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 Living Animals
Extinct Animals
Diet
Habitat

Extinct Animals- Thylacinus cynocephalus

Size comparison of human and Thylacinus cynocephalus  
Class: Mammalia
Supercohort: Marsupialia
Order: Dasyuromorphia
Family: Thylacinidae
Genus & Species: Thylacinus cynocephalus

Thylacinus cynocephalusThylacinus cynocephalus is more commonly known as the Thylacine or Tasmanian Tiger, although a better name may be the 'marsupial wolf' because of the wolf-like nature of its skull, teeth and body. 

Thylacine jaw bone
Fossil jaw bone of Thylacine, found in Victoria Fossil Cave, is over 200,000 years old
Its principal habitat was open forest and woodlands where its major source of food, kangaroos and wallabies, could be found.

 

 

 

Skeleton of Thylacine

Skeleton of Thylacine
Click on picture to enlarge (43Kb)

The fossil record shows the Thylacine was once common over much of Australia. However like the Devil, its disappearance on the mainland coincided with the time Dingoes were introduced to Australia around 3,500 years ago. It survived in Tasmania relatively recently.

 

 

Thylacines
Models of Thylacines
The Thylacine was hunted to extinction following European settlement as farmers were convinced that Thylacines were killing their sheep. A bounty was granted by the government and the animals were exterminated, with the last one dying in the Hobart Zoo in 1936.

Sadly, people had finally realised their mistake by 1936 and had moved to protect the species, however by that stage it was too late and this magnificent marsupial carnivore was gone.

 

 

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This page was last modified 2006-08-16
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