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Evelyn Waugh 1st Edition Bibliography

Compiled from a collection by Adam Corres,

Title: The Balance
Pub: In: 'Georgian Stories', Chapman & Hall
Date: 1926
Evelyn Waugh's first appearance in book form.
Title: Rossetti
Pub: Duckworth & Co Ltd
Date: 1928
A biography of Dante Gabriel Rossetti (although Ruskin had already effectively done this in Rosetti, Pre-Raphaelitism). Waugh outlines Rosetti's education, religious leanings, then schools of painting: Pre-Raphelites, the Aesthetes, the 'Fleshly School' etc. The artist's compositions and attempted suicide are covered, together with reasons for his 'spiritual inadequacy'. This book is intended for scholars of art history, so won't appeal much to a general audience.
Title: Decline and Fall
Pub: Chapman & Hall Ltd
Date: 1928 - Sept
"The wedding was an unparalled success among the lower orders". A stunning debut novel described as 'an illustrated novelette' (contains 6 cartoons by Waugh) and as 'a shocking novelette' by his publishers. Waugh includes an author's note: 'Please bear in mind throughout that IT IS MEANT TO BE FUNNY.' Waugh's recent traumas [getting a 3rd class degree and leaving Oxford without collecting it, teaching at Arnold House School in Wales and dismissed from Aston Clinton in Buckinghamshire, then his attempted suicide by drowning and marriage to Evelyn Gardner] inspire an altogether classical novel. This book chronicles the voyage of Paul Pennyfeather through all levels of 1920s English society. He starts in the middle class, shows promise at Public School, is sent down from university due to a concatenation of circumstances inflicted upon him by his social 'betters' (who behave like animals), gets a job as a master in a provincial school, settles in with the dropouts of humanity who run the place (including Grimes, the survivor and the headmaster's daughter "If she's so rich, why doesn't she wear brighter clothes?"), meets aristocratic aspiration figures on sports day etc. He moves onward to dizzy heights until he feels accepted at the highest level of the class system, but soon finds the whole edifice is supported by criminality (slavery and prostitution). When the law catches up with his new friends, it's Pennyfeather who takes the fall. We then find what it takes to get through life in prison, for 'a public school man who shouldn't be there' and see Pennyfeather released, assume a new identity and re-enroll at the same university to start the cycle all over again, a wiser man. He then hears stories about his own behaviour, the lost years, which sound like they are about someone else. This amazing book shows us a facade, a fragile bubble of social behaviour which the established order was desperate to maintain as the rest of the world seemingly fell to Radicals, Fascists and Communists. Waugh exposes the myths, and destroys our unquestioning respect, with this journey into the unfair. Even now, Waugh's portrayal is shocking and brave.
Title: Vile Bodies
Pub: Chapman & Hall Ltd
Date: 1930
I regard this as Waugh's finest novel. It's difficult to think of anyone else who could have written it. The black humour is oh so refined. The author's divorce, conversion to Catholocism and long trip to Africa in 1930 show this to be a major year of turmoil in his life. Waugh's objectivity depicts the most serene of humans as just another kind of amusingly expendable creature. London society, and the greater world, are shown to be illusions we create to hide away the chaos of the universe and the emptyness of life. People have fun, then are destroyed meaninglessly as the author plays with their lives. The 'bright young things' of the rich social whirl between the wars think they are the new immortals, invulnerable to the realities of existence, but soon burn out like mayflies. Although not a sequel to Decline & Fall, it does share characters. Waugh described it as set 'in the near future, where existing social tendencies have become more marked', but he probably knew he was describing the thrashing finale to an excessively sparkling, yet cruel, era. Collectors note: two episodes of Vile Bodies were published before the first edition in The New Decameron and in Harper's Bazaar.
Title: Labels
Pub: Duckworth & Co Ltd
Date: 1930 - Sept
Also known as 'A Mediterranean Journal' and 'A Bachelor Abroad' (US). A travelogue of Waugh's 1929 trip to write about the Mediterranean (although up until a week before he had intended to go to Russia). This book marked a turning point in Waugh's life as he completely revised his attitude to Roman Catholicism, a faith which would then occupy his attention for the rest of his life. Lots of churches, Port Said, architecture, some moralising and plenty about old Barcelona. Not his best work.
Title: Remote People
Pub: Duckworth & Co Ltd
Date: 1931
US title: 'They Were Still Dancing'. Five contents sections are entitled, three of which contain the word 'nightmare'. Waugh chronicles his travels through H.I.M. Haile Selassie's Abyssinian/Ethiopian dream, Kenya, Tanganyika, Aden (then British Empire), Uganda (pre Idi Amin) and Congo. Written in a typicaly detached style, the travelogue is a mixture of the eye-opening and the awful. It might surprise you to hear that the final 'nightmare' isn't the third world, it's a fashionable club in high-society London. - and you thought it was just you that thought like that.
Title: Black Mischief
Pub: Chapman & Hall Ltd
Date: 1932 - Oct
A superb novel inspired by his 'Remote People' visit to Abyssinia. The 'Azanian Empire' is ruled by Seth 'His virility inexhaustible, his progeny beyond human computation', aged 24. 'Seth, Emperor of Azania, Chief of the chiefs of Sakuyu, Lord of Wanda and Tyrant of the Seas, Bachelor of The Arts of Oxford University', and The Emperor has problems. People, at least all the important people, have been 'seduced from their loyalty' and are scarpering from the capital as fast as they can. Seth, an emperor descended from slaves, complains at the rising decay and issues proclamations although no-one is listening. At least he has his loyal secretary (there was no room on the boat) and reigns in magnificent isolation from the 'Western Powers who cruise the sea'. Everything Waugh wanted to say about recent African imperial history. Subtle, savage and observed. Brilliant, just brilliant.
Title: Ninety-Two Days
Pub: Duckworth & Co Ltd
Date: 1934
The second part of Waugh's trilogy of travelogues spanning Africa and the Mediterranean, British Guiana to Brazil. Collectors note: A 1st ed in dustwrapper of this book is very rare.
Title: A Handful of Dust
Pub: Chapman & Hall Ltd
Date: 1934
"I will show you something different from your shadow in the morning which strides before you; your shadow in the evening which rises to meet you; I will show you fear in a handful of dust" [apologies for my half-remembered quotation from T.S.Eliot]. Evelyn Waugh's marriage (his wife was also called Evelyn Waugh) collapsed into a twisted mess of spite and retribution. Waugh loved his wife and felt destroyed by her actions. After a particularly acrimonious and grasping divorce, Waugh spilt out all his feelings of angst and disgust into this book. This is probably still the most evocative image of failed marriage ever written. 'Evoke' is accurate too: 'to raise up from the dead' - Waugh's feelings pour out with the victim's passion - of a fresh betrayal and murder. The leading character, Tony, is a thinly veiled Waugh in an English society where politicians still resign when they act dishonourably. His marriage goes wrong, his child dies and his wife has an affair. In a society where a divorced woman is shunned, he provides his wife with a reason to divorce him instead (a set up). Armed with this evidence, she re-writes her demands and tries to take everything he's got. After producing evidence to ruin her case, he tries to clear his head with a journey to a remote jungle. Here, he is made captive and in his absence his wife seeks to have him declared dead. Okay, that's the plot so far, but what I haven't mentioned is the conveyed sensation that makes this book a masterwork: Fear. For a quiet and undemonstrative novel, you hardly notice the building sensation. The characters are oblivious. Society is breaking down and people don't spot it. By the time the story reaches the Brazillian jungle (which he visited in 1933) the fear is quite overwhelming. The reader will become psychologically defensive for days afterward - honestly, this book will speak to your subconscious and put you into fight or flight mode. Amazing literature hidden in a rant. If you'll forgive my unchecked Aeschylus: 'Fear is stronger than arms'.
Title: Edmund Campion
Pub: Longmans, Green & Co
Date: 1935 - Sept
Clearly one of Waugh's icons, this is the story of a missionary directly following the reign of Queen 'Bloody' Mary (who burned people for not recanting their Anglicanism) and during the reign of the glorious Queen Elizabeth I (who thought the state would be more secure if her parliament suppressed Catholocism). Edmund Campion attended Oxford University, then went abroad to receive religious instruction. When he returned, it was as a Jesuit priest travelling secretly from house to house preaching and hearing confession. Elizabeth had met and clearly respected this man, but couldn't allow him to carry on running around the country stirring things up. He was eventually caught by a 'priestfinder' and became a martyr. Waugh must have written this as a testimony to his bravery, compassion and sacrifice. Many would now read it and simply note that religion gets people killed and achieves nothing. It's your choice. Collectors note: The first 50 copies were numbered, for private distribution.
Title: Waugh in Abyssinia
Pub: Longmans, Green & Co
Date: 1936
A title not of Waugh's choosing, he had planned to write 'A Disappointing War', but never completed. Written following his 1935 visit to Abyssinia as a newspaper reporter looking into 'the Ethiopian question'. The Italians, under Mussolini, are set to invade Abyssinia as the first step in establishing their own fascist empire. Waugh, together with reporters from all over the world, arrives to document Abyssinia's fall and hint at Britain's conspicuous lack of effort in stopping it. 'Vinci cheerfully entered his claims for explanation at the Foreign Office, in the certainty that they would receive no attention.' The country's occupation echoes modern events, where whoever wins the war (however wrong) is cheered by the ravaged population, just to be on the safe side. The begging children cried "Viva Duce!" and 'were rewarded with handfuls of small change.' It may be history, but modern super-powers forget that history is proverbially repeated as farce.
Title: Mr Loveday's Little Outing, and Other Sad Stories
Pub: Chapman & Hall Ltd
Date: 1936
A collection of short stories written before WWII, including 'Mr Loveday's Little Outing' [1935], which I would nominate as the finest piece of black-humour ever written in the English language. Other stories include: 'By Special Request' [an alternative ending to 'Handful of Dust' to replace Chapters V, VI, VII beginning at page 241, where Tony Last takes a cruise, rather than going to Brazil], 'Cruise' [1932], 'Period Piece' [1934], 'On Guard' [1934], 'Incident in Azania' [Using characters established in 'Black Mischief'], 'Out of Depth' [a Margot Metroland story], 'Excursion in Reality' [1934], 'Love in the Slump', 'Bella Fleace Gave A Party' [1932] and 'Winner Takes All' [1936]. A little-known book, for one of such quality.
Title: Scoop
Pub: Chapman & Hall Ltd
Date: 1938
Following his re-marriage in 1937, he wrote a novel inspired by his journalistic work for the Daily Mail about the power of newspaper barons to influence the very world events they are selling newspapers about. You'll think I'm wrong. You'll think it's the story of a weary journalist trying to make his way, but by the end Waugh lets the reader tune in. The message is disguised in a story relaying what it is like to be a journalist sent off to a remote trouble-spot, of which you know little, and being pressured to send back explanations of everything going on when you don't speak the language and nothing is being explained to you. It is therefore easy to miss the action entirely, or report what you have been told without adequate checking (i.e. you may be fed the story someone wants you to send back, so being grateful for scraps of information, you do). News is power, but flow of information can be controlled. If you control the story, you can control people, decisions and countries. This is clearly a novel years ahead of it's time as all these issues are increasingly relevant today. In recent times, the James Bond 'Elliot Carver' character, or Robert Maxwell, would fill the same role. This is a novel for the Spin Doctor, Political Lobbyist and Satirist just as much as the reader of good literature. Collector's note: The true first edition seems to read 'First Published 1933' due to a worn '8' in the typesetting, which was later replaced.
Title: Robbery Under Law, The Mexican Object-Lesson
Pub: Chapman & Hall Ltd
Date: 1939
Waugh originally intended to tour Mexico, witness their version of Catholocism, and bring his readers around the world up to date about the country's desperate situation. Instead he discovered the real reasons behind the country's problems. He unveils the history of political in-fighting and banditry through the previous forty years, uneasy relations with neighbouring countries and the reason why foreign companies would not invest in Mexico. The 'Robbery Under Law' of the title refers to the Mexican Govt inviting foreign companies to set up, import machinery, train workers and construct their housing, find oil, build the infrastructure to take it out, organise a supply network etc, THEN the Mexican Govt declared all foreign assets nationalised and stole the lot. On the face of it, a triumph for Mexico. In reality, no foreign investor would touch the place and oil sales were boycotted until Nazi Germany took up the slack in the late 1930s. People suffered and the Government blamed the lack of rich foreign investors. The discrepancy in wealth between Mexican exploiters and exploited is also clear. Altogether a sickening example of how a mis-managed country can spiral into decay. Following this book's publication, Waugh joined the British Army and temporarily stopped writing.
Title: My Father's House
Pub: Horizon
Date: 1941
Horizon Magazine, November Vol.IV, No.23, 1941 edited by Cyril Connolly is subtitled 'a review of literature and art'. 'My Father's House' [pg 329-341] is a strange lament for the loss of a cultured parent, where the child ends by leaving his father's house (being a cultural metaphor) just as it was.
Title: Put Out More Flags
Pub: Chapman & Hall Ltd
Date: 1942
"∧ a drunk military man should order gallons and put out more flags in order to increase his military splendour" [Chinese sage, quoted and translated by Lin Yutang in the 'Importance of Living']. Dedicated to Randolph Churchill, who fought alongside Waugh in Yugoslavia to help Tito's partisan army free the country from Nazi occupation. Strangely enough, my step-father (Harry Gamwell) was in the Special Operations Executive group based in Italy which made sure they got their supplies. Small world. Anyway, the book I hear you ask. A decreasing proportion of readers will recall that following the British declaration of war (Hitler preferred invading countries without ever declaring war) there was a long wait before any real fighting happened. The 'Phoney' or 'Great Bore War' is the setting for this story. 'The real thing' is of course covered later in the 'Sword of Honour' trilogy. You may have noticed that Waugh preferred to write about the ingrained nature of British Society and it's impact on the under-developed greater world not when it was all going swimmingly, but when it was under pressure. He liked confronting it's perceptions with the absurd, the savage and the disfunctional. He couldn't help dropping in the occassional jab of pointlessness and cruelty as a counterpoint to put a self-obsessed humanity back in it's place. For this reason, WWII was the ideal setting for Waugh's style. What better antagonist could there be to show artificiality a rude reality? The police raid falling flat because they can't get past the gate keeper is a perfect example of Waugh's brilliance: "Is Mr Silk expecting you?" "We hope not" "Then you can't see him".
Title: Work Suspended (Incomplete)
Pub: Chapman & Hall Ltd
Date: 1942
The original short story of 'Work Suspended' (a new edition was published in 1948 with considerable further addition).
Title: Brideshead Revisited
Pub: Chapman & Hall Ltd
Date: 1945
A novel of epic standing in the world of literature. Waugh's most famous book, 'The Sacred & Profane Memories of Captain Charles Ryder' are essentially Britain's answer to Gibbon's 'The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire'. He describes it as 'nothing less than an attempt to trace the workings of the divine purpose in a pagan world'. The author writes of this world 'to those who see it as transitory, insignificant and, already, hopefully passed' with the caveat '...but that the human spirit, redeemed, can survive all disasters'. The plot is incidental to the mood of romanticism Waugh sets as he chronicles the end of an era, the end of an estate, the end of an empire. It's almost as if Ryder is wandering through an opera house, to which he's never before been invited, scuffing his shoes through the debris of the final performance and knowing that the noble building will be pulled to the ground when he walks away. I expect you would like to know a little of the story. Perhaps a little then. Ryder, the original classless man, meets the effete and pointless 'younger son' Sebastian Flyte at Oxford University and is soon drawn into the gravitational pull of his fascinating world. Sebastian is the final generation product of an historic, aristocratic, catholic family in the sixteen years leading up to the outbreak of the '39 war. His family is split and residing mostly abroad. The stately house (Brideshead) is in mothballs and the hope for the future, Sebastian, purposeless and vaguely homosexual, looks already to be the infertile last of his line. Ryder chronicles this redundancy of the human spirit, which exudes a tragic grace even when set against the greater brutal tragedy of a world war. Of course, Waugh isn't just writing about a family at the end of an era. He's writing about England and to a wider extent, the lack of unification and faith. When the army clears and commandeers Brideshead as a barracks, for instance, we have a recreation of the feeling when the Attlee/Bevan government (for the first time representing the power of the emergent lower middle classes) took control of the nation. For the aristocratic houses, the first and second wars changed the rules, the new Britain was under a new administration - and they didn't belong.
Title: When the Going was Good
Pub: Duckworth & Co Ltd
Date: 1946
A compilation of everything Waugh wished to preserve from his previous travel books (Labels, Remote People, Ninety-Two Days and Waugh in Abyssinia). 'From 1928 until 1937 I had no fixed home and no possesions which would not conveniently go on a porter's barrow'. This is Waugh's Grand Tour.
Title: Scott-King's Modern Europe
Pub: Chapman & Hall Ltd
Date: 1947
Set in 1946, a classical Oxbridge scholar who's blinkered world focusses on an obscure Habsburg Empire poet, Bellorius, is invited to the poet's homeland (a country now called Neutralia) by a seemingly hospitable government conducting anniversary celebrations. Scott-King starts to notice things are not entirely as they seem. People haven't heard of the poet, they haven't heard of Scott-King and his hosts seem vaguely shifty. It gradually becomes clear that the politically myopic scholar is at the mercy of totalitarian hospitality, thus giving the regime some degree of the legitimacy they need. Deep water then - hints of Oxford and the Berlin Olympics.
Title: The Loved One
Pub: Chapman & Hall Ltd
Date: 1948
An 'Anglo-American Tragedy' illustrated by Stuart Boyle. Waugh visited America in 1947 and 1948 and spent some time in Southern California, where he noticed 'the splendid elaboration of it's graveyards'. A strange little story about our fascination with death and commemoration. Here, with exaggerated tastelessness, we are told of the lives and loves of the death industry. We hear of the chemical gunk which comes out of the incinerators (breast implants?), the gaudiness and eventually a depressive suicide. It makes you want to live forever.
Title: Work Suspended (Revised)
Pub: Chapman & Hall Ltd
Date: 1948
A collection of stories written before WWII, including 'Work Suspended' [1941] and much of Waugh's previously published 1936 collection 'Mr Loveday's Little Outing' [1935], 'Cruise' [1932], 'Period Piece' [1934], 'On Guard' [1934], 'An Englishman's Home' [1939], 'Excursion in Reality' [1934], 'Bella Fleace Gave A Party' [1932] and 'Winner Takes All' [1936].
Title: Helena
Pub: Chapman & Hall Ltd
Date: 1950
Another 'must read'. The story of Helena, an ostler's daughter, who marries a Roman officer stationed in the province of Britannia. The officer becomes Emperor Constantine, the first Christian emperor of Rome, so she is then Emperess. Helena becomes enthralled by the newly emerging Christian cult and launches her own personal crusade to find the true cross. The Roman army do most of the 'finding' and she has to satisfy herself that she's been handed the correct relic (hundreds of years have passed). Although Waugh was fascinated by religion, and this book simply dramatises existing fact, you don't have to be religious at all to enjoy this novel. Waugh isn't making a point, he's just relating a superb story.
Title: Men At Arms
Pub: Chapman & Hall Ltd
Date: 1952
1st instalment of the 'Sword of Honour ' trilogy gleaned from his entirely objective impressions of the English and their society at the outbreak and through WWII. In 'Men At Arms', Guy Crouchback joins the army, enlisting as an officer (of course) in the unfashionable Halberdiers, then condascendingly finds a sargent to demand some square-bashing practice. Billetted at a school, his notice board still bears a list the last season's cricket colours and it soon becomes patently obvious that this is a society mentally unprepared, or indeed oblivious, to the implications of war. England knows that England always wins at war. It's just another sport, just another kind of magic. Then, unexpectedly, the world has changed and England has a very real chance of losing. When England starts to lose, it soon starts using the word 'British' - the first indication of the struggle becoming serious. Then we find out the real mechanism for the victories everyone takes for granted. Crouchback's calm detachment is useful, but Brigadier Ritchie-Hook's suicidaly insane death-wish enthusiasm for leaping ashore and attacking the enemy on his own is exactly the sort of madness required to emerge victorious from a world submerged in madness. We also meet McTavish the opportunist chancer who takes the credit and always comes up smelling of roses, despite having done nothing at all. Waugh creates characters who are noticeably pawns of the gods, some 'inspired by illusion', some indestructible and some just seemingly so.
Title: Love Among The Ruins
Pub: Lilliput Magazine
Date: 1953 - May
In the May-June issue [pg 72-96] can be found the first appearance of 'A new complete story: Love Among the Ruins', with 6 cartoon illustrations, one being full page.
Title: Love Among The Ruins
Pub: Chapman & Hall Ltd
Date: 1953
Despite their promises at the last election, the politicians had not yet changed the climate.' This short illustrated book (51 pages, decorated by Waugh and others) describes a utopian (is it?) world in the near future where all politicians are agreed and the State is everything. The past civilisation is a faint, untaught, memory in the minds of the population. Euthanasia is a general rule, although people often have to wait so long that they die naturally before the doctor has got around to poisoning them. The romance, the love, is between a state and an ideal. The pending impression throughout is that, given time, people can fall out of love with any ideal.
Title: The Holy Places
Pub: The Queen Anne Press
Date: 1953
Print run: 1,000 numbered copies, of which numbers 1-50 are bound in full niger morocco and signed by the author and artist (wood engravings by Reynolds Stone). A 37 page book of commentary on religious sites in sections entitled 'Work Abandoned' (a visit to Jerusalem in 1935, written in 1952), 'St Helena Empress' [see the novel 'Helena'] and 'The Defence of the Holy Places' which concerns hope for the continued unity of the church.
Title: Officers And Gentlemen
Pub: Chapman & Hall Ltd
Date: 1955
The second, and best, part of the 'Sword of Honour' series. As preparation begins for the defence of Crete, the godless Luftwaffe stoop to the shocking tactics of bombing London gentlemen's clubs. The reader is given a cross-section of the mood in beseiged London (noticeably leaving out the mood of the 'common man') and the infighting within ministeries: "They're out to do us down"...'No one thought he meant the Germans'. McTavish changes his name to Trimmer as part of his usual insuppressable ducking and diving, commando groups are formed, and plots are hatched. In Crete, the Germans thought they had lost, having taken huge casualties in their parachute landings. Unfortunately, due to terrible communication and co-ordination, the British forces retreat in the face of an inferior enemy, then disembark or surrender their army in the most embarrasing of displays. The officers are idiots and Crouchback observes the bravery of infantrymen, who then lose their lives in the most pointless of ways. The author creates a hero, then lets them die on the brink of success, as if to emphasise that in real warfare such fairytales do not happen. Everything shrieks death, waste and dis-illusionment. The politicians at home, in desperate need for good news, latch onto anything positive to drown out the news of defeat. Due to navigational incompetence, a group of soldiers lands in uncharted France and takes fire from an old French woman at a farm house. They report a successful raid on enemy territory, under fire, and the press hail Trimmer as a hero. A tale of empty and incompetently real warfare as contrasted with the approved glorious histories.
Title: The Ordeal of Gilbert Pinfold
Pub: Chapman & Hall Ltd
Date: 1957
Described as 'a conversation piece', this novel conveys the author's own experiences of hallucination and feelings of losing mental control (on a passenger ship to Ceylon) when he mixed several medicines, and alcohol, without understanding there would be side effects. Waugh heard voices, then suspected he must be mentally ill. Pinfold goes through it all, aboard a passenger ship where he can't escape his demonic situation. A realistic tale told from a rather unfussingly English and observed position. The end result is symapthetic black humour.
Title: Ronald Knox
Pub: Chapman & Hall Ltd
Date: 1959
A priest, scholar and artist who 'lacked only longevity to have become a national figure'. Ronald Arbuthnott Knox died in 1957, aged 69, and was a Fellow of Trinity College, Oxford and Pronotary Apostolic to His Holiness Pope Pius XII. Waugh record his life, presuming it will be much studied in the future.
Title: A Tourist In Africa
Pub: Chapman & Hall Ltd
Date: 1960
Waugh's travel through Kenya, Tanganyika and Rhodesia. According to the flyleaf 'a very pleasant bedside book which should induce sleep in all but the most stubborn of insomniacs'! Waugh, who at this stage in his life never spends a February in England, provides leisurely impressions and commentary on peaceful East and Central Africa, which provides an interesting contrast with terrorised countries (Zimbabwe), and post-colonial ports (Aden etc), as they appear today.
Title: Unconditional Surrender
Pub: Chapman & Hall Ltd
Date: 1961
The concluding part of the 'Sword of Honour' series and a book which 'completes the dis-illusionment of the hero, Guy Crouchback'. In this episode we find out more of Ludovic's history (the hero of Crete) and see how a soldier who takes tough decisions and does what needs to be done (e.g. murdering an incompetent officer on his own side) will rise to the top through all the social faff of peace-time. Guy, level headed and now wiser, returns to England and trains the next intake of soldiery, who are a generation entirely diverged from his own. Guy attempts to settle into the social scene, but finds that has changed too. Eventually we see who has done well out of the war, who was born for it, who hated it, and who was destroyed. This triogy, an un-jingoistic and ground-breaking damnation of war, ranks amongst the finest examples of it's kind ever to be written.
Title: Basil Seal Rides Again
Pub: Chapman & Hall Ltd
Date: 1963
A limited edition illustrated story featuring one of Waugh's most remembered characters. Illustrated by Kathleen Hale. 750 numbered copies signed by the author.
Title: A Little Learning
Pub: Chapman & Hall Ltd
Date: 1964
The 'first part' of Waugh's autobiography, constructed in the style of his earlier acclaimed biography of Ronald Knox. Great detail appears concerning his family, education, religious beliefs and time as a schoolmaster, but sadly precious little about his actual books.
Title: The Sword Of Honour
Pub: Chapman & Hall Ltd
Date: 1965
The final version of the novels' (includes an errata slip!) 'Men At Arms' [1952], 'Officers And Gentlemen' [1955] and 'Unconditional Surrender' [1961]. The bitter sweet story of a Halberdier - a gentleman playing at soldiers. Read this before you volunteer.
Title: Wine In Peace And War
Pub: Saccone & Speed Ltd
Date: 1967
A short (77 page) and rather rare book, with 'decorations by Rex Whistler' seemingly printed to glorify wine and wine merchants (e.g. Saccone & Speed). Dedicated to a Russian prince and published after his death, in April of the previous year. There are only three illustrations, including the dustwrapper, but they are rather good. I like this little tome and I think more things like this should be written. I can't be the only one either, judging by the number of years it took to get my copy (eventually snaffled from the library of Dorothy L.Sayers). Waugh outlines the problems getting a decent supply during the war and the trials of reacquaintance in it's aftermath. After all, a fellow should have a hobby.
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