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School Desegregation

We are committed to generating and synthesizing research on key civil rights and equal opportunity policies that have been neglected or overlooked.

Denver Public School: Resegregation, Latino Style
Chungmei Lee. January 24, 2006

The Denver Public Schools (DPS) provide a unique opportunity to study the dynamics of school segregation within the context of rapid demographic changes and key policy changes. In 1973, Denver became the first northern school district ordered to desegregate by the U.S. Supreme Court. Lawyers representing a group of Black, Latino and White families filed a lawsuit in U.S. District Court charging that schools in the Park Hill neighborhoods were intentionally segregated to keep White students separate from minority students.

Research Type: Final Report

 

Research Topic: School Desegregation


Racial Transformation and the Changing Nature of Segregation
Gary Orfield and Chungmei Lee. January 12, 2006

This report is about the changing patterns of segregation in American public schools through the 2003-2004 school year. We begin by examining the transformation of racial composition in the nationís schools, the dynamic patterns of segregation and desegregation of all racial groups in regions, states, and districts by using data from 1968 until 2003-4. We examine both the changes over the last decade (1991-2003) as well as those over a much longer period (1954-2003). Data from this report are computed from the Common Core of Data of the National Center for Education Statistics of the U.S. Department of Education for the years 1988, 1991, and 2003.

Research Type: Final Report

 

Research Topic: School Desegregation


New Faces, Old Patterns? Segregation in the Multiracial South
Chungmei Lee. September 6, 2005

A third of a century ago the schools of the South became the most integrated in the nation, a stunning reversal of a long history of educational apartheid written into the state laws and constitutions of the eleven states of the Confederacy and the six Border states, stretching from Oklahoma to Delaware, all of which had legally imposed de jure segregation until the Supreme Court prohibited it in 1954. From being almost completely segregated in their own schools, more than two-fifths of black students in the South were attending majority white schools and many more were in schools with significant diversity at the height of integration.

Research Type: Final Report

 

Research Topic: School Desegregation


Why Segregation Matters: Poverty and Educational Inequality
Gary Orfield and Chungmei Lee. January 13, 2005

One of the common misconceptions over the issue of resegregation of schools is that many people treat it as simply a change in the skin color of the students in a school. If skin color were not systematically linked to other forms of inequality, it would, of course, be of little significance for educational policy. Unfortunately that is not and never has been the nature of our society. Socioeconomic segregation is a stubborn, multidimensional and deeply important cause of educational inequality.

Research Type: Final Report

 

Research Topics: Diversity in K-12 Education, School Desegregation, Poverty and Educational Equity



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