kahle. When we did, we found out that archiving the largest information machine in the history of the world wasn't enough for the man Slate called an "evangelical librarian."

"He wants archive everything - the billions of pages on the internet, but also music, movies and books. It's an awesome undertaking, and Brewster Kahle plans to get it done."

On the Media. The Internet Forever. (Real Audio version) April 22, 2005.

See also:
Paul Boutin. The Archivist. Slate. April 7, 2005.

The Internet Archive.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology in our New Afternoon Edition. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 12:14 PM | Send to a friend!

April 26, 2005

D-Lib Studies Social Bookmarking

"With the introduction of new social software applications such as blogs, wikis, newsfeeds, social networks, and bookmarking tools (the subject of this paper), the claim that Shelley Powers makes in a Burningbird blog entry [1] seems apposite: "This is the user's web now, which means it's my web and I can make the rules." Reinvention is revolution – it brings us always back to beginnings.

"We are here going to remind you of hyperlinks in all their glory, sell you on the idea of bookmarking hyperlinks, point you at other folks who are doing the same, and tell you why this is a good thing. This paper reviews some current initiatives, as of early 2005, in providing public link management applications on the Web – utilities that are often referred to under the general moniker of 'social bookmarking tools.'"

Tony Hammond, et al. Social Bookmarking Tools (I): A General Review. D-Lib Magazine. April 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology in our New Afternoon Edition. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 02:42 PM | Send to a friend!

Libraries Role in Gaming World

"Why pay attention to games? For starters, games are the 'medium of choice' for many Millennials, with broad participation among the 30 and under population. Although part of a web of new media, technology, and social shifts, games are the quintessential site for examining these changes.

"Game cultures feature participation in a collective intelligence, blur the distinction between the production and consumption of information, emphasize expertise rather than status, and promote international and cross-cultural media and communities. Most of these characteristics are foreign, or run counter to print-era institutions such as libraries.

"At the same time, game cultures promote various types of information literacy, develop information seeking habits and production practices (like writing), and require good, old-fashioned research skills, albeit using a wide spectrum of content. In short, librarians can't afford to ignore gamers."

Kurt Squire & Constance Steinkuehler. Meet the Gamers. Library Journal. April 15, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:36 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

A Weblog Webliography

A Weblog Webliography includes links to interesting articles about weblogs. The articles range from authors in academics or experts on blogging and others about weblogs in education.

Kairosnews. A Weblog Webliography. April 20, 2005.

Attribution: SNTReport.com first discovered news of these weblog articles through a posting in Phil Bradley's Blog, edited by Phil Bradley.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:29 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

April 23, 2005

Expanding Role of Libraries

"The public library, once the sole keeper of knowledge - collections of books, art, papers and journals - has undergone radical changes in the new, Google world.

"The chief executive of the British Library, one of the largest national libraries in the world, said public libraries had evolved dramatically with the advent of new and emerging technologies, so the role of librarian had been refashioned too.

"Lynne Brindley said tertiary courses had adapted to this new role and now prepared students for careers in 'knowledge management' and dissemination."

Ebru Yaman. Libraries Much More Than Books. Australian IT. April 20, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:19 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Rresearchers to Help Blind Access Web

"A three-year project to improve blind access to the internet has started at Queen's University in Belfast.

"Researchers at the university are working to devise ways to guide the blind and visually impaired through the web, as part of the Enabled initiative.

"As well as schemes involving tactile display screens and audio cues, there is also the potential to use mobile devices as audio guides for the blind."

BBC News. Project to Open Internet to Blind. April 19, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:24 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

April 22, 2005

Sirsi and CCC Partner to Facilitate Permissions

Copyright Clearance Center (CCC) and Sirsi Corporation have announced a partnership that allows libraries to arrange for CCC permissions for ILL, reserves, document delivery and other uses through Sirsi's Resolver resolution system.

Resolver provides access to a variety of electronic resources, which allows enables librarians and staff accessing that electronic content to clear copyright permission directly through copyright.com. Library staff can also request permission to reuse content from within Sirsi's metasearch and OPAC services.

Sirsi Corporation. Sirsi Corporation and Copyright Clearance Center Partner to Integrate Copyright Permission Into Two Leading Library Services. April 8, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology in our New Afternoon Edition. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 12:57 PM | Send to a friend!

Evaluating Provisions of USA Patriot Act

"On December 31, sixteen portions of the USA Patriot Act are set to expire - or, in legal parlance, "sunset." Currently, Congress is holding hearings on the Act. It is considering, among other issues, whether to amend it to curb the broad surveillance powers the Act bestowed on the federal government.

"For example, under the Act, the government can now monitor an individual's web surfing records. It can use roving wiretaps to monitor phone calls made by individuals 'proximate' to the primary person being tapped. It can access Internet Service Provider records. And it can even monitor the private records of people involved in legitimate protests."

Anita Ramasastry. The Important But Flawed USA Patriot Act: Why Congress Should Allow Certain Provisions to Expire This Year. Find Law's Writ. April 20, 2005.

See also:
U.S. Senate Select Committee on Intelligence. Chairman Roberts Issues Statement on the USA PATRIOT ACT. (.pdf) April 19, 2005.

American Civil Liberties Union. Testimony of Associate Director Gregory Nojeim and Legislative Council Timothy Edgar at the Hearing on the USA PATRIOT Act of 2001 Before the Select Committee on Intelligence of the United States Senate. (.pdf) April 19, 2005.

American Civil Liberties Union. Testimony of ACLU National Security Policy Counsel Timothy H. Edgar Before the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism and Homeland Security on the USA PATRIOT Act: Effect of Sections 203 (b) and (d) on Information Sharing. April 19, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:47 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Utah's Historic Newspapers Available Online

"Thanks to new technology, digital pictures are making old newspapers readable from the comfort of your home computer.

"On Tuesday, the University of Utah's Digital Technology Division began loading onto the Internet digitized copies of 19th century editions of The Salt Lake Tribune.

"Starting today, computer users can begin reading pages of The Tribune from the 1870s. Next month, plan on pursuing The Tribune's 1880s news accounts and by early July, read and browse news stories from the 1890s."

Shinika A. Sykes. Old News is Brand New at U. Library Project. Salt Lake Tribune. April 13, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:38 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Citizens Reap Benefits of Increasing Access

"Citizens' access to federal information is increasing thanks to best practices of federal depository libraries, federal-funded community technology centers, public libraries, and the National Archives and Records Administration, according to the Office of Management and Budget."

Jason Miller. OMB Highlights Best Practices in Federal Information Dissemination. GCN.com. April 19, 2005.

See also:
Office of Management and Budget. Section 213 of the E-Government Act Report to Congress: Organizations Complementing Federal Agency Information Dissemination Programs. (.pdf) April 15, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:05 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

April 21, 2005

Universities May Sponsor Nationwide Hot Spot

"Before it was the World Wide Web, the Internet started life as DARPAnet, a nationwide computer network that connected U.S. government with the nation's leading research universities.

"Although students and faculty members at virtually all universities and many school systems routinely access the Internet through their local networks today, gaining access from remote campuses is difficult.

"That's about to change through an initiative called Education First, a cooperative effort of two educational management organizations, based in Minnesota, and two Massachusetts-based wireless technology companies working to turn the entire educational community into one giant coast-to-coast hot spot.

Carol Ellison. Education Network Seeks to Become Nation's Largest Wi-Fi Hot Spot. eWeek. April 15, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology in our New Afternoon Edition. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 12:49 PM | Send to a friend!

Japan Library Proactively Digitizes Collections

"The National Diet Library is wrestling to digitize 8.14 million books to keep pace with the age of the Internet and to prepare against major earthquakes and other natural disasters.

"The Diet library, the only archive of the legislative branch of government in Japan, has been collecting publications issued in the country since its opening in 1948.

"At the end on March 31, 2004, of fiscal 2003, its collection totaled 8.14 million, including valuable reference materials on Japanese political history."

Kyodo News. National Diet Library Working on Digitization of Books. Japan Today. April 20, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:54 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

April 20, 2005

Library Dedicated to America's Greatest President

"President Bush dedicated the first museum for Abraham Lincoln on Tuesday, a high-tech tribute to the man raised in a log cabin who went on to become arguably America's greatest president."

Tabassum Zakaria. Bush Heralds Lincoln, Dedicates Library. Reuters. April 19, 2005.

See also:
Office of the Press Secretary. President Dedicates Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum. The White House. April 19, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:44 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Impact of Electronic Documents on Libraries

"Some federal depository librarians are upset about the Government Printing Office's move to significantly cut the distribution of printed government documents.

"GPO's shift to electronic formats, which will redefine the librarians' role as government information gatekeepers, will be an issue at this weekend's Depository Library Council meeting in Albuquerque, N.M."

Aliya Sternstein. Librarians Face Existential Crisis. FCW. April 15, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:37 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

April 19, 2005

Sony to Convert Films for Digital Library

"Sony Pictures Entertainment is expected to announce today the creation of an all-digital library for its valuable video footage, the first of its kind for a major Hollywood studio.

"The library, which Ascent Media Group Inc. of Santa Monica is running with technology from Hewlett-Packard Co of Palo Alto, stores Sony's films and television shows as high-quality digital files on computers, not videotape or reels of film."

Jon Healey. Sony Is Building a Digital Library. LATimes.com. April 18, 2005.

See also:
Chris Marlowe. Sony Pictures, HP, Ascent in Digital Deal. Reuters. April 18, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:25 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

April 18, 2005

Detailed Look at Google Library Project

"The digitization of the world’s enormous store of library books—an effort dating to the early 1990s in the United Kingdom, the United States, and elsewhere—has been a slow, expensive, and underfunded process.

"But last December librarians received a pleasant shock. Search-engine giant Google announced ambitious plans to expand its 'Google Print' service by converting the full text of millions of library books into searchable Web pages.

"Most librarians and archivists are ecstatic about the announcement, saying it will likely be remembered as the moment in history when society finally got serious about making knowledge ubiquitous."

Wade Roush. The Infinite Library. Technology Review. May 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:53 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Are Libraries Still Relevant?

"'Within two decades,' says Michael A. Keller, Stanford University’s head librarian, 'most of the world’s knowledge will be digitized and available, one hopes for free reading on the Internet, just as there is free reading in libraries today.'

"Can that really be possible? If so, where exactly does it leave libraries? More important, where does it leave culture?

"On the one hand, the digital revolution represents the ultimate democratization of knowledge and information, of which Carnegie likely would have approved wholeheartedly. On the other hand, libraries perform an essential function in preserving, organizing and to some extent validating our collective knowledge."

Daniel Akst. Do Libraries Still Matter?. Carnegie Reporter. Vol 3., No.2, Spring 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:52 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Orphan Works FAQ

"What are 'orphan works,' why are they important, and why I have I heard so much about them recently?

"This FAQ is answered by Peter Hirtle, Technology Strategist and Intellectual Property Officer for Cornell University Library."

Peter Hirtle. Adopting "Orphan Works". RLG DigiNews. April 15, 2005.

Editor's note See also SNTReport.com's prior story on orphan works.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:45 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Controversy Over British Library's Wi-Fi Fees

"Wireless internet access at the British Library (BL) has come under fire after details of the service's provision emerged using the Freedom of Information (FoI) Act.

"Author and library user Heather Brooke has obtained the service agreement documents for wi-fi access at the BL, and is campaigning for costs to be slashed.

"Brooke is unhappy that wireless internet access at the St Pancras site is supplied by a private company and expensive to use."

Mark Chillingworth. British Library Wi-fi Access Under Fire. Information World Review. April 15, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:32 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

April 15, 2005

U. Minnesota Conference on Open Access

Scholarship means little without publication. But the definitions of 'publication' are undergoing major changes.

The digital age has brought unprecedented opportunities to share research discoveries with a global audience, prompting a revolution some have compared to post-Gutenberg times. Yet as the Internet and World Wide Web have unleashed new resources and capabilities, they have also challenged the conventions of how research is published and shared.

Featuring presentations by leading thinkers from the scholarly community, this conference explores:

  • Current challenges in scholarly communication and publication
  • The ways in which research is shared and exchanged
  • The role of the public university in sharing the products of research
  • Alternative publication systems, including “open access” publishing
  • Recent movements to legislate free access to the products of research
  • and
  • The changing landscape of copyright and intellectual property

University of Minnesota. Publication, the Public University and the Public Interest. Tuesday, April 19, 2005, 8:00 AM to 3:00 PM. Coffman Memorial Union, University of Minnesota (East Bank Campus), 300 Washington Avenue S.E., Minneapolis, MN.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology in our New Afternoon Edition. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 09:42 AM | Send to a friend!

Book Bites at Meet the Author

Book Bites provide webcasts featuring streaming video of authors talking about their works.

"Book Bites are NOT reviews, they are NOT written by the marketing departments of publishers - these are authors speaking from their heart - to YOU."

Meet the Author. Bringing Books to Life!

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:57 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Moore's Law Magazine Disappears from Library

"A day after Intel said it would offer $10,000 for a copy of a magazine in which Moore's Law was first announced, a University of Illinois engineering library noticed that one of its two copies had disappeared.

"There was a glaring space on the shelf where the bound volume containing the April 19, 1965, edition of Electronics Magazine sat for years, said Mary Schlembach, assistant engineering librarian at the Grainger Engineering Library at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.

"Another librarian heard a student talking on a cell phone about the volume the same day, Schlembach said. Ordinarily, the magazine is not a popular item."

Michael Kanellos. Librarians Fuming Over Intel Magazine Bounty. ZDNet. April 14, 2005.

See also:
Michael Kanellos. Intel Offers $10,000 for Moore's Law Magazine. ZDNet.

Update: BBC News. Moore's Law Original Issue Found. April 22, 2005. (A British engineer found his original copy of the magazine under floorboards.)

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:21 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

April 14, 2005

Has Google Finally Trumped the Librarian?

"Just how concerned about Google and other new technologies should academic librarians be?

"That was the essential question at the core of a Web-based panel Saturday, 'Googlelizers, Visualization, Metasearch, and Other Disruptive Search Technologies,' sponsored in conjunction with the annual meeting of the Association of College and Research Libraries."

"Richard Sweeney, university librarian at the New Jersey Institute of Technology and a proud Googlelizer, and Judy Luther, a consultant on library technology issues, both praised Google for making information more accessible to a much broader range of users. Sweeney compared searching in Google to the kind of video and other gaming that many young people do."

Doug Lederman. Google: Friend or Foe? Inside Higher Ed. April 11, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 01:33 PM | Send to a friend!

April 13, 2005

Slides from K. Matthew Dames' Lecture on Open Access

SNTReport.com executive editor K. Matthew Dames gave a lecture to information professionals at the AeA David Packard Conference Center in Washington, DC on the open access movement. The lecture, entitled "A Discussion on Open Access," was the last in a series sponsored by the Washington, DC chapter of SLA, among others, that addresses some of the most important legal and policy issues that information professionals face today.

Dames also gave the lectures for the first presentation in the series, "Licensing Digital Resources," on Wednesday, January 12, 2005, and the second presentation in the series, "Licensing Digital Resources," on Wednesday, February 9, 2005, also at the Packard Center.

Thank you to the series' sponsors: the DC Chapter of SLA, National Capitol Chapter (NCC) of AIIM, the Washington DC Chapter of SCIP, Northern Virginia Chapter of ARMA, Federal Law Librarians’ SIS, Adobe Systems Inc., and STG International.

An electronic copy of the lecture notes is posted below. All resource links are available at Seso Group LLC's del.icio.us page.

Lecture Notes
K. Matthew Dames. "A Discussion on Open Access". (.pdf) April 13, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 09:56 AM | Send to a friend!

How Google Print and Scholar Will Change Librarianship

"Within one month Google announced two projects that will have profound implications for the future of librarianship.

"First up in November 2004 was Google Scholar, which aims to provide access to scholarly materials via the crisp and familiar Google search box. Soon the Scholar buzz was overshadowed by the December announcement that Google has entered into a partnership to digitize the materials of five leading research libraries: Harvard, Oxford, Michigan, Stanford, and the New York Public Library. The principal rationale for this project is that it will democratize access to the intellectual resources of elite institutions.

"The library material represents a radical expansion of the Google Print program. Google Print continues to generate significant discussion. One recent example is the March 2005 issue of American Libraries, which features a colloquium entitled, "Google at the Gate." Because of this, it is essential that we critically examine both the benefits and shortcomings of Google Scholar and Google Print."

Marcus A. Banks. The Excitement of Google Scholar, The Worry of Google Print. Biomedical Digital Libraries. March 22, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 09:53 AM | Send to a friend!

Good News for Open Access Journals

"Despite concerns about the ethics of pay-for-play publishing, the number of open-access academic and medical journals is growing at a fast clip.

"In January, an open-access pioneer announced it would more than double the number of journals it offers. Meanwhile, Blackwell Publishing, the world's largest publisher of academic society journals, is dipping its toes into open access, and the number of free journals has grown by about 300 over the last few months.

"At least 1,525 journals provide free access, making up 5 to 10 percent of the world's journals. The free journals are gaining influence too: Thomson Scientific, which tracks academic publishing, found they're commonly cited by other journals, suggesting that they're well-read. Meanwhile, other journals are opening their archives to readers for free."

Randy Dotinga. Open-Access Journals Flourish. Wired News. April 11, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:54 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

April 12, 2005

Tagging as a New Classification System

"Melvil Dewey had it easy. In 1876, when he created his famous system of ordering information, the Dewey Decimal Classification System, there weren't Web sites, video clips or blogs. Today's digital world—where millions of items are generated on an hourly basis, and even fantastic search engines can't find all the good stuff—is tougher to organize than a herd of Democrats.

"But Internet pundits now claim a solution: let the people do the categorizing. Using a practice called tagging, we can collectively label everything from great literature to pictures of your puppy. Bye-bye, Dewey. Hello, do-it-yourself."

Steven Levy. In the New Game of Tag, All of Us Are It. Newsweek. April 18, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 11:40 AM | Send to a friend!

Computers in Libraries' Presentations Available Online

"This page features links to World Wide Web sites, PowerPoint slideshows, and other electronic resources used in support of presentations at Computers in Libraries 2005. Links are provided at the discretion of presenters. Additional links will be provided as they become available."

Information Today. Computers in Libraries 2005: Presentation Links.

Attribution: SNTReport.com first discovered news of these presentation links through a posting in beSpacific, edited by Sabrina I. Pacifici.

Editor's note See also SNTReport.com's prior story on K. Matthew Dames' presentation at the conference.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:38 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

April 11, 2005

Electronic Reserve Controversy Arises at U. California

"Publishers are objecting to an electronic reserve system at the University of California in which libraries scan portions of books and journals and make them available free online to students.

"In recent months, lawyers for the Association of American Publishers have sent letters to the university that object to the use of electronic reserves on the San Diego campus. The publishers say that the use of electronic reserves is too extensive, violating the "fair use" doctrine of copyright law and depriving them of sales.

"University officials counter that the electronic reserves at San Diego are well within the bounds of fair use. They worry that the letters portend a lawsuit."

Scott Carlson. Legal Battle Brews Over Texts on Electronic Reserve at U. of California Libraries. The Chronicle of Higher Education. April 7, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 10:20 AM | Send to a friend!

National Library Week 2005

National Library Week is underway this week and libraries throughout the nation are celebrating with special events.

The Marin County Free Library has posted several links available this week, including songs about libraries and librarians and an annotated filmography of librarians in the movies.

The Herb Society of America has posted interesting facts and quotes about libraries.

Thompson Gale is offering free access to 30 databases for library patrons this week.

LexisNexis has a has continued with a sixth edition National Library Week "Toolkit" available for libraries to promote a partnership.

Also, ebrary is offering libraries free access to a unique collection of library science titles for a year.

Attribution: SNTReport.com first discovered news of the Gale and LexisNexis promotions through a posting in LISNews.com edited by Blake Carver.

Yahoo! Finance. ebrary Supports National Library Week, Provides ALA Members with Free Access to Library Science Collection. (Press Release.) April 7, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:57 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

April 09, 2005

Slate Profiles Brewster Kahle

"Search-engine wiz and dot-com multimillionaire Brewster Kahle founded the Internet Archive in 1996 with a dream as big as the bridge: He wanted to back up the Internet. There were only 50 million or so URLs back then, so the idea only seemed half-crazy. As the Web ballooned to more than 10 billion pages, the archive's main server farm -- hidden across town in a data center beneath San Francisco's other big bridge -- grew to hold a half-million gigabytes of compressed and indexed pages.

"Kahle is less the Internet's crazy aunt than its evangelical librarian. Like it or not, the Web is the world's library now, and Kahle doesn't trust the guys who shelve the books. They're obsessed with posting new pages, not preserving old ones. Every day, Kahle laments, mounds of data get purged from the Web: government documents, personal sites, corporate communications, message boards, news reports that weren't printed on paper. For most surfers, once a page disappears from Google's cache it no longer exists."

Paul Boutin. The Archivist. Slate. April 7, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:55 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Patriot Act Specifics Not Known

"Time isn't easing concerns over the enhanced law-enforcement powers of the USA Patriot Act, judging by the debate that's firing up on Capitol Hill over the renewal of its expiring provisions.

"President Bush calls the Patriot Act an invaluable tool in the war on terror, but, until this week, little was known about where, why, or how often the law has been applied.

"At the same time, confusion persists over what the law actually does. Critics sometimes conflate Patriot Act provisions with other controversial moves, such as indefinite detentions at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, that have nothing to do with the act."

Gail Russell Chaddock. Patriot Act: What's Not Known Feeds Debate. Christian Science Monitor. April 7, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:19 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

April 07, 2005

More Patriot Act Disclosure Needed

"More information is dribbling out about the exercise of extraordinary powers granted to federal police nearly four years ago as part of the war on terror.

"As the Bush administration this week called on Congress to expand the USA Patriot Act, it disclosed how two of the most controversial sections of the law have been wielded by police."

Declan McCullagh. Feds Uncloak the Patriot Act. News.com. April 5, 2005.

See also:
National Public Radio. Senate Panel Debates Patriot Act Provisions. Day to Day. April 5, 2005.

Eric Lichtblau.Justice Dept. Defends Patriot Act Before Senate Hearings. The New York Times. April 5, 2005.

U.S. Department of Justice. Fact Sheet:USA PATRIOT ACT Provisions Set for Reauthorization. April 5, 2005.

U.S. Department of Justice. Department of Justice Releases New Numbers on Section 213 of the PATRIOT ACT. April 4, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:47 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

April 06, 2005

Archivists Campaign for NARA's Grant Program

"Archivists and historians nationwide are mounting a major campaign to stop the dismantling of the National Archives and Records Administration's grants program, which is responsible for electronic records research.

Office of Management and Budget officials slashed all funding for the 70-year-old National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) in President Bush's proposed fiscal 2006 budget. In addition to e-records research, NHPRC funds historical projects.

Aliya Sternstein. E-records Research in Jeopardy. FCW. March 28, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:37 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

April 05, 2005

Patriot Act Debate Begins This Week

"If you thought the congressional debate over Terri Schiavo was intense, wait until the one over the Patriot Act begins this week.

"Both the Senate and the House of Representatives are kicking off what promises to be a tumultuous series of hearings about whether to renew key sections of the controversial 2001 law.

"Roughly half of the law is set to expire on Dec. 31."

Declan McCullagh. The Next Chapter in the Patriot Act. News.com. April 4, 2005.

Related:
Mark Sherman. Record Number of Teror Warrants Approved. SFGate.com. April 1, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:37 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Russian Library Guilty of Copyright Infringement

"A Moscow court has found Maxim Moshkov, owner of the biggest and most popular Russian on-line library, lib.ru, guilty of breaching copyright law.

"It was the only lawsuit brought against Moshkov that has ended in success for the plaintiff."

MosNews. Russia’s Biggest Online Library Found Guilty of Breaching Copyright. MosNews.com. April 1, 2005.

See also:
CCRC Staff. Russian Courts Attack On-line Libraries. Computer Crime Research Cente. April 1, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:44 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

France Wants Rival Search Engine

"In the dimly lit cyber-café at Sciences-Po, hot-house of the French elite, no Gauloise smoke fills the air, no dog-eared copies of Sartre lie on the tables. French students are doing what all students do: surfing the web via Google.

"Now President Jacques Chirac wants to stop this American cultural invasion by setting up a rival French search-engine. The idea was prompted by Google's plan to put online millions of texts from American and British university libraries.

"If English books are threatening to swamp cyberspace, Mr Chirac will not stand idly by."

No author. Google à la française. Economist.com. March 31, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:40 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

April 04, 2005

The Power of Blogs & RSS for Educators

"The internet has long been valued by teachers and librarians as a powerful research and communications tool, and in the last 10 years, it has brought about a sea change in the way students find, manage, and use information. But the promise of the Web as more than just a readable, searchable resource has been slow to be realized ... until now.

"Two new Internet technologies, Weblogs and RSS (Real Simple Syndication), are redefining the way students and teachers use the Internet, turning them from mere readers into writers to the Web as well, and making it easier to filter and track the ever-growing number of resources coming online each day.

"In fast-growing numbers, educators across the country and throughout the world are finding just how powerful this new interactive Internet can be."

Will Richardson. Blogging and RSS — The "What's It?" and "How To" of Powerful New Web Tools for Educators. InfoToday. April 1, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:43 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Copyright Office Posts Orphan Works Comments

The U.S. Copyright Office has posted 711 unique comments in response to the "Orphan Works" inquiry.

Attribution: SNTReport.com first discovered news of these comments through a posting in Lessig Blog, edited by Lawrence Lessig.

U.S. Copyright Office. Orphan Works Comments.

See also:
Federal Register. Library of Congress, Copyright Office: Orphan Works. Jan. 26, 2005.

Editor's note See also SNTReport.com's prior story on the Orphan Works copyright circular.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:30 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Search Engine Watch Announces Awards

"The Search Engine Watch Awards recognize outstanding achievements in search via the web. The winners for accomplishments during 2004 are below:

Danny Sullivan. 5th Annual Search Engine Watch Awards. SearchEngineWatch. March 31, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:27 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

April 02, 2005

Podcast for I.T. Industry

"Scrolling through the master playlist on an iPod, one could come across the following selections: The Beatles, Duran Duran, Foghat, I.T. Conversations, The Police, Frank Sinatra ... Wait a second. I.T. Conversations? Never heard of them.

"And to date, very few people have. But it's not because the band has yet to crack the Top 40."

No author. CIOs Getting Vocal about iPods. Health Data Management. March 28, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:25 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Judiciary Committee to Analyze Patriot Act

"The tumultuous process of reviewing portions of the USA Patriot Act is about to begin. Sen. Arlen Specter, R-Penn., said Thursday that his Judiciary Committee will begin a series of three hearings starting April 5 to examine the 2001 law and consider which sections should be renewed before their Dec. 31 expiration date."

Declan McCullagh. Patriot Act to be Scrutinized. News.com. March 31, 2005.

See also:
No author. PATRIOT Act Goes Too Far. Patriot-News. March 31, 2005.

American Library Association. USA PATRIOT ACT of 2001. Aug. 31, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:55 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

March 31, 2005

RSS for Libraries

Randy Reichardt provides insight for library uses and the potential to leverage RSS technology.

Randy Reichardt. RSS: Moving Into the Mainstream. EI Updatee. March/April 2005.

Attribution: SNTReport.com first discovered news of libraries using RSS through a posting in beSpacific, edited by Sabrina I. Pacifici.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:20 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

March 30, 2005

Supreme Court Hears P2P Case

"The much-heralded Supreme Court showdown in the Grokster case today between old-fashioned entertainment and new-fangled technology found the justices surprisingly responsive to warnings from Grokster and its allies that a broad definition of copyright infringement could curtail innovation.

"Justice David H. Souter asked Donald B. Verrilli, Jr., the lawyer arguing for the Hollywood studios and the recording industry, to envision 'a guy sitting in his garage inventing the iPod.'

"That David Souter, the least technically minded of the justices, was an indication of how this confrontation of powerful interests had engaged the court.But by the end of the lively argument, any prediction about what the court will actually decide appeared perilous."

Linda Greenhouse. Justices Seem Responsive to Arguments on File Sharing. The New York Times. March 29, 2005.

See also:
John Borland. Supreme Court Takes Hard Look at P2P. News.com. March 29, 2005.

Jon Healey. Technology or Piracy? Court Asked to Draw Line. Seattle Times. March 29, 2005.

Ted Bridis. Supreme Court Weighs in on File-Sharing. ABC News. March 29, 2005.

National Public Radio. Supreme Court Weighs Online File-Sharing Case. All Things Considered. March 29, 2005.

National Pubic Radio. Slate's Jurisprudence: File-Sharing. Day to Day. March 29, 2005.

David McGuire. At a Glance: MGM v. Grokster. WashingtonPost.com. March 29, 2005.

Katie Dean. Camping Out for the Grokster Case. Wired News. March 29, 2005.

Update:
Andrew Leonard. Music Rules. Salon. March 30, 2005.

Jim Puzzanghera. Justices Wary of Barring Tools for File-sharing. San Jose Mercury News. March 30, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:54 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Net Rules Raise Awkward Political Position

"After a public outcry over government regulation of bloggers, some of Congress' most ardent campaign finance reformers have found themselves in a politically uncomfortable position.

"Three years ago, Sens. John McCain, R-Ariz., and Russell Feingold, D-Wis., persuaded their colleagues to approve a campaign finance law with no exemptions for the Internet. But because that law now requires federal regulators to take a look at bloggers, McCain and Feingold are suddenly ducking for cover.

"So, for that matter, are Reps. Christopher Shays, R-Conn., and Martin Meehan, D-Mass., the sponsors of the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act in the House of Representatives."

Declan McCullagh. Blog rolling? D.C.'s New Spin on Net Rules. News.com. March 28, 2005.

See also:
Declan McCullagh. Feds Get Set for Net Rules. News.com. March 24, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:44 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Libraries and Weblogs

"Within the miasma of the blogverse floats an ethereal blogosphere where millions of blogphiles are blogging away on their very own blogs.

"It may sound like a lot of nonsense, but that was an example of 'blog-speak,' a language that is growing as fast as the increasing interest in Weblogs."

Alyesha Asghar. Weblogs Connect People Through Journals About Everything From Book Clubs to Bands. Bluefield Daily Telegraph. March 26, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:34 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

March 28, 2005

James Madison's Papers Available Onlin

"James Madison, often called the 'Father of the Constitution,' did not think it needed a bill of rights. Public pressure was so great that he decided it would be politically necessary, so he made a speech in the First Federal Congress proposing 19 changes, 10 of which passed.

"Beginning Friday, Madison's "Notes for a Speech in Congress" of June 8, 1789, will be available online, along with about 12,000 other pages from his papers preserved in the Library of Congress."

Carl Hartman. U.S. Library to Put Madison Papers Online. ABC News. March 24, 2005.

See also:
Library of Congress. The James Madison Papers.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:27 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

March 26, 2005

Groups Seek Patriot Act Changes

"Representatives from the FBI and the privacy community on Tuesday clashed over how provisions in a 2001 anti-terrorism law known as the USA PATRIOT Act are being used to access information.

"'We at the FBI do not want your secrets, unless of course you are a terrorist or a spy,' Valerie Caproni, general counsel for the FBI, said at a conference sponsored by the American University National Security and Law Society.

"Caproni downplayed the controversy surrounding the law, which has been criticized as giving the government too much investigatory and surveillance powers."

Chloe Albanesius. FBI Official, Privacy Advocate Clash Over PATRIOT Act. GovExec. March 22, 2005.

See also:
Edward Epstein. Left and Right Unite to CChallenge Patriot Act Provisions. San Francisco Chronicle. March 23, 2005.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:35 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Librarians Battle to Digitize Perishing Images

"If the thought of backing up e-mail evokes feelings of dread, spare a thought for Australia's librarians who are racing against the clock to digitize millions of decaying photographic images before nature has its cruel way.

"While IT managers may worry about whether their document management solutions are legally up to scratch, photographic curators - charged with the safekeeping of Australia's pictorial history - have to deal with a pervading smell of vinegar as their cellulose assets shrivel and die."

Julian Bajkowski. Race Against Time to Digitize Decaying Images. ComputerWorld. March 23, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:17 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

March 25, 2005

'Pretty' Librarian Sues Harvard

"A black librarian suing Harvard for discrimination said her supervisor advised her to look for jobs elsewhere because other companies are always looking for good minority candidates.

"Denise Goodwin, 40, is suing Harvard for race and gender discrimination after being passed over 16 times in five years for higher-paying jobs. Goodwin, who earns $40,000, has been a librarian for 17 years, first at Boston College and later at Harvard beginning in 1994.

"She testified yesterday she was in shock when her boss told her she was viewed as 'just a pretty girl' who wore low-cut tops, tight pants and would never get a promotion."

J. M. Lawrence. Librarian: Harvard Boss Told Me I Was Just a Pretty Face. BostonHerald.com. March 23, 2005.

Update: BBC News. US Librarian Loses 'Sexy' Lawsuit. April 5, 2005. (A federal jury in Boston has ruled in Harvard University's favor in a discrimination lawsuit filed by a library assistant.)

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 08:49 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Leading Experts Present BlogWiki2005 Workshop

BlogWiki2005 will take place on May 19-20, 2005 in Coral Gables, Florida.

Leading experts will provide a comprehensive program featuring the emerging techonologies of blogs, Bots, Wikis and RSS/Web feed applications.

Presenters include: Gerry McKiernan, Science and Technology Librarian and Bibliographer, Iowa State University Library; Sabrina I. Pacifici, Founder, Editor, Publisher and Web Manager of LLRX.com and Author, beSpacific.com; and Marcus P. Zillman, Executive Director of the Virtual Private Library and creator of VPL White Papers and Subject Tracer™ Blogosphere.

Attribution: SNTReport.com first discovered news of the BlogWiki2005 Workshop through a posting in beSpacific, edited by Sabrina I. Pacifici.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:17 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

March 24, 2005

World's Oldest Bible to be Digitized

"On Friday 11th March, the British Library in London announced an ambitious historical international project to reinterpret the oldest Bible in the world, the Codex Sinaiticus. A team of experts from the UK, Germany, Russia, Egypt and the United States will combine efforts to make the Bible accessible to a global audience using innovative digital technology.

Eunice K. Y. Or. British Library Heads Project in Digitalising the World’s Oldest Bible. Christian Today. March 14, 2005.

See also:
The British Library. World’s Oldest Bible Goes Global: Historic International Digitisation Project Announced. (Press Release.) March 11, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:19 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

March 21, 2005

France Investigate Google-Like Digitization Effort

"Jacques Chirac told France's national library on Wednesday to draw up a plan to put European literary works on the Internet, rivaling a similar project by U.S.-based Web search engine Google.

"The French president gave the go-ahead for research into the project after Jean-Noel Jeanneney, who heads the national library, expressed concern that Google's plan to put books from some of the world's great libraries online would favor the English language."

Reuters. Paris Match for Google's Library Plan?. News.com. March 17, 2005.

Related:
Reuters. Google Book Plan Sparks French War of Words. News.com. Feb. 21, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 08:56 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

March 19, 2005

Pew Study: More Parents Use Net Filters

"More than half of American families with teenagers use filters to limit access to potentially harmful online content – a 65% increase from the number of those who used filters in 2000. But big majorities of both teens and parents believe that teens do things on the internet that their parents would not approve of."

Amanda Lenhart. Protecting Teens Online. Pew Internet & American Life Project. March 17, 2005.

Amanda Lenhart. Protecting Teens Online. (.pdf) Pew Internet & American Life Project. March 17, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:19 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

March 18, 2005

K. Matthew Dames' Presentation on Social Software

On Thursday, K. Matthew Dames, SNTReport.com's executive editor, co-chaired the "Communities & Collaboration" track at Computers in Libraries 2005. Dames also gave the first presentation in that track, "Social Software 101," which is available in .pdf format below.

Editor's Note: I was very excited about this conference because I believed that the program Steven Cohen and I created contained some of the most valuable material in the entire conference. From the feedback I have received thus far, it seems that the attendees left each session with a lot of fresh ideas about using digital collaboration tools in their workplaces. If today's organizers and speakers were able to spur some of our audience to begin testing these tools for personal use, seek to implement them in the workplace, or merely spur enough curiosity to warrant further investigation, the track was a success.

I would like to thank all the people that attended Computers in Libraries 2005, and I also would like to congratulate Information Today on its 20th year as organizer of CIL.

There are some people, however, for which I reserve a special thanks. Thank you to Will Richardson (editor of Weblogg-ed), Aaron Schmidt (editor of Walking Paper), Michael Stephens (editor of Tame the Web), Megan Fox, and Blake Carver (editor of LISNews.com) for contributing a wealth of rich content and ideas to Thursday's sessions.

Thank you to Nancy Garman, Information Today's Director of Conference Program Planning, and Jane Dysart, CIL 2005 program chair, for their organizational guidance.

And a huge thank you to Steven Cohen, editor of Library Stuff. It was an honor working with you, a pleasure to finally get to know you, and I sincerely hope we can work together again to advance the information sciences and the profession called librarianship.

K. Matthew Dames. Social Software 101. (.pdf). March 17, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 09:00 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

GuruNet's CEO Explains the Un-Search Engine

"GuruNet CEO Bob Rosenschein will be the first to tell you he doesn't have an answer for everything. Rosenschein is content with answers to the million topics included in Answers.com, GuruNet's 2-month-old reference site. If you ask Rosenschein how his piddling million topics can compare with the 8 billion pages indexed by Google, Rosenschein will revert to his mantra: Answers.com is not a search engine.

"Instead, the company--which survived an ill-fated foray into enterprise search--sees itself as an online compendium of reference sources, collecting on a single page about 100 information sources including encyclopedias, dictionaries, almanacs and search engines on topic pages about English words and notable people, places and things.

"Rosenschein insists his company isn't competing with the search engines. But even as it gets closer to Amazon.com's A9 search site and to Google itself, GuruNet is inevitably carving out a search niche of its own that could turn the company into a serious threat or a valuable acquisition target."

Paul Festa. The Answer Man. News.com. March 16, 2005.

See also:
Paul Festa. GuruNet Launches New Search Service. News.com. Jan. 3, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:47 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

March 17, 2005

A Look at Web Conferencing Services

"Imagine that only certified and trained employees could make phone calls. And that each phone call took 15 minutes to initiate and cost 75 cents a minute, plus 25 cents per person if you wanted a conference. Do you think this might bog down your business?

"That's how the vast majority of Web conferencing services, such as WebEx and Genesys Meeting Center, work. Most are difficult to use, the meter is always running, only licensed and trained organizers can create meetings, and the services are generally not conducive to spur-of-the-moment collaboration.

"For Web conferencing to move beyond sales and marketing presentations and into everyday confabs for project teams, some things need to change. In this story, we look at services that offer low, flat-rate pricing, simple interfaces, and in many cases, innovative ways to start meetings and invite participants on the fly."

Robert P. Lipschutz. Instant Meeting: Easy Web Conferencing. PC Magazine. March 2, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:54 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

March 16, 2005

Internet Transforms Library World

"Public libraries have always operated on the democratic principle that all Americans should have equal access to public information, with librarians serving as expert guides to the labyrinth of reference materials. But the Internet's emergence as a mainstay of modern life has forced the profession to rethink its role."

Anddrew Clevenger. Internet Revolutionizes Life in the Library. Times Argus. March 13, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:40 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Who Will Cover Cost For Open Access?

"If open access —a movement gaining momentum in academic publishing that proposes journal articles be made universally available online to all readers for free—becomes reality, the results could dramatically reshape the activities of all scholarly publishers, including the IEEE.

"Three events last year rocketed open access from the realm of the hypothetical to that of a hard-nosed practical concern.

"'Good or bad, open access is happening,' declares John Vig, IEEE's 2005 Vice President of Technical Activities and the past chair of the Technical Activities Board's Strategic Planning and Review Committee. 'It’s not a matter of 'if,' but 'when.'"

Trudy E. Bell. Information Free-for-All?. The Institute. March 2005.

See also/:
House of Commons Science and Technology Committee. Scientific Publications: Free For All?. (pdf). July 20, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:13 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

March 14, 2005

Congress Tackles Identity Theft Laws

"An amorphous political debate over how to respond to recent data mishaps at ChoicePoint, Bank of America and Reed Elsevier Group's LexisNexis service is beginning to take shape.

"In what could mark a turning point in the legislative process, both Democratic and Republican politicians on Thursday decried what they called poor security for Americans' personal information held by data brokers such as ChoicePoint and LexisNexis.

"During a Senate Banking committee hearing, Sen. Jon Corzine, D-N.J., said he plans to introduce a bill next week that borrows concepts from securities regulation. The measure would require 'the chairman or chief enforcement officer to attest to the effectiveness of the systems that provide for control of information' and provide notification to consumers of security breaches, Corzine said."

Declan McCullagh. Congress Edges Toward New Privacy Rules. News.com. March 10, 2005.

See also:
Declan McCullagh. Senator Predicts 'Overdue' Changes to Privacy. News.com. March 10, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:53 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

March 12, 2005

Don't Get Goggle-Eyed Over Google Project

"If you haven't heard about Google's plan to digitize millions of books, you must live in another galaxy. Hardly a news outlet in the country, digitized or no, missed the story at the end of last year.

"Most people were pleased by the news. It seemed that books would finally be available at your fingertips. Google had embarked on a grand scheme to digitize the world's greatest works, in cooperation with the world's greatest libraries. Break out the champagne!

"Not a few bean counters at colleges and universities around the world must have thought, 'At long last. We can kick the library in the archives and be done with that financial black hole.' Some librarians may have had a similar vision of the future and been dismayed, although most of them were optimistic about Google's plan."

Mary Y. Herring. Don't Get Goggle-Eyed Over Google's Plan to Digitize. The Chronicle Review. March 11, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:16 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

March 11, 2005

Debate Over Downloading

"Copyright infringement may not sound like a hot topic, but for the generation of Americans born in the Internet age, the ability to download music and films off the Internet has brought the issue front and center, along with confusion, thousands of lawsuits and now a Supreme Court case.

"The entertainment industry is suing makers of software that allow computer users to find and download files from each other's computers, not just Web sites.

"The question for the Supreme Court: How to protect copyrights without stifling the innovation that has brought new technologies such as MP3 players and TiVo?"

Terence Smith. Downloading Debate. Online NewsHour. March 7, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:48 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

March 09, 2005

Wikipedia: Open Source in Purest Form

"Four years ago, a wealthy options trader named Jimmy Wales set out to build a massive online encyclopedia ambitious in purpose and unique in design. This encyclopedia would be freely available to anyone. And it would be created not by paid experts and editors, but by whoever wanted to contribute. With software called Wiki - which allows anybody with Web access to go to a site and edit, delete, or add to what's there - Wales and his volunteer crew would construct a repository of knowledge to rival the ancient library of Alexandria.

"In 2001, the idea seemed preposterous. In 2005, the nonprofit venture is the largest encyclopedia on the planet. Wikipedia offers 500,000 articles in English - compared with Britannica's 80,000 and Encarta's 4,500 - fashioned by more than 16,000 contributors. Tack on the editions in 75 other languages, including Esperanto and Kurdish, and the total Wikipedia article count tops 1.3 million."

Daniel H. Pink. The Book Stops Here. Wired. March 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:04 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

March 07, 2005

Turn Your Screen Into a Work of Art

Can't get to the New York Public Library to view 16th-century maps of North America or Russian Civil War posters from the early 1900s?

No problem. They'll come to you via your computer.

On Thursday, the library launched its NYPL Digital Gallery, which offers 275,000 images online, from Civil War photographs to renowned manuscripts to early American maps.

Dawn Kamamoto. NY Library Hangs Gallery of Images Online. News.com. March 3, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 08:31 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

March 05, 2005

Library Offers Audio Books on iPod Shuffle

"Checking out a new iPod now applies to more than shopping trips or web browsing. This week the South Huntington Public Library on Long Island, New York, became one of the first public libraries in the country to loan out iPod shuffles.

"For the past three weeks, the library ran a pilot program using the portable MP3 devices to store audio books downloaded from the Apple iTunes Music Store. They started with six shuffles, and now are up to a total of 10. Each device holds a single audio book.

Cyrus Farivar. Library Shuffles Its Collection. Wired News. March 3, 2005.

See also:
National Public Radio. iPod Shuffle at a Public Library. Talk of the Nation. March 3, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:03 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

PATRIOT Act Ruling Overdue

"Nearly 15 months have passed since U.S. District Judge Denise Page Hood promised a prompt ruling on whether an important challenge to part of the USA Patriot Act should proceed.

"Back in July 2003, several Muslim community groups and the American Civil Liberties Union challenged Section 215 of the post-9/11 law, which broadened the federal government's ability to obtain secret surveillance and search warrants. Back on Dec. 3, 2003, Hood heard oral arguments on the Justice Department's motion to dismiss the case.

"At the time, Hood said she understood the importance of the case. Yet still, she has not ruled."

No author. PATRIOT ACT: Court Ruling on Key Section is Long Overdue. Detroit Free Press. Feb. 25, 2005.

See also:
American Civil Liberties Union. PATRIOT Act Fears Are Stifling Free Speech, ACLU Says in Challenge to Law.

Related
John Darling. Librarians, FBI Official Debate the Patriot Act. Mail Tribune. March 3, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:44 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

March 03, 2005

Hush is the Word on Google's Digitization Project

"Beyond vague talk about Google having developed a much more efficient process, the project's specifics are secret. At Harvard, for instance, Google won't allow reporters to visit or photograph the scanning currently being done -- of 40,000 volumes as a kind of pilot project, just to make sure the books don't get damaged or lost -- at the university library's 5-million-volume off-campus storage facility.

"But the aims seem transparent enough. It will bring to the masses these great research institutions, full of books one would normally need a plane ride and permission to access, and make them as easy to search for and within as a particular city's restaurant listings."

Steve Johnson. How Google Will Scan the World, 1 Book at a Time. Chicago Tribune. Feb. 25, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 08:39 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

March 02, 2005

ALA President-Elect Calls Out Bloggers

"I had heard of the activities of the Blog People and of the absurd idea of giving them press credentials. I was not truly aware of them until shortly after I published an op-ed piece in the Los Angeles Times ("Google and God's Mind," December 17, 2004). Then, thanks to kind friends with nothing but my welfare in mind, I rapidly learned more about the blog subcultures.

"My piece had the temerity to question the usefulness of Google digitizing millions of books and making bits of them available via its notoriously inefficient search engine. In the eyes of bloggers, my sin lay in suggesting that Google is OK at giving access to random bits of information but would be terrible at giving access to the recorded knowledge that is the substance of scholarly books.

"It is obvious that the Blog People read what they want to read rather than what is in front of them and judge me to be wrong on the basis of what they think rather than what I actually wrote."

Michael Gorman. Revenge of the Blog People!. Library Journal. Feb. 15, 2004.

Related:
Kevin Drum. Google and the Human Spirit. Washington Monthly. Dec. 17, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 08:47 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

February 24, 2005

A New View of the News

"Want to stay up on the latest news but think Google News is dry and boring? For something a little more visual, try 10x10. The site lets viewers scour the top headlines using photos, which combine to create a broad snapshot of the world every hour on the hour.

"News at a glance has never been so literal, thanks to information architect Jonathan Harris, 25, creator of the site. 10x10 takes the most common words from major news outlets like BBC World Edition and New York Times International and couples them with pictures. The site lets users interactively search for the top stories by scrolling over pictures and the words associated with them.

"The idea for 10x10's design and ever-changing content came to Harris while traveling in Greece. He started to wonder "what a moment in the world would look like," and it was from this question that he came up with the idea for 10x10."

David Cohn. A Fluid Look at the News. Wired News. Feb. 21, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:42 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

February 23, 2005

Groups Challenge Broadcast Flag Rules

"Mike Godwin, the legal director for Public Knowledge, a digital-rights advocacy group in Washington, is a fan of Showtime's new drama series 'Huff.' So three weeks ago, when he missed the season finale, he decided to download it to his personal computer.

"To Mr. Godwin, the time-consuming download (and the file's poor quality) indicated that the rampant piracy of digitized broadcast programs - a threat Hollywood has long warned against - was hardly imminent. But to the Federal Communications Commission and the Motion Picture Association of America, cases like this one suggest a future of widespread illegal file-sharing that must be stopped before it begins."

"The debate will be presented in oral arguments tomorrow before the District of Columbia Circuit for the United States Court of Appeals in a lawsuit brought by Public Knowledge and others against the F.C.C., challenging a new regulation that is intended to prevent such bleeding of television content onto the Internet."

Tom Zeller Jr. Federal Effort to Head Off TV Piracy Is Challenged. News.com. Feb. 21, 2005.

See also:
Ed Felton. Broadcast Flag in Court. Freedom to Tinker. Feb. 21, 2005.

Electronic Frontier Foundation. Broadcast Flag "Just As Important As Grokster". Deep Links. Feb. 18, 2005.

Electronic Frontier Foundation. EFF's HDTV-PVR Cookbook. No date

Update: Declan McCullagh. Court Questions FCC's Broadcast Flag Rules. News.com. Feb. 22, 2005. (A federal appeals court questions whether the FCC has authority to undertake such sweeping regulation.)

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:49 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Librarians Value Online Communities

"Last February I was introduced to Bob Spence from the Carnegie Library in Ballinger, TX. Ballinger is a town of about 4000, smack-dab in the middle of the state. Right off, Spence told me he'd been 'cramming to learn the how-tos' ever since he'd started in his new role as library director, only six months before.

"In subsequent months, Spence shared his goal to have Ballinger's library become "the most practical public library in West Texas." He asked for advice on involving his library board, cataloging relevant web sites, and, in true Texas form, his struggle with 'wearing so many hats.'

"Since the onslaught of Internet services, all librarians have been struggling to incorporate new types of information, formats, and skills into our work, for both ourselves and our patrons. We exercise our professional skills, judgments, expertise, and even "share" an awful lot online, but perhaps we've missed an important point in all the technology hubbub—one that's fundamental to our ethics and practice in librarianship: we must be present and connected with our patrons and each other. What if we were all 'here, listening and learning,' like Bob Spence, in our online community?"

Chrystie R. Hil. Everything I Need To Know I Learned Online. Library Journal. Feb. 15, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:30 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

NGA Considers Restricting Access to Maps

"Officials at the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency want to bar the public from viewing the agency's aeronautical and navigational data and publications, a decision that has upset many who use that information. Some librarians, commercial mapmakers and public-interest group members say they will launch a campaign to retain access.

"Without seeking public comment, NGA officials announced plans in November 2004 to stop selling and distributing the aeronautical and navigational data because of copyright concerns and worries about terrorist attacks. Last December, however, they said they would seek comments before making a final decision.

"Jim Mohan, an NGA spokesman, said the agency is considering the action partly because an increasing number of foreign source providers are claiming intellectual property rights or warning agency officials that they intend to copyright their source material."

Frank Tiboni. A Publishing Dilemma. FCW. Feb. 7, 2005.

See also:
National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency. NGA Invites Public Comment on Proposal to Remove Aeronautical Information from Public Sale and Distribution. (.pdf) (Press Release.) Dec. 3, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:09 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Researchers: IM Creates New Field of Linguistics

"We love instant messenger for the little pleasures it provides: workday diversions, covert flirting opportunities, parental contact with an easy out.

"But communicating using instant messenger, text messaging, even blogging are changing the way humans communicate. The technologies have opened up a whole new field of linguistic studies, and researchers say the impact will be as significant as the advent of the telegraph and telephone.

"Traditional linguists fear the internet damages our ability to articulate properly, infusing language with LOLs, dorky emoticons and the gauche sharing personal information on blogs. But some researchers believe we have entered a new era of expression."

Kristen Philipkoski. The Web Not the Death of Language. Wired News. Feb. 22, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:31 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

February 21, 2005

10 Copyright Myths Explained

"An attempt to answer common myths about copyright seen on the net and cover issues related to copyright and USENET/Internet publication.

"Note that this is an essay about copyright myths. It assumes you know at least what copyright is -- basically the legal exclusive right of the author of a creative work to control the copying of that work. If you didn't know that, check out my own brief introduction to copyright for more information."

Brad Templeton. 10 Big Myths About Copyright Explained. Templeton.com. No date.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:35 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

February 18, 2005

Next Generation Web Searches

"In less than a decade, Internet search engines have completely changed how people gather information. No longer must we run to a library to look up something; rather we can pull up relevant documents with just a few clicks on a keyboard. Now that 'Googling' has become synonymous with doing research, online search engines are poised for a series of upgrades that promise to further enhance how we find what we need.

"New search engines are improving the quality of results by delving deeper into the storehouse of materials available online, by sorting and presenting those results better, and by tracking your long-term interests so that they can refine their handling of new information requests.

"In the future, search engines will broaden content horizons as well, doing more than simply processing keyword queries typed into a text box. They will be able to automatically take into account your location--letting your wireless PDA, for instance, pinpoint the nearest restaurant when you are traveling. New systems will also find just the right picture faster by matching your sketches to similar shapes. They will even be able to name that half-remembered tune if you hum a few bars."

Javed Mostafa. Seeking Better Web Searches. ScientificAmerican.com. Feb. 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:54 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Questel-Orbit Introduces New International Patent Database

"Questel-Orbit recently announced the release of FamPat, the family-based version of its international patent database PlusPat. An interesting feature of FamPat is that it gives searchers a choice of how broad a patent family they may display. Subject-searchable elements include:

"First, some background. Like PlusPat, FamPat has probably the broadest country and time coverage of any subject-searchable patent database. It covers 75 patenting authorities, and some countries go back to the early 20th century (or even earlier: Germany goes back to 1877). The very early records only have numeric information. However, this includes ECLA classes in some cases, so they can be retrieved in subject searches."

  • title and abstract text and (for some French patents) indexing terms
  • ECLA (European Patent Office) classifications, as applied by the EPO, including the ICO (in computer only) classes that cover non-inventive and other aspects of the patent
  • U.S. patent classes as applied by the USPTO
  • International Patent Classes as applied by most countries’ patent offices

Nancy Lambert. Announcing FamPat, A New International Patent Database from Questel-Orbit. Information Today. Feb. 14, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:46 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

February 16, 2005

Online Social Networks 2005

"Online Social Networks 2005, going on now through February 23rd, is a summit for all those interested in working with social networking processes, tools, and media. In addition to attending many workshops, panels, and presentations by leading experts and practitioners, attendees will have the opportunity to be part of a community with a significant role in defining the future direction of online social networking.

"During the OSN2005 summit a manifesto will be created and published describing what is wanted and needed from online social networking tools.

"Attendees will be invited to participate in a series of focus groups to provide feedback on current OSN technology and articulate specific suggestions for future features and developments. A series of White papers based on these focus groups will be shared with venture investors who want to know where to place their bets in this industry."

Online Conference. Online Social Networks 2005. Feb. 9-23, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:56 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

February 14, 2005

The Need for Information Literacy

"Information literacy seems to be a phrase whose time has come. Last month, the Educational Testing Service announced that it had developed a test to measure students' ability to evaluate online material. That suggested an official recognition that the millions spent to wire schools and universities is of little use unless students know how to retrieve useful information from the oceans of sludge on the Web.

"Clearly, 'computer skills' are not enough. A teacher of Scandinavian literature at Berkeley recently described how students used the Web to research a paper on the Vikings: 'They're Berkeley students, so, of course, they have the sense to restrict their searches to 'vikings NOT minnesota.' But they're perfectly willing to believe a Web site that describes early Viking settlements in Oklahoma.'

"But there is a paradox in the way people think of the Web. Everyone is aware that it teems with rotten information, but most people feel confident that they can sort out the dross.

"That level of confidence may not be justified, particularly when a search for information requires judging a Web site's credibility."

Geoffrey Nunberg. Teaching Students to Swim in the Online Sea. The New York Times. Feb. 13, 2005.

See also:
Deborah Fallows. Search Engine Users: Internet Searchers are Confident, Satisfied and Trusting – But They are Also Unaware and Naïve. (.pdf) Pew Internet & American Life Project. Jan. 23, 2005.

Editors note: See also SNTReport.com's prior story story on literacy assessment.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:49 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

February 12, 2005

Best Search Tools Chart

Best Search Tools Chart compares features of the best web search tools, including selected search engines, meta-search engines, and subject directories.

Joe Barker. Best Search Tools Chart. Infopeople Project. Jan. 11, 2005.

See also:
Joe Barker. Best Search Engines Quick Guide. Infopeople Project. Jan. 11, 2005.

Joe Barker. Best Search Tools. Infopeople Project. Jan. 11, 2005.

Attribution: SNTReport.com first discovered news of the Best Search Tools Chart through a posting in beSpacific , edited by Sabrina I. Pacifici.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:56 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

February 10, 2005

Slides from K. Matthew Dames' Lecture on Licensing

As reported Wednesday in SNTReport.com, executive editor K. Matthew Dames gave a lecture to information professionals at the AeA David Packard Conference Center in Washington, DC on licensing digital information. The lecture, entitled "Licensing in the Digital Age," was the second in a series sponsored by the Washington, DC chapter of SLA, among others, that addresses some of the most important legal and policy issues that information professionals face today.

Dames will moderate the lecture for the next presentation in the series, "Digital Rights Management," on Wednesday, March 9, 2005, also at the AeA David Packard Center in Washington, DC. Those interested in attending the March 9 lecture may register online at the AIIM National Capitol Chapter website, or contact organizer Barbie Keiser.

An electronic copy of the lecture notes, as well as additional resources, are posted below.

Lecture Notes
K. Matthew Dames, "Licensing in the Digital Age." (.pdf). Feb. 9, 2005.

Additional Licensing Resources
Yale University Library. Liblicense: Licensing Digital Information; A Resource for Librarians.

Yale University Library. Licensing Terms & Descriptions.

Yale University Library. Definitions of Words and Phrases Commonly Found in Licensing Agreements.

Florida State University. Software Site Licensing.

International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions. Licensing Principles.

Ed Foster. Ed Foster's Gripelog.

Information Access Alliance.

Creative Commons.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 08:58 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

February 09, 2005

K. Matthew Dames Gives Presentation on Licensing

K. Matthew Dames, executive editor of SNTReport.com, is presenting a talk in Washington, DC on Wednesday entitled "Licensing in the Digital Age." The talk will review the key terms and conditions of modern licenses and discuss how the trend toward licensing threatens the viability of federal copyright law. Today's presentation is part of a brown bag lecture series on information law and policy issues that Dames is moderating throughout the winter and early spring of 2005.

Series Description: Once a legal backwater that interested only specialists, information law issues are now considered central to the nation’s communications, legal and economic infrastructure. While information law is more important than ever, information professionals often lack the necessary knowledge and tools to navigate the thicket of laws, regulations, treaties and policies.

This brown bag luncheon series will address some of the most important legal and policy issues that information professionals face today. Sponsored by the DC Chapter of SLA, National Capitol Chapter (NCC) of AIIM, the Washington DC Chapter of SCIP, Northern Virginia Chapter of ARMA, Federal Law Librarians’ SIS, Adobe Systems Inc., and STG International, this series will identify information professionals’ responsibilities, providing a forum for discussing and resolving some of the profession’s most important issues, sharing resources for further research and problem-solving.

The sessions will be moderated by K. Matthew Dames, JD, MLS, an information policy expert who teaches information law at Syracuse University’s School of Information Studies. A comprehensive set of handouts will be created for each topic and posted to the DC/SLA website and SNTReport.com.

Schedule: Join us on the second Wednesday of each month, January through April 2005, as we explore copyright, fair use, licensing digital resources, digital rights management, and open access.

Session 2, February 9, 2005: Licensing Digital Resources
As more of the world’s information is created or accessed through digital means, licensing agreements take over where copyright leaves off. Therefore, it is essential to know the basics of licensing. During this second session, we will discuss the licensing agreement, including:
- What to consider before entering a license agreement;
- Basic contract law and important licensing clauses and terms, including terms of access and termination;
- Licensing’s affect on copyright law.

Session 3, March 9, 2005: Digital Rights Management
With the increase in digital information comes the increase in measures to protect it. Some of the protections, however, may take away your rights under existing law. During this session, we will discuss the importance of digital rights management (DRM), including:
- What is Digital Rights Management and how does it relate to copyright law, including the Digital Millennium Copyright Act?
- The technology of DRM: Selected tools for authentication, authority, access, and accountability; and
- What are the costs associated with rights management?

Session 4, April 13, 2005: Open Access
The recent consolidation of the publishing industry has been a large factor in the price rise of scholarly resources, and has hurt the ability of libraries and information centers to provide users with essential information. The fourth and final brown bag session will discuss the open access crisis, including:
- A review of key mergers and acquisitions;
- The role of licensing and DRM in open access issues;
- Local control over scholarly and self-publishing: Open archives initiatives (e.g., eprints, eScholarship Repository, LOCKSS);
- Responses by the information profession, including the Information Access Alliance.

Site & Registration Details:The brown-bags will begin promptly at 12 noon (12:00 pm – 2:00 pm) at the AeA David Packard Conference Center, 601 Pennsylvania Ave., NW, North Bldg - Suite 600 (Metro: Archives/Navy Memorial) in Washington, DC. Space is limited, so register early at the AIIM National Capitol Chapter website, or contact series organizer Barbie Keiser.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 08:59 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

February 07, 2005

NIH Calls for Speedy Net Access to Research

"The U.S. National Institutes of Health, which spent nearly $20 billion last year funding research, urged scientists on Thursday to let the agency publish their studies on the Internet.

"Researchers receiving NIH grants should send their manuscripts to a free, Web-based archive managed by the National Library of Medicine as soon as they can, after first submitting them to medical or scientific journals, NIH director Dr. Elias Zerhouni said."

Maggie Fox. NIH Asks for Internet Access to Studies. Reuters. Feb. 3, 2005.

See also:
National Institutes of Health. NIH Calls on Scientists to Speed Public Release of Research Publications. (Press Release.) Feb. 3, 2005.

National Public Radio. NIH to Deliver Free Access to Research. All Things Considered. Feb. 3, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:58 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

February 05, 2005

Trademark Document Retrieval System Now Online

"The Patent and Trademark Office is now making official trademark application files, including decisions by trademark examining attorneys, available online.

"The milestone is part of PTO’s effort to make the trademark registration process fully transparent to the public on the PTO Web site, the Commerce Department agency announced Friday.

"The Trademark Document Retrieval system (TDR) provides an electronic portal for viewing, downloading and printing an array of information and documents as Adobe Portable Document Format files. All told, the system has more than 460,000 trademark applications totaling more than 8 million document pages."

Mary Mosquera. PTO Puts Trademark Application Files Online. GCN. Jan. 31, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:13 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Education Dept. Lists Accredited Colleges

"The Education Department released an online list of accredited colleges and universities Tuesday, as part of the fight against diploma mills and federal employees who present fraudulent credentials.

"The Web site that houses the list was unveiled during a press conference on Capitol Hill, where a string of lawmakers and federal officials said that some federal workers have used fake degrees to get promotions or higher pay. Diploma mills are schools that sell degrees, but do not have a genuine academic curriculum. The Education Department list is designed to be used by personnel officials to research schools on applications and résumés."

David McGlinchey. Education Unveils Database of Accredited Schools. GovExec.com. Feb. 2, 2005.

See also:
Patience Wait. OPM, Education Take Action on Diploma Mills. GCN. Feb. 1, 2005.

Joanne Kenen. U.S. Opens Campaign Against Fake 'Diploma Mills'. Reuters. Feb. 1, 2005.

Ryan Singel. Database Fights Diploma Mills. Wired News. Feb. 2, 2005.

Federal Trade Commission. Avoid Fake-Degree Burns By Researching Academic Credentials. Jan. 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:03 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

February 04, 2005

Libraries Position in a Google World

"Librarians just need to look at the latest announcements from Google to see why the Chinese character for change is the combination of the characters for danger and opportunity

"In the past 18 months we've seen the arrivals of Google Scholar (see 'Google in the Academic Library,' Online Databases, p. 32), Google Print, Google News, Google Alerts, Google Deskbar, Google Desktop Search, Google Library Digitization Project, Google Suggest, Google Local with Keyhole (maps), Google Gmail, Google Orkut, Google Picasa (digital photo organizer), and on and on. For two years Google has also been snapping up new technology companies—from blogging software to a global positioning system—while also investing in Baidu, China's largest search engine.

"Google has accomplished a lot in five years and now has the infusion of capital to accomplish more. Can libraries compete, complement, or cooperate? Or will we lose out? It's still our choice, but not for long. Here are ten key things your institution, your library, and you can do in a Google world."

Stephen Abram. The Google Opportunity. Library Journal. Feb. 1, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:48 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

February 03, 2005

Library Allows Users to Copy E-Books

"For audio-book addicts, the King County Library System has something for you and you don't even have to set foot in a library.

"Last November, the county library became the first in the nation to allow people to download audio 'e-books' to home computers.

"An e-book can be downloaded from the library's Web site onto a computer and either burned to a CD or transferred to an MP3 player.

"For free."

Susan Gilmore. King County Library Lets You Copy its E-books. The Seattle Times. Jan. 31, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:19 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

January 31, 2005

Correcting Copyright

"Who owns the words you're reading right now? if you're holding a copy of Bookforum in your hands, the law permits you to lend or sell it to whomever you like. If you're reading this article on the Internet, you are allowed to link to it, but are prohibited from duplicating it on your web site or chat room without permission.

"You are free to make copies of it for teaching purposes, but aren't allowed to sell those copies to your students without permission. A critic who misrepresents my ideas or uses some of my words to attack me in an article of his own is well within his rights to do so.

"But were I to fashion these pages into a work of collage art and sell it, my customer would be breaking the law if he altered it. Furthermore, were I to set these words to music, I'd receive royalties when it was played on the radio; the band performing it, however, would get nothing. In the end, the copyright to these words belongs to me, and I've given Bookforum the right to publish them. But even my ownership is limited."

Robert S. Boynton. Righting Copyright. Bookforum. Feb./March. 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:48 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

January 26, 2005

Copyright Office Publishes Circular on Copying

"Many educators and librarians ask about the fair use and photocopying provisions of the copyright law. The Copyright Office cannot give legal advice or offer opinions on what is permitted or prohibited.

"However, we have published in this circular basic information on some of the most important legislative provisions and other documents dealing with reproduction by librarians and educators."

U.S. Copyright Office. Reproduction of Copyrighted Works by Educators and Librarians. (.pdf) April 29, 2004.

Attribution: SNTReport.com first discovered news of this copyright circular through a posting in LISNews edited by Blake Carver.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:38 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

January 21, 2005

NIH Revises Open Access Plan

"An ambitious proposal to make the results of federally funded medical research available to the public quickly and for free has been scaled back by the National Institutes of Health under pressure from scientific publishers, who argued that the plan would eat into their profits and harm the scientific enterprise they support.

"The initial plan, encouraged by Congress and hailed by patient advocacy groups, called for the results of NIH-funded research to be posted on a publicly accessible Web site within six months after they are published in a scientific journal. Most research results now are available only by subscription to the journal -- at a cost that often reaches into the thousands of dollars -- or on a pay-per-article basis that can cost $100 or more for two or three articles.

"In the final version of the plan, however, the recommended six-month deadline for posting results has been stretched to a year. That change has angered many advocates of public access, who have argued it isn't fair that taxpayers must either wait or ante up to see the results of research they have already paid for."

Rick Weiss. NIH Revises Plan for Quick, Free Access to Study Results. WashingtonPost.com. Jan. 18, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:37 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

January 20, 2005

Current State of Copyright Framework

As reported in SNTReport.com recently, BayTSP announced FirstSource, an automated system that identifies the first users to upload copyright or trademark-protected content to P2P file sharing networks.

SNTReport.com also reported the legal and monetary issues surrounding documentary filmmaker's inability to broadcast or sell copies of Eyes on the Prize.

"The two news items offer a nice pair of brackets in which to frame the current state of copyright affairs. On the one hand, the public is denied the opportunity to view one of the most compelling histories of modern American life produced in the last 30 years because copyright restrictions make it financially unfeasible to broadcast it. On the other hand, actual copyright violation continues unabated, giving rise to an entire market niche devoted to the task of stamping it out. Is there any way to look at this situation in which it is not a complete mess?"

"The tragedy that a socially enriching documentary series like 'Eyes on the Prize' might fall victim to a copyright snafu seems like the kind of thing that could be addressed by selective tweaking of copyright laws. Perhaps a waiver for materials deemed 'educational' or a weakening of restrictions on the protections granted to archival footage. When do the benefits to society from increased access to information outweigh the financial interests of those who own the copyrights? In an ideal world, this is the kind of question that a democratic society could debate and answer to its own satisfaction."

"But we do not live in an ideal world. We live in a world where lobbyists for entertainment corporations routinely get the laws rewritten to serve their own profit-seeking special interests, and where trend lines reveal that copyright protections are only increased, never weakened."

Andrew Leonard. Eyes on Your Copyrighted Prize. Salon. Jan. 5, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: Salon.com normally requires a paid subscription, but you can view articles if you register for a free day pass.)

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:47 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

FexIT: Icelandic Business Search Engine

"On January 6 2005 Sigridur Kristjansdottir and Sigurdur Arnorsson issued a press release about their new search service FexIT. It is a specialized search service targeted at the business sector.

"FexIT has several different points of entry on the start page and it seems a lot of time and effort has gone into making a good user interface."

Lars Våge. FexIT -- Business Oriented Search Service from Iceland. Pandia. Jan. 11, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:22 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

January 19, 2005

Pew Survey Evaluates Future of Internet

"Technology experts and scholars foresee a bigger role for the internet in people's personal and work lives in the next decade.

"A wide-ranging survey of technology leaders, scholars, industry officials, and analysts finds that most internet experts expect attacks on the network infrastructure in the coming decade as the internet becomes more embedded in everyday and commercial life.

"In addition, there was notable agreement among the 1,286 experts in this survey that in the next 10 years the internet will be more deeply integrated in our physical environments and high-speed connections will proliferate – with mixed results. They believe the dawning of the blog era will bring radical change to the news and publishing industry and they think the internet will have the least impact on religious institutions.

Pew Internet and American Life Project. Internet Evolution. Jan. 9, 2005.

Susannah Fox, et al. The Future of the Internet. (.pdf) Pew Internet and American Life Project. Jan. 9, 2005.

Pew Internet and American Life Project.Technology Experts and Scholars Foresee a Bigger Role for the Internet in People's Personal and Work Lives in the Next Decade. (Press Release) Jan. 9, 2005.

See also:
Princeton Survey Research Associates. Internet Experts Web Survey. (.pdf) Dec. 6, 2004.

Elon University/Pew Internet and American Life Project. Predictions Database. Imagining the Internet. Jan. 9, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:55 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Enterprise Blogging

"Weblogs can take many different forms, any of which might be appropriate for enterprise blogging. They may be a one-way form of communication, where users simply read the 'posts' of the blog owners.

"Alternatively, blogs can be a two-way medium of communication (between
owners and their readers) or they can be the basis of a community in which all readers of the blog can contribute on an equal footing. Each of these options has its place.

"There is very little research related to enterprise blogging; the commercial applications of blogging are mostly unproven as yet. There are, on the other hand, many articles and papers written by enthusiasts or early adopters. While this literature contains many useful ideas, there is little evaluative material, so though we know that enterprises have used blogs for various purposes, we don't
necessarily know whether or not those blogs achieved the purposes for which they were created."

Laurel A. Clyde. Enterprise Blogging. FreePint. Jan. 13, 2005.

Attribution: SNTReport.com first discovered news of Enterprise Blogging through a posting in Library Stuff, edited by Steven M. Cohen.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:43 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

January 18, 2005

Does California's Anti-Spware Law Include Libraries?

"The Consumer Protection Against Computer Spyware Act (.pdf) went into effect in California on January 1st. Although this is already being proclaimed as a model for the country, it was signed by Governor Schwarzenegger in spite of objections raised by privacy advocates.

"Beth Givens (Director, Privacy Rights Clearinghouse -- and former librarian) and Pam Dixon (Exec. Director, World Privacy Forum) say that the law sets such high standards regarding actual knowledge that it could actually undermine existing statutes that protect privacy and prohibit deceptive practices.

Mary Minow. How Does California's New Anti-Spyware Law Affect Libraries?. Library Law Blog. Jan. 5, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:52 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

January 17, 2005

Copyright Could Be Killing Culture

"As Americans commemorate Martin Luther King Jr. and his legacy today, no television channel will be broadcasting the documentary series Eyes on the Prize. Produced in the 1980s and widely considered the most important encapsulation of the American civil-rights movement on video, the documentary series can no longer be broadcast or sold anywhere.

"Why?

"The makers of the series no longer have permission for the archival footage they previously used of such key events as the historic protest marches or the confrontations with Southern police. Given Eyes on the Prize's tight budget, typical of any documentary, its filmmakers could barely afford the minimum five-year rights for use of the clips. That permission has long since expired, and the $250,000 to $500,000 needed to clear the numerous copyrights involved is proving too expensive.

"This is particularly dire now, because VHS copies of the series used in countless school curriculums are deteriorating beyond rehabilitation. With no new copies allowed to go on sale, 'the whole thing, for all practical purposes, no longer exists,' says Jon Else, a California-based filmmaker who helped produce and shoot the series and who also teaches at the Graduate School of Journalism of the University of California, Berkeley."

Guy Dixon. How Copyright Could be Killing Culture. The Globe & Mail. Jan. 17, 2005.

See also:
Katie Dean. Bleary Days for Eyes on the Prize. Wired News. Dec. 22, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 09:00 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

January 15, 2005

Google, Libraries & Privacy Issues

"As you have no doubt heard by now, five major libraries have agreed to let Google digitize all or part of their collections.

"Nowhere in the press have any librarians or academics expressed concerns about privacy issues. Google has the capacity, the history, and the intention of tracking the browsing habits of anyone and everyone who visits any of their sites. Since its inception, Google has used a cookie with a unique ID in it that expires in 2038. They record this ID, along with the IP address, the search terms, and a time/date stamp, for everyone who searches at Google.

"To make matters worse, Google never comments on their relations with officials in the dozens of countries where they operate. Google even required the libraries to sign nondisclosure agreements."

Daniel Brandt. Google, Libraries, And Privacy. Webpronews.com. Jan. 12, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:42 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Corporate Library Weblogs

The latest isssue , the newsletter of the Information Technology Division of the Special Libraries Association features an article on Corporate library blogging.

An overview of points are provided to consider when starting a corporate library weblog.

"Does your library need one? And, if so, what type of content is your library going to be placing on the blog?

"What sense is there to having a blog, especially those that are for public consumption, if there is no one to read it?"

Steven Cohen. Corporate Library Blogs. (.pdf) B/iTE. Nov./Dec. 2004.

Attribution: SNTReport.com first discovered news of these points to consider for a corporate library blog through a posting in Library Stuff, edited by Steven M. Cohen.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:17 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

January 14, 2005

Slides from K. Matthew Dames' Lecture on Fair Use

As reported in SNTReport.com on Wednesday, executive editor K. Matthew Dames gave a lecture to information professionals at the AeA David Packard Conference Center in Washington, DC on the fair use doctrine of copyright law. The lecture, entitled "Fair Use in the Digital Age," was the first in a series sponsored by the Washington, DC chapter of SLA, among others, that addresses some of the most important legal and policy issues that information professionals face today.

Dames will also give the lecture for the next presentation in the series, "Licensing Digital Resources," on Wednesday, February 9, 2005, also at the AeA David Packard Center in Washington, DC. Those interested in attending the February 9 lecture may register online at the AIIM National Capitol Chapter website.

An electronic copy of the lecture notes, as well as additional resources, are posted below.

Lecture Notes
K. Matthew Dames, "Fair Use in the Digital Age." (.pdf). Jan. 12, 2005.

Additional Fair Use Resources
Laura "Lolly" Gasaway. When Works Pass into the Public Domain.

Peter Hirtle. Copyright Term and the Public Domain in the United States.

United States Copyright Office.

United States Copyright Office. Copyright Law.

Stanford University Libraries. Copyright & Fair Use.

University of Texas. Fair Use of Copyrighted Materials.

SNTReport.com. Copyright Archives.

Copyright Management Center. Fair Use Issues.

Copyright Management Center. Fair Use Checklist.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 08:59 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Clean Up the Copyright System

"Last month, Google announced a partnership with major research libraries to scan 20 million books for inclusion in Google's search database. For those works in the public domain, the full text will be available. For those works still possibly under copyright, only snippets will be seen.

"But the excitement around Google's extraordinary plan has obscured a dirty little secret: It is not at all clear that Google and these libraries have the legal right to do what is proposed.

"If lawsuits were filed, and if Google and its partner libraries were found to have violated the law, their legal exposure could reach into the billions."

Lawrence Lessig. Let a Thousand Googles Bloom. Los Angeles Times. Jan. 12, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:51 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

LOC Posts Civil War Maps Online

"Civil War buffs are getting access to a trove of information: thousands of original maps and diagrams of battles and campaigns between 1861 and 1865, all posted on the Internet.

"The Library of Congress is posting 2,240 maps and charts and 76 atlases and sketchbooks, while the Virginia Historical Society and the Library of Virginia are adding about 600 items. Much of the collection is online now; the rest will be posted by spring.

"The documents depict troop positions and movements, as well as fortifications. There also are reconnaissance maps, sketches and coastal charts and theater-of-war maps."

Carl Hartman. Civil War Maps Posted Online. Seattle Times. Jan. 11, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:12 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Lawmakers Push Bills for Library Filters

"Two Virginia lawmakers are pushing bills that would require any public library that receives state funds to install filtering software on its computers.

"The legislation is necessary to protect children from unwittingly stumbling across pornography while using the Internet at their local libraries, said the House bill's sponsor, Del. Samuel Nixon, Jr., R-Chesterfield. Nixon said his bill would be identical to one already filed by Sen. Mark Obenshain, R-Harrisonburg.

"Nixon introduced his plans for the bill at a Monday press conference for the Family Foundation, which unveiled its legislative agenda for the upcoming General Assembly session that also backs a state constitutional ban on same-sex civil unions."

Kristen Gelineau. Bill Aims to Filter Internet Content at State Libraries. dailypress.com. Jan. 10, 2005.

See also:
Christina Bellantoni. Virginia Considers Requiring Library Computer Filters. Washingtontimes.com. Jan. 11, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:50 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

PLoS to Launch Additional Open-Access Journals

"The Public Library of Science, a pioneering U.S. non-profit publisher of open access journals, will launch three new journals this year.

" Part of an ambitious plan to transform scientific publishing, PLoS launched PLoS Biology in 2003 and PLoS Medicine in 2004, both with the support of the Gordon and Bettie Moore Foundation. Next up are PLoS Computational Biology, PLoS Genetics, and PLoS Pathogens.

"PLoS is partnering with the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB) to publish PLoS Computational Biology. The journal, now accepting submissions, is scheduled to launch in June 2005. PLoS Genetics, also now accepting submissions, will launch in July 2005. PLoS Pathogens will begin accepting submissions in March 2005 and begin publishing in autumn of 2005."

No author. PLoS to Launch New Journals. Library Journal. Jan. 11, 2005.

See also:
Public Library of Science. Public Library of Science to Launch Additional Open-Access Journals. (Press Release.) Jan. 6, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:30 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

January 12, 2005

K. Matthew Dames Gives Presentation on Fair Use

K. Matthew Dames, executive editor of SNTReport.com, is presenting a talk in Washington, DC this afternoon entitled "Fair Use in the Digital Age." The talk will analyze Section 107 of the copyright law, including where fair use falls within the copyright landscape, how information professionals can properly analyze the law, and how the nature of fair use has changed as the dominant information format has evolved from analog to digital. Today's presentation is part of a brown bag lecture series on information law and policy issues that Dames will be moderating throughout the winter and early spring of 2005.

Series Description: Once a legal backwater that interested only specialists, information law issues are now considered central to the nation’s communications, legal and economic infrastructure. While information law is more important than ever, information professionals often lack the necessary knowledge and tools to navigate the thicket of laws, regulations, treaties and policies.

This brown bag luncheon series will address some of the most important legal and policy issues that information professionals face today. Sponsored by the DC Chapter of SLA, National Capitol Chapter (NCC) of AIIM, the Washington DC Chapter of SCIP, Northern Virginia Chapter of ARMA, Federal Law Librarians’ SIS, Adobe Systems Inc., and STG International, this series will identify information professionals’ responsibilities, providing a forum for discussing and resolving some of the profession’s most important issues, sharing resources for further research and problem-solving.

The sessions will be moderated by K. Matthew Dames, JD, MLS, an information policy expert who teaches information law at Syracuse University’s School of Information Studies. A comprehensive set of handouts will be created for each topic and posted to the DC/SLA website and SNTReport.com.

Schedule: Join us on the second Wednesday of each month, January through April 2005, as we explore copyright, fair use, licensing digital resources, digital rights management, and open access.
Session 1, January 12, 2005: Copyright & Fair Use
The copyright doctrine of fair use has become critically important in the digital age, yet it remains one of copyright law’s most misunderstood and misapplied doctrines. During this first luncheon meeting, we will analyze what fair use means, including:
- Translating the law into plain English
- Establishing a system for determining whether fair use applies
- Discussing whether fair use remains viable given the changes in the law over the last decade.

Session 2, February 9, 2005: Licensing Digital Resources

Session 3, March 9, 2005: Digital Rights Management

Session 4, April 13, 2005: Open Access

Site & Registration Details:The brown-bags will begin promptly at 12 noon (12:00 pm – 2:00 pm) at the AeA David Packard Conference Center, 601 Pennsylvania Ave., NW, North Bldg - Suite 600 (Metro: Archives/Navy Memorial) in Washington, DC. Space is limited, so register early at the AIIM National Capitol Chapter website.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 08:59 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Bio Med Central Responds to Open Access Myths

"In the evidence presented to the House of Commons Science and Technology Committee Inquiry into Scientific Publications, many dubious arguments have been used by traditional publishers to attack the new Open Access publishing model.

"Below, BioMed Central responds to some of the most prevalent and most misleading anti-Open Access arguments."

Jonathan B Weitzman. (Mis)Leading Open Access Myths. Open Access Now. No date.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:04 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

January 10, 2005

A Decade of Federal Web Content

"At just over ten years of age, the U.S. federal government’s external web presence is maturing, if not yet mature. Federal government agencies are using their websites as serious, central communications channels rather than as showy supplements to older channels such as printed publications, paper correspondence, or telephone hotlines.

"Gone are the exciting 'Information Highway' days of the 1990s when researchers watched anxiously for news of agencies coming online one by one, each with a small chunk of content, often on a pilot basis. It was a bumpy road, with some agencies speeding away, others stalling, and all generally headed in different directions.

"Today, researchers travel a relatively more predictable route. We assume that a federal agency has a web site, that certain categories of information will be available, and that certain tools for finding that information will be provided. It is a good time to take stock of exactly what these sites have to offer. What follows is an alphabetical list of content that researchers can expect to find on federal, executive branch websites, and where on the site they can expect to find it."

Peggy Garvin. The Federal Web: Content at the Ten-year Mark. LLRX.com. Dec. 27, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:44 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Sony, Matsushita Release Electronic Book

"They have fought over DVDs, digital cameras, MP3 players and flat-screen televisions. Now Japan's gadget makers have chosen a new battleground for 2005: the electronic book.

"Technology companies and science-fiction writers have been predicting the death of paper for decades, and they have always been wrong. Until now, people have happily stuck to books despite the digital age because books still represent the cheapest and easiest-to-read medium for words.

"But Sony and Matsushita, the two largest consumer electronic companies, believe they may have turned the corner in driving the humble book to extinction."

Leo Lewis. Latest Thing in Hi-Tech: A Book. Times Online. Jan. 1, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:46 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

January 08, 2005

Topix.net Adds Area Start-Up Channels

"Topix.net, the Palo Alto Web service that provides local news, continues to punch above its tiny weight. The company has only eight employees but has grabbed a lot of attention by linking up local news content it pulls from the Web with relevant local advertising.

"At www.topix.net/startups, Topix pulls in news on about 2,500 area start-ups, a great reference for entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, accountants and others. It crawls 10,000 online news and other sources.

"The list of the 2,500 start-ups is supplied by another company, LinkSV, which is also free, allows you to search profiles of each of the 2,500 start-ups. It includes information like name and biographical details of key executives, a business focus summary, names of board members, venture capital backing, company contact info and names of customers. Topix is offering a related channel that tracks press releases from any of the same 2,500 start-ups, at www.topix.net/startups/pr."

Matt Marshall. Topix Offers Start-up, VC News Sites. San Jose Mercury News. Jan. 4, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:00 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

January 07, 2005

Internet Archive to Build Google Alternative

"Ten major international libraries have agreed to combine their digitised book collections into a free text-based archive hosted online by the not-for-profit Internet Archive. All content digitised and held in the text archive will be freely available to online users.

"Two major US libraries have agreed to join the scheme: Carnegie Mellon University library and The Library of Congress have committed their Million Book Project and American Memory Projects, respectively, to the text archive. The projects both provide access to digitised collections.

"The Canadian universities of Toronto, Ottawa and McMaster have agreed to add their collections, as have China's Zhejiang University, the Indian Institute of Science, the European Archives and Bibliotheca Alexandrina in Egypt."

Mark Chillingworth. Internet Archive to Build Alternative to Google. Information World Review. Dec. 21, 2004.

See also:
Internet Archive. International Libraries and the Internet Archive Collaborate to Build Open-Access Text Archives. Dec. 15, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:55 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Entertainment Industry Sees Piracy as Major Threat

"People working in the entertainment industry see digital piracy as a major threat to their businesses, according to a new study by ,In-Stat/MDR.

"In a survey of film and TV industry workers, nearly half said illegal theft of entertainment content threatened their bottom lines, In-Stat said Tuesday. About 27 percent of those surveyed said they had already lost revenue because of piracy. The survey was taken by 1,806 people working in the variety, broadcasting, cable and news sectors.

"The entertainment industry is trying to grapple with illegal downloading of music from the Internet, as well as file sharing and the use of peer-to-peer software. These efforts got a boost last month, when the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to hear a case on whether companies that produce file-sharing software can be held legally responsible when people use their products to swap copyrighted material.

Dinesh C. Sharma. Piracy Hits Hollywood in the Wallet. News.com. Jan. 4, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:43 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

January 06, 2005

There's No Escaping the Blog

"Freewheeling bloggers can boost your product - or destroy it. Either way, they've become a force business can't afford to ignore.

"The blog - short for weblog - can indeed be, as Scoble and Gates say, fabulous for relationships. But it can also be much more: a company's worst PR nightmare, its best chance to talk with new and old customers, an ideal way to send out information, and the hardest way to control it. Blogs are challenging the media and changing how people in advertising, marketing, and public relations do their jobs. A few companies like Microsoft are finding ways to work with the blogging world;even as they're getting hammered by it. So far, most others are simply ignoring it.

"That will get harder: According to blog search-engine and measurement firm Technorati, 23,000 new weblogs are created every day - or about one every three seconds. Each blog adds to an inescapable trend fueled by the Internet: the democratization of power and opinion. Blogs are just the latest tool that makes it harder for corporations and other institutions to control and dictate their message. An amateur media is springing up, and the smart are adapting. Says Richard Edelman, CEO of Edelman Public Relations: 'Now you've got to pitch the bloggers too. You can't just pitch to conventional media.'"

David Kirkpatrick and Daniel Roth. Why There's No Escaping the Blog. Fortune. Jan. 10, 2005.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:49 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

January 05, 2005

Information Today Analyzes Google's Digitization Project

"Librarians, academicians, journalists, information industry pundits, and real people continue to ring in with comments, concerns, quarrels, and commendations for Google’s new library program. 'This is the day the world changes,' said John Wilkin, a University of Michigan librarian working with Google. 'It will be disruptive because some people will worry that this is the beginning of the end of libraries. But this is something we have to do to revitalize the profession and make it more meaningful.'

"When asked whether Google is building the library to replace all other libraries, Google representatives—after saluting the role of librarians—said they had 'no such plans at the moment. There was too much work to do.'

"Here is a roundup of some of the questions asked and answers posited."

Barbara Quint. Google’s Library Project: Questions, Questions, Questions. InformationToday.com. Dec. 27, 2004.

See also:
Mary Minow. Google-Watchers - Want Privacy Guarantees Before Handing Over Library Books for Google Digitization. LibraryLaw Blog. Dec. 16, 2004.

Gary Price. Google Partners with Oxford, Harvard & Others to Digitize Libraries. Search Engine Watch. Dec. 14, 2004.


SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 08:52 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

GuruNet Launches Answers.com

"GuruNet--a reference service that bypasses search engines to yield succinct information on terms in any document--launched a new Web site Monday that it insists will not compete with Google.

"GuruNet, a New York-based, publicly traded company with a research and development unit in Jerusalem, gained attention in 1999 for its desktop application that made any word in a document searchable with a single click.

"Now, after an unsuccessful foray into the enterprise search market, the company has returned to its consumer roots by retiring its subscription service in favor of an ad-supported revenue model and launching Answers.com, a Web site that will allow people to access its information warehouse without downloading the GuruNet application."

Paul Festa. GuruNet Launches New Search Service. News.com. Jan. 3, 2005.

See also:
Gary Price. GuruNet Becomes Answers.com and Is Now Available Free!. Search Engine Watch. Jan. 3, 2005.

Walter S. Mossberg. GuruNet as a Reference Tool Goes Beyond Search Engines. WSJ.com. March 6, 2003.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:19 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

January 04, 2005

2004 Search Engine Trends

"So, 2004 turned out to be a very exciting search engine year, after all. For a moment, one could believe that we were moving into an era with a virtual Google monopoly, and monopolies are seldom good for innovation.

"Instead there has grown up new alternatives. Competition is as fierce as ever, and given that both users and stockmarkets reward innovation, there has been a large number of refinements, new services and new products."

No author. Search Engine Trends in 2004. Pandia. Dec. 31, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:51 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

January 03, 2005

The Management & Logistics of Digitization Projects

"Susan Wojcicki's grandmother, a librarian for more than 30 years, ran the Slavic department at the Library of Congress. Now Wojcicki is overseeing Google Inc.'s ambitious plan to digitize the collections of five top libraries: Stanford, Harvard, Oxford, the University of Michigan and the New York Public Library.

"The project eventually will allow any Internet user anywhere in the world to search inside millions of volumes, seeing the pages exactly as they appear in the originals, complete with illustrations, charts and photos.

"The logistics involved are staggering."

Carolyn Said. Digitizing Books: A Mountainous Task for Google. SeattlePI.com. Dec. 24, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 08:49 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

A Look Back at 2004

"In the legislative battle over copyright and file swapping, you might assume the entertainment industry's lobbyists are sitting fat and pretty.

"Nothing could be further from the truth, and the constellation of forces in Washington could be ripe for a redrawing, said Declan McCullagh--one of the many columnists who offered CNET News.com readers insight and analysis of the major tech events of 2004."

Charles Cooper. Year in Review:Politicos in the Crosshairs. News.com. Dec. 25, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:54 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

December 23, 2004

Time Magazine's Complete Archive Online

"Today, Time magazine released their complete archive (full text of all article back to 1923) on the web. Access is free for Time subscribers. The archive is located at: http://www.time.com/time/magazine/archives.

"The archive also allows the user to browse covers and find what covered appeard on a specific date."

Gary Price. Complete Searchable Archive of Time Magazine Now Available. SearchEngineWatch. Dec. 20, 2004.

Time Magazine. TIME Launches Archive: Magazine's Articles Since 1923 Now Online. Yahoo! News. (Press Release) Dec. 20. 2004.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:47 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Broadband Age Has Arrived

"In 2004, broadband reached its tipping point.

"In August, a study conducted by Nielsen/NetRatings shows more Americans accessing the Internet through a high-speed connection than through slower dial-up by a ratio of 51 to 49. The gap will only increase as providers entice the U.S. dial-up base. DSL offers cheaper subscriptions than cable, which promises higher speeds.

"This study only concluded that Americans want their broadband. Americans want their broadband by any means necessary. The events of the past year also show they are willing to look beyond their phone or cable company to get it."

Jim Hu. Year in Review: Dawning of the Broadband Age. News.com. Dec. 20, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:48 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

December 22, 2004

Google Won't Replace Libraries

"This week Google Inc. down in Mountain View, wading in dough from its stock offering, announced it would use some of the money to put millions of volumes from the country's great libraries online where anybody can use them.

"Don't burn that library card just yet, though.

"There's a catch. Well, several. First, as anyone trying to send Grandma's recipe for plum pudding to a sister in Des Moines knows, scanning takes time. Google claims to have a new whiz-bang way to do it -- there won't be some luckless employee feeling her brain cells die as she flattens a book on a cranky copier page by page. It won't say exactly what its method is.

"For a company bent on putting the universe at the disposal of anyone who can type words into a box, it seems less enthusiastic about information flowing out of its headquarters in Mountain View."

Adair Lara. 'Googleizing' Libraries Won't Replace Books. San Francisco Chronicle. Dec. 18, 2004.

See also:
No author. Here's What You Will - and Won't - Be Able to See When Searching for Library Books on Google. Detroit Free Press. Dec. 15, 2004.

George Kerevan. Despite Google, We Still Need Good Libraries. Scotsman.com. Dec. 16, 2004.

National Public Radio. Google's Plan Prompts a Question: What's on the Web?. Talk of the Nation. Dec. 15, 2004.

Matt Hicks. Google's Library Project Could Drive Content Contest. eWeek. Dec. 14, 2004.

Andrew Leonard. What Google Promises Us. Salon. Dec. 14, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: Salon.com normally requires a paid subscription, but you can view articles if you register for a free day pass.)

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:50 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

December 21, 2004

W3C Delivers Web Architecture Overview

"The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) this week published a final version of its 'Architecture of the World Wide Web, Volume 1' document, looking to set forth codified principles for the Web itself.

"Published as a formal W3C recommendation, the architecture features components for URIs (Uniform Resource Identifiers), data formats, and protocols such as HTTP.

"'The purpose of this document is [to serve as a guide] if you need to know everything about the Web in 50 pages, in a sense,' said Dan Connolly, member of the W3C Technical Architecture Group."

Paul Krill. W3C Publishes Web Architecture. InfoWorld. Dec. 16, 2004.

See also:
World Wide Web Consortium. World Wide Web Consortium Issues "Architecture of the World Wide Web, Volume One" as a W3C Recommendation. (Press Release) Dec. 15, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:17 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

December 20, 2004

Eight Copyright Myths Exposed

"A handful of myths have spawned practices, particularly among bloggers and Website owners, that turn copyright law on its head. These myths are rooted in the assumption that everything is up for use online unless and until proven otherwise. Those myths and that ease have fostered a presumption of entitlement that causes Netizens to treat the Internet (and non-electronic sources as well) as a buffet spread of photos, articles, sounds and multi-media files free for the plucking and posting.

"Despite all the media attention to recent lawsuits cracking down on unauthorized music downloads, these myths are still in surprisingly widespread circulation. In the past six months, otherwise educated people have asserted eight different fallacies to me as if they were law. Every one of them has the potential to lead the ill-informed into the land of copyright infringement, where even a short stay can carry a whopping price tag.

"Note: The discussion below will use the term 'permission' to include both explicit permission from the copyright holder and any legally imputed permission, whether due to the work being in the public domain or through fair use, the exercise of the special reproduction right granted to libraries and archives under 17 U.S.C. Section 108, or the limited instructional exemption granted by 17 U.S.C. Section 110. Also, this discussion addresses only works created in the United States or otherwise subject to U.S. copyright law."

Kathy Biehl. Bloggers Beware: Debunking Eight Copyright Myths of the Online World. LLRX.com. Dec. 16, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:41 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

December 18, 2004

Can IBM Build a Google for Businesses?

"IBM is building software it hopes will make it the Google of corporate-search technology.

"Big Blue has been quietly working on data storage software designed to greatly improve the ability of companies to find business documents scattered across their networks, Janet Perna, the general manager of IBM's information management group, told CNET News.com.

"The new software, along with other information-retrieval products IBM already has, underscores the company's shift out of low-cost hardware, notably PCs, and into higher-margin software and services. The move is meant to accelerate IBM's transition from a relational database company into a provider of a full range of information management software, Perna said."

Martin LaMonica. Can IBM Be A Google for Businesses?. News.com. Dec. 13, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:11 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

December 17, 2004

P2P Trade Group Fights Child Porn

"A peer-to-peer industry trade group is launching a Web site aimed at educating consumers about the dangers of child pornography online and helping them report it to law enforcement.

"The Distributed Computing Industry Association's P2P Patrol site will go live Monday, as part of a larger approach to the issue, DCIA Chief Executive Officer Marty Lafferty said.

"Previously, the group has worked with law enforcement to help find online child pornographers and has helped create a tool that pops up a warning to computer users if they are searching for a term frequently associated with the illicit material."

John Borland. P2P Group Launches Site to Combat Child Porn. News.com. Dec. 12, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:33 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

December 16, 2004

Film Group Sues DVD Jukebox Maker

"A Hollywood-backed technology group is suing a high-end home theater system company, contending that its home DVD jukebox technology is illegal.

"The DVD Copy Control Association, the group that owns the copy-protection technology contained on DVDs, said a company called Kaleidescape is offering products that illegally make copies of DVDs. The company, which has won several recent consumer electronics awards, said it has worked closely with the DVD CCA for more than a year, and will fight the suit, filed Tuesday.

"Kaleidescape creates expensive consumer electronics networks that upload the full contents of as many as 500 DVDs to a home server, and allow the owner to browse through the movies without later using the DVDs themselves. That's exactly what the copy-protection technology on DVDs, called Content Scramble System (CSS) was meant to prevent, the Hollywood-backed group said."

John Borland. Hollywood Allies Sue DVD Jukebox Maker. News.com. Dec. 7, 2004.

See also:
Tina Harlan. Home Theater Maker Kaleidescape Hit with Copyright Suit. E-Commerce Times. Dec. 9, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:40 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

December 15, 2004

Major Libraries, Google Partner to Digitize Collections

"Five prestigious university and public libraries have reached agreement with Google Inc. to digitize millions of volumes in their collections and make portions of the text available for free to computer users online, the search giant plans to announce today.

"The collaboration is likely to rekindle debate about the extent to which books should be available on the Internet. Some publishers worry that such efforts will depress sales. But the libraries say online access can be a boon to researchers and a benefit to people who do not have access to high-quality collections.

"Initially, some of the libraries plan to make available the full text of books that are in the public domain while offering snippets or excepts of books protected by copyright."

David A. Vise. Google to Digitize Some Library Collections. WashingtonPost.com. Dec. 14, 2004.

Cynthia L. Webb. Google -- 21st Century Dewey Decimal System. WashingtonPost.com. Dec. 14, 2004.

See also:
Hiawatha Bray. Google to Index Works at Harvard, Other Major Libraries. The Boston Globe. Dec. 14, 2004.

Gary Price. Google Partners with Oxford, Harvard & Others to Digitize Libraries. Search Engine Watch. Dec. 14, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:50 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Google Offers Suggestion Search Tool

"Google has launched a new feature that tries to guess what people are looking for as they type queries into a search box.

"Google Suggest quietly debuted this week on the company's Labs site, which showcases Google features that 'aren't quite ready for prime time,' according to a message on the site. When someone starts typing a request into the search box, a drop-down menu appears with suggestions as to what that person could be looking for.

"Google uses 'a wide range of information' to predict queries, according to an FAQ, including data about the overall popularity of various searches. The company does not use individual search histories to help generate the prompts, it says."

Margaret Kane. Google Offers a Suggestion. News.com. Dec. 10, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:10 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Senate Approves Telecom Package

"As its final act of 2004, the U.S. Senate late Wednesday night approved a telecommunications package that includes reopening the E-Rate financial pipeline and creating a federal agency spectrum relocation fund. Lawmakers also authorized matching grants for state E-911 program enhancements.

"In the wake of charges of fraud and abuse in the federal E-Rate program, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in August moved to shore up the accounting practices associated with the fund, which provides financial support for schools and libraries to connect to the Internet.

"Part of the changes involved forcing the E-Rate fund to have enough upfront cash to cover its commitments, even if payments were not due until 2005. The new accounting rules forced the Universal Service Administrative Company (USAC), which administers the program, to delay more than $400 million in payments to schools and libraries."

Roy Mark. Senate Approves Last Minute Telecom Package. InternetNews.com. Dec. 9, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:44 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

December 14, 2004

High Court to Hear MGM-Grokster case

"The Supreme Court, accepting urgent pleas from the recording and film industries, agreed on Friday to decide whether the online services that enable copyrighted songs and movies to be shared freely over the Internet can be held liable themselves for aiding copyright infringement.

"For the entertainment industry and for everyday consumers, the case is likely to produce the most important copyright decision since the Supreme Court ruled in 1984 that the makers of the videocassette recorder were not liable for violating the copyrights of movies that owners of the devices recorded at home.

"The earlier decision, Sony Corporation of America v. Universal City Studios, ushered in one technological revolution. The new case, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios v. Grokster Ltd., No. 04-480, comes as another is already well under way. More than 85 million copyrighted songs and a smaller but rapidly growing number of movies are downloaded from the Internet every day by people using file-sharing services."

Linda Greenhouse. Justices to Hear Case on Sharing of Music Files. The New York Times. Dec. 11, 2004.

See also:
John Borland. Supreme Court to Hear P2P Case. News.com. Dec. 10, 2004.

Ashlee Vance. The Supremes Prep for P2P Battle Royal. The Register. Dec. 10, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:49 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Search Engine Strategies in Chicago

"Marketers and technologists will converge on Chicago next week for Search Engine Strategies, a trade show focused on the intensely competitive search industry.

"Search services are locked in a features war as they battle to grab market share or hold onto what they've got. It's been a dizzying quarter for marketers, Web publishers, online retailers and technologists trying to keep up with the shifting landscape.

"Workshops at the conference will explain search engine marketing, working with agencies and optimizing Web sites for the various search engines."

Susan Kuchinskas. Hot Search Engine Strategies in Cold Chicago. InternetNews.com. Dec. 10, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:32 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Blogs Gain Political Influence

"Internet blogs are providing a new and unregulated medium for politically motivated attacks. With the same First Amendment protections as newspapers, blogs are increasingly gaining influence.

"While many are must-reads for political junkies, are some Internet blogs also being used as proxies for campaigns? In the nation’s hottest Senate race, this past year, the answer was yes.

"Little over a month ago, the first Senate party leader in 52 years was ousted when South Dakota Republican John Thune defeated top Senate Democrat Tom Daschle. While more than $40 million was spent in the race, saturating the airwaves with advertising, a potentially more intriguing front was also opened.

David Paul Kuhn. Blogs: New Medium, Old Politics. CBS News. Dec. 8, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:55 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

December 13, 2004

Libraries Go Virtual

"The newest books in the New York Public Library don't take up any shelf space. They are electronic books - 3,000 titles' worth - and the library's 1.8 million cardholders can point and click through the collection at www.nypl.org, choosing from among best sellers, nonfiction, romance novels and self-help guides.

"For years, library patrons have been able to check card catalogs online and do things like reserve or renew books and pay overdue fines. Now they can not only check out e-books and audiobooks but view movie trailers and soon, the actual movies.

"And they can do it without setting foot in the local branch."

Tin Gnatek. Libraries Reach Out, Online. The New York Times. Dec. 9, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 08:49 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

December 09, 2004

Reflections on the 108th Congress

At the Chicago Association of Law Libraries November meeting, Mary Alice Baish, American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) Associate Washington Affairs Representative, spoke on "The 108th Congress Draws to an End: the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly."

"I’d like to give you an overview of our core issues during the past two years—from the perspective of what was good, what was bad, and what was really ugly.

"I’m going to cover them under four broad categories: First, appropriations. Second, copyright and digital rights management. Third, the USA Patriot Act. And fourth, access to government information."

Mary Alice Baish. The 108th Congress: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly. (.pdf) American Association of Law Libraries. Nov. 17, 2004.

Attribution: SNTReport.com first discovered news of Mary Alice Baish's presentation through a posting in LibraryLaw Blog, edited by Mary Minow.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:47 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Wi-Fi Enables Creative Applications

"Wi-Fi networks can help companies dependent on older technologies leapfrog intermediate steps and go right to the cutting edge.

"Some companies and industry sectors are finding the use of Wi-Fi to be a helpful way to leap ahead to cutting edge technology while skipping intermediary steps saving time and money.

"Just ask Robert Israel, the CIO at the two John C. Lincoln hospitals in Phoenix, Ariz. Thanks to a Wi-Fi network he installed last year in one of the two hospitals, the CIO feels like he's leapt forward several thousands of centuries -- from using an over-head paging system to using voice-activated portable communicators that run off a wireless network."

Jeanette James. Wi-Fi: From the Stone Age to Star Trek. CIO Update. Dec. 1, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:57 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Blogs Increase Reach, Foster Communities

"Blogs, says Charlie O'Donnell, are frequently updated, personal journals posted on the Web - think Web plus log equals blog. Bloggers with similar interests end up finding one another, linking to and often posting responses on one another's blogs. Hence communities form.

In the past six months, O'Donnell, 24, an equities analyst in Manhattan, has identified 40 to 50 bloggers in the venture capital field he likes to keep up with. The snippets, rumors, hypotheses he gets from them help him stay ahead of the crowd. 'I don't want to wait three months' he says, 'before the mainstream media - no offense - finds out about a new technology.' (Thanks, Charlie.)

"He also authors a blog himself on his Web site, www.find mypath.com, where he shares career advice with college students. He tells them how they can research their chosen fields by reading blogs written by 'thought leaders' in their industries. And, indeed, much can be gained - information on trends, companies that are expanding, advice on getting a job - as long as young people master the basics of networking, with the first rule being: Thou shalt not come right out and do the 'help-me, help-me' needy thing and ask people for jobs."

Patricia Kitchen. Blogging Bluepoint. Newsday.com. Dec. 5, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:07 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

December 08, 2004

World's Largest Free Full-Text Science Archives

"While government agencies, academics, and publishers debate over whether or not publicly funded research results should be freely available, Stanford University’s HighWire Press has been doing its part in taking responsibility for the Open Archive.

"Participating HighWire-hosted publishers have been steadily growing the world’s largest collection of open access, high-impact scholarly research online.

"Today, more than 780,000 free peer-reviewed, full-text articles are available at www.highwire.org. This open archive covers a wide range of not-for-profit titles. Over 90% of the articles in the government repository are already available for free in their complete context (the entire online journal, not just individual articles), with advanced full-text searching and toll-free reference linking, through HighWire."

No author. Free eJournal Archive Passes 3/4 Million Mark. Managing Information. Dec. 1, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:52 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

China's Tenuous Relationship With the Internet

"As the number of people online in China has quintupled over the last four years, the government has shown itself to be committed to two concrete, and sometimes competing, goals: strategically deploying the Internet to economic advantage, while clamping down - with surveillance, filters and prison sentences - on undesirable content and use.

"Both trends, experts say, are likely to continue.

"China is already the largest mobile communications subscriber market in the world, with more than 320 million subscribers. Internet users - who numbered fewer than 17 million in 2000 - are now estimated to be somewhere near 90 million, according to the China Internet Network Information Center, the government's clearinghouse for Internet statistics. China is second only to the United States in the number of people online, and the 90 percent of its total population around 1.3 billion who are not online still represents a vast, untapped market. "

Tom Zeller Jr. Beijing Loves the Web Until the Web Talks Back. The New York Times. Dec. 6, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:32 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

The Internet: A Tool for Information

"Two things are certain when thinking about the Internet as a tool for business journalists. One is that it is indispensable. The other is that it is challenging.

"There is no single magical principle or method of discovery that will lead you every time to the most relevant material precisely when you need it. That would be like batting 1.000.

"But I would like to offer up 10 ideas to keep in mind when you approach the Internet as a source of information."

Ira Chinoy. The Internet as a Reporting Tool. Society of American Business Editors & Writers. No date.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:16 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

December 07, 2004

"W3C10" Gathering Looks Back, Looks Forward

"Internet luminaries gathered in Boston Wednesday to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), honor its founder, Director and Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee, and look forward to another decade of innovation.

"Speakers at the gathering recounted, in sometimes excruciating detail, the events leading to the creation of the Web and the W3C, which has promoted a long line of key Web standards, including HTML (Hypertext Markup Language) and XML (Extensible Markup Language). Experts, including representatives of leading technology firms, also looked forward to future developments backed by the W3C, including the Semantic Web, which will allow users to access and connect more types and sources of data online.

"Berners-Lee was the star of the gathering, and he used the occasion to focus attention on W3C's ongoing work, including the Semantic Web, a World Wide Web extension that greatly expands the information types and relationships between information that can be represented online."

Paul Roberts. W3C Focuses on Future at 10th Anniversary Meeting. InfoWorld. Dec. 2, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:35 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

December 06, 2004

Firefox Uses Creative Commons Search Engine

"There are probably not many that are familiar with the new search engine for finding material online that can be used without paying royalty or clearing copyright issues. Finding this kind of material is naturally of great interest to e.g. people in the media who need to know if they can use a given text, photo or stream etc. without risking a lawsuit.

"Since September a beta version of a Creative Commons search engine has been available that lets you search for just this kind of thing.

"This new search engine has not been launched in a big way, but in the new web browser FireFox 1.0 from Mozilla, it has high visibility: In the search box in the upper right corner, the Creative Commons search engine is right there among Google, Yahoo!, Amazon, Ebay and Dictionary.com!"

Lars Vage. Creative Commons Search Engine in the New FireFox. Pandia. Dec. 2, 2004.

See also:
Creative Commons. Creative Commons Unique Search Tool Now Integrated into Firefox 1.0. (Press Release) Nov. 22, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:49 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

December 04, 2004

Topic Maps for Smarter Search

"Databases and search engines provide instantaneous access to endless information about anyone or anything, but the search results often include as many misses as hits. To generate more-relevant answers, organizations including the federal government are using topic maps to index their data.

"Topic maps are smart indices that improve search capabilities by categorizing terms based on their relationships with other things. For example, William Shakespeare is a topic that would be mapped to essays about him, his plays and his famous quotes.

"Organizing content with topic maps provides context for words that can have multiple meanings, according to Patrick Durusau, chairman of a topic maps technical committee at OASIS, the Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards."

John Gartner. Searching Smarter, Not Harder. Wired News. Nov. 30, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:25 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Iran Agrees to Share Library Materials

"U.S. and Iranian officials have signed an agreement to share library materials, giving scholars in America their first access to such items from Iran since Islamic militants took over the U.S. Embassy there in 1979.

"The agreement, signed Nov. 4, authorizes exchange of books and periodicals, information on research technology, cooperation on preserving old manuscripts, exploring invitations to one another to take part in fairs, exhibitions and cultural programs including films and music.

"The Library of Congress has six regional offices abroad that acquire material from more than 60 countries. Iran has not participated since its Islamic revolution of 1978-79."

Carl Hartman. U.S., Iran to Share Library Materials. Yahoo! News. Nov. 30, 2004.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:29 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

December 03, 2004

PR Newswire Presents Online Seminar/Panel Discussion

PR Newswire will present a free webcast on December 14 at 3 p.m. (EST) entitled 'Leveraging Search for Greater Impact in your Public Relations Programs.'

"Since the advent of the Internet, the opportunity for PR practitioners to target their messages directly to consumers, influencers, and investors has grown exponentially.

"Today, the real power of the Internet lies in its search engines. The ability for search engines to connect media, consumers, customers, stakeholders and influencers - or 'pre-qualified' audiences - directly with the content they seek offers the PR industry a much untapped, but extremely effective means for delivering information to those people most likely to act."

Attribution: SNTReport.com first discovered news of this online seminar/panel discussion through a posting in Micro Persuasion, edited by Steve Rubel.

PR Newswire. Leveraging Search for Greater Impact in Your Public Relations Programs. MultiVu. No date.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:42 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Redesigned Law & Regulation Web Service Unveiled

"Legal and business publisher Pike & Fischer Inc., a subsidiary of The Bureau of National Affairs, Inc., unveiled its redesigned Internet Law & Regulation web service today at www.ilrweb.com.

"The newly redesigned service, known as 'ILR' to its subscribers, provides legal practitioners with a state of the art search engine and a more user-friendly interface, enhancing the industry's widest selection of cyberlaw content.

"ILR provides comprehensive coverage of legal developments affecting e-business, including court opinions and proprietary case digests; pleadings, motions, and briefs; statutes and regulations; analysis by top practitioners; and news from both Pike & Fischer and The Bureau of National Affairs, Inc."

Business Wire. Pike & Fischer, Inc. Launches Internet Law & Regulation Web Service, Enhancing Cyberlaw Research. CBS Marketwatch. Dec. 1, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:17 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

December 02, 2004

E-Rate Funding Slowly Resumes

"The program that helps link schools and libraries to the Internet has resumed spending after a cash-flow crunch that delayed more than $400 million in projects.

"The E-Rate program has ended a four-month-long moratorium on new projects, federal officials said Tuesday, but it will take time to clear a backlog of more than 4,000 requests.

"The $2.25 billion-a-year program is credited with getting high-speed Internet access to people in poor and remote locations through discounts on connection gear and phone service."

Ben Feller. Internet Aid to Schools, Libraries Flowing Again. Technology Review. Nov. 24, 2004.

See also:
Marguerite Reardon. E-rate Funding Restarts, But Crisis Continues. News.com. Nov. 23, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:57 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

December 01, 2004

Proposed Student Database Raises Privacy Concerns

"A proposal by the federal government to create a vast new database of enrollment records on all college and university students is raising concerns that the move will erode the privacy rights of students.

"Until now, universities have provided individual student information to the federal government only in connection with federally financed student aid. Otherwise, colleges and universities submit information about overall enrollment, graduation, prices and financial aid without identifying particular students.

"For the first time, however, colleges and universities would have to give the government data on all students individually, whether or not they received financial assistance, with their Social Security numbers."

Diana Jean Schemo. Federal Plan to Keep Data on Students Worries Some. The New York Times. Nov. 29, 2004.

See also:
Joseph Gidjunis. Proposed Change in How Federal Government Collects Student Data Raises Privacy Concerns. The Chronicle of Higher Education. Nov. 26, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:22 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

RFID in Library Draws Sharp Criticism

"A plan to put radio frequency identification (RFID) tags into San Francisco public library books has drawn sharp criticism on grounds ranging from privacy for library patrons to the health and safety of library workers.

"A provision in the San Francisco city budget approved last June allocated $300,000 to begin a pilot RFID program at the San Francisco public library. However the plan has been placed on hold according to San Francisco supervisor Jake McGoldrick, who expects the Board of Supervisors to revisit the RFID issue in January.

"RFID tags emit a radio signal which can be read by a scanner up to 30 feet away. Librarians contend this will speed check out and return of books and assist with inventory control. Wal-Mart and other large retailers have adopted the tags in their warehouses. The tags pose an obvious privacy issue for library patrons if the RFID signal is not properly encrypted."

Joe Rogers. Privacy Advocates Promise to Fight Electronic Tags in Library Books. KPIX.com. Nov. 28, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:41 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

November 30, 2004

Kahle Loses Copyright Term Limit Lawsuit

"A lawsuit brought by a group of Internet archivists against recent congressional actions expanding copyright protections has been dismissed by a federal judge.

"The case was led by Net pioneer Brewster Kahle, whose most recent Internet Archive project aims to make a huge digital archive of Web sites and other media. The court's ruling, issued late last week, marks another setback for a movement of activists and scholars against expanding legal protections for artistic works.

"The court relied primarily on last year's Supreme Court ruling (.pdf) that said Congress had the power to extend the term of copyright."

John Borland. Court Nixes Lawsuit Fighting Copyright Law. News.com. Nov. 24, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 09:00 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Technology Industry Outguns Entertainment Industry?

"Is the entertainment industry losing its clout on Capitol Hill? At first blush, a lot of people might find that to be a laughable proposition. But a prominent architect of the Recording Industry Association of America's legal strategy confided to me last week that his colleagues are being 'outgunned' in the legislative skirmishing over new copyright laws.

"It may seem counterintuitive, but there is some truth to that statement. It explains why Marybeth Peters from the U.S. Copyright Office is saying that the entertainment industry won't get what it wants from Congress before politicians leave town for Thanksgiving.

"Predicting what copyright legislation will be enacted in the last days of the 108th Congress is a risky business, but one thing is certain: The list of laws will not include the Induce Act, which is revered by the entertainment industry but reviled by technology companies."

Declan McCullagh. Outgunned on Copyright?. News.com. Nov. 22, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:08 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Open Access vs Tradional Publishers

"The benefits to scientists of open access scientific publishing provided by the internet are too significant to be ignored, says Matthew Cockerill.

"The progress of science is ultimately defined by peer-reviewed journal articles: they record the results of research and act as a foundation for all future research.

"In the UK alone, billions of pounds of tax-payers’ money are spent annually on research, so the government might be expected to take a prudent interest in how the resulting journal articles are published, archived and made accessible. Surprisingly, though, copyright to publicly funded research articles is routinely signed over to publishers, who then sell limited, subscription-based access back to the scientific community.

"The cost of publishing a scientific research article is a tiny fraction of what it costs to do the research in the first place; yet publishers end up controlling access to the findings."

Matthew Cockerill and John Enderby. Internet Upstarts v Traditional Publishers. FT.com. Nov. 25, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:05 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

November 24, 2004

Baseball & Books Come Together in D.C.

"At the Mount Pleasant Neighborhood Library in Northwest Washington, steam pipes are leaking, paint is peeling, windows are nailed shut and carpets are stained. For several days last month, the building was closed because the heat wasn't working.

"Chief Librarian Ellen E. Kardy has a 15-page plan to renovate the 79-year-old building, but year after year the city fails to fund the $6 million facelift.

"In a remarkable turn of events, however, the District's 27-branch public library system suddenly stands to reap $45 million -- enough to build eight libraries or renovate 17. And it will be made possible only if the D.C. Council approves a plan offered by Mayor Anthony A. Williams that has polarized the city: using hundreds of millions of public dollars to build a baseball stadium along the Anacostia River in Southeast."

David Nakamura. Community Responses Mixed to Baseball Payoff. WashingtonPost.com. Nov. 21, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 08:59 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Judge Allows Internet Archive Snapshots as Evidence

"Magistrate Judge Arlander Keys, in the Northern District of Illinois, ruled that 'snapshots' taken by the Internet Archive that depict web pages as they appeared in the past are admissible under the Federal Rules of Evidence.

"The court rejected the arguments of plaintiff Telewizja Polska USA that the archived pages constituted hearsay and that the Internet Archive was an 'unreliable source.'

"He also noted that, since Polska was seeking to suppress evidence of its own previous statements, the snapshots would not be barred even if they were hearsay."

No author. Internet Archive's Web Page Snapshots Held Admissible as Evidence.
Stanford Law School Center for Internet and Society. Vol 2, No.3.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:05 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Report: High-Speed Internet Use Doubles

"The number of Americans using fast Internet connections doubled from 2001 through late 2003, still below some expectations and especially low among minority groups and people in rural areas, according to a report by the Bush administration.

During the election campaign, President Bush advocated affordable access to high-speed Internet services for all Americans by 2007.

"The Commerce Department report, prepared in September but undisclosed until after the election, said use of fast Internet connections grew dramatically through October 2003 to 20 percent of U.S. households. The report praised such services for fueling online banking, entertainment and commerce.

Ted Bridis. Report: Fast-Internet Use Doubles in U.S.. WashingtonPost.com. Nov. 22, 2004.

U.S. Department of Commerce. A Nation Online: Entering the Broadband Age. Sept. 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:34 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

November 23, 2004

Personalizing the Search

"Early Web search engines succeeded spectacularly at turning up interesting results.

"With the growth of online content and the improvement in the ranking of search results, the situation is now flipped: Any query turns up an overabundance of results, both relevant and irrelevant.

"Search engines struggle with the challenge of helping users deal with this information overload. Some search engines are placing their bets on personalization, which I contend is a dead end: Top talent will be expended on the problem with little to show for it in the end."

Raul Valdes-Perez. Narrowing the Search. News.com. Nov. 22, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:23 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

UCLA Launches Campaign Finance Database

"A first-of-its-kind database that will make it easy to compare and contrast the campaign finance disclosure statutes and regulations of all 50 states, the District of Columbia and the federal government was released by the UCLA School of Law as part of the Campaign Disclosure Project.

"The Campaign Disclosure Law Database was designed to be useful to legislators, public interest groups, media representatives, scholars and the public. It is divided into 25 categories that reflect the most important campaign finance practices, such as filing deadlines, contributor information, loans to campaigns, electronic filing, enforcement rules and independent expenditures.

"The database is further divided into 105 subcategories and can be used to answer questions on topics such as whether the occupation of a contributor must be reported, or whether the state requires the disclosure of late independent expenditures."

The Pew Charitable Trusts. UCLA Launches First-of-Its-Kind Campaign Finance Database. (press release) Nov. 17, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:17 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

AP CEO: Future of News is Online

"The Internet will change the way news is provided to the world by giving consumers the power to demand and receive any sports score, analysis or breaking story instantly, the head of the world's largest news organization said.

"Newspapers, TV broadcasts and even fancy Web pages will have less meaning as people use Web-surfing programs and recording devices to pick and choose items from various providers, said Tom Curley, president and chief executive officer of The Associated Press.

"In the new media age, people will be able to dictate exactly what news they want, when they want it and on which electronic devices they want to receive it, he said."

Robert Jablon. AP Leader Sees Internet As Future of News. MyWay. Nov. 13, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:06 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

November 22, 2004

EPA Improves Search Capability

"A keyword search in the Environmental Protection Agency's Web pages used to yield a mishmash of results. Typing, say, 'water quality' in the search engine might have returned links to high-level overviews of water quality issues or to documents that merely mentioned water quality.

"The relevancy ranking of our search engine couldn't really say, 'Here's a general thing about water quality that could get you started,' said Richard Huffine, program manager for the EPA's National Library Network. So EPA officials modified the search engine.

"Now, the engine returns documents based on a ranking of data stored in metadata fields, giving priority — in descending order — to information that has the search query term embedded in a document's subject, title, description and text."

David Perera. EPA Builds a Better Search. FCW. Nov. 15, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:43 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

November 20, 2004

PubSub Manages Real-Time Information

"RSS feeds, search alerts and other information monitoring technologies are great, but often end up providing too much of a good thing. PubSub is a 'matching engine' that offers a promising new way to keep up to date while alleviating information overload.

"Over the past year, subscribing to RSS feeds has become an increasingly popular way to keep up to date with favorite web sites, blogs, and other frequently changing sources of web content.

"But anyone who's used an RSS aggregator has experienced at least two problems: Information overload and information underload."

Chris Sherman. Managing the Firehose of Real-Time Information. SearchEngineWatch. Nov. 17, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:39 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

November 19, 2004

Congress May Act on Copyright Bill

"Several lobbying camps from different industries and ideologies are joining forces to fight an overhaul of copyright law, which they say would radically shift in favor of Hollywood and the record companies and which Congress might try to push through during a lame-duck session that begins this week.

The Senate might vote on HR2391 (.pdf), the Intellectual Property Protection Act, a comprehensive bill that opponents charge could make many users of peer-to-peer networks, digital-music players and other products criminally liable for copyright infringement. The bill would also undo centuries of 'fair use' -- the principle that gives Americans the right to use small samples of the works of others without having to ask permission or pay.

"The bill lumps together several pending copyright bills including HR4077, the Piracy Deterrence and Education Act, which would criminally punish a person who 'infringes a copyright by ... offering for distribution to the public by electronic means, with reckless disregard of the risk of further infringement.' Critics charge the vague language could apply to a person who uses the popular Apple iTunes music-sharing application."

Michael Grebb. Senate May Ram Copyright Bill. Wired News. Nov. 16, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:57 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Google Launches Search Product for Scholars

"Google Inc. plans to announce on Thursday that it is adding a new search service aimed at scientists and academic researchers.

"Google Scholar, which was scheduled to go online Wednesday evening at scholar.google.com, is a result of the company's collaboration with a number of scientific and academic publishers and is intended as a first stop for researchers looking for scholarly literature like peer-reviewed papers, books, abstracts and technical reports.

"Google executives declined to say how many additional documents and books had been indexed and made searchable through the service. While the great majority of recent scholarly papers and periodicals are indexed on the Web, many have not been easily accessible to the public."

John Markoff. Google Plans New Service for Scientists and Scholars. The New York Times. Nov. 18, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:47 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

London's 'Biggest Ever' Wi-Fi Hotspot Opens

"The British Library finally launched its wireless network on Tuesday, which it claims is the largest enclosed Wi-Fi hot spot in the UK capital.

"The network covers eleven reading rooms, the Library auditorium, a cafe and restaurant, and also an outdoor Piazza. It will be available to around 3,000 visitors per day.

"Broadcom has built a huge Wi-Fi zone outdoors in Central London, but the British Library believes its network is the largest indoor site, rivalling locations such as Heathrow Airport in terms of coverage.

Graeme Wearden. London Gets 'Largest Ever' Indoor Wi-Fi Site. ZDNet UK. Nov. 16, 2004.

See also:
Tony Smith. British Library tunes into Wi-Fi. The Register. Nov. 16, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:59 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Old Newspapers to be Available Online

"The government promises anyone with a computer will have access within a few years to millions of pages from old newspapers, a slice of American history to be viewed now only by visiting local libraries, newspaper offices or the nation's capital.

"The first of what's expected to be 30 million digitized pages from papers published from 1836 through 1922 will be available in 2006.

"Bruce Cole, chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, said the National Digital Newspaper Program is to further the founding fathers' belief that knowledge of history was a necessity for government by the people."

Carl Hartman. U.S. Vows 30M Newspaper Pages To Go On Net. Seattle Post-Intelligencer. Nov. 16, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:32 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

November 18, 2004

Texas Schoolchildren Equipped With RFID Tags

"Hoping to prevent the loss of a child through kidnapping or more innocent circumstances, a few schools have begun monitoring student arrivals and departures using technology similar to that used to track livestock and pallets of retail shipments.

"Here in a growing middle- and working-class suburb just north of Houston, the effort is undergoing its most ambitious test. The Spring Independent School District is equipping 28,000 students with ID badges containing computer chips that are read when the students get on and off school buses. The information is fed automatically by wireless phone to the police and school administrators."

Matt Richtel. In Texas, 28,000 Students Test an Electronic Eye. The New York Times. Nov. 17, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:53 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

November 17, 2004

Free Culture Fest Raises Awareness

"It's been said that information wants to be free. Now some folks are saying culture wants to be free, too. And they're building a grassroots organization throughout the nation's campuses to advance that idea.

"FreeCulture.org, founded by Swarthmore students Nelson Pavlosky and Luke Smith, is advancing its mission to unfetter culture by supporting projects such as promoting the use of open-source software, encouraging student artists to adopt relaxed licensing agreements for their creations, holding remixing contests and campaigning against legislation that expands the powers of copyright holders.

"This week, the organization is holding a week-long 'Free Culture Fest' at Swarthmore to educate the public about a host of subjects, from open-source software software development to workshops on collage and intellectual property law."

John P. Mello Jr. Free Culture Fest Targets Copyright Restrictions. TechNewsWorld. Nov. 12, 2004.

See also:
Katie Dean. Students Fight Copyright Hoarders. Wired News. Nov. 10, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:46 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

November 15, 2004

PC Magazine Reviews Search Engines

"Ease of use, thoroughness, accuracy, and speed are critical in a utility designed to separate what is often a tiny amount of wheat from vast piles of chaff. The tool you choose also depends on where you're looking—on the Web or more locally, such as on your own system or a LAN—and how you can approach your search. In some cases you know specific terms that will produce relevant answers; in other cases, you have only concepts.

"At this point, no single product addresses all these needs, so we look at five Windows solutions that, taken in one combination or another, should serve you well—blinkx; Clarity, which at the time of our review was Creo Six Degrees; Google Desktop beta; MSN Search beta; and X1 Search."

Gary Berline. Supersonic Search Engines. PC Magazine. Nov. 12, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:42 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Hitwise: Giant Search Engines Still Lead

"While a number of smaller search engines have set themselves up as alternatives to search powerhouses such as Google, the concentration of searches is being driven through Google and the other major engines is going up, according to recent findings from web traffic monitoring firm Hitwise.

"For the week ending Oct. 30, one in every fourteen visits to the Internet by U.S. web users went to the top 10 search engines, a 7% increase from the same period a year ago, Hitwise reports.

"'This increasing concentration of traffic among the top search engines, particularly Google and Yahoo Search, is indicative of the brand equity they’ve built over the years,' says Bill Tancer, vice president of research at Hitwise."

No author. Alternative Search Engines Have Far To Go To Catch Giants, Hitwise Reports. Internet Retailer. Nov. 8, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:04 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

November 13, 2004

How RSS Can Serve Libraries

Zeki Celikbas provides an explanation and background of technology used in RSS feeds and offers suggestions for potential benefits libraries can gain by using this technology.

"Suggestions include general communications and marketing; library user education (via book lists); current awareness services (via table of contents analysis for journals); and augmenting of reference services."

Zeki Celikbas. What is RSS and How Can it Serve Libraries?. (.pdf). E-prints in Library and Information Science. Nov. 9, 2004.

Attribution: SNTReport.com first discovered news of this paper through a posting in Library Stuff, edited by Steven Cohen.

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:51 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Benefits of Library RFID Tags

"Imagine a library system that knows where every book is and allows visitors to return and issue books automatically. That dream is slowly becoming a reality as libraries adopt the use of tiny Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tags for tracking books and audiovisual items.

"Tiny RFID tags can store detailed information about an item, which is then sent via radio waves to a reading device - either a handheld or fixed unit.

"The technology is used for tracking the movement of goods in the retail industry, but it is making inroads in other areas, such as library management systems."

Ken Young. Shelf Life. The Guardian. Nov. 11, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:02 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

November 12, 2004

Libraries' Plan for Technology

"A well-thought-out technology plan can help libraries stay on course.

"We may know that technology is not an end in itself but a tool to help us meet our libraries' service goals, but that's easy to forget. After all, technology often sucks up huge amounts of attention, money, and staff resources. Our users, also technology consumers, have evolving expectations of what the library should provide. Yet new technologies can be disruptive to both staff and public. Added to all this, some of us remain technophobes while others are consumed by technolust—an irrational love for new technology combined with unrealistic expectations for the solutions it brings.

"How do we find our way through this confusing technological terrain? We need only one thing: a plan."

Michael Stephens. Technoplans vs. Technolust. Library Journal. Nov. 1, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:47 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

PC World Reviews Desktop Search Tools

"Lots of programs promise to locate your data in a hurry. Our tests reveal the top tools for searching your hard drive and inbox.

"PC World reviewed ten competitive file-search utilities, three that work solely or primarily with Microsoft Outlook, and seven that search all or selected files on a PC's hard drive.

"The eidtor's picks were DtSearch Desktop With Spider and Lookout Software."

Dennis O'Reilly. Find Files Fast. PC Magazine. Nov. 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:33 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Privacy Policys & The Patriot Act

"Just two months from now, the government has the opportunity to appeal a ruling by a N.Y. Federal District Court judge that strikes down an important provision of the controversial U.S. Patriot Act.

"The ruling, (.pdf) which came Sept. 29, was set to go into effect 90 days from that date unless the government solves the constitutional flaws the judge identified.

"Few laws have elicited as much emotional and legal reaction as the Patriot Act. Adopted in the early days after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, the law includes many provisions sought by law enforcement over the years and gives the government many new rights to scrutinize public behavior. It also overrides many earlier privacy laws, such as allowing the government to collect information about an individual's videotape rentals, financial information, and even his or her Web searches and online practices."

Parry Aftab. The Privacy Lawyer: Privacy Policies And The Patriot Act. InformationWeek. Nov. 8, 2004.

See also:
John D. Cline. United States: Court Strikes Down National Security Letter Statute. Mondaq. Oct. 13, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:49 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

November 11, 2004

Ashcroft and Evans Resign From Bush Cabinet

"John D. Ashcroft, the combative attorney general whose anti-terrorism policies made him the focus of a fierce national debate over civil liberties, resigned yesterday along with Commerce Secretary Donald L. Evans, one of President Bush's closest friends.

"Ashcroft, 62, has been one of the most controversial and influential figures of Bush's first term. Ashcroft provided reliable fodder for Democrats on the campaign trail and served as a visible representative of the evangelical Christians who played a crucial role in reelecting the president.

"In a five-page handwritten resignation letter to Bush -- dated Election Day but released yesterday -- Ashcroft took credit for declining crime rates and the absence of terrorist attacks on U.S. soil since Sept. 11, 2001."

Dan Eggen and Mike Allen. Ashcroft, Evans To Leave Cabinet. WashingtonPost.com. Nov. 10, 2004.

See also:
Declan McCullagh. Ashcroft Resigns Attorney General's Post. News.com. Nov. 9, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

SNTReport.com™ Covering the Intersection of Collaboration and Technology. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:46 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

November 06, 2004

Votes are In: Onward to Tally Issues

"It's finally over: President George W. Bush claimed victory in his re-election bid on Wednesday, a win that capped a tumultuous night of election results and propelled technology and other stocks higher.

"Coupled with the Republican gains in Congress, the results of the 2004 election offer the president a long-awaited opportunity to consolidate his grip on power in the nation's capital--a prospect that could, depending on the details, help or hurt the technology industry.

"Aside from a few spats about offshoring early in the year, technology topics have never been a priority for either Bush or Sen. John Kerry, his Democratic rival. But this week's results ensure that attitudes in Washington, D.C., toward broadband, spectrum management, taxes and Internet telephony will line up squarely behind Republican priorities through at least the midterm elections in 2006."

Declan McCullagh. Votes are Cast--Time to Count the Issues. News.com. Nov. 3, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:12 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

November 03, 2004

Canada Study Sees Risk in U.S. Patriot Act

"A key U.S. anti-terrorism law threatens the privacy of Canadians and rigorous steps are needed to protect private medical and financial information, a government study said Friday.

"Current safeguards are not sufficient to prevent the FBI from using the USA Patriot Act to force U.S. firms and their foreign subsidiaries to turn over private data even if doing so violates Canadian law, the province of British Columbia's privacy commissioner said.

"The study is among the first to examine the foreign impact of the Patriot Act, which was passed after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. Reaction to the study is being watched closely as governments move to contract their data storage work to private firms -- many of which are U.S.-linked."

Allan Dowd. Canada Study Sees Risk in U.S. Anti-terrorism Law. Reuters. Oct. 29, 2004.

See also:
Information & Privacy Commissioner for British Columbia. Privacy & the USA Patriot Act - Implications for British Columbia Public Sector Outsourcing. (.pdf). Oct. 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:00 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

November 01, 2004

Broadband Policies Increases Digital Divide

"Major consumer organizations said Tuesday that U.S. policies on broadband have pushed the country behind overseas nations and have helped widen inequality.

"In a report released Tuesday, the Consumers Union and the Consumer Federation of America found that the big local phone companies and cable TV companies have increasing control of broadband business.

"The groups said the policies behind this trend have failed to provide benefits for consumers and do not create enough competition."

John Borland. Watchdogs: Broadband Policy a Bust. News.com. Oct. 27, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:04 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

October 30, 2004

What Makes a Wiki Work?

"It has no editors, no fact checkers and anyone can contribute an entry - or delete one. It should have been a recipe for disaster, but instead Wikipedia became one of the internet's most inspiring success stories. It might seem like anarchy. And, given the lack of central control, it technically is. However, there are three elements that make it work.

"The first is its ownership, and lack of commercial imperative. The site is manned by volunteers, and now owned by a foundation, which means people willingly give their time and intellectual property to the venture. It manages to run on less than $100,000 a year.

"The second is that the overriding editorial principle that all articles should show a "Neutral point of view' (NpoV). According to Wales, this is as much 'a social technique for getting people to work together" as it is an editorial policy.

"The third - and perhaps most critical - has been the evolution of an incredibly intricate and democratic social order to keep this vast sprawling project in order."

Simon Waldman. Who Knows?. The Guardian. Oct. 26, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:48 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

October 26, 2004

Wiki Projects Expand

"Jimmy Wales, 38, a computer programmer in St. Petersburg, Fla., is trying to make the entire concept of a printed reference book obsolete. Three years ago he created the Wikipedia, a free online encyclopedia that draws articles not from a sequestered brain trust of academics but from the great unwashed: thousands of Internet users around the world who freely add to and edit the site. It's one part reference tool, one part fascinating social experiment.

"Wikipedia just roared past 1 million total articles (300,000 in English, the rest mostly in 40 other languages), making it the world's largest encyclopedia—three times the size of the 233-year-old Britannica.

"Wales is also expanding into projects like the Wiktionary (a dictionary and thesaurus), Wikibooks (textbooks and manuals) and Wikiquote(quotations). The goal: to give 'every single person free access to the sum of all human knowledge.'"

Brad Stone. It's Like a Blog, But It's a Wiki. Newsweek. Nov. 1, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:51 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

October 25, 2004

PLoS Takes On Reed Elsevier

"A major new 'open access' journal for medicine has been launched, putting it in direct competition with the established publications in this lucrative area including Reed Elsevier's The Lancet.

The Public Library of Science (PLoS), a US-based not-for-profit organisation, is behind PLoS Medicine, which it said was 'the most significant international general medicine journal to emerge in over 70 years'.

Saeed Shah. US Public Library of Science Launches Rival to 'The Lancet'. Independent.co.uk. Oct. 19, 2004.

See also:
Laura Lynch. Public Library of Science. Creative Commons. Oct. 2003.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:21 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

October 23, 2004

Classrooms Go Dark Over E-Rate Snafus

"In the far reaches of Alaska, the Internet has become as integral a part of the classroom as a blackboard and textbooks.

"But at least three school districts in the state are going without online access while administrators await a decision on the fate of the federal program known as E-rate.

"Since August, funds earmarked under the $2.5 billion program have been held up over accounting issues, leaving cash-strapped districts with no alternative but to turn off the Internet."

Marguerite Reardon. Schools Lose Net Over E-rate Freeze. News.com. Oct. 21, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:14 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

October 21, 2004

Libraries Trailbraze the Way with RFID

"For a glimpse of how RFID technology could transform stores, factories and people's everyday lives, you may only need to look as far as your local library.

"Hundreds of city and college libraries are placing special microchips, known as RFID tags, on books in an effort to make libraries more efficient. The tags are central to a new breed of digital tracking system that can speed checkouts, keep collections in better order, and even alleviate repetitive strain injuries among librarians.

"One snag facing RFID, however, is that consumer advocates are in an uproar. They say the unchecked spread of the devices in libraries and elsewhere could spell disaster for privacy."

Alorie Gilbert. RFID, Coming To A Library Near You. News.com. Oct. 18, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:27 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

October 19, 2004

Lawyers Use Google for Research

"The at-your-fingertips convenience of Internet searches has lawyers and even judges a little Google-obsessed. And their fascination with the Internet and its capabilities isn’t limited to mundane questions about the latest fashions or fall gardening. Google and other Internet search engines have fast become a legal research tool, to the concern of some critics.

"Lawyers search the Internet to check out clients, find out how to locate witnesses, get the dirt on companies and examine the vitae of the opposition’s experts. The information they find is sprouting up in their legal briefs. Not to be left behind, judges are using Internet searches to double-check facts and bolster decisions."

Molly McDonough. In Google We Trust?. ABA Journal. Oct. 14, 2004.

SNTReport.com™ The Online Journal for Social Software, Digital Collaboration & Information Policy. A Seso Group™ Venture.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 06:28 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

October 15, 2004

Justice Department Seeks New Antipiracy Powers

"The U.S. Justice Department recommended a sweeping transformation of the nation's intellectual-property laws, saying peer-to-peer piracy is a 'widespread' problem that can be addressed only through more spending, more FBI agents and more power for prosecutors.

"In an extensive report (.pdf) released Tuesday, senior department officials endorsed a pair of controversial copyright bills strongly favored by the entertainment industry that would criminalize 'passive sharing' on file-swapping networks and permit lawsuits against companies that sell products that 'induce' copyright infringement.

"Tuesday's report was not focused exclusively on Internet piracy: It also included recommendations about responses to trademark infringements, trade secret violations and fake pharmaceuticals. But the Internet-related bills it endorses are at the heart of the ongoing political battle pitting Hollywood and the music industry against the computer industry, 'fair use' advocates and librarians."

Declan McCullagh. Justice Dept. Wants New Antipiracy Powers. News.com. Oct. 12, 2004.

See also:
Katie Dean. Ashcroft Vows Piracy Assault. Wired News. Oct. 14, 2004.

The Hon. Attorney General John Ashcroft. Prepared Remarks: Release of the Report of the Department of Justice's Task Force on Intellectual Property. Oct. 12, 2004.

Department of Justice. Attorney General John Ashcroft Announces Recommendations of the Justice Department's Intellectual Property Task Force. Oct. 12, 2004.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:47 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

October 14, 2004

OCLC's Entire Collection Moving Toward the Web

"Excited by the 'resounding success' of the Open WorldCat pilot program, the management of OCLC has decided to open the entire collection of 53.3 million items connected to 928.6 million library holdings for 'harvesting' by Google and Yahoo! Search.

"Besides expanding the Open WorldCat content to the entire WorldCat collection, OCLC has modified the interface. According to Andrew Boyer, project manager for Open WorldCat, the new interface lets the user choose to expand holdings information to regional or even a worldwide view.

"If Google and Yahoo! choose to harvest the entire WorldCat database, several advantages should occur. Most obvious, the leap in coverage from 2 million records to 53.3 million records represents a tremendous value surge to and through the Web."

Barbara Quint. All of OCLC’s WorldCat Heading Toward the Open Web. Information Today. Oct. 11, 2004.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:22 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Ideas Outlining the Web's Future

"Universal access to all human knowledge could be had for around $260m, a conference about the web's future has been told.

"The idea of access for all was put forward by visionary Brewster Kahle, who suggested starting by digitally scanning all 26 million books in the US Library of Congress. His idea was just one of many presented at the Web 2.0 conference in San Francisco that aims to give a glimpse of what the net will become.

"Experts at the event said the next generation of the web will come out of the creative and programming communities starting to tinker with the vast pool of data the net has become."

No author. Visionaries Outline Web's Future. BBC. Oct. 8, 2004.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:09 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

October 09, 2004

Google Announces New Book Search Service

"Google has quietly launched a new search technology to help publishers sell books online, a fast-growing market dominated by Internet retailer Amazon.com.

"Google founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin will host a press conference on Thursday to demonstrate the technology at the Frankfurt Book Fair, an important showcase if the Internet search engine is to recruit the heavyweights of the book publishing industry.

"The new service, dubbed Google Print, will be incorporated into Google search queries. From launch, users will see book excerpts alongside ordinary Google Web page search results. The book excerpts will carry a link to buy the book from a choice of online book retailers."

Jeffrey Goldfarb. Google Launches Amazon-Style Book Search Business. Reuters. Oct 6, 2004.

See also:
Danny Sullivan. Google Print Opens Widely to Publishers. SearchEngineWatch. Oct. 6, 2004.
Associated Press. Google Expands Book Search, Making More Content Available. San Jose Mercury News. Oct. 6, 2004.
Keith Regan. Search Wars: Google, Snap, Amazon Arm for Battle. E-Commerce Times. Oct. 6, 2004.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:41 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Using RFID Without Invading Privacy

"Once upon a time, checking out an armful of library books could seem to take longer than writing them yourself. Today, however, using the technology that lets commuters zip through E-ZPass tolls, some libraries are offering quicker checkout, improved inventory practices, and better protection against theft.

"As RFID technology becomes more advanced, privacy adovacates warn it could allow both the tracking of books borrowed by a reader and the tracking of the reader via his library books.

"This could permit the government or other interested parties to compile a list of readers who have checked out books on particular topics - a potential invasion of privacy that civil-rights advocates find troubling."

Andrew Heining and Christa Case. Are Book Tags a Threat?. Christian Science Monitor. Oct. 5, 2004.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:06 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Search Engine Uses Dictionary to Govern Language Patterns

"Search engines make it easy to ask any and every kind of question, from ones that are refreshing in their innocence to those that would make even a prison doctor blush. But the net, like any friend, is not infallible and can let its prejudices skew the information it passes on.

"Keyword and page rank just look at the fact that there's that word out there and that it exists on a web page and people link to it,' says Justin Gardner, spokesman for new search engine Kozoru.

"'This can be dubious at times, providing information that's old or information that's not correct. It does not understand timeliness or actual fact.' This could explain why some search engines and services are setting themselves up as unbiased sources of fact.

"Kozoru is going back to basics to build its search engine, which is due in mid-2005."

Mark Ward. The Future of Facts. BBC. Oct. 4, 2004.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:05 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

October 08, 2004

Washington State Launches America’s First Government Digital Archives

"Yesterday, Washington state made 2.4 million records available online — many for the first time — as part of what officials said was a crusade to rescue endangered history.

"The state now has an online archive of records, including birth, marriage, death, census and military information, free for anyone to see from a personal computer.

"This is the stuff of government,' said Secretary of State Sam Reed, who led the project. 'This is what makes it work. People need to have access to it.'

"Known as the Washington State Digital Archives, the government project is online at: www.digitalarchives.wa.gov."

Kim Peterson. State's Online Archive Rescues Records From History's Dustbin. Seattle Times. Oct. 5, 2004.

See also:
Washington Secretary of State. Secretary of State, Microsoft, EDS Rescue Endangered History. Oct. 4, 2004.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:28 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

October 05, 2004

FCC Freezes Grants for E-Rate Program

"Public libraries and schools around the nation have suddenly stopped receiving any new grants from a federal program that is wrestling with new rules on how it spends $2.25 billion each year to provide high-speed Internet and telephone service.

"The moratorium at what is known as the E-Rate program began two months ago, with no notice, and may last for months, causing significant hardships at schools and libraries, say state officials and executives at the company that runs the program.

"The suspension came after the Federal Communications Commission, in consultation with the White House, imposed tighter spending rules that commission officials say will make it easier to detect fraud and waste in the program."

Stephen Labaton. Internet Grants to Schools Halted as the F.C.C. Tightens the Rules. The New York Times. Oct. 4, 2004.

See also:
E-Rate Central. House Committee E Rate Hearing Focuses on NEC and IBM. Sept. 27, 2004.

Update: Stephen Labaton. Internet Grants Cut, and F.C.C. Scolded. The New York Times. Oct. 6, 2004. (At the E-Rate Full Committee Hearing on Tuesday, the majority of senators focused on the F. C. C.'s decision to impose tighter spending restrictions and declared that many of the most significant changes would not make it easier to perform audits or disclose fraud and waste.)

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:50 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

October 01, 2004

Connections: Gary Roberts, 21st Century New Librarian Award Winner

Editor's Note: For this edition of Connections, we are pleased to feature an interview with Gary Roberts, the Information Systems Librarian at the Herrick Memorial Library at Alfred University in upstate New York. Earlier this year, Syracuse University's School of Information Studies named Gary the winner of its second 21st Century New Librarian Award. Gary received the award for his outstanding contributions to Herrick, including the use of library database-driven Web sites and the library's comprehensive Journal Locator.

Gary succceeds SNTReport.com Executive Editor K. Matthew Dames as the 21st Century New Librarian Award winner.

Gary joined Herrick's staff after graduating in 1999 from the School of Informatics at the University at Buffalo. His professional research has focused on how smaller libraries can fully-utilize technology through collaboration, publication and resource sharing. Gary also has researched the benefits of combining online information literacy tutorials with course management systems to support comprehensive information literacy programs.

As he will reveal in the interview below, Gary is a strong proponent of using social software to improve how and where librarians provide services to their customers.

Gary will receive his award in a brunch ceremony in Syracuse on Sunday, October 10. Recently, SNTReport.com writer Carol Schwartz interviewed Gary to discuss several topics, including how he uses social software tools to improve work and digital collaboration efforts between Herrick's librarians and the University's students, staff and faculty.

SNTReport.com: What type of research have you been conducting involving social software?
Roberts: I have been focusing on information literacy, which is the ability of people to identify when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and effectively use the needed information. It is an essential skill in a technology-based world where the library and traditional publishing model is no longer the only source of credible information dissemination.

SNTReport.com: How has your library been incorporating technology?
Roberts: We are focusing on the use of technology to leverage the abilities of the library to meet the needs of the students and effectively use personnel to get where the students are, which is online. Librarians have traditionally been comfortable with asynchronous software, not synchronous software such as instant messaging or chat -- which requires them to speak on the spot. Students are more comfortable with using "technology on the fly" and do not necessarily want or need detail. It is a challenge to move toward the student's level.

Librarians are information sharers by profession, and it is part of our culture to document as much as possible and demonstrate best practices. We have to be careful about keeping the students coming back, we try to go with what they think they need. Ultimately with higher broadband, Internet II, VoIP, and streaming video, we may see an increased comfort and ability [to serve] another generation.

Additionally, we are using the tools to help out with information literacy. A lot of tools become essential when working with a small school. Budgets are decreasing and we have to work smarter using technology. We have a lot of resources on campus and we are leveraging existing knowledge without going out and spending lots of money.

SNTReport.com: What types of tools do you use for information literacy?
Roberts: We are using both personal management tools and course management tools. We use Outlook Exchange for a personal management information system. It is a client-server model and combines a calendar for scheduling and email contacts. We also have an Intranet that it is web-based containing archival knowledge. For course management, we use web-based Blackboard for storing knowledge about courses and specific projects. Literacy is time intensive; it takes time to set up tools. We utilize existing tools that are commercially available.

Small institutions are able to leverage their investment in available course management systems without having to implement technology-intensive authentication systems. Many librarians have expanded and are using personal digital assistants (PDAs) that feature the Palm operating system. The PDA becomes an extension to handle details, and can be used to connect via a USB connection and sync with the information management system. For example, my PDA buzzed to remind me that you would be calling at this time for this interview. I had the interview scheduled in Outlook Exchange and downloaded my schedule information to my PDA for when I was not at the library.

The PDA facilitates efficiency utilizing knowledge of 100 years of collaboration. All of the tools that we use facilitate communication and workflow allowing us to do more with less.




Social software is revolutionary for libraries. We are seeing smaller staff achieving larger goals. At this point, I think librarians are at a crossroads with external forces demanding change using social software. If we fail at this transformation, we could be extinct, marginalized at best.





SNTReport.com: What type of impact has social software had on your library?
Roberts: Social software is revolutionary for libraries. We are seeing smaller staff achieving larger goals. At this point, I think librarians are at a crossroads with external forces demanding change using social software. If we fail at this transformation, we could be extinct, marginalized at best.

Alfred University is thinking about using Vonage and using broadband for chat and synchronous communication. Synchronous communication is more friendly and the 'human touch' is still very important. Communication would involve one-to-one or one-to-several. Inquiries are typed into the computer, making for formalized communication. Chat is not formalized. We cannot use the same rules in chat that we use for email because the communication is not being archived.

Further, librarians are becoming more comfortable with video conferencing. The up-front time saves down the line since it is available inexpensively. Five years ago videoconferencing was either too expensive or the technology was impossible without the infrastructure in place; now it is much more commonplace.

SNTReport.com: Do you find your students turning toward the Web more often for information?
Roberts: There are commercial venues available such as Google, Amazon, News, and Entertainment portals. Librarians do not see them as competitors. Libraries beat them at their own game because we have content; we are the ones with the collections. Google does a better job with delivery, going where the patrons are. We have to look at the design and indexing methods that Google is using since students are attracted by the delivery methods.

SNTReport.com: Could you tell me about your Library IT Blog?
Roberts: My blog is an area to share "nuts and bolts" for other plans. It contains a little more content than listserv. Ultimately, I use it to post content for collaboration, but I don't necessarily post daily. It is an area to build an archive of what I am doing and what others are doing. Blogs take less time than publishing. I post when I have something to help others. The use of blogs depends on how you use the tool, at first they were cool, now they seem cheesy.

SNTReport.com: How does your library and IT department coordinate activities?
Roberts: Our university librarian is also the Vice President of Information Technology. We are able to keep the information flow going between both departments. More and more there is less of a distinction between IT and the library. As the knowledge base grows, the areas overlap. IT people have a better understanding of the hardware. We have a similar understanding of how thing work together and utilize core competencies. We collaborate and do not build walls.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:47 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Federal Court Strikes Down Part of Patriot Act

"A key part of the USA Patriot Act that allows the FBI to secretly demand information from Internet providers violates the U.S. Constitution, a federal judge ruled Wednesday.

"U.S. District Judge Victor Marrero barred (.pdf) the FBI from invoking that portion of the law in the future, saying it is an 'unconstitutional prior restraint of speech in violation of the First Amendment.'

"The 2001 law requires Internet service providers and any other type of communications provider to comply with secret "national security letters" from the FBI. Those letters may ask for information about subscribers, including what local and long-distance telephone calls they have made."

Declan McCullagh. Judge Disarms Patriot Act Proviso. News.com. Sept. 29, 2004.

See also:
American Civil Liberties Union. In ACLU Case, Federal Court Strikes Down Patriot Act Surveillance Power As Unconstitutional. Sept. 29, 2004.
American Library Association Washington Office Newsline. Court Decision on PATRIOT Act May Affect Libraries. Sept. 30, 2004.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:27 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

September 29, 2004

OCLC Buys Popular Digital Reference Resource

"The Metropolitan Cooperative Library System, a 32-member library consortium based in southern California, has transferred the assets of its popular 24/7 Reference operation to OCLC, the world’s largest library network. "

"OCLC already administers QuestionPoint, a virtual reference service developed in cooperation with the Library of Congress. Both services currently offer an infrastructure of software and communication tools as well as collaborative network arrangements with participating libraries. A new, improved platform of software and services that combines the best features of both systems is being developed. Subscribers to both services should see the new suite of tools early in 2005. Current contracts will remain as is until then."

Barbara Quint. OCLC Acquires 24/7 Reference Services. Information Today. No date.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 06:07 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

September 28, 2004

10 Major Trends Emerging in the Internet’s First Decade of Public Use

“Ten Years, Ten Trends' Highlight the Major Findings in Year Four of the Digital Future Project’s Study of the Impact of the Internet on Americans.

"Ten years after electronic portals to the Worldwide Web were first opened to millions of computer users, ten significant trends have emerged that vividly illustrate how the Internet affects America, according to findings from the comprehensive year-to-year study of the impact of online technology by the USC Annenberg School Center for the Digital Future.

"Year Four of the Digital Future Project (formerly the UCLA Internet Report) provides a broad year-to-year exploration of the influence of the Internet on Americans. The project examines the behavior and views of a national sample of 2,000 Internet users and non-users, as well as comparisons between new users (less than one year of experience) and very experienced users (in Year Four, seven or more years of experience)."

USC Annenberg School Center for the Digital Future. Center for the Digital Future Identifies the 10 Major Trends Emerging in the Internet’s First Decade of Public Use. Sept. 23, 2004.

USC Annenberg School Center for the Digital Future. Digital Center's Internet Report 2004. (.pdf). Sept. 23, 2004.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:55 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

September 27, 2004

OCLC Open WorldCat Project Uses Yahoo! Search

"OCLC has expanded its online library locator service for books to Yahoo! Search.

"Last October, I reported on a new pilot project between OCLC and Google that opened library holdings information for just under 2 million items in the WorldCat union catalog (extracted from the 55 million items with over 900 million holdings recorded.

"In January 2004, Yahoo! approached OCLC to arrange access to Open WorldCat records under Yahoo!’s new Content Acquisition Program.

"While Google took months to spider all the OCLC data, Yahoo! moved very quickly. The agreement was signed May 21; content first appeared on Yahoo! Search May 28; and full crawling and loading of the 1,993,073 set was completed June 6. Overall, OCLC seems to consider the Open WorldCat project a wonderful success and plans to expand it."

Barbara Quint. Yahoo! Search Joins OCLC Open WorldCat Project. Information Today. Sept. 24, 2004.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:31 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

September 25, 2004

Librarians Reaching Users Through IM

"The stereotypical librarian would feel out of place in many university libraries today. Gone are the days of tight buns, mid-calf plaid skirts, shushing and dusty books.

"Shoot, many librarians even dispense reference help via their own instant messaging screen name.

"Although the University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s librarians have not jumped on the bandwagon of using American Online Instant Messenger (AIM) to answer students’ questions, many libraries have."

Jenna Johnson. Librarians Sign on to Internet Help Sessions. Daily Nebraskan. Sept. 21, 2004.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:15 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

September 17, 2004

Vermont Librarian Speaks Up

"Jessmyn West is a 36-year-old librarian living in central Vermont. But she's not your stereotypical bespectacled research maven toiling behind a reference desk and offering expert advice on microfiche.

She's a 'radical librarian' who has embraced the hacker credo that 'information wants to be free.' As a result, West and many of her colleagues are on the front lines in battling the USA Patriot Act, which a harried Congress passed a month after 9/11 even though most representatives hadn't even read the 300-page bill. It gave the government sweeping powers to pursue the 'war on terror' but at a price: the loss of certain types of privacy we have long taken for granted.

"What got many librarians' dander up was Section 215 of the law, which stipulates that government prosecutors and FBI agents can seek permission from a secret court created under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act to access personal records -- everything from medical histories to reading habits. They don't need a subpoena. In fact, they don't need to show that a crime has even been committed. And librarians, stymied by a gag order, are forbidden to tell anyone (except a lawyer)."

Adam L. Penenberg. Don't Mess With Librarians. WiredNews. Sept. 15, 2004.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:20 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

September 13, 2004

Phoenix Filters Net Access

"A determined City Council declared Wednesday that pornography will no longer be available at Phoenix libraries, an action that could lead to a courtroom showdown with First Amendment advocates.

"Phoenix's new policy, which will filter all Internet sessions for adult users, is unusually stringent and appears to be the first of its kind among the nation's largest cities, a number of First Amendment advocates say.

"The new regulations, which take away library patrons' ability to surf the Web without restrictions, took effect immediately and could be implemented today."

Ginger D. Richardson. Phoenix Bans Internet Porn at Libraries. The Arizona Republic. Sept. 9, 2004.

See also Connie Cone Sexton. Net Filtering Could Start at Libraries Today. The Arizona Republic. Sept. 20, 2004.

Update: Monica Alonzo-Dunsmoor. Net Filter is Working in Libraries. The Arizona Republic. Jan. 6, 2005. (City officials reviewed library policies on Internet filtering and are satisfied with the results.)

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:08 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

September 08, 2004

Proposal for Free Access to Research

"The National Institutes of Health has proposed a major policy change that would require all scientists who receive funding from the agency to make the results of their research available to the public for free.

"The proposal would mark a significant departure from current practice, in which the scientific journals that publish those results retain control over that information.

"Pressure to make publicly financed research results more available to the public has been building for years but gained new momentum this summer with report language by the House Appropriations Committee.

"'The committee is very concerned that there is insufficient public access to reports and data resulting from NIH-funded research,' it read. 'This situation . . . is contrary to the best interests of the U.S. taxpayers who paid for this research.'"

Rick Weiss. NIH Proposes Free Access For Public to Research Data. WashingtonPost.com. Sept. 6, 2004.

See also:
Peter Suber. NIH Open-Access Plan Frequently Asked Questions. Sept. 6, 2004.

Susan Morrissey. NIH Weighs Open Access. Chemical & Engineering News. Sept. 6, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:58 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

September 04, 2004

Designing for the Handheld

"Among the few websites that are truly standards-compliant, only a handful sport style sheets adjusted to the needs of handheld devices. Of those which do offer styling for handhelds, not all will fit the smallest, lowest-resolution screens without presenting the user with the ultimate handheld horror: namely, horizontal scrolling.

"The Opera browser runs on handheld devices of all screen sizes and resolutions, some of them only 120 pixels wide. In this article, we’ve prepared a set of general suggestions for creating a handheld-friendly style sheet, along with a few Opera-specific pointers that you may find useful."

Elika Etemad and Jorunn D. Newth. Pocket-Sized Design: Taking Your Website to the Small Screen. A List Apart. Aug. 31, 2004.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 06:40 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

September 03, 2004

Sssshhhhh!!! (Or Pay Up)

"City leaders in Huntington Beach, CA have adopted an ordinance, which takes effect Sept. 15, that bans all cell phone use in libraries, including talking, text messaging and ringing tones of any kind.

"First-time violators will be warned, then fined $250 if they don't comply. A second offense gets a $500 fine and a third offense gets a $1,000 fine."

Associated Press. Cell Phone Use In Huntington Beach Libraries Could Cost $1,000. The Mercury News. Aug. 27, 2004.

See also:
Katie Fehrenbacher. Talk On A Cellphone, Pay A Grand. Engadget. Sept. 2, 2004.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 08:18 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

September 02, 2004

Challenging Secret Court is Easier Said than Done

"The Justice Department has argued in a recent court case that librarians, booksellers and other businesses can easily challenge a controversial provision of the USA Patriot Act by appealing to a super-secret court that approves surveillance of terrorists and foreign intelligence agents.

The only problem, according to a document released last week, is that the same court does not allow anyone but government attorneys and agents inside its doors.

"The rules governing the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court also do not include procedures for outside litigants to file memorandums or otherwise influence a case, according to a copy of the rules (.pdf) obtained by the American Civil Liberties Union."

Dan Eggen. Secret Court Poses Challenges. WashingtonPost.com. Aug. 30, 2004.

See also American Civil Liberties Union. ACLU Obtains Rules of Secret Wiretap Court But Says Much of Government’s Spy Power Remains Shrouded in Unnecessary Secrecy. Aug. 25, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:19 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

August 30, 2004

Electronic Books Becoming More Popular

"After more than a decade of false starts and empty promises, publishers may finally be starting to understand what consumers want from electronic books.

"Although revenues remain tiny, industry surveys show encouraging signs of growth in e-book sales over the past year.

"Publishing executives and analysts say the industry is finally coming to grips with the most significant issues that have stalled e-book adoption to date."

David Becker. Have e-books Turned a Page?. News.com. Aug. 27, 2004.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:01 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

August 19, 2004

Closing the Digital Divide

"Raj Reddy was fed up debating the problem of the digital divide between the rich and the poor and decided to do something about it.

"Reddy, a pioneering researcher in artificial intelligence and a professor at Carnegie Mellon University, plans to unveil at the end of this year his new project, called the PCtvt, a $250 wirelessly networked personal computer intended for the four billion people around the world who live on less than $2,000 a year.

"He says his device can find a market in developing countries, particularly those with large populations of people who cannot read, because it can be controlled by a simple TV remote control and can function as a television, telephone and videophone."

John Markoff. Trying to Take Technology to the Masses. News.com. Aug. 15, 2004.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:17 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

August 17, 2004

Copyright Crusaders Target Schools

"For the third year in a row, software companies are supplying schools with materials that promote their antipiracy position on copyright law.

"But for the first time this year, the library association is presenting its own material, hoping to give kids a more balanced view of copyright law.

"The ALA sees a need for this because materials offered by groups like the Business Software Alliance and the Motion Picture Association of America are designed to influence kids with one-sided information."

Katie Dean. Copyright Crusaders Hit Schools. Wired News. Aug. 13, 2004.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:57 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

A New Business Model for Online Publishing

"After 13 years of experimenting, veteran Net publisher Adam Engst has finally stumbled on a good business model -- fast-turnaround e-books.

"Since 1990, Engst has been publishing TidBits, a weekly Mac-oriented newsletter that is the second-longest-running publication on the Internet.

"From the get-go, Engst has pioneered just about every revenue model on the Internet -- ads, subscriptions, sponsorships and the now-ubiquitous tip jar -- with mixed success.

"But now Engst thinks he's finally cracked it. Since last fall, Engst has published a series of rapidly produced e-books using a system he calls 'extreme publishing.'"

Leander Kahney. Net Publishing Made Profitable. Wired News. Aug. 13, 2004.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:43 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

August 10, 2004

ALA's Copyright Network

The American Library Association Washington Office's Office for Information and Technology Policy is in the process of developing the Copyright Advisory Network, an online resource that will allow librarians to post questions about copyright issues, and receive answers to those issues. The answers will come from the Association's copyright experts, presumably including Carrie Russell, who writes the "Carrie on © column in School Library Journal, and is the author of Complete Copyright.

"The ALA should be appluaded for taking this step. It will be interesting to see how the Association navigates unauthorized practice of law concerns, and it also will be interesting to see the volume and nature of questions that may be posted to the Network.

Above all, this initiative highlights how important copyright knowledge is to all information professionals, including librarians. It is a shame, however, that so few graduate information science programs devote a full course to the topic. When last I checked about a year ago, no more than five of this nation's ALA-accredited graduate library science programs offer a course in copyright law. (Fortunately, my alma mater, Syracuse University's School of Information Studies, is one of them.)

American Library Association. Copyright Advisory Network.

Attribution: SNTReport.com first discovered news of the Copyright Advisory Network through a posting in LibraryLaw Blog, edited by Mary Minow.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 08:58 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (1)

August 05, 2004

College Libraries Using RFID Tags

"Some college libraries have replaced the bar codes on their books with high-tech tags that can silently transmit information, a change that might escape the notice of most patrons. But privacy advocates hope you take a closer look.

"The new tags use radio-frequency identification, or RFID. They have made the news recently as a tool to make retail stores more efficient at inventory control and theft prevention -- and also as a potential source of snooping. Recently, libraries have starting adopting the tags as well.

"With their encased microchips, RFID tags can transmit information to devices designed to pick up the signals and interpret them. Some privacy advocates worry that a day will come when a library book's tag could broadcast information about a patron to anyone nearby with a tag-reading device -- stalkers, snoops, corporate marketers, or G-men."

Scott Carlson. Talking Tags. The Chronicle of Higher Education. August 6, 2004.

See also Electronic Frontier Foundation. ACTION ALERT: A Chance to Keep RFIDs Out of San Francisco Public Libraries.

Editor's note: See also SNTReport.com's prior story on library's RFID usage.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:48 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

August 02, 2004

SNTReport.com's Editor Writes About Libraries & Social Software

LLRX.com, an online publication dedicated to providing information professionals with the most up-to-date information on a wide range of technology-related issues, has published an article by SNTReport.com Editor in Chief K. Matthew Dames. The article, entitled "Social Software in the Library," discusses the role and uses of several social software applications within the library space.

"Most of the published literature about social software has been more about the commercial viability of services like Orkut, LinkedIn, Feedster, and Ryze. Missing from much of the discourse is an analysis of the practical and educational value of social software. There are few published articles that explain what social software is, how social software tools may be used to build knowledge networks, or the information professional’s role in using and mediating these tools."

"The purpose of this article is to fill that void. By its end, the reader should have a solid understanding of what social software is, and hopefully will understand how these tools may be used to help people and organizations work better and more collaboratively."

K. Matthew Dames. Social Software in the Library. LLRX.com. July 26, 2004.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 08:30 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

How Long Will Digital Data Last?

"If Moses had been handed the Ten Commandments on floppy disks, would word from on high have survived through the ages? Literal interpretations of the Bible aside, the answer, quite possibly, is no.

"In the digital era, consumers worry about the staying power of their sacred possessions. They fret about the permanence of computers and electronics gear. And they pray that the most prized digital treasures — family photographs — will last from one generation to the next.

"Digital longevity is a contradiction in terms. As consumers eye their aging PCs or pine for the latest camera or cell phone gadgetry, they must worry about the legacy of stuff left behind.

Edward C. Baig. Life Has Gotten Even Shorter in Digital Age. USA Today. July 26, 2004.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:00 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

July 28, 2004

More and More Libraries Using RFID

"This week, staffers at the Berkeley Public Library will begin putting radio frequency identification (RFID) tags in half of the 500,000 items in their collection.

"By implementing the system this fall, the Berkeley Public Library will join more than 300 libraries around the world that have already outfitted their books with RFID tags.

"But by embracing RFID, librarians have raised the ire of civil libertarians who have long looked askance at the technology. They find it alarming that librarians, who are normally among society's staunchest defenders of intellectual freedom and First Amendment values, are contributing to the electronic erosion of privacy."

Katharine Mieszkowski. The Checkout Line -- or The Check-You-Out Line? Salon. July 26, 2004.

See also Berkeley Public Library. Best Practices for RFID Technology. (.pdf) No date.

(Editor’s Note: Salon.com normally requires a paid subscription, but you can view articles if you register for a free day pass.)

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:01 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

July 22, 2004

Federal Grants to Ensure Future of Librarianship

"The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), the federal agency that supports the nation's museums and libraries, has awarded $14,790,543 to library schools and library service organizations to recruit and educate new librarians to help offset a looming national shortage.

"Librarians make accessible the resources and services that help to stimulate and support learning throughout life. The grants IMLS makes today will ensure the future of librarianship in America that creates and sustains our nation of learners."

"For a contact list of the organizations funded with descriptions of their winning grant projects, please see the attached list."

Eileen Maxwell and Mamie Bittner. Over $14.7 Million to Recruit New Librarians for 21st Century. Institute of Museum and Library Services. July 13, 2004.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:06 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

July 21, 2004

How Law can Help Bridge the Digital Divide

"My regular Toronto Star Law Bytes column discusses how law can help bridge the digital divide.

"The column reflects on a recent United Nations sponsored meeting on e-commerce law in Asia which highlighted not only great enthusiasm of the developing world, but also how many are being poorly advised by conflicted consultants, self-interested companies, and some members of the intellectual property law community.

"The column coincides with my launch of the Techlawed Project, which will seek to provide pro bono technology law training assistance in the developing world as well as the announcement of a global Internet law conference featuring experts from 16 countries."

Michael Geist. Bridging the Digital Divide. Toronto Star. July 19, 2004.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:59 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Social Software Has Its Own Confab

This weekend, the Haas School of Business at the University of California, Berkeley is hosting BlogOn, an event that positions itself as "the first conference to examine in-depth the business of social media."

"It is not just for the professional blogger, but for forward-thinking investors, smart marketing executives and media company professionals who understand it is time to understand and harness this gathering disruptive phenomenon. BlogOn is for executives who want to see a sharper Big Picture for social media and to identify their options and opportunities."

From looking at the event's lineup, it seems like this conference is really for investors and business people from large media companies who haven't "gotten it" about social software, are afraid they will miss out on an income opportunity, and want to attend a weekend "skin-and-grin" to make sure they can place their capital in the right place in the event "this stuff takes off." Truly, it is a business conference -- "the business of social media," as it bills itself -- not a social software conference.

I hope I am wrong. I would like the conference speakers to address how social software can be a community-building, collaboration tool for all organizations, regardless of revenue stream. I would want to listen to ideas about how to keep social social software from devolving into the dreck that has become e-mail. I really like to hear about librarians and their role in fostering social software, and how libraries can serve as perfect test cases for social software use and implementation.

Somehow, though, I don't think such topics will make it into the conversation. Instead, the talk will be about investment, advertising, "monetization" (what a strange word), and venture capital. In my view, that has been part of the problem with the social software "industry": some of the largest voices speaking abou social software discuss it purely from a business standpoint, not a utility standpoint.

But that's just fine: collaboration, knowledge networks, communities of practice, and the people that are involved in them ... this is what SNTReport.com is about.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 07:30 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

July 16, 2004

Report on Patriot Act Receiving Backlash

"A report (.pdf) submitted to Congress by Attorney General Ashcroft on the government’s use of the Patriot Act omits key information and avoids any mention of numerous controversial provisions of the law, the American Civil Liberties Union said.

"President Bush and Attorney General Ashcroft need to spend less time waging public relations campaigns and more time responding to the specific, legitimate concerns of the American people.

"This report is troubling not only in what it says, but in what it doesn't say. It contains no mention whatsoever of some of the sections that Americans find most objectionable. The memo also misrepresents some of the sections that it does discuss."

American Civil Liberties Union. Ashcroft’s Patriot Act Report to Congress Omits Key Information, ACLU Says. July 13, 2004.

See also:
American Civil Liberties Union. FBI Forced to Turn Over Documents Under Court Order. June 17, 2004.
American Civil Liberties Union. Supreme Court Ends Term With Reaffirmation of Rule of Law During Times of National Crisis. June 29, 2004.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:35 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

July 15, 2004

Journals Ignoring Conflicts of Interest

"Some leading scientific and medical journals do not always enforce their conflict of interest policies with the authors of published studies, according to a new report.

"The Center for Science in the Public Interest found that in some cases the journals did not disclose contributing authors' financial conflicts of interest even though the journals' own rules require such disclosures.

"The most obvious conflicts were reported, such as when the research was funded by a company that employs the author. But the CSPI researchers found hidden conflicts in which there was no direct link, but the researcher stood to benefit from the same industry."

Robert Davis. Journals, Authors Cited for Conflicts of Interest. USAToday. July 12, 2004.

See also:
Merrill Goozner. Unrevealed:Non-Disclosure of Conflicts of Interest In Four Leading Medical and Scientific Journals. (.pdf) The Center for Science in the Public Interest. July 12, 2004.
The Center for Science in the Public Interest. Readers Consider the Source, But Media Don’t Always Give It. July 8, 2004.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:52 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Details Using Patriot Act Revealed

"Seeking to bolster support for the Patriot Act, the Justice Department provided Congress on Tuesday with details of numerous cases in which the anti-terrorism law has been used.

"The 29-page report (.pdf) is part of a Bush administration effort to discourage Congress from weakening a law that critics say threatens civil liberties by giving authorities more latitude to spy on people. Key sections of the law expire at the end of 2005.

"Release of the document comes less than a week after House Republican leaders barely turned back an amendment (.pdf) that would have prevented the FBI from using Patriot Act authority to obtain library and bookstore records."

[Editor's note: In July 2002, Assistant Attorney General Daniel Bryant outlined four letters (.pdf) to Congress detailing how the Patriot Act has been used to conduct Internet and electronic surveillance.]

Associated Press. Ashcroft Details Uses of Patriot Act. CNN.com. July 13, 2004.

See Also Curt Anderson. Justice Dept. Details Patriot Act Cases. Yahoo! News. July 13, 2004.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:34 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

July 13, 2004

Libraries Maintain Ethics

"Librarians across the state are crying foul over a widespread request for library cardholder information, and some argue the query amounts to an attack on privacy rights.

"A law student and clerk at the firm of Flory & Associates in Okemos, has demanded libraries hand over patron names, addresses, telephone numbers and e-mail addresses from at least 85 Michigan libraries.

"His request is made under the Michigan Freedom of Information Act, which allows the public access to documents created or held by a public body."

Amy Lee. Libraries Uphold Privacy. Detnews.com. July 6, 2004.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:45 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

July 12, 2004

Curbing Patriot Act Defeated

"The Republican-led House bowed to a White House veto threat Thursday and stood by the USA Patriot Act, defeating an effort to block the part of the anti-terrorism law that helps the government investigate people's reading habits.

"The effort to defy Bush and bridle the law's powers lost by 210-210, with a majority needed to prevail.

"The effort to curb the Patriot Act was pushed by a coalition of Democrats and conservative Republicans. But they fell short in a showdown that came just four months before an election in which the conduct of the fight against terrorism will be on the political agenda."

Alan Fram. Bush Wins; House Leaves Patriot Act As Is. Yahoo! News. July 8, 2004.

See also:
Eric Lichtblau. GOP Lobbying Defeats Bid to Curb Patriot Act. Houston Chronicle. July 9, 2004.
Clint Talbot. Congress Keeps Spy Times in Libraries. DailyCamera.com. July 9, 2004.
Associated Press. Library Chief May Refuse to Give Feds Info About Patrons. HeraldTribune.com. July 5, 2004.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:30 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

July 10, 2004

Librarians Reinventing Profession

"Gone are the days of shushing and the Dewey decimal system, of linoleum floors and musty volumes.

"Now, being a librarian takes Internet savvy, organization, keen business sense and a touch of a detective's skills.

"Librarians often manage a company's information resources, including 'best practices' that successful company veterans want to pass on to a firm's new hires. Another new avenue is corporate intelligence, or staying one step ahead of the competition."

Kathy Carlson. Librarians Burst Stereotype and Break Out of the Stacks. Cincinnati.com. July 5, 2004.

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 06:07 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

July 08, 2004

AALL Blogs 2004 Convention

Kudos to the American Association of Law Libraries, which has decided to publish an official blog of its 97th Annual Convention & Meeting. (The AALL Convention is being held this year in Boston, MA from July 10 through July 14.)

I have some observations about the effort.

1. Syndication: The use of both RSS and Atom syndication provides good access coverage. More blogs should offer dual-platform syndication.

2. Writers: How does AALL determine who will have publishers' privileges? The blog makes reference to a group called "The HUB Bloggers," but there is no biographical information available on the group or its members. As a result, a reader cannot get background information on the reader, their affiliation with AALL, or their connection to the Conference.

(Further, one of the most recent posts is from Raquel Ortiz, who I know is involved in the Webmaster's Developers workshop. But Ortiz is not listed as a part of the "HUB" group, nor is her bio or connection to the blog -- or the Association -- mentioned anywhere on the site.)

3. Posts: The length of some posts is too long, even though such postings seem to use Blogger's extended entry function. (The extended entry function allows lengthy postings to be divided across the main page and a referral page. This feature keeps lengthy postings from taking up too much space on the main page.)

Here at SNTReport.com, we send most of the text over to a jump page -- with just the lead paragraphs on the main page -- whenever we have a posting that is dense with text, or more than three paragraphs. (Note, for example, how this posting jumps from the main page to a referral page, which has the entire story, after the second paragraph.)

To be sure, a lot of this is a "feel" thing -- if the entry feels lengthy, it probably should be split after a couple of paragraphs and "jumped" to a referral page. Having said that, some of the posts here should jump to a referral page much higher in the story.

4. Classification: Where is it? It is inexcusable for a librarian or library association to publish anything that lacks requisite classification and metadata. The blog has disparate postings about traveling to Maine, Special Interest Section (SIS) events, and newsletters all in the same blog. The blog seems to lack a core theme -- which is another story altogether -- but convention coverage, while ambitious, can work if there is a strong classification scheme that allows readers to look exclusively at specific topics. Without such a scheme, content chaos will surely ensue.

5. Layout: I really like the layout. There is a good amount of white space, but given the density of the content, I think the white space is a welcome addition. (Granted, if the stories were jumped to another page, it might seem that there is too much white space, but multiple postings throughout the convention will probably take care of that.)

6. Key Information: What, no navigational link to the Hynes Convention Center?

7. Extras: From the "that would be really cool" department:
(a) Send the blog -- or at least certain blog categories -- to mobile devices;
(b) Allow authors to post to the blog -- or "moblog" -- through mobile devices or phones (actually, that might be more of a necessity than a luxury given the pace of the convention and the mobile nature of its participants);
(c) Publish multimedia snippets from some of the sessions, AALL officers, and blog authors.

(There is also a possibility that AALL could sell ad space on the blog, but I'll refrain from going down that road right now. I fear that such an initiative would become the exclusive domain of vendors such as West and Lexis, and I think vendors -- especially West and Lexis -- already have a disproportionate amount of influence on the Annual Convention and its proceedings.)

Overall, this is a good effort, but it needs to be polished for the 2005 meeting in San Antonio.

One last thing. In the spirit of city of Boston (which is also hosting the Democratic National Convention later this month) and the current presidential election year, I would like to take this opportunity to campaign for giving a blog to AALL's Washington Affairs Office, headed by Robert Oakley and Mary Alice Baish.

Almost everything that the Office publishes -- Action Alerts, press releases, amicus curiae briefs, statments -- could be published quicker and more efficiently using a high-powered blog platform. More importantly, the Office should use a blog to syndicate its content across the Web so that other interested parties are notified instantly about issues and topics. This last feature is critical given the Office's need for instant galvanization and response to copyright, privacy and access issues. (Case in point: the INDUCE Act (.pdf))

Frankly, I think it is foolish for the Association to continue to publish this sort of information in any other form besides a well-formed blog. And because I am so convinced of the efficacy of this initiative, I'll go even one step further: I offer right here and now to set up the blog for the AALL Washington Affairs Office on the Association's servers (or those of the Georgetown University Law Library, where the Washington Office's site is currently hosted) and train Bob and Mary Alice on how to use it for free.

Do I have any takers?

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 08:59 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

June 22, 2004

Library Stacks Going Digital

"For the last few years, librarians have increasingly seen people use online search sites not to supplement research libraries but to replace them. Recently librarians stopped lamenting the trend and started working to close the gap between traditional scholarly research and the incomplete, often random results of a Google search.

"A three-year study of research habits, including surveys of 1,233 students across the country, that concluded that electronic resources have become the main tool for information gathering, particularly among undergraduates.

"Librarians have to respond to these new ways and come up with a way to make better research material available online. That means working with commercial search engines to make ever more digital-research materials searchable."

Katie Hafner. Old Search Engine, the Library, Tries to Fit Into a Google World. The New York Times. June 21, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:48 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

June 14, 2004

Syracuse University Library Adds IM Reference Feature

I just received a notification that the Syracuse University Library is offering reference service via instant messaging, or IM.

"LibChat is a reference service that provides online, interactive assistance to Syracuse University students, faculty, and staff engaged in research activities from both on- and off-campus locations. The service is open to those who have questions about Syracuse University, the Library or its collections. LibChat is staffed by reference librarians from Syracuse University Library."

The service, which apparently has been operating since February given bibliographic information on the LibChat Web page, is available for 34 hours during the summer semester. Hopefully, we can get an interview with an SU librarian and publish a Connections column on this initiative in the near future.

Syracuse University Library. Welcome to Chat. Feb. 17, 2004.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 08:30 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Cities Reject PATRIOT Act

"In the past two years, more than 300 cities and four states have passed resolutions calling on Congress to repeal or change parts of the USA Patriot Act that, activists say, violate constitutional rights such as free speech and freedom from unreasonable search and seizure.

"Barring that, the resolutions declare that their communities will uphold the constitutional rights of their residents should federal law enforcement agents come knocking on the door of local authorities for assistance in tracking residents. This means local authorities will insist on complying with federal orders only in ways that do not violate constitutional rights. The resolutions are not binding, however, and do not affect the federal government's actions."

Kim Zetter. Cities Say 'No' to the Patriot Act. Wired News. June 7, 2004.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 07:09 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Report on the Information Commons

"The Internet offers unprecedented possibilities for human creativity, global communication, and access to information. Yet digital technology also invites new forms of information enclosure. In the last decade, mass media companies have developed methods of control that undermine the public's traditional rights to use, share, and reproduce information and ideas. These technologies, combined with dramatic consolidation in the media industry and new laws that increase its control over intellectual products, threaten to undermine the political discourse, free speech, and creativity needed for a healthy democracy.

"In response to the crisis, librarians, cyber-activists, and other public interest advocates have sought ways to expand access to the wealth of resources that the Internet promises, and have begun to build online communities, or "commons," for producing and sharing information, creative works, and democratic discussion. This report documents the information commons movement, explains its importance, and outlines the theories and "best practices" that have developed to assist its growth."

Nancy Kranich. The Information Commons: A Public Policy Report. The Free Expression Policy Project. (.pdf version) 2004.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 07:00 AM | Send to a friend!

June 08, 2004

Apple's Rendezvous Expands to PocketPC Platform

"Apple Computer released a very unique network recognition system, aptly named Rendezvous as part of its OSX operating system. The basic role of Rendezvous is to allow machines, and inadvertently their operators, to locate available networks and initiate conversations, in one form or another. For the most part, these conversations are either social a la user-user chat or functional a la synchronization, streaming, and sharing of files/resources.

"In the next few weeks, the Rendezvous methodology of auto-discovery will be unlatched from Apple, and more importantly from the desktop and destined for your pocket. A bright developer, Razvan Dragomirescu of Simedia, is poised to release his newest application: Pocket Rendezvous."

Get Real. Pocket Rendezvous: Spawning Connectivity. June 3, 2004.

See also

Andrew Orlowski. Promiscuous BluePod File Swapping -- Coming to a PDA Near You. The Register. June 3, 2004.

Technobiblio. Thoughts on "Rendezvous" Services in Libraries for Our Users. June 4, 2004. ("What if library patrons had their wireless device and we had a 'book locator server' that they could link to that would help get them to the book with step-by-step directions? Do a catalog look-up wirelessly, say you want to find that book, and your wireless device tells the server where you are in relation to that book and gives you 'MapQuest' directions?")

Andrew Orlowski. Apple's ‘BluePod’ – Promiscuous Exchanges with Strangers. The Register. Dec. 6, 2002.

Apple. Rendezvous: Networking Simplified. No date.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 08:12 AM | Send to a friend!

June 04, 2004

RIAA Seeks to Restrict Legal Copies

"Record labels say CD sales have plummeted as a result of copies--and copies of copies. Now the labels are testing technology that would limit the number of times a CD, or its copy, could be burned.

"Tools under review by the major labels would limit the number of backups that could be made from ordinary compact discs and prevent copied, or 'burned,' versions from being used to create further copies, according to Macrovision and SunnComm International, rival companies that are developing competing versions of the digital rights management software."

"Such anticopying efforts have met with consumer resistance in the past, but if the labels have their way, it may be that not only CDs, but also iTunes-style digital downloads, will be restricted."

(Editor's Note: Jenny Levine, editor of The Shifted Librarian, points out that the industry seems willing to allow corporate partners to give away downloads, but will not allow the same opportunity for libraries.)

John Borland. Labels to Dampen CD Burning?. News.com. June 2, 2004.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 07:25 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Visualize Your Blog

"Video blogs don't require sophisticated equipment, just a PC or a Mac, a high-speed connection and a digital video camera as well as a hosted weblogging service like TypePad and, if you want, editing software such as Apple's Final Cut Pro or iMovie.

"Although millions of text-driven blogs have blossomed worldwide, there are only a couple hundred video blogs out there."

Jeffrey Ressner. See Me, Blog Me. Time. May 31, 2004.

Attribution:: SNTReport.com first discovered news of the video blogs through a posting on Library Stuff, edited by Steve Cohen. Cohen also made the following observation about video blogs: "Librarians, think of the possibilities of using video clips in your weblogs. There can be real-time tutorials on how to use the online catalogs and fee-based databases, or a tour of the library (just a few that popped in my head)."

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 06:14 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

June 03, 2004

Elsevier to Allow Pre-Production Posts

"According to a post on the SPARC Open Access Forum, Elsevier has declared they will allow authors who publish in any of their 1,700+ journals to put their peer-reviewed post-prints on their personal webpages and their own institutional repositories, where they can be made available, for free, to anyone with internet access.

"This does sound like a big shift on Elsevier's part, and now that Elsevier has made this concession, it is crucial that authors take the next steps to ensure that their research is made available to wider audiences.

"But I still see plenty of challenges here for librarians, who will have to continue advocating for open access, promoting institutional repositories, and developing ways for all that material to be made accessible through simple search systems.

"Does all this mean that Elsevier has seen the light? I wouldn't bet on it."

Commons-Blog. Elsevier to Allow Open Access Archiving. May 27, 2004.

Updates:

Richard Wray. Reed Allows Academics Free Web Access. The Guardian. June 3, 2004.

Reed Elsevier. Comments on Evolutions in Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishing and Reflections on Possible Implications of Open Access Journals for the UK. (.pdf) February 2004.

Attribution: SNTReport.com first discovered news of the Guardian article and the Elsevier report through a posting in beSpacific, edited by Sabrina Pacifici.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 08:20 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Library Associations Form Information Access Alliance

"Libraries conduct business with numerous companies to acquire scholarly resources for their user communities. Over the last 10 to 15 years, however, many of these companies have been bought and sold, resulting in fewer and fewer publishers in the commercial marketplace.

"Within scholarly publishing, librarians have watched the number of companies shrink while prices rise and service declines. Individually, library associations in the United States have conveyed their concerns about major mergers to the Department of Justice. These included the 1991 purchase of Pergamon Press by Elsevier Science, the Thomson-West merger of 1996, the proposed merger of Reed Elsevier and Wolters Kluwer in 1997, and the purchase by Reed Elsevier of Harcourt General in 2001.

"The Association of College & Research Libraries, recognizing that it was time for a new strategy in confronting mergers, invited colleagues from several other library organizations to discuss how to pool efforts on a more public-policy focused effort to bring attention to this issue. Out of these discussions in spring 2002, the Information Access Alliance was born.

Mary M. Case. Information Access Alliance: Challenging Anticompetitive Behavior in Academic Publishing. C&RL; News. June 2004.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 07:33 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

June 02, 2004

The Continuing Need for the Commons

I found this intriguing editorial published in the Christian Science Monitor, and written by one of its former writers. What struck me particularly about the piece was that libraries remain true to the ideas -- and ideals -- of a commons, yet many communities fail to recognize them as such.

"Every invention, business technique, story, and song draws on what has come before. I couldn't write this, nor you read it, without the English language - a gift to both of us. We all stand on many shoulders; and earlier concepts of property acknowledged this.

"Nowhere was this thinking more evident than in the realm of invention and ideas. America itself is an idea, the first nation so conceived; so the views of the Founders on this point are especially telling. Jefferson and Madison considered the mind to be the mother lode of freedom, and they wanted no restrictions - private or public - on its fruits. The copyright and patent clause of the Constitution generally restricts these private monopolies to limited times; and this provision is of a piece with the First Amendment protections of freedom of speech."

Jonathan Rowe. Our Dangerous Distance Between the Private and the Commons. Christian Science Monitor. May 27, 2004.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 07:09 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

May 31, 2004

Public Media's Role in the Digital Age

First Monday is one of my favorite publications, and this article illustrates why. The topic is slightly beyond what we normally cover here at SNTReport.com, but given its applicability to what libraries do and provide, I thought it a welcome departure.

The paper was presented at the Fifth Annual Conference on Libraries and Museums in the Digital World, sponsored by the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

"The other phenomenon is that we’re rapidly moving beyond the one–way mass communications model to one in which there is increasing interaction between members of the audience and the communicators, and among members of the audience as well. Interactive media are taking many new forms, including the use of cell phone text messaging for audiences to register their responses to broadcast programming. Viewers and listeners and readers go online to participate in forums and conversations, and to access additional audio, video and text which were not included in the broadcast program.

"But what is 'the voice' with which they hear us speaking when they visit with us online?"

David B. Liroff. The Power and Problems of Public Media. First Monday. May 2004.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 08:19 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

May 29, 2004

Better Building, Fewer Hours

Such an irony: build a new library building that costs $165 million, cut service hours by 15 percent ...

Rebekah Denn. Jewel of a Building Will Still Have Shortened Hours. Seattle Post-Intelligencer. May 20, 2004.

... but the building still has books.

Michael Upchurch. The Real Star of Seattle's Central Library? The Books. Seattle Times. May 23, 2004.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 07:16 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

May 26, 2004

Library Leads University Blog Initiative

"With the April launch of UThink, a program under the library's auspices to offer free blogs to the university community, the University of Minnesota is among the first university libraries to become the center for blogging. Blogging has become popular on campuses nationwide but not necessarily sponsored by the academic library. UM asserts that blogging is key to the library's mission, from collecting 'campus history' to facilitating academic discourse."

Andrew Albanese. UM Library Offers Free Blogs. Library Journal. May 17, 2004.

University of Minnesota University Libraries. UThink: Blogs at the University Libraries. April 12, 2004.

University of Minnesota University Libraries. UThink FAQ. No date.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 07:25 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

FTC Holds Info Session on RFID

(Editor's Note: Given the implications of RFID for libraries, librarians and other information professionals who work in and around the library environment may be very interested in this.)

"The FTC has extended until July 9, 2004 the deadline for filing comments on “Radio Frequency Identification: Applications and Implications for Consumers.” On April 12, 2004, the agency announced that it will hold a workshop to 'explore the uses, efficiencies, and implications for consumers associated with radio frequency identification (RFID) technology. The workshop will address both current and anticipated uses of RFID tags and their impact on the marketplace.'"

Federal Trade Commission. Announced Action for May 20, 2004.

Federal Trade Commission. Radio Frequency IDentification: Applications and Implications for Consumers.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 06:52 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

May 10, 2004

Upgrading Librarians' Skills

"Blog! The tools are free. Blog internally and externally. Promote your stuff to your users. Promote the library to the staff. Bring out your staff's hidden creativity. It's time well spent.

"Send out your Web content via RSS. Not everyone may know what's up with RSS but they soon will. That little on your site says a lot!"

Michael Stephens. 10 Things A Library Can Do to Boost their Techie Stuff. Tame the Web. May 8, 2004.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 01:32 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

April 30, 2004

Libraries In Danger; New Directions Necessary

During the past week, two library advocate organizations have issued reports that detail extensive funding cuts to libraries, and one of the organizations warns that libraries must change their managerial directions and service offerings if they are to remain relevant -- or even open -- in the future.

The first report was issued in the form of a database by the American Library Association, the largest library representative organization in the United States. The ALA findings confirm what many librarians have known for some time: many of the country's libraries continue to lose funding at an alarming rate. The ALA documents several trends that suggest American libraries are endangered species: library personnel and operating hours have been reduced, patronage is down, and there is an increased reliance on non-professionals in critical functions.

"ALA has found that libraries in at least 41 states (82 percent) report funding cuts of as much as 50 percent," said the Association. "Most of the data accumulated from published reports reflects deep cuts to library budgets on the federal, state, and local levels. Many 'positive' news stories describe a status quo situation—library staff are relieved that their limited budgets aren’t reduced further or that fundraising efforts are underway to close funding gaps."

This trend is not isolated to the United States, according to Libri, a UK-based charity whose mission is to "encourage a vibrant and relevant public library network, where the local library can develop as a centre of community involvement, and which everyone in the local community wants to use."

Libri has commissioned a study that points out that British archives and museums are being used more, yet the public is ignoring the country's libraries. "In the past seven years, use of museums and archives in this country has doubled. Since visitors have been recorded, use of the public library service has fallen each year until 2003/4, for which figures are yet to be fully reported," according to the executive summary. "In the library service there is so much good work in progress to introduce reading to those who are excluded and to those who are isolated. Libraries have always been a centre for learning through life."

"However, today’s reality is that if we do not address the fundamental structural problems of the library service, there may be no libraries to provide these excellent services to readers in ten or fifteen years’ time," the report continued. "Those who are responsible for libraries must change what they are doing, and the way they approach their work. Change in the library service requires change in the library profession and in the way in which library professionals are managed."

An article in the Guardian about the Libri report was even more direct. "[Libraries] stock too few new books, are not open at times that suit the public and are burdened with too many expensive administrators," according to the article. "Figures on the declining popularity of the service have spurred the government to call a high-level meeting to try to find answers to what is seen as a gathering crisis."

The libraries summit, as it is being called, will be convened on June 21 by the media and heritage minister Lord McIntosh, said the Guardian.

One possible way to save libraries is to transform them into "discovery centers," according to a BBC news report. "More needs to done to attract people through the doors," according to the article. "Discovery centres will therefore offer additional services such as IT facilities, access to lifelong learning, local history information, archives and museum displays to attract new visitors."

The message from these reports is clear: libraries (and those who work in them) need to better serve their customers. We believe that one way libraries can do this is by using technology to foster and extend community. Community always has been the advantage that libraries have had over other institutions, but libraries have been very slow to develop community beyond the walls of the physical building.

The "discovery center" concept described above demands that librarians use technology in novel ways in order to extend the library virtually. More than anything, though, libraries must have librarians that are ready, willing, and able to implement fresh ideas that will attract a new generation of users.

American Library Association. ALA's Report on Library Funding in the United States. No date.

American Library Association. National Study Finds Library Funding Cuts in 41 States. (Press release.) April 19, 2004.

John Ezard. British Libraries Could Shut by 2020. Guardian Unlimited. April 28, 2004.

Ian Herbert. Hi-tech centres to save libraries. BBC. April 27, 2004.

Tim Coates. Who's In Charge: Responsibility for the Public Library Service. (.pdf) Libri. No date.

UPDATE: The Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals responds to Who's In Charge?

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 05:57 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (1)

April 28, 2004

RFID for Library Books?

"The chief librarian of the San Francisco Public Library is considering spending almost $1 million over two years to replace bar codes and magnetic strips with RFID tags on books, videos and other library materials. Although I appreciate City Librarian Susan Hildreth's desire to streamline the check-in/check-out process, I think using RFID tags is a bad idea.

"Although I believed Hildreth when she told me during a telephone interview earlier this month that she doesn't want anything such as a title or bibliographic information contained in the RFID, there's no law or rule that would prevent subsequent library chiefs from adding that information."

Cameron Sturdevant. No RFID for Library Books. eWeek. March 23, 2004.

Update: American Library Association. RFID: A Brief Bibliography. March 2004.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 05:45 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

April 13, 2004

Solving the Scholarly Publishing Conundrum?

"Google, the popular search-engine company, has teamed up with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and 16 other universities around the world to provide a way to search the institutions' collections of scholarly papers, according to university officials.

"A pilot test of the project is just getting under way. If all goes as planned, the search feature could appear on Google in a few months, said MacKenzie Smith, associate director of technology for MIT's libraries. She said the search would probably be an option on Google's advanced-search page."

One of the most troubling issues that universities face these days is how to manage the crushing expense of subscriptions to scholarly journals (or the databases that house past issues of those journals). This effort by Google may turn out to be one of several steps -- others include MIT's DSpace and the Public Library of Science --that make scholarly research more widely available, and at a more affordable cost.

Jeffrey R. Young. Google Teams Up With 17 Colleges to Test Searches of Scholarly Materials. The Chronicle of Higher Education. April 9, 2004.

Patrick Brown. For Cracking the Spine of the Science Cartel. Wired. April 2004. (This article was written to commemorate the Public Library of Science winning the Science category of the 2004 Rave Awards.)

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 06:40 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

April 05, 2004

Introducing SNTReport.com’s Connections Column: Suchi Mohanty

Today, we debut our Connections column. The purpose of Connections is to interview an information professional who is using social software tools in unique and interesting ways.

In our first Connections column, we are pleased to publish an interview with librarian Suchi Mohanty.

Mohanty, 25, is a reference and instruction librarian at the R. B. House Undergraduate Library at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. For nearly one year, Mohanty has been an integral part of an initiative in which House librarians use Web logs and instant messaging in order to communicate with and service their clientele. (In addition, the House library makes social hardware software tools available for checkout, including laptop computers and wireless cards.)

These initiatives, which target a core audience that ranges from 18 to 22 years old, point to the increased – and natural – use of social software in the library environment.

SNTReport.com's Founder and Editor K. Matthew Dames interviewed Mohanty on April 1, 2004.

SNTReport.com: How did the IM initiative start?
Mohanty: I guess I should start by telling you about the background and history of our library. The House building was built in 1968. We closed in December 2000 in order to renovate, and reopened in August 2002. During the renovation period, the building was gutted and rebuilt to accommodate wireless and other technologies.

When we re-opened, we noticed that we weren’t getting the same level of business at reference desk. We began discussing this internally, trying to figure out why our numbers were dropping. One of the things we noticed was that the computer labs were always filled to capacity, and we got the idea that one reason people didn’t come to the reference desk was that they didn’t want to leave their computers; they feared they would lose their spot if they did so.

As a result, we developed the IM service as a response to that: students could send us questions from their computers without having to come to us at the desk, and possibly lose their computer time as a result.

We launched the IM initiative in May 2003, and ran it over the summer as a pilot program. We got very little response during the pilot: we had about 20 questions over the whole summer. But once the fall semester began, our numbers exploded. In October [2003], we got 245 IM questions, and in November we got 395 questions. Last month [March 2004], we got 202 questions. Our peak times are around exams.

SNTReport.com: Who is your main audience?
Mohanty: Our main audience is the undergraduate student body. We get some business from graduate students, but they usually gravitate toward Davis, the campus' main library, or the departmental libraries.

Our policy says that the service is primarily for students at UNC-Chapel Hill, but we don’t exclude non-Chapel Hill students. We occasionally get questions from high school students in the area, and we’ve even had alums IM us from California.

SNTReport.com: What IM technology do you use?
Mohanty: We’re using AOL’s Instant Messenger as the main tool because it’s such a familiar tool for our undergraduates. We wanted to pick a software they were familiar with in order to eliminate any technology intimidation issues.

SNTReport.com: Where do your students IM from?
Mohanty: We originally envisioned that people inside the [library] building would use the IM service, but it has expanded to include people outside the library, including from the dorms. We do get IM from in the building, but the majority of our IM customers come from outside the building.

SNTReport.com: How do you handle IM questions in the overall reference mix?
Mohanty: In our policies, we state that IM service is for “brief” questions. We may ask patron to call us if the question is detailed or complicated. But, on the other hand, we IM’d with a student yesterday for more than an hour. The questions really vary in complexity.

We also state in our policies that people who are at the reference desk have priority over IM questions. If we are too busy at the desk, we usually tell the IM customer to wait a few minutes, and usually they are happy to wait. If we are away from the desk helping someone in the stacks, we’ll post an away message that includes a link to our Ask-A-Librarian page.

[Editor’s note: House’s IM service is open 68 hours per week, the same total hours and times that the Library's reference desk is open.]

SNTReport.com: How has the library and University administration responded to the IM initiative?
Mohanty: The head of the undergraduate library, Leah McGinnis, has been very supportive. Part of our mission statement is to test new technologies. We like the idea of offering service using a service students already familiar with. Other people on the campus seem to be very impressed with our success.

SNTReport.com: What other Chapel Hill libraries are using IM?
Mohanty: Well, the Math/Physics Library is experimenting with it now. The School of Information and Library Science is starting a trial this summer. And the main library, Davis, offers a chat service through LSSI, and they have had increased usage numbers as well.

[Editor's note: LSSI provides a virtual reference service that several public and university libraries use.]

SNTReport.com: What other social software initiatives are you using at the Library?
Mohanty: We are using a blog as well. We started the blog pilot at the same time as our IM pilot. The blog idea came from a graduate student in the LIS school, Jean Ferguson, who worked in our instruction program. The purpose of the blog is to provide an alternative space for communication, and to draw students into library. Again, the overall goal has been to take a technology that students are familiar with in the recreational arena, and adapt it to our academic purposes.

[Editor's note: The online publication blogwithoutalibrary.net maintains a listing of public, special and academic libraries that use blogs.]

SNTRreport.com: What is the future of these initiatives?
Mohanty: We’ve been doing both of these for almost a year now. We want to take the summer to evaluate the results, and we’d like to take time to develop more interest among staff. We’ve been thinking about offering LSSI as a supplement, but we may hold off on that because IM is perfect for what we do.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 06:30 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

March 01, 2004

New Roles for Vanguard Librarians

CIO Magazine recently published an article about the chameleon-like qualities a modern chief information officer must have in order to run today's information organization.

The most interesting thing about this article is that it describes the modern chief librarian as well.

Have any ideas about librarians' roles in the 21st century? Please post a comment below.

Michael Fitzgerald. "Chief Beggar, Fortune-Teller and Juggler". CIO. March 1, 2004.

Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 09:40 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)