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August 11, 2005

An Open Access Webliography

Adrian K. Ho and Charles W. Bailey Jr. have created an Open Access Webliography which includes a comprehensive range of useful freely available internet resources related to the open access movement.

Attribution: SNTReport.com first discovered news of this Webliography through a posting in Open Access News, edited by Peter Suber.

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July 21, 2005

Pirates Digitize New Harry Potter Book

"The latest Harry Potter tome was not released as an ebook because of fears over piracy - a plan as cunning as any of Baldrick's.

"Unfortunately some committed fans/pesky pirates immediately scanned the book on its release last weekend and used optical recognition software to digitise the text. Copies were then proof-read, not very well from the bits we've seen, before being released.

John Oates. Harry Potter Hit by Pesky Pirates. The Register. July 20, 2005.

See also:
TeleRead. Illegal But Beautifully Read: Net.radio Performance of New Harry Potter Book. July 17, 2005.

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July 18, 2005

Efforts to Peek at Paid Content

"Popular wisdom holds that you can find anything on the Web. And if you're looking for information on products, transportation schedules, or tourist attractions, it's probably true.

"But there is a vast body of knowledge hidden either in the so-called deep Web that browsers can't find or in those archaic but wonderful repositories called books.

"Two factors combine to make so much valuable and authoritative information inaccessible."

Stephen H. Wildstrom. The Web Hits the Stacks. BusinessWeek. July 14, 2005.

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July 09, 2005

OCLC Launches Reference Service Pilot

"Over the next few months, a series of pilot projects will expand OCLC’s Open WorldCat project into a full-featured, Web-integrated library service.

"In December 2004, OCLC opened WorldCat, its master union catalog of library holdings, to Google, Yahoo! Search, and other outlets.

"Initially, the material accessible to the Web search engines was books and monographs. With the new eSerials pilot project, OCLC will begin expanding content to electronic journal collections."

Barbara Quint. OCLC Pilots Traditional Libraries into Web Services. Information Today. July 5, 2005.

See also:
Online Computer Library Center. How the Open WorldCat Program Works.

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:33 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

July 08, 2005

A Lifecycle Approach to Electronic Records

"Forget gigabytes or even terabytes.

"The National Archives and Records Administration’s creation of a permanent online archive of its electronic records is one of the few projects anywhere in which data storage is measured by the petabyte — a quadrillion bytes — and that is what fascinates Steve Hansen.

"But the project is significant not just for its mammoth size. It is the highest-profile example of the growing trend of information lifecycle management, a strategy for managing records from their creation to their use to how they are archived."

Alice Lipowicz. Long Live E-Records!. Washington Technology. July 5, 2005.

See also:
David Talbot. The Fading Memory of the State. Technology Review. July 2005.

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July 05, 2005

Hurst Addresses TIFF Archive Debate

While catching up on some back reading, I discovered that Jill Hurst-Wahl has addressed an issue that should interest many who are involved in digitization, digital libraries, or preservation. Why does the library community insist on having images encoded in the Tag Image File Format (TIFF) instead of a high-quality file encoded in the much more popular (and portable) Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) format?

Jill and I discussed this recently while on a site visit to Kirtas Technologies, which produces a high quality book scanner that includes a Canon digital camera that shoots images at an astounding 16 megapixels. If you have that sort of quality, do you really need a TIFF image?

Digitization 101. Mega JPEG files vs. TIFF. June 30, 2005.

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Harvard Scientists Digitize Records to Speed Research

"Harvard scientists are building a powerful computer system that will use artificial intelligence to scan the private medical files of 2.5 million people at local hospitals, as part of a government-funded effort to find the genetic roots of asthma and other diseases.

"The $20 million project -- which would probe more deeply and more quickly into medical records than human researchers are capable of -- is designed to find links between patients' DNA and illnesses.

"Although the effort could raise concerns about privacy, researchers say the new program, called ''I2B2' (for 'Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside') would respect the strict guidelines set out in federal and state laws, and could be a powerful tool for many kinds of research."

Gareth Cook. Harvard Project to Scan Millions of Medical Files. Boston Globe. July 4, 2005.

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June 30, 2005

Publishers Seek Delay for Google's Digitization Plans

"The Association of American Publishers has asked Google to suspend for six months its plan to digitize books from the collections of several major research libraries and make them searchable online.

"AAP Vice President for Legal and Governmental Affairs Allan R. Adler told the Chronicle of Higher Education that the group made the request in a June 10 letter that stopped short of calling for the project to 'cease and desist.' 'We’ve simply asked for a six-month moratorium to facilitate discussion,' said Adler.

"Adler said in the June 21 Chronicle that the letter was prompted by AAP members’ concern that they have not 'gotten satisfactory answers to their questions about copyright infringement.' It requested a meeting between Google executives and leaders of the publishing association."

American Libraries Online. Publishers’ Group Seeks Six-Month Delay in Google Library Project. June 22, 2005.

See also:
Jeffrey R. Young. Publishers' Group Asks Google to Stop Scanning Copyrighted Works for 6 Months. The Chronicle of Higher Education. June 21, 2005.

Editor's note See also SNTReport.com's prior stories here and here and here on concerns over Google's digitization.

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:33 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

Study: A Switch to Digital Publishing

"The vast majority of UK research material will be available in electronic form by 2020.

"According to a study (.pdf) commissioned by the British Library, 90% of newly published work will be available digitally by this time.

"Only half of this will also be available in print form, with just 10% of new titles available only in print."

BBC News. Publishing Makes Shift to Digital. June 29, 2005.

See also:
The British Library. Publishing Output to 2020. Jan. 29, 2004.

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June 29, 2005

France's Cultural Counter-Attack Against Google

"The French, concerned that the internet is in danger of becoming the exclusive preserve of the English language, are responding to Google's project to put 15 million books and documents online with their own French version.

"The French are far from relaxed about their creative treasures, and especially the contents of La Bibliothèque Nationale de France (BNF), their National Library.

"With the Google Print project planning to put 4.5 billion pages of English onto the web, France has decided to do something similar with French, though on a smaller scale."

David Reid. French Answer to Google Library. BBC News. June 25, 2005.

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June 23, 2005

Google Print Draws Flack from Publishers

" Publishers have finally had a chance to look at some of the details of Google's Print for Libraries project, a massive effort to digitize books that some publishers fear could violate copyright laws.

"So far, many publishers don't like what they see -- and they want Google to agree to a six-month moratorium.

Burt Helm. A New Page in Google's Books Fight. BusinessWeek Online. June 22, 2005.

See also:
Gary Price. Publishers Group Asks Google To Halt Scanning For 6 Months. SearchEngineWatch. June 21, 2005.

Daniel Brandt. Google-eyed U.Michigan Gives Away its Library. GoogleWatch.org. June 19, 2005.

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June 20, 2005

Photofinishers Refuse to Print High Quality Pics

"The advent of digital photography and editing has created a Cinderella story for the family snapshot. Ugly, off-center photos can be cleaned up, cropped, or retaken, with only the most professional-looking being sent off to the printer.

"But therein lies the hitch. Some photofinishers, worried about violating copyright law, are refusing to print any pictures that look too polished.

"Every photo is automatically protected by copyright law, and without negatives, it's harder to determine who the owner is. Clerks, who have guidelines but often limited training, have to try to judge what looks professional, lest the store get sued by a photographer whose livelihood is on the line."

Susan Llewelyn Leach. A Photo Too Good to be Yours?. Christian Science Monitor. June 20, 2005.

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Libraries: The Future Digital Resource Center

"Several years ago journalist John Lenger told a remarkable story in the Columbia Journalism Review about teaching a journalism class at Harvard’s extension school. He asked his young students to write a story about a Harvard land deal that occurred in 1732, but after a week of research, most came back with almost nothing substantial to report.

"The problem: They had done most of their research using the Internet, walking right past Harvard’s library and archives, where the actual information could be found.

"When Lenger questioned their research methods, one student replied that she assumed that anything that was important in the world was already on the Internet."

Michael Rogers. Turning Books Into Bits. MSNBC News. June 19, 2005.

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June 18, 2005

Will Google Adhere to Library Privacy Policies?

" A contract (.pdf) between Google and the University of Michigan released publicly on Friday contains no provisions for protecting the privacy of people who will eventually be able to search the school's vast library collection over the Internet.

"Google announced plans late last year to digitize and index as many as 7 million volumes of material from the University of Michigan to make them searchable on the Internet as part of its Google Print service, a searchable index of books.

"While the library projects have prompted copyright concerns from university groups and publishers, privacy issues are the latest wrinkle in Google's plans to expand the universe of Web-searchable data."

Elinor Mills. Privacy Issues with Google Library Search. News.com. June 17, 2005.

See also:
University of Michigan and Google, Inc. Cooperative Agreement between the University Library and Google. (.pdf) Dec. 14, 2004.

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June 11, 2005

Google Library Project Webcast

"On June 15, EDUCAUSE is offering a free webcast (advance registration required, however) featuring Reg Carr from Oxford and John Price Wilken from the University of Michigan speaking out the progress of the Google digitization programs at those institutions."

USC E-Resources Update. EDUCAUSE Webcast!. June 9, 2005.

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June 09, 2005

Archivist Creates BBS Documentary

"Before America Online, Friendster, forums and blogs, geeks communicated with one another in a clunky and pedestrian way that was the precursor to all subsequent forms of online communication.

"It was called a bulletin board system, or BBS, and was essentially a virtual living room where people hooked up remotely to chat, exchange freeware or play computer games, albeit at a really slow speed.

"Anyone nostalgic for those halcyon days can now thank digital archivist and filmmaker Jason Scott for BBS: The Documentary, a five-and-a-half-hour paean to the era when computers were named Stacy and Lisa, and tech loyalists fought bitter battles over the superiority of Ataris to Amigas."

Kim Zetter. How Humble BBS Begat Wired World. Wired News. June 8, 2005.

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GPO Releases Report on Metadata Specifications

"GPO is working with the library community on a national digitization plan, with the goal of digitizing a complete legacy collection of tangible U.S. Government publications. The objective is to ensure that the digital collection is available, in the public domain, for no-fee permanent public access through the FDLP.

"The project will ensure that the collection is digitally reformatted for preservation purposes. The digital preservation masters and the associated metadata will be preserved in the GPO electronic archive (in addition to any other places that the materials might be held), and there will be no-fee public access to the content through derivative files on GPO Access."

U.S. Government Printing Office. Report on the Meeting of Experts on Digital Preservation: Metadata Specifications. June 8, 2005.

See also:
U.S. Government Printing Office. Report on the Meeting of Experts on Digital Preservation: Metadata Specifications. (.pdf) (Revised Report.) June 2, 2005.

U.S. Government Printing Office. Report on the Meeting of Experts on Digital Preservation: Metadata Specifications. (.pdf) (Original Report.) June 14, 2004.

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June 06, 2005

German Publishers to Rival Google Print

"When the online retailer Amazon.com came calling a year ago to sign up German publishers for a digital indexing project, one book executive urged a strategy of polite rebuffs.

"Then this year, when Google started wooing publishers to sign on for its own digital book project, that German executive, Matthias Ulmer, decided the time was ripe to seize control with a homegrown counterattack.

"Now Mr. Ulmer and a five-member task force of the German book trade association Börsenverein are organizing their own digital indexing project, Volltextsuche Online. "

Doreen Carvajal. German Publishers Plan Challenge to Google Print. The New York Times. June 5, 2005.

See also:
Gary Price. German Publishers Plan Major Book Digitization Project. SearchEngineWatch. June 5, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

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Filmaker Preserves Culture Via Podcasts

"A filmmaker who has been collecting digital artifacts for 25 years is amassing the world's largest collection of podcasts, though he has little interest in actually listening to them.

"Jason Scott, a 34-year-old documentary filmmaker from the Boston area, has saved and cataloged more than 340 GB of online amateur radio since he started in February.

"Scott is currently monitoring and archiving some 1,500 podcasters using a $300 computer running a handwritten script that automatically downloads audio files to cheap hard drives."

Ryan Singel. Collector's Trove of Podcasts. Wired News. June 2, 2005.

See also:
ASCII by Jason Scott. All of the Podcasts. Feb. 26, 2005.

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June 04, 2005

Will Sony's PSP Play Books?

"Sony Computer Entertainment may be planning to bring digitized texts to the PlayStation Portable. The company recently filed trademarks for 'PSP Comics,' 'PSP Books' and 'PSP Magazine' with the Japan Patent Office.

"These trademarks could foretell future products, or they could simply be a cautionary measure to head off possible property poachers."

Hirohiko Niizumi. E-books Coming to PSP?. News.com. June 3, 2005.

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June 03, 2005

Open Access Momentum Continues to Grow

"'Sorry, but this article is available only to subscribers.' Try to view a science journal article online and, more often than not, that is the message you will see. This is not just a problem for members of the public - scientists and medical practitioners face it every day.

"There are so many science journals that no library can afford to subscribe to them all. The internet has the potential to give researchers instant access to all the information they need, but this potential is not exploited because scientific journals still operate a subscription-based model inherited from the days of print publishing."

Matthew Cockerill. Access All Articles. Guardian Unlimited. June 2, 2005.

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The New Yorker to be Available on DVD

"The New Yorker, the weekly magazine that started as 'a hectic book of gossip, cartoons and facetiae,' as Louis Menand once wrote, and has evolved into a citadel of narrative nonfiction and investigative reporting, will publish its entire 80-year archives on searchable computer discs this fall.

"The collection, titled 'The Complete New Yorker,' will consist of eight DVD's containing high-resolution digital images of every page of the 4,109 issues of the magazine from February 1925 through the 80th anniversary issue, published last February."

Edward Wyatt. 80 Years of The New Yorker to Be Offered in Disc Form. The New York Times. June 2, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Times allows free access to their stories on the Web for seven days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archive.)

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May 31, 2005

Amid Controversy, Google Print Launches

"Google opened the door to its online library late Thursday with the launch of a book-specific search page.

"Print.Google.Com makes official the search goliath's project to digitize the world's books. But the launch drew backlash from the Association of American University Presses, in the form of an open letter focusing on Google Library, a service that went live in December."

Susan Kuchinskas. Google Print Goes Live. InternetNews.com. May 27, 2005.

Related:
Gary Price. SafeSearch Doesn't Work On Google Print & Can Full Book Preview Prevention Be Hacked?. SearchEngineWatch. May 27, 2005.

See also:
Gary Price. New Interface Available: Search Only Material in the Google Print Database. SearchEngineWatch. May 26, 2005.

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May 27, 2005

Honeywell's Knowledge Network Reflects Culture

"Four years ago, corporate culture expert and consultant Rajat Paharia faced 'a sea of cubicles' at one of Honeywell International's offices. The place was faceless and gray and vast, with the muted crackling of a hundred hands typing away. 'There was nowhere for people to get together,' says Paharia. 'There was no sharing space.'

"However, sharing space, at least in the virtual sense, was precisely what Honeywell wanted to create with the help of Paharia and its own Digitization Group. The $24 billion technology and manufacturing leader, which has offices and facilities in 90 countries, was in the midst of building a powerful knowledge network within its prized employee portal, MyHoneywell.

"The idea was that this knowledge network would allow people to share intimate business knowledge with each other, and, in the process, would allow Honeywell to maximize the largely untapped resource of employee knowledge."

Tom Kaneshige. Counter Culture. Line56.com. May 25, 2005.

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May 24, 2005

AAUP Poses Questions & Concerns to Google

"A group of academic publishers called Google Inc.'s plan to scan millions of library books into its Internet search engine index a troubling financial threat to its membership.

"The Association of American University Presses said in a letter to Google that the online search engine's library project "appears to involve systematic infringement of copyright on a massive scale."

"The association, which represents 125 nonprofit publishers of academic journals and scholarly books, asked Google to respond to a list of 16 questions seeking more information about how the company plans to protect copyrights."

Michael Liedtke. Publishers Protest Google Library Project. Yahoo! News. May 24, 2005.

See also:
Jeffrey R. Young. University-Press Group Raises Questions About Google's Library-Scanning Project. The Chronicle of Higher Education. May 23, 2005.

Burt Helm. A Google Project Pains Publishers. BusinessWeek Online. May 23, 2005.

BusinessWeekOnline. The University Press Assn.'s Objections. May 23, 2005.

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May 17, 2005

Adobe Digital Media Store to Close

"Without any fanfare, the Adobe Digital Media Store, which was set up to showcase the versatility of the PDF format, will cease operations on June 3, 2005. According to its Web page, users no longer are able to purchase digital content, although they may download already purchased content and redeem gift certificates before the June closing date.

"Tom Prehn, senior business development manager at Adobe Systems Inc. and the creator of its Digital Media Store, said that the store, which was launched Oct. 31, 2003, sold a wide range of content, from best-selling novels and popular magazines to scientific papers. According to Prehn, the store became unnecessary as vendors such as Amazon.com and eBooks.com increasingly offered a broad range of e-docs for purchase."

Robyn Weisman. Adobe to Shut Down Digital Media Store. PDFZone. May 11, 2005.

See also:
Don Fluckinger. PDFs Don't Have to Be an Internet Blight. PDFZone. April 11, 2005.

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May 16, 2005

Google Library Project May Expand to Europe

"Mom and pop investors got a rare opportunity to question Google Inc. 's top executives Thursday, but most chose generally upbeat topics of inquiry at the search engine's first shareholder meeting.

"Google's executives used the opportunity to address the company's potential for growth abroad, its competition against Yahoo and Microsoft and its efforts to keep employees motivated.

"Many of Thursday's questions were routine. But a few elicited some nuggets of new information."

Verne Kopytoff. Google Shareholders Meet for First Time. SFGate.com. May 13, 2005.

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May 13, 2005

Google to Increase Global Presence

"Google Inc.'s top executives said yesterday that they are focused on aggressively increasing the search engine's business abroad, particularly in Europe, Japan, and China, where the number of new Internet users is growing faster than in the United States.

"Speaking at Google's first annual meeting since going public, chief executive Eric E. Schmidt told shareholders he anticipated that the company, which gets almost all of its revenue from advertising sales, would see a shift that would reflect its increasing global presence. The company's latest financial results show that it generates slightly less than two-thirds of its revenue domestically."

David A. Vise. Google to Focus on Expanding Its Business Overseas. WashingtonPost.com. May 13, 2005.

See also:
Doug Young. Google Steps Up Fight for the China Market. Reuters. May 11, 2005.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

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May 11, 2005

Stanford Launches GATT Digital Library

"For scholars interested in international commerce over the past 50 years, April 19 was a big day. On that day, the GATT Digital Library — a collection of 30,000 public documents and 200 reports related to the workings of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, or GATT — was uploaded online at http://gatt.stanford.edu. The library is the culmination of a six-year project to digitize and archive the GATT archives.

"The GATT executive-congressional agreement goes back to 1947, when several countries decided to reduce tariffs and establish international trade rules. After several rounds of modifications, the GATT was succeeded by the World Trade Organization, or the WTO, in 1993."

Rose Jenkins. Stanford, WTO Partnership Places Trade Documents Online. Stanford Daily. May 10, 2005.

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May 10, 2005

GPO, LOC to Utilize Web Harvesting

"Government Printing Office officials, who have a significant role in preserving government information, want to capture fugitive publications, which are documents that federal agencies have published on the Web but for which no copy or record exists in GPO's database.

"To recover such documents for preservation, GPO officials are interested in new software technologies such as Web harvesting, and they are reviewing proposals from companies that make such software.

"Web harvesting, sometimes called crawling or spidering, is more than searching for and discovering information. Harvesting techniques are used for downloading code, images, documents and any files essential to reproduce a Web site after it has been taken down."

Aliya Sternstein. Fugitive Documents Elude Preservationists. FCW. May 9, 2005.

See also:
Susan M. Menke. GPO and its Collection of Last Resort. GCN.com. April 20, 2004.

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May 09, 2005

Oxford University Press Expands Open Access

"The drive to make scientific, medical and academic research more freely available on the internet got a shot in the arm yesterday as Oxford University Press widened its trial of open access publishing.

"In a separate move, a new plan was announced yesterday to digitise thousands of core legal judgments and law reports, making them available free over the web."

Richard Wray. OUP Widens Open Access Trial. Guardian Unlimited. May 6, 2005.

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April 30, 2005

GPO's Policies Have Ripple Effect on Libraries

"The Government Printing Office prints some of the nation's best-known publications: the Congressional Record, the Ronald Reagan funeral condolence books, the U.S. budget, the Sept. 11 commission report--even your passport.

"At its peak in the 1980s, before the days of Web sites and e-documents, the office printed more than 35 million documents a year, sending copies to libraries across the country, some of which kept everything the GPO produced and made it available to anyone who asked.

"But now to cut costs, government agencies are increasingly putting documents online rather than printing them and do not always provide an electronic copy to the GPO.

Dawn Withers. Librarians Worry Important Information is Being Lost. Chicago Tribune. April 29, 2005.

See also:
Aliya Sternstein. Librarians Air Frustrations. FCW.com. April 27, 2005.

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April 28, 2005

European Libraries Retaliate Against Google

"Nineteen European national libraries have joined forces against a planned communications revolution by Internet search giant Google to create a global virtual library, organisers said Wednesday.

"The 19 libraries are backing instead a multi-million euro counter-offensive by European nations to put European literature online."

TurkishPress.com. European Libraries Join Forces Against Google Global Virtual Library. April 27, 2005.

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April 22, 2005

Utah's Historic Newspapers Available Online

"Thanks to new technology, digital pictures are making old newspapers readable from the comfort of your home computer.

"On Tuesday, the University of Utah's Digital Technology Division began loading onto the Internet digitized copies of 19th century editions of The Salt Lake Tribune.

"Starting today, computer users can begin reading pages of The Tribune from the 1870s. Next month, plan on pursuing The Tribune's 1880s news accounts and by early July, read and browse news stories from the 1890s."

Shinika A. Sykes. Old News is Brand New at U. Library Project. Salt Lake Tribune. April 13, 2005.

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CEO Warns Publishers of Google Print

"Bloomsbury chief executive Nigel Newton has warned UK publishers to beware the blandishments of Internet search engine Google.

"Newton argued that the project to digitize books and allow the content to be searched on Google could lead to the 'Napsterization' of the publishing industry. The comment preceded a presentation of the Google Print project at the PA's annual general meeting, held today (April 19) in London."

Philip Jones. Bloomsbury Exec Warns Against Google Print. The Book Standard. April 20, 2005.

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April 21, 2005

Japan Library Proactively Digitizes Collections

"The National Diet Library is wrestling to digitize 8.14 million books to keep pace with the age of the Internet and to prepare against major earthquakes and other natural disasters.

"The Diet library, the only archive of the legislative branch of government in Japan, has been collecting publications issued in the country since its opening in 1948.

"At the end on March 31, 2004, of fiscal 2003, its collection totaled 8.14 million, including valuable reference materials on Japanese political history."

Kyodo News. National Diet Library Working on Digitization of Books. Japan Today. April 20, 2005.

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April 20, 2005

Impact of Electronic Documents on Libraries

"Some federal depository librarians are upset about the Government Printing Office's move to significantly cut the distribution of printed government documents.

"GPO's shift to electronic formats, which will redefine the librarians' role as government information gatekeepers, will be an issue at this weekend's Depository Library Council meeting in Albuquerque, N.M."

Aliya Sternstein. Librarians Face Existential Crisis. FCW. April 15, 2005.

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April 19, 2005

Sony to Convert Films for Digital Library

"Sony Pictures Entertainment is expected to announce today the creation of an all-digital library for its valuable video footage, the first of its kind for a major Hollywood studio.

"The library, which Ascent Media Group Inc. of Santa Monica is running with technology from Hewlett-Packard Co of Palo Alto, stores Sony's films and television shows as high-quality digital files on computers, not videotape or reels of film."

Jon Healey. Sony Is Building a Digital Library. LATimes.com. April 18, 2005.

See also:
Chris Marlowe. Sony Pictures, HP, Ascent in Digital Deal. Reuters. April 18, 2005.

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April 18, 2005

Detailed Look at Google Library Project

"The digitization of the world’s enormous store of library books—an effort dating to the early 1990s in the United Kingdom, the United States, and elsewhere—has been a slow, expensive, and underfunded process.

"But last December librarians received a pleasant shock. Search-engine giant Google announced ambitious plans to expand its 'Google Print' service by converting the full text of millions of library books into searchable Web pages.

"Most librarians and archivists are ecstatic about the announcement, saying it will likely be remembered as the moment in history when society finally got serious about making knowledge ubiquitous."

Wade Roush. The Infinite Library. Technology Review. May 2005.

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Are Libraries Still Relevant?

"'Within two decades,' says Michael A. Keller, Stanford University’s head librarian, 'most of the world’s knowledge will be digitized and available, one hopes for free reading on the Internet, just as there is free reading in libraries today.'

"Can that really be possible? If so, where exactly does it leave libraries? More important, where does it leave culture?

"On the one hand, the digital revolution represents the ultimate democratization of knowledge and information, of which Carnegie likely would have approved wholeheartedly. On the other hand, libraries perform an essential function in preserving, organizing and to some extent validating our collective knowledge."

Daniel Akst. Do Libraries Still Matter?. Carnegie Reporter. Vol 3., No.2, Spring 2005.

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April 07, 2005

Amazon.com Acquires Book Printing Service

"Online retail giant Amazon.com has acquired printing fulfillment company BookSurge, which maintains a catalog of thousands of book titles that users can print on demand.

"The move likely reflects Seattle-based Amazon's continued efforts to add new revenue streams and counter competition from online rivals such as eBay and Overstock.com."

Tim Gray. Amazon Buys On Demand Player BookSurge. InternetNews.com. April 4, 2005.

See also:
Reuters. Amazon Buys Private BookSurge. Yahoo! News. April 4, 2005.

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March 30, 2005

Forrester: Usability Problems Curb Doctor Handheld Usage

"U.S. physicians are five times as likely as general consumers to use handheld computers, but less than a third of physicians who have mobile electronic medical records actually use them. That's the conclusion of a new report by Forrester Research that surveyed 1,331 physicians."

M.L. Baker. Doctors Using Handhelds, But Not for Medicine. CIO Insight. March 27, 2005.

See also:
Brian Fonseca. Medical Records' Digitization Offers a Quick Cure. eWeek. March 1, 2005.

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March 28, 2005

James Madison's Papers Available Onlin

"James Madison, often called the 'Father of the Constitution,' did not think it needed a bill of rights. Public pressure was so great that he decided it would be politically necessary, so he made a speech in the First Federal Congress proposing 19 changes, 10 of which passed.

"Beginning Friday, Madison's "Notes for a Speech in Congress" of June 8, 1789, will be available online, along with about 12,000 other pages from his papers preserved in the Library of Congress."

Carl Hartman. U.S. Library to Put Madison Papers Online. ABC News. March 24, 2005.

See also:
Library of Congress. The James Madison Papers.

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March 26, 2005

Librarians Battle to Digitize Perishing Images

"If the thought of backing up e-mail evokes feelings of dread, spare a thought for Australia's librarians who are racing against the clock to digitize millions of decaying photographic images before nature has its cruel way.

"While IT managers may worry about whether their document management solutions are legally up to scratch, photographic curators - charged with the safekeeping of Australia's pictorial history - have to deal with a pervading smell of vinegar as their cellulose assets shrivel and die."

Julian Bajkowski. Race Against Time to Digitize Decaying Images. ComputerWorld. March 23, 2005.

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March 25, 2005

Ireland's Cinemas Go All Digital

"Digital Cinema Limited (DCL), the Irish subsidiary of the digital cinema technology firm Avica Europe, will be installing new technology into 500 screens in 105 sites throughout the country at a cost of EUR40 million, making Ireland the first country in the world to convert all cinemas to a digital format from 35mm film."

Deirdre McArdle. Irish Cinemas Go Digital. ElectricNews.net. Mrach 22, 2005.

See also:
Laura Rohde. Ireland Putting Digital Films in Every Cinema. PC World. March 21, 2005.

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 08:22 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

March 24, 2005

World's Oldest Bible to be Digitized

"On Friday 11th March, the British Library in London announced an ambitious historical international project to reinterpret the oldest Bible in the world, the Codex Sinaiticus. A team of experts from the UK, Germany, Russia, Egypt and the United States will combine efforts to make the Bible accessible to a global audience using innovative digital technology.

Eunice K. Y. Or. British Library Heads Project in Digitalising the World’s Oldest Bible. Christian Today. March 14, 2005.

See also:
The British Library. World’s Oldest Bible Goes Global: Historic International Digitisation Project Announced. (Press Release.) March 11, 2005.

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Posted by Carol Schwartz at 07:19 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

March 21, 2005

France Investigate Google-Like Digitization Effort

"Jacques Chirac told France's national library on Wednesday to draw up a plan to put European literary works on the Internet, rivaling a similar project by U.S.-based Web search engine Google.

"The French president gave the go-ahead for research into the project after Jean-Noel Jeanneney, who heads the national library, expressed concern that Google's plan to put books from some of the world's great libraries online would favor the English language."

Reuters. Paris Match for Google's Library Plan?. News.com. March 17, 2005.

Related:
Reuters. Google Book Plan Sparks French War of Words. News.com. Feb. 21, 2005.

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Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 08:56 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

March 12, 2005

Don't Get Goggle-Eyed Over Google Project

"If you haven't heard about Google's plan to digitize millions of books, you must live in another galaxy. Hardly a news outlet in the country, digitized or no, missed the story at the end of last year.

"Most people were pleased by the news. It seemed that books would finally be available at your fingertips. Google had embarked on a grand scheme to digitize the world's greatest works, in cooperation with the world's greatest libraries. Break out the champagne!

"Not a few bean counters at colleges and universities around the world must have thought, 'At long last. We can kick the library in the archives and be done with that financial black hole.' Some librarians may have had a similar vision of the future and been dismayed, although most of them were optimistic about Google's plan."

Mary Y. Herring. Don't Get Goggle-Eyed Over Google's Plan to Digitize. The Chronicle Review. March 11, 2005.

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March 03, 2005

Hush is the Word on Google's Digitization Project

"Beyond vague talk about Google having developed a much more efficient process, the project's specifics are secret. At Harvard, for instance, Google won't allow reporters to visit or photograph the scanning currently being done -- of 40,000 volumes as a kind of pilot project, just to make sure the books don't get damaged or lost -- at the university library's 5-million-volume off-campus storage facility.

"But the aims seem transparent enough. It will bring to the masses these great research institutions, full of books one would normally need a plane ride and permission to access, and make them as easy to search for and within as a particular city's restaurant listings."

Steve Johnson. How Google Will Scan the World, 1 Book at a Time. Chicago Tribune. Feb. 25, 2005.

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Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 08:39 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

March 02, 2005

ALA President-Elect Calls Out Bloggers

"I had heard of the activities of the Blog People and of the absurd idea of giving them press credentials. I was not truly aware of them until shortly after I published an op-ed piece in the Los Angeles Times ("Google and God's Mind," December 17, 2004). Then, thanks to kind friends with nothing but my welfare in mind, I rapidly learned more about the blog subcultures.

"My piece had the temerity to question the usefulness of Google digitizing millions of books and making bits of them available via its notoriously inefficient search engine. In the eyes of bloggers, my sin lay in suggesting that Google is OK at giving access to random bits of information but would be terrible at giving access to the recorded knowledge that is the substance of scholarly books.

"It is obvious that the Blog People read what they want to read rather than what is in front of them and judge me to be wrong on the basis of what they think rather than what I actually wrote."

Michael Gorman. Revenge of the Blog People!. Library Journal. Feb. 15, 2004.

Related:
Kevin Drum. Google and the Human Spirit. Washington Monthly. Dec. 17, 2004.

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Posted by K. Matthew Dames at 08:47 AM | Send to a friend! | Comments (0)

January 15, 2005

Google, Libraries & Privacy Issues

"As you have no doubt heard by now, five major libraries have agreed to let Google digitize all or part of their collections.

"Nowhere in the press have any librarians or academics expressed concerns about privacy issues. Google has the capacity, the history, and the intention of tracking the browsing habits of anyone and everyone who visits any of their sites. Since its inception, Google has used a cookie with a unique ID in it that expires in 2038. They record this ID, along with the IP address, the search terms, and a time/date stamp, for everyone who searches at Google.

"To make matters worse, Google never comments on their relations with officials in the dozens of countries where they operate. Google even required the libraries to sign nondisclosure agreements."

Daniel Brandt. Google, Libraries, And Privacy. Webpronews.com. Jan. 12, 2005.

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January 05, 2005

Information Today Analyzes Google's Digitization Project

"Librarians, academicians, journalists, information industry pundits, and real people continue to ring in with comments, concerns, quarrels, and commendations for Google’s new library program. 'This is the day the world changes,' said John Wilkin, a University of Michigan librarian working with Google. 'It will be disruptive because some people will worry that this is the beginning of the end of libraries. But this is something we have to do to revitalize the profession and make it more meaningful.'

"When asked whether Google is building the library to replace all other libraries, Google representatives—after saluting the role of librarians—said they had 'no such plans at the moment. There was too much work to do.'

"Here is a roundup of some of the questions asked and answers posited."

Barbara Quint. Google’s Library Project: Questions, Questions, Questions. InformationToday.com. Dec. 27, 2004.

See also:
Mary Minow. Google-Watchers - Want Privacy Guarantees Before Handing Over Library Books for Google Digitization. LibraryLaw Blog. Dec. 16, 2004.

Gary Price. Google Partners with Oxford, Harvard & Others to Digitize Libraries. Search Engine Watch. Dec. 14, 2004.


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January 03, 2005

The Management & Logistics of Digitization Projects

"Susan Wojcicki's grandmother, a librarian for more than 30 years, ran the Slavic department at the Library of Congress. Now Wojcicki is overseeing Google Inc.'s ambitious plan to digitize the collections of five top libraries: Stanford, Harvard, Oxford, the University of Michigan and the New York Public Library.

"The project eventually will allow any Internet user anywhere in the world to search inside millions of volumes, seeing the pages exactly as they appear in the originals, complete with illustrations, charts and photos.

"The logistics involved are staggering."

Carolyn Said. Digitizing Books: A Mountainous Task for Google. SeattlePI.com. Dec. 24, 2004.

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December 15, 2004

Major Libraries, Google Partner to Digitize Collections

"Five prestigious university and public libraries have reached agreement with Google Inc. to digitize millions of volumes in their collections and make portions of the text available for free to computer users online, the search giant plans to announce today.

"The collaboration is likely to rekindle debate about the extent to which books should be available on the Internet. Some publishers worry that such efforts will depress sales. But the libraries say online access can be a boon to researchers and a benefit to people who do not have access to high-quality collections.

"Initially, some of the libraries plan to make available the full text of books that are in the public domain while offering snippets or excepts of books protected by copyright."

David A. Vise. Google to Digitize Some Library Collections. WashingtonPost.com. Dec. 14, 2004.

Cynthia L. Webb. Google -- 21st Century Dewey Decimal System. WashingtonPost.com. Dec. 14, 2004.

See also:
Hiawatha Bray. Google to Index Works at Harvard, Other Major Libraries. The Boston Globe. Dec. 14, 2004.

Gary Price. Google Partners with Oxford, Harvard & Others to Digitize Libraries. Search Engine Watch. Dec. 14, 2004.

(Editor’s Note: The Post allows free access to their stories on the Web for 14 days before sending the stories to the paper’s fee-based Archives.)

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November 19, 2004

Old Newspapers to be Available Online

"The government promises anyone with a computer will have access within a few years to millions of pages from old newspapers, a slice of American history to be viewed now only by visiting local libraries, newspaper offices or the nation's capital.

"The first of what's expected to be 30 million digitized pages from papers published from 1836 through 1922 will be available in 2006.

"Bruce Cole, chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, said the National Digital Newspaper Program is to further the founding fathers' belief that knowledge of history was a necessity for government by the people."

Carl Hartman. U.S. Vows 30M Newspaper Pages To Go On Net. Seattle Post-Intelligencer. Nov. 16, 2004.

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September 22, 2004

Valuable Historical Resources Restricted by Copyright

"Valuable resources are being lost to students, researchers and historians because of sweeping changes in copyright law, according to digital archivists who are suing the government.

"These resources -- older books, films and music -- are often out of print and considered no longer commercially viable, but are still locked up under copyright. Locating copyright owners is a formidable challenge because Congress no longer requires that owners register or renew their copyrights with the U.S. Copyright Office.

"Brewster Kahle, founder of the Internet Archive and Rick Prelinger, a film collector, want permission to digitize these so-called orphan works to create online libraries for free public access."

Katie Dean. Saving the Artistic Orphans. Wired News. Sept. 20, 2004.

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