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Smartphones and the mass market

David Wood's Insight series kicks off with a visionary look at the benefits and lifestyle changes that smartphones will bring to a wider mobile audience

David WoodSmartphones in 2005 are roughly where the Internet was in 1995. In 1995, there were, worldwide, around 20-40 million users of the Internet. That's broadly the same number of users of smartphones there are in the world today. In 1995, people were debating the real value of Internet usage. Was it simply an indulgent plaything for highly technical users, or would it have lasting wider attraction? In 2005, there's a similar debate about smartphones. Will smartphones remain the preserve of a minority of users, or will they demonstrate mass-market appeal?

Personally, I have no doubt as to the answer. Smartphones are for all. Smartphones - the rapidly emerging new category of advanced computer-based programmable mobile phones - will appeal to all users of mobile phones worldwide. Smartphones are built from highly advanced technology, but they won't require a highly advanced understanding of technology in order to use them. You won't need to be a computer whiz kid or the neighbourhood geek to get real value from a smartphone. Nor will you need a huge income to afford one. Smartphones will help us all to keep in better touch with the friends and colleagues and information and discussions and buzz that are important to us, and they are opening up new avenues for entertainment, education, and enterprise alike. Smartphones will help us all to work hard and play hard. And in line with their name, smartphones will also help us to work smart and play smart.

Smartphones differ from ordinary mobile phones in two fundamental ways: how they are built, and what they can do. The way they're built - using open systems to take advantage of the skills, energy, and innovation of numerous companies from a vast range of industries - means that smartphones extend the phenomenal track record of mobile phones by improving constantly and rapidly, year by year. As for what they can do - in line with the "phone" part of their name, smartphones provide all the capabilities of ordinary mobile phones, in a particularly user-friendly style - but that's only the start. In addition, smartphones increasingly use their computer-brains and network-connectivity to:

  • Excel at all sorts of communication - instant messaging, email, video conferencing, and more

  • Help us to organise our to-do lists, ideas, calendars, contacts, expenses, and finances

  • Boost our effectiveness in our business life - connecting us smoothly into corporate data systems

  • Entertain us with huge libraries of first-rate music, mobile TV, social networking, and games

  • Guide us around the real world, with maps and location-based services, so we never get lost again

  • Subsume our keys, ID cards, tickets, and wallets - so we can leave these old-world items at home

  • Connect us into online information banks covering every topic under the sun.

In short, smartphones are rapidly becoming our preferred mobile gateway into the ever growing, ever more important digital universe.

In 1995, some people wondered if the Internet would ever really be "useful" (as opposed to a passing fad). Today, you may wonder if mobile access to the Internet will ever really be useful. But if you look at what smartphone users are already able to do, you'll soon see the benefit. If it's valuable to you to be able to access bbcnews.com or amazon.com or ebay.com or betfair.com or imdb.com or google.com or wikipedia.org (etc) from your desktop PC, you'll often find it equally valuable to check these sites when you're away from your desktop. Because you'll be carrying your smartphone with you, almost everywhere you go, you'll have the option to keep in touch with your digital universe, whenever it suits you.

Crucial to this increase in value is the steady set of remarkable improvements that have taken place for both output and input mechanisms on smartphones. Screens have become clearer, larger, sharper, and more colourful. Intelligent handwriting recognition systems, word-completion systems, multi-way jog-dials, Bluetooth keyboards, and ingenious folding and twisting mechanisms, mean that it's easier than ever before to enter data into smartphones. And faster networks, more powerful on-board processors, and more sophisticated software, mean that "www" on a smartphone no longer means "world wide wait" but rather "world wide wow".

In parallel, costs are dipping, further and further. In part, this is due to Moore's Law, which summarises the steady technological improvements in the design and manufacture of integrated circuits and memory chips. But in large part, it's also due to the dramatic "learning effects" which can take place when world-class companies go through several rounds of finding better and better ways to manufacture their smartphone products. In turn, the magnitude of these "learning effects" depends on the open nature of the smartphone industry. Here, the word "open" has the following meanings:

  • Programmable: the intelligence and power that is in a smartphone can be adapted, extended, and enhanced by add-on applications and services, which tap into the underlying richness of the phone to produce powerful new functionality

  • Interchangeable: services that are designed for use in one smartphone can be deployed on other smartphones as well, from different manufacturers (despite the differences between these smartphones), with minimal (often zero) changes; very importantly, this provides a better incentive to companies to invest the effort to create these new services

  • Collaborative: the process of creating and evolving smartphone products benefits from the input and ideas of numerous companies and individuals; for example, the manufacturers of the second generation of a given smartphone can build in some of the unexpectedly successful applications that were designed by previously unknown companies as add-ons to the first generation of that smartphone

  • Open-minded: the companies who create smartphones have their own clear ideas about how smartphones should operate and what they should contain, but newcomers have ample means and encouragement to introduce different concepts - the industry is ready to accept new ideas

  • Free-flowing: the success of a company in the smartphone industry is substantially determined by its skills with innovation, technology, marketing, and operations, rather than any restrictive contractual lock-ins or accidents of location or history.

In all these cases, the opposite to "open" is "closed". More specifically, the opposite of the successful smartphone industry would see:

  • Fixed functionality, that changes only slowly and/or superficially

  • Non-standard add-ons, that are each restricted to a small subset of phones

  • Overly competitive companies, whose fierce squabbles would destroy the emerging market before it has time to take root

  • Closed-minded companies who are misguidedly convinced that they have some kind of divine right to act as "benign dictators" for the sake of the industry

  • Bottlenecks and chokes that strangle or restrict innovation.

Foreseeing the risks of a closed approach to smartphone development, the mobile phone industry came together to create Symbian, seven years ago. The name "Symbian" is derived from the biological term "symbiosis", emphasising the positive aspects of collaboration. Symbian's motto is "cooperate before competing". It's no surprise that the vast majority of today's smartphones utilise Symbian OS.

The volumes of smartphones in circulation are already large enough to trigger a tipping point - more and more industry players, across diverse fields, are choosing Symbian OS to deploy their new solutions. And at the same time as manufacturers are learning how to provide smartphone solutions ever more affordably, users are learning (and then sharing) surprising new ways they can take advantage of the inner capability and richness of their smartphones. It's a powerful virtuous cycle. That's the reason why each new generation of smartphone product has a wider appeal.

Insight is a brand new series of articles, that Symbian will be publishing monthly

Success with Smartphones
David Wood's insights into successfully managing Symbian OS smartphone projects are contained in the book "Symbian for Software Leaders".
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