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REH Bookshelf - M

compiled by Rusty Burke

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Macaulay, Thomas Babington | McCabe, Joseph | McGuffey, William Holmes | McHarg, William | Machen, Arthur | MacKaye, Percy | McKenna, Edward L. | Macpherson, James | Maeterlinck, Maurice | Magazines | Maitland, Robert | Mandeville, Sir John | Mansfield, Katherine | March, Joseph Moncure | Markham, Lula Clark | Markun, Leo | Marlowe, Christopher | Masefield, John | Mashburn, W. Kirk | Masters, Edgar Lee | Maturin, Charles Robert | Mencken, Henry Louis | Merritt, Abraham | Millay, Edna St. Vincent | Miller, Warren Hastings | Milton, John | Missale Romanum | Mitchell, Bess | Molière | Mooney, Booth | Moore, C.L. | Mundy, Talbot | Munn, Harold Warner | Mure, Geoffrey Reginald Gilchrist | Musser, Benjamin F.

 


Macaulay, Thomas Babington

(1800-1859)

Lays of Ancient Rome

(1842). 

REH to H.P. Lovecraft, ca. February 1931: "My antipathy for Rome is one of those things I can't explain myself.  Certainly it isn't based on any early reading, because some of that consisted of MacCauley's 'Lays of Ancient Rome' from which flag-waving lines I should have drawn some Roman patriotism, it seems.  At an early age I memorized most of those verses, but in reciting, changed them to suit myself and substituted Celtic names for the Roman ones, and changed the settings from Italy to the British Isles!"

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McCabe, Joseph

(1867-1955)

REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, ca. April 1930 [SL 1 #35]: "I got a letter from Preecel, i.e. Hink [Harold Preece] and he said he… had met…Joseph McCabe." 

REH to H.P. Lovecraft, ca. October 1930 [SL 1 #47]: "I found your remarks on witch-craft highly interesting.  It was not until a few years ago that I realized that such a cult really did exist in former times -- discovered this by reading an article by Joseph McCabe on the subject."

[Perhaps Witchcraft Facts, Little Blue Book #1132. McCabe was a former Catholic priest who wrote a number of Little Blue Books.]

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McGuffey, William Holmes

(1800-1873)

Eclectic Speaker

30683 (as "Electric Speaker"); PQ3; GL; TDB. 

[No edition noted.]

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McHarg, William [Briggs]

(1872-1951) and Edwin Balmer (1883-1959)

REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, 7 July 1923, in a listing of parodic book titles is "'The Indian Bum,' by W. McHarg and E. Balmer" [The Indian Drum, 1917]

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Machen, Arthur

(1863-1947)

REH to H.P. Lovecraft, ca. 9 August 1930 [SL 1 #39]: "...after a close study of Poe's technique, I am forced to give as my personal opinion, that his horror tales have been surpassed by Arthur Machen, and that neither of them ever reached the heights of cosmic horror or opened such new, strange paths of imagination as you have done..." 

REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, ca. 18 August 1930 [SL 1 #42]: [Quoting from a letter from H.P. Lovecraft ]: "'Incidentally, Long and I often debate about the real folklore basis of Machen's nightmare witch cults (referring here, I guess, to "The Red Hand" and so on).  I think they are Machen's own inventions, for I never heard of them elsewhere; but Long cannot get over the idea that they have an actual source in European myth.  Can you give us any light on this?  We haven't the temerity to ask Machen himself.' ¶ Naturally I know nothing about it, but I'm going to tell Lovecraft if he'll give me Machen's address, I'll write and ask him about it.  I'd like to know myself." 

REH to H.P. Lovecraft, ca. September 1930 [SL 1 #43]: "If you can get Machen's address from Mr. Derleth, I'll see what I can do.  If Machen answers my inquire at all, his reply should be very interesting.  I have always been fascinated by his work, though I will say, frankly and with no intent to flatter, that I consider him inferior to yourself as a horror story writer." 

REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, ca. September 1930 [SL 1 #44]: "I think if I get time, I'll write to... Arthur Machen." 

REH to H.P. Lovecraft, ca. October 1930 [SL 1 #45]: "It takes a master of the pen, such as Machen and yourself, to create a proper SUGGESTION of unseen and unknown horror."  

REH to H.P. Lovecraft, ca. October 1930 [SL 1 #47]: "I have read...some of Machen..."  

From "The Children of the Night" (Weird Tales, April/May 1931): "'The universe is full of the unexplainable.' ¶ 'And therefore the uninteresting, according to Machen,' laughed Taverel."  [From the same story:] "'You'll find there a number of delectable dishes – Machen, Poe, Blackwood, Maturin...'" 

REH to H.P. Lovecraft , ca. August 1931: "Some day I must read...the tales you mention by...Machen..."  

REH to H.P. Lovecraft, ca. December 1932: Machen is listed among those Howard refers to as "my favorite writers."  

REH to H.P. Lovecraft, ca. 6 March 1933: "As far as I am concerned, your stories and poems are superior to anything of the sort ever written by Dunsany, Machen, Poe, or any of the others."

"The Novel of the Black Seal."

(1895)

"The Children of the Night" (Weird Tales, April/May 1931): "But in such tales as Poe's Fall of the House of Usher, Machen's Black Seal, and Lovecraft's Call of Cthulhu – the three master horror-tales, to my mind – the reader is borne into dark and outer realms of imagination." 

REH to H.P. Lovecraft, ca. June 1931 [SL 2 #53]: "As regards my mention of the three foremost weird masterpieces -- Poe's, Machen's and your own -- its my honest opinion that these three are the outstanding tales."

"The Red Hand."

(1895)

REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, ca. 18 August 1930 [SL 1 #42] (see above in general section on Machen).

"The Shining Pyramid."

(1925)

"The Little People": "I did so mechanically, glancing at the volume which had incurred her youthful displeasure.  The story was The Shining Pyramid by Arthur Machen. | 'My dear girl,' said I, 'this is a masterpiece of outre literature.'... | 'This tale is not intended to be an exponent of common-day realism,' I explained patiently. | '...who were "The Little People" he speaks of -- the same old elf and troll business?' | ... 'The "Little People" spoken of by Machen are supposed to be descendants of the prehistoric people who inhabited Europe before the Celts came down out of the north.'"

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MacKaye, Percy

(1875-1956)

The Scarecrow

A Tragedy of the Ludicrous.  (1914). 

REH to H.P. Lovecraft, ca. January 1934, mentions having heard over the radio, "'The Scare Crow' by Percy McKaye (was it?) a most strikingly weird and haunting thing..."

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McKenna, Edward L.

Hardware

New York: Robert M. McBride & Co., 1929. 

REH to Harold Preece, ca. 18 September 1929: "I also glanced over a book by a fellow named McKenna, titled Hardware, and apparently dealing with the adventures of one of the Donegal Cronins."  

[A short story of this title by the same author appeared in Adventure, April 1, 1927.]

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Macpherson, James

(1736-1796)

The Poems of Ossian

(1760-1763).

REH to Harold Preece, ca February 1930 [SL 1, #30]: "So you've been reading Macpherson? Well, don't take him too seriously. He's a damned fraud. I like his stuff because of their beauty and imagery -- " [quotes several lines from "Carthon"]. "Well, read him for his beauty, but realize his junk's a hoax.  It was the style then to 'discover' new unpublished manuscripts.  As for him denying the origin of his race, damn him for a red-shanked gilly.... And if MacPherson says that Conaire ardri na Eireann was a Scotchman, he lies in his teeth."

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Maeterlinck, Maurice

(1862-1949)

The Blue Bird

(1908).

REH to H.P. Lovecraft, ca. September 1933: "I quite agree with your estimate of the average newspaper, and do not differ radically with your opinion of radio programs.  And yet it would be erroneous to say that all radio programs are entirely without cultural value... I have heard, among other things, such plays as, 'The Blue Bird'... Of course I had rather see these things on the stage, but as my chances of doing that are so slim they are practically non-existant, I was grateful for the opportunity of hearing them over the air."

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Magazines

REH was a voracious reader of magazines and, of course, submitted stories to a great many.  Magazines which he mentions, or to which he is known to have submitted stories, include: Ace-High, Action Stories, Adventure (q.v.), Argosy (q.v.), College Humor, Complete Stories, Cosmopolitan (q.v.), Cowboy Stories, Dime Sports, Far East, Fight Stories, Ghost Stories, Jack Dempsey's Fight Magazine, Liberty, Magic Carpet, Oriental Stories, Police Gazette (q.v.), Red-Blooded, The Ring (q.v.), Romance, Saturday Evening Post (q.v.), Short Story, Spicy-Adventure Stories, Sport Story, Strange Detective Stories, Strange Tales, Super-Detective Stories, Tales of Mystery and Magic, Ten Story Book, Thrilling Adventures, Thrilling Mystery, Thrills of the Jungle, Top-Notch, True Stories, True Strange Stories, Weird Tales (q.v.), Western Aces, Western Story, Youth's Companion.

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Maitland, Robert

The Boy Scouts in Camp

or, Jack Danby's Courage.  Chicago: Saalfield, 1912.  30755; PQ3; GL; TDB.

The Boy Scouts to the Rescue

or, Jack Danby's Fighting Chance.  Chicago: Saalfield, 1912.  30743; PQ3; GL; TDB.

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Mandeville, Sir John

See The Travels of Sir John Mandeville.

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Mansfield, Katherine

[pen name of Kathleen Mansfield Beauchamp Murry (1888-1923)].

Post Oaks and Sand Roughs, p. 76: [quoting a letter Steve Costigan (= REH) received from an editor] "Try reading something by Katherine Mansfield and learn from her what simplicity of style can do for a story."

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March, Joseph Moncure

(1899-1977)

REH to H.P. Lovecraft, ca. December 1932: March is listed among a number of poets Howard likes.

The Set-Up

New York: Covici, Friede, 1928.  30725; PQ1; GL; TDB.  Still in HPU holdings.

Note in TDB: Narrative poem later made into movie. 

REH to August W. Derleth, ca. November 1933: "It makes me feel like an old man to watch fighters I knew in their prime, get slapped around by kids.  'A fighter's life is short at best, no time to waste, no time to rest; the spot-light shifts, the clock ticks fast, all youth becomes old age at last.'" 

[The quoted lines are from the third stanza of section two of the poem.]

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Markham, Lula Clark

"In the Garden of Lindaraxa."

Argosy All-Story Weekly, 19 May 1923.

This poem, with its opening line "Teresa, Teresita!" may have suggested Howard's untitled verse with the opening line "Keresa, Keresita!"

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Markun, Leo

(1901-       )

REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, ca. March 1928: "Long live such men as Markun and Fielding, who realize that psychology has its roots deep in biology."  

[Markun was the author of a number of Little Blue Books, among them The Psychology of Joy and Sorrow: What Behaviorists and Others Learned About Our Nature (#377) and The Psychology of the Criminal (#1459).]

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Marlowe, Christopher

(1564-1593)

Mentioned in "A Poet's Skull" as "Kit Marlowe" (by which familiar name he was known to his contemporaries). 

"The Thessalians" (The Yellow Jacket [Howard Payne College], 13 January 1927): "…we played Shakespeare, Marlow, Goethe and some of the moderns."

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Masefield, John

(1878-1967)

REH to H.P. Lovecraft, ca. December 1932: Masefield is listed among a number of poets Howard likes.

"A Consecration."

REH to H.P. Lovecraft, ca. 2 November 1932 [SL 2 #65] quotes the first, fourth, sixth and seventh stanzas.

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Mashburn, W[allace] Kirk[patrick]

(1900-1968)

REH to Kirk Mashburn, ca. March 1932: "...I have been much interested in your work in Weird Tales.  I particularly remember 'Tony', 'Sola,' 'Placide's Wife', and your recent 'Vengeance of Ixmal' -- a powerful tale.  I hope to have the opportunity of reading more of your work soon." 

REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, ca. May 1932 [SL 2 #61]: "Kirk Mashburn, a damned good writer..."

"The Last of Placide's Wife."

Weird Tales, September 1932.

REH to Kirk Mashburn, ca. September 1932: "Just a line (and rather belated, too) to congratulate you on 'The Last of Placide's Wife'.  It's a splendid story; you have the knack of making the impossible convincing, which is the true test of a weird story writer."

"Placide's Wife."

Weird Tales, November 1931. 

REH to Kirk Mashburn, ca. March 1932 (see above in general section on Mashburn).

"Sola."

Weird Tales, April 1930.

REH to Kirk Mashburn, ca. March 1932 (see above in general section on Mashburn).

"Tony the Faithful."

Weird Tales, July 1928.

REH to Kirk Mashburn, ca. March 1932 (see above in general section on Mashburn).

"The Vengeance of Ixmal."

Weird Tales, March 1932.

REH to Kirk Mashburn, ca. March 1932 (see above in general section on Mashburn).

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Masters, Edgar Lee

(1868-1950)

"The Search."

Cosmopolitan, March 1917. 

REH to Robert W. Gordon, 4 February 1925:  "And now, there is a poem which I have been trying to re-discover.... It came out in the 'Cosmopolitan' magazine some nine years ago.  I have even forgot the name and the author but it contains the following stanzas, fragments of which I remember." [He quotes, surprisingly accurately, stanzas 12, 16-19, 37, 25-26, and 15.] "I don't even know whether the lines were spaced like that or not.   Just know that it was published in the Cosmopolitan."

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Maturin, Charles Robert

(1787-1824)

Melmoth the Wanderer

(1820)

From "The Children of the Night" (Weird Tales, April/May 1931): "You'll find there a number of delectable dishes – Machen, Poe, Blackwood, Maturin..." 

REH to H.P. Lovecraft, ca. 10 August 1931: "Some day I must read 'Melmoth'..."

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Mencken, Henry Louis

(1880-1956)

Mentioned in "The People of the Winged Skulls" (parody, included in REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, ca. 1928).  

Mentioned in "King Hootus" (parody, included in REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, ca. January 1928) as "Aich Hell Stinckin."  

Mentioned in "A Fable for Critics." Post Oaks and Sand Roughs, p. 36, named as a writer Lars [Jansen = Fowler Gafford] "had never heard of..." 

REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, ca. November 1928 [SL 1 #17]: "When you strike your stride, people will forget there ever was a Mencken." 

Mentioned in "The Case of the College Toilet" (parody, included in REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, ca. February 1929). 

REH to H.P. Lovecraft, ca. December 1932: "I don't know of anything I'd enjoy more than striking a match on a pile containing all Mencken's works, and if he was sitting on top of the heap at the time, it would be all right with me.  I'd rather read Zane Grey the rest of my life." 

REH to H.P. Lovecraft, ca. 6 March 1933: "As for Mencken I esteem him no more than any other maggot spawned in buzzard's puke." 

One Who Walked Alone, p. 21: Howard is quoted as saying, "H.L. Mencken, the man who looks in the mirror and thinks he's shaving God."  [Same source, p. 164:] "Bob was interested in talking about Mencken.  Several years ago, Mencken wrote something in which he was most uncomplimentary toward Southerners.  Bob read the article, and it made him so furious he never got completely over it, no matter what else Mencken wrote."  [Same source, p. 165:] "...he had to admit that he'd read some of Mencken's things he liked."

A Treatise on the Gods

New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1930. 

One Who Walked Alone, p. 165: "He said that he had enjoyed Mencken's book: A Treatise on the Gods.... Bob insisted that A Treatise on the Gods was the best thing he'd read of Mencken's."

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Merritt, Abraham

(1884-1943)

REH to H.P. Lovecraft, ca. February 1931: "Have you ever tried Argosy? ...they gobble up Merritt's stuff and you have him beat seven ways from the ace.  Not that Merritt isn't good; he is.  But his work lacks the sheer, somber and Gothic horror of your tales..  A touch of mere fantasy sometimes mars his work..."

"The Snake Mother."

Argosy All-Story, October 1930. 

REH to H.P. Lovecraft, ca. January 1931: "I'm sending you some stuff under separate cover which I hope may be of interest. ...a tale of A. Merritt's which recently appeared in Argosy."

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Millay, Edna St. Vincent

(1892-1950)

REH to Harold Preece, ca. December 1928 [SL 1 #20], includes Millay among a list of the world's great women.  

REH to Harold Preece, ca. November 1930: “To my mind she [Lenore Preece, q.v.] is far superior to Edna St. Vincent Millay right now.”

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Miller, Warren Hastings

(1876-1960)

REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, ca. May 1932: "Miller says further that the original Warren Hastings was an ancestor of his. [The "original Warren Hastings" (1732-1818) was the first British governor-general of India, 1773-1885]... He also said that some of his yarns, recently published in Oriental, had laid around for ten years without a buyer until Farnsworth came along." 

REH to H.P. Lovecraft, ca. 24 May 1932: "My knowledge of the Orient is extremely sketchy... Price and Miller, however, are a big help in the matter of Arabic names, grammar, etc.."

"Jungle Girl."

Oriental Stories, Spring 1932.

REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, ca. May 1932: "If you read 'Jungle Girl' in the latest Oriental, you might be interested to know that it has a factual base.  Miller writes me, 'Ah welladay; I won a bottle of champagne on that girl.  She was the most beautiful female creature I ever laid eyes on, and Lord De B -- had the nerve to bring her to the St. George in Algiers, where all the respectable matrons sniffed and gave her the icy lorgnette.  I bet my aunt I could run off with her under his nose, and did.  He had not begun to treat her mean yet, but I could see it coming; hence the story.  He had her on safari with him down in Nigeria at that time."

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Milton, John

(1608-1674)

Works of Milton

30717; PQ3; GL; TDB (as Works).

[No edition noted.]

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Missale Romanum

"Children of the Night": Conrad's library is said to include "a Missale Romanum, bound in clasped oak boards and printed in Venice, 1740."   

This is the official altar book of the Roman Catholic Church, originally issued in 1570 after the Council of Trent decreed that all churches must use the same rites.

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Mitchell, Bess

 Cortes, Montezuma and Mexico

past and present; the discovery and conquest of Mexico, its wars and revolutions, customs and costumes, ruins, antiquities, legends, amusements, and its future. Chicago: A. Flanagan, 1898. [The Teacher's Helper, v. 5, n. 2]  30757; PQ3; GL; TDB.

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Molière

[pseudonym of Jean Baptiste Poquelin (1622-1673)]

Tartuffe

(1664). 

REH to H.P. Lovecraft, ca. September 1933: "I quite agree with your estimate of the average newspaper, and do not differ radically with your opinion of radio programs.  And yet it would be erroneous to say that all radio programs are entirely without cultural value... I have heard, among other things, such plays as... 'Tartuffe'... Of course I had rather see these things on the stage, but as my chances of doing that are so slim they are practically non-existant, I was grateful for the opportunity of hearing them over the air."

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Mooney, Booth

(1912-1977)

REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, ca. March 1930 (SL 1 #34): "Booth said his story appeared this month...." 

REH to Harold Preece, postmarked 24 March 1930: [Mooney] "mentioned that his story was coming out in the next Ten Story Magazine...."

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Moore, C[atherine] L[ucille]

(1911-1987)

"Black God's Shadow."

Weird Tales, December 1934.

C.L. Moore to REH, 29 January 1935: "Thanks for being flattering about Black God's Shadow..."

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Mundy, Talbot

[psuedonym of William Lancaster Gribbon] (1879-1940). 

REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, 8 June 1923: "Have your Talbot Mundy books come yet?" 

REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, 22 June 1923: "I found your first letter waiting for me when I got back, also the Talbot Mundy books.  I got them Monday.  I've read 'King of the Khyber Rifles,' 'The Ivory Trail,' 'The Winds of the World' and have started on 'The Eye of Zeitoon.' [22 June 1923 was a Friday.][Ibid.:] "How do you like Talbot Mundy?  Ranjoor Singh ('Winds of the World,' 'Hira Singh'), Rustum Khan ('The Eye of Zeitoon') and Mahommed Gunga ('Rung Ho!') are my favorite characters, native, that is; a Sikh and two Rangar Rajputs.  Did you ever read 'The Man That Came Back' by Kipling?  In it a phrase is used, 'Rung Ho! Hira Singh!' which is the titles of two of Talbot Mundy's books." 

REH to H.P. Lovecraft, ca. December 1930 [SL 1 #49]: "...Kipling, Mundy, a few others, they can write convincingly of Oriental mysticism..." 

REH to H.P. Lovecraft, ca. December 1932: Mundy is listed among those Howard refers to as "my favorite writers."

"The Adventure of El-Kerak."

Adventure, 10 November 1921. 

[See Appendix Two]

The Eye of Zeitoon

Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill Co., 1920.  30639; PQ3; GL.

Included on listing, headed "Library," found among Howard's papers. [See Appendix Two.] 

REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, 22 June 1923 (see above in general section on Mundy).

Guns of the Gods

A Story of Yasmini's Youth.  Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill Co., 1921.  30753 (author as "Coll, Clement J."); PQ2 (same as accessions list); GL (same as accessions list); TDB (author as "Coll, Clement S."). 

Included on listing, headed "Library," found among Howard's papers. [See Appendix Two.] 

[This book was illustrated by Joseph Clement Coll.]

Hira Singh

When India Came To Fight In Flanders.  Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill Co., 1918.  30642, 30686; PQ3; GL; TDB.

Included on listing, headed "Library," found among Howard's papers. This title was listed twice. (REH apparently had 2 copies, as it is also listed twice on the accessions list.) [See Appendix Two.]  

REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, 22 June 1923 (see above in general section on Mundy).

The Ivory Trail

Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill Co., 1919.  30641; PQ3; GL; TDB.

Included on listing, headed "Library," found among Howard's papers. [See Appendix Two.] 

REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, 22 June 1923 (see above in general section on Mundy). 

"Skull-Face": Heading for Chapter 14 is from Chapter 7 of this book.

King, of the Khyber Rifles

A Romance of Adventure.  Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill Co., 1916.  30643; PQ3; GL; TDB.

Included on listing, headed "Library," found among Howard's papers. [See Appendix Two.] 

REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, 22 June 1923 (see above in general section on Mundy).

"The Lion of Petra."

Adventure, 20 March 1922.

[See Appendix Two]

"The Lost Trooper."

Adventure, 30 May 1922.

[See Appendix Two]

Rung Ho!

New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1914.  30761; PQ3; GL; TDB.

Included on listing, headed "Library," found among Howard's papers. [See Appendix Two.] 

REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, 22 June 1923 (see above in general section on Mundy).  

"Skull-Face": Heading for Chapter 10 is from Chapter 17 of this book; heading for Chapter 19 is from Chapter 32 of this book.

"The Seventeen Thieves of El-Kalil."

Adventure, 20 February 1922.

[See Appendix Two]

"The Shriek of Dum."

Adventure, 1 September 1919.

[See Appendix Two]

The Winds of the World

Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill Co., 1917.  30640; PQ3; GL; TDB.

Included on listing, headed "Library," found among Howard's papers. [See Appendix Two.] 

REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, 22 June 1923 (see above in general section on Mundy).  

"Skull-Face": Heading for Chapter 15 is from Chapter 3 of this book.

"The Woman Ayisha."

Adventure, 20 April 1922.

[See Appendix Two]

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Munn, Harold Warner

(1903-1981)

REH to H.P. Lovecraft, ca. September 1930 [SL 1 #45]: "I quite agree with your praise of Mr. H. Warner Munn.  I have been reading his work in Weird Tales for many years and consider it of the highest quality.  I should like very much to see the history of light weird fiction you say he is preparing..."  

[Munn's stories in Weird Tales prior to this time were: "The Werewolf of Ponkert," July 1925; "The City of Spiders," November 1926; "The Return of the Master," July 1927; "The Chain," April 1928; "The Werewolf's Daughter," October, November, December 1928.] 

REH to H.P. Lovecraft, ca. 24 May 1932: "Please extend my heartiest thanks, also, to Mr. Cook and Mr. Munn, both gentlemen for whose literary talents I have the sincerest regard.... I am sorry his [i.e., Munn's] work does not appear more often in Weird Tales."

"City of Spiders."

Weird Tales, November 1926. 

REH to H.P. Lovecraft, ca. 24 May 1932: "I remember his 'City of Spiders' as one of the most striking and powerful stories I have ever read..."

"Tales of the Werewolf Clan."

REH to H.P. Lovecraft, ca. 24 May 1932: "...and his 'Tales of the Werewolf Clan' had the real historic sweep.  He is evidently a deeply read student of history." 

[Umbrella title for a series of stories appearing in Weird Tales: "The Werewolf of Ponkert" (July 1925), "The Return of the Master" (July 1927), "The Werewolf's Daughter" (October, November and December 1928), "The Master Strikes" (November 1930), "The Master Fights" (December 1930), "The Master Has a Narrow Escape" (January 1931).]

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Mure, Geoffrey Reginald Gilchrist

(1893-     )

See "Sappho."

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Musser, Benjamin F[rancis]

(1889-1951)

REH to Tevis Clyde Smith, ca. July 1929 [SL 1 #26]: The main reason I'm writing this letter is to quote you what Musser, the editor of Contemporary Verse wrote to me" [quotes Musser's letter]. "He also says that he can't find Cross Plains in the atlas but wants to meet me when he comes to Dallas in October to lecture on modern poetry - a kind of lecture tour over the country, I gather."  In the August 1929 issue of Contemporary Verse, Musser wrote, "I'm planning to instruct midwestern USA and read to 'em in October…"  The following month he listed among the addresses where he could be reached on his tour, "c/ Mrs. J.F. Robertson, Box 303, Rising Star, Texas, no later than October 12."  This was Lexie Dean Robertson (q.v.), herself a poet and contributor to Musser's magazines. 

REH to H.P. Lovecraft, ca. December 1930 [SL 1 #49]: "One shining example of tolerance and broadmindedness among the moderns is my friend Ben Musser, a poet of no small note." 

REH to H.P. Lovecraft, 6 March 1933: "I once met a noted poet, who had been kind enough to praise my verse most highly, and with whom I'd had an enjoyable correspondence. But I reckon I didn't come up to his idea of what a poet should be, because he didn't write me, even after he returned East, or even answer the letter I wrote him. I suppose he expected to meet some kind of an intellectual, and lost interest when he met only an ordinary man, thinking the thoughts and speaking in the dialect of the common people. I'll admit that after a part-day's conversation with him, I found relief and pleasure in exchanging reminiscences with a bus driver who didn't know a sonnet from an axle hub." 

[Musser published "Tides" in Contemporary Verse, September 1929, and "Red Thunder" in JAPM: The Poetry Weekly, 16 September 1929. He discontinued both his journals at the end of 1929 (they were merged with Bozart, "The Bi-Monthly Poetry Review") and devoted the rest of his life to religious work (he was a tertiary of the order of St. Francis, i.e., a lay monk). In an autobiographical essay for The Book of Catholic Authors (Detroit: Walter Romig Co., 1945), Musser wrote of "...a period in which Bohemianism rivalled Catholicism for the field and finally, I pray forever, fell before the Cross.  That 'arty' interlude included the editorship of several poetry magazines...." ]

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