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Charnwood Borough Council - Leading in Leicestershire

Historic and Listed Buildings in Loughborough

Statutory Listed Buildings

Descriptions are given below for the following statutory listed buildings in Loughborough. There are additional lists of buildings in the settlements of Cotes, Hathern and Nanpantan.
Please note that the records describe the salient features of each property in order to aid identification: the records are not intended to be either comprehensive or exclusive.
Listing covers all parts of the property and its curtilage, ie all internal and external elements whether described or not.

Entries are arranged alphabetically by street.

Ashby Road
Church of St Mary and House Adjoining, Ashby Road (north side) - Grade II
The Grove, Ashby Road (north side) - Grade II
Gate Piers to The Grove, Ashby Road (north side) - Grade II
Field House, Ashby Road (north side) - Grade II
Lodge to Garendon Park, Ashby Road (north side) - Grade II
Garendon Park, Gateway and Railings to Hall, Ashby Road (north side) - Grade II
Garendon Park, Entrance Archways to Hall, Ashby Road (north side) - Grade II
Garendon Park, Wrought Iron Screens and Gates, Ashby Road (north side) - Grade II
Garendon Park, The Obelisk, Ashby Road (north side) - Grade II
Garendon Park, Stonebow Bridge, Ashby Road (north side) - Grade II
Garendon Park, The Triumphal Arch, Ashby Road (north side) - Grade I
Garendon Park, The Temple of Venus, Ashby Road (north side) - Grade II*
Garendon Park, Lodge & Archway N of Site House, Ashby Road (north side) - Grade II
Garendon Park, Barn, Ashby Road (north side) - Grade II
Garendon Park, Dovecote, Ashby Road (north side) - Grade II
Garendon Park, Outbuildings, Ashby Road (north side) - Grade II
Garendon Park, Boundary Wall, Ashby Road (north side) - Grade II
Loughborough University, Summer House & Garden Wall, Ashby Road (south side) - Grade II
Loughborough University, Gardeners Cottage, Ashby Road (south side) - Grade II
Holywell Farmhouse, formally listed as Holywell Farm Hall, Ashby Road (south side) - Grade II
Outbuildings to Holywell Farm, Ashby Road (south side) - Grade II
Ashby Square
The Griffin Inn, Ashby Square (south side) - Grade II
Baxter Gate
54, Baxter Gate (east side) - Grade II
General Baptist Meeting House, Baxter Gate (west side) - Grade II
Bramcote Road
Moat House, Bramcote Road (west side) - Grade II
Burton Street
1 and 2, Burton Street (west side) - Grade II
Burton Walks
Loughborough Grammar School, Burton Walks (north side) - Grade II
Loughborough Grammar School Boarding House, Burton Walks (north side) - Grade II
Lodge and Gate Screen to Loughborough Grammar School - Grade II
6, Burton Walks (south side) - Grade II
Castledine Street
Garage and attached walls between Nos 71 and 61 - Grade II
Cattle Market
National Westminster Bank, Cattle Market (east side) - Grade II
Church Gate
37 and 38, Church Gate (south side) - Grade II
39 and 40, Church Gate (south side) - Grade II
Derby Road
Ruins of All Saints Church, Dishley, Derby Road (north side) - Grade II Scheduled Ancient Monument
Dishley Grange, Dishley (north side) - Grade II
Dovecote, Dishley Grange, Derby Road, Dishley (north side) - Grade II
Milestone, West of Dishley Grange, Dishley (south side) - Grade II
Elms Grove
The Elms, Elms Grove (south side) - Grade II
Fennel Street
12a, Fennel Street (north side) - Grade II
16, 17 and 17a, Fennel Street (north side) - Grade II
Forest Road
Emmanuel Church, Forest Road (north side) - Grade II
14, Forest Road (south side) - Grade II
Freehold Street
Taylors Bell Foundry, Freehold Street - Grade II
Granby Street
Carnegie Library - Grade II (includes 19 Packe Street)
Great Central Road
Great Central Railway Station, Sheds & Bridge, Great Central Road - Grade II
Platform Water Tank at Loughborough Central Station - Grade II
North Water Tank at Loughborough Central Station - Grade II
South Water Tank at Loughborough Central Station - Grade II
Signal Box at Loughborough Central Station - Grade II
Gregory Street
2, Gregory Street (west side) - Grade II
Hazel Road
Halfway House, Hazel Road (south end) - Grade II
Park Grange, Hazel Road (south end) - Grade II
Leicester Road
Lodge to Aingarth, Leicester Road (east side) - Grade II
Lodge and Gate Screen to Loughborough Grammar School See Burton Walks
Loughborough Cemetery Chapels, Leicester Road (west side) - Grade II
Loughborough Cemetery Lodge, Gates & Railings, Leicester Road (west side) - Grade II
Market Place
Fearon Fountain, Market Place - Grade II
Town Hall, Market Place (east side) - Grade II
41 (Midland Bank), Market Place (east side) - Grade II
Meadow Lane
9 Ivy Cottage, Meadow Lane (east side) - Grade II
Moor Lane
Holy Trinity Church, Moor Lane (south side) - Grade II
Nanpantan Road
Burleigh Farmhouse (Tudor Farmhouse), Nanpantan Road (north side) - Grade II
Outwoods Farm House, Nanpantan Road (south side) - Grade II
Outwoods Farmyard Buildings, Nanpantan Road (south side) - Grade II
Nottingham Road
Gainsborough House, Nottingham Road (east side) - Grade II
Loughborough Railway Station, Nottingham Road (west side) - Grade II
K6 Kiosk outside Station, Nottingham Road - Grade II
Old Ashby Road
Knightthorpe Lodge, Old Ashby Road (north side) - Removed from list and demolished Sept 1990
Orchard Street
Loughborough Masonic Hall Ltd, Orchard Street (north side) - Grade II
Packe Street
19 Packe Street See Carnegie Library
Park Road
Our Lady’s Convent and School adj., Park Road (north side) - Grade II
Pinfold Gate
45-54 (10 Cottages), Pinfold Gate (north side) - Grade II
30-31, Pinfold Gate (south side) - Grade II
Queens Park
Carillon Tower, Queens Park - Grade II
Queens Road
Towles Mill, Queens Road (north side) - Grade II
Rectory Place
1 and 2 (Chesterton House), Rectory Place (east side) - Grade II
3, Rectory Place (east side) - Grade II
The Old Rectory, Rectory Place (north side) - Grade II* Previously an Ancient Monument - descheduled 20 Feb 97
Sparrow Hill
10, Sparrow Hill (east side) - Grade II
11 and 12, Sparrow Hill (east side) - Grade II
58-60, Sparrow Hill (west side) - Grade II
The Windmill Public House, Sparrow Hill (west side) - Grade II
Steeple Row
Church of All Saints, Steeple Row (east side) - Grade II
Storer Road
Rosebery School, Storer Road - Grade II
St Peters Church, Storer Road - Grade II
Thorpe Acre Road
Church of All Saints, Thorpe Acre Road (east side) - Grade II
Woodthorpe
80 (Reynalls), Woodthorpe (east side) - Grade II

Church of St Mary and House Adjoining, Ashby Road (north side) - Grade II
Roman Catholic church and house adjoining, 1833-4, by William Flint of Leicester. Stucco. Original church forms chancel of present church, which was enlarged in the 1920s by a 5-bay nave to the south. Massive 4-column south portico flanked by aisle windows in lugged architraves. Ceramic panel of the Annunciation above central door. Original church has ceiling with coved sides rising from cornice and west gallery with iron railing enriched with palmettes. C20 fittings otherwise. House to west: 2 storey, double-fronted, 3 window range. Giant pilasters supporting entablature. Lugged architraves and bracketed cills. Pilastered doorcase, rectangular fanlight, 6-panelled door (2 panels now glazed). C20 casement windows.
The Grove, Ashby Road (north side) - Grade II
House, now student hostel. C1830, stucco (rusticated to ground floor), hipped slate roof. Two-storeys, 3 window range, 1-1-1, French windows to ground floor, C20 casements to first floor. Tented verandah across front on cast iron trellis supports. Central stone porch with bowed centre supported on 4 fluted columns; entablature. Deep eaves. Left hand return front has 2 large 2 storey canted stucco bay windows with slate roofs and French windows with segment headed fanlight with Gothic glazing bars between. Right hand return front plainer with one canted 2 storey bay window of smaller size.
Gate Piers to The Grove, Ashby Road (north side) - Grade II
Two gate piers. C1830, roughcast with stone caps and octagonal lanterns on wrought iron consoles. Listed for group value with The Grove (qv).
Field House, Ashby Road (north side) - Grade II
House, 1887 on plaque, red brick and terracotta, with plain tile roofs and moulded brick chimney stacks. “Queen Anne” style. Main block of 2 storeys and attic with subsidiary blocks to left hand side and rear. Main block 5 window range, with central doorway with decorative keystone and white painted bracketed hood over. Sash windows with glazing bars. Terracotta frieze with ongar and cornice above, between 1st and attic floors. White painted eaves cornice. French window to left of entrance (leading to conservatory, now lost). Left hand wing has 2 storey rectangular bay window and gabled dormer, and, to rear, white painted lantern with lead roof and weathervane in the form of a fix. Right hand return front has 2 storey rectangular projection, decorative plaques, ground floor oriel window and arched entrance with swan’s neck pediment and oval window above. The rear of this wing is canted. Rear has rendered and roughcast gables and some leaded windows.
Lodge to Garendon Park, Ashby Road (north side) - Grade II
Lodge, 1847 on plaque, by William Railton. Of Charnwood granite rubble with ashlar dressings and fishscale slate roof, with coped gables and brick end stacks. “Tudor Gothic” manner. 1½ storeys, gable end to street. Three light window with glazing bars to left and similar window in bracketed and gabled dormer with date plaque above. Gabled entrance with shield of arms in lower gabled wing to right hand side. Street end has rectangular ground floor bay window.
Garendon Park, Gateway and Railings to Hall, Ashby Road (north side) - Grade II
Gateway and length of railing to either side (approx 1 yd to east and approx 15 yds to west), mid C18. Stuccoed round arched gateway, rusticated, with Doric columns supporting triglyph frieze and pediment. Rear elevation has rusticated Doric pilasters. Wrought iron railings incorporate decorative panels, and carry scrolls at either side of the gateway. Originally one of a pair of gateways flanking Garendon Hall (demolished 1964).
Garendon Park, Entrance Archways to Hall, Ashby Road (north side) - Grade II
Entrance archway to Garendon Hall (demolished 1964). Mid C18, stuccoed. Segmental carriage archway between plain palisters with entablature and pediment over. Clock face in tympanum of pediment; domed cupola above. North face carries wrought iron lamp bracket.
Garendon Park, Wrought Iron Screens and Gates, Ashby Road (north side) - Grade II
Screens and gates, mid C18, ornamental wrought iron work.
Garendon Park, The Obelisk, Ashby Road (north side) - Grade II
Obelisk, of the 1730s by Ambrose Phillips of Garendon (d.1737). Of red brick rendered, carried on a thick iron plate on 4 ball feet, and standing on a stone pedestal with cornice and base moulding. Mark Airnard “Ambrose Phillipps of Garendon”, Architectural History, 1965.
Garendon Park, Stonebow Bridge, Ashby Road (north side) - Grade II
Bridge, perhaps medieval origin. Rubble stone of 3 arches, the central one pointed. Upstream side has pointed cutwaters. Downstream side has flat platforms stretching into the brook.
Garendon Park, The Triumphal Arch, Ashby Road (north side) - Grade I
Triumphal Arch, of the 1730s, by Ambrose Phillipps of Garendon (d.1737). Of ashlar, with a moulded round headed carriage arch, the soffit of which has octagonal coffering in stucco on brick. The east front has 4 Corinthian columns on tall pedestals supporting a rich entablature. The attic, crowned by a cornice, has a fine relief of the Metamorphosis of Actalon. The west side has 2 Corinthian columns on pedestals with a pediment over the entablature. Cornice crowning attic. Keystone to arch in form of a head. The interior of the arch has some tiny rooms. Based on the Arch of Titus in Rome, the Triumphal Arch at Garendon is a very early (perhaps the earliest) example of an English building inspired directly from an Ancient Roman source, archaeologically interpreted. Mark Aironard, “Ambrose Phillipps of Garendon”, Architectural History, 1965.
Garendon Park, The Temple of Venus, Ashby Road (north side) - Grade II*
Temple, of the 1730s, by Ambrose Phillipps of Garendon (d.1737). Of ashlar , with carved oak entablature and copper dome. Circular plan, loosely based on the Temple of Vesta at Tivoli. Raised on 4 steps, with a peristyle of Ionic columns. Entablature painted white, with the frieze of ox skulls and small bays with swags between. The roof member of the cornice has lions’ heads at intervals. The centre of the temple has a circular apartment with rusticated walls, classical doorcase and 2 fold fielded-panel door. The interior originally contained a statue of Venus, now lost, perhaps destroyed by Luddite rioters in 1811. Mark Aironard, “Ambrose Phillipps of Garendon”, Architectural History, 1965.
Garendon Park, Lodge & Archway N of Site House, Ashby Road (north side) - Grade II
Lodge and archway, 1830s, by William Railton (design exhibited at Royal Academy). Red brick with stone dressings and Swithland slate pyramidal roof to stair turret (replacing the earlier spiral roof). Single rooms of granite rubble to either side. “Tudor” style. Four centred carriage arch with oriel window over, incorporating shields of arms in panels. Crow stepped gables and angle buttresses, with finials. Octagonal stair turret to west.
Garendon Park, Barn, Ashby Road (north side) - Grade II
Barn, C19, red brick, with south wall of rubble stone, probably medieval. Slate roof. North side has buttresses with segmental headed recesses between. Originally used as Riding School.
Garendon Park, Dovecote, Ashby Road (north side) - Grade II
Dovecote, probably medieval origin. Lower part of rubble stone with plinth quoins and moulded string, upper of red brick, brick dentil cornice, Swithland slate roof, rudimentary wooden louvre. Square plan. Pediments on east and west sides. West side has low doorway framed by massive beams, perhaps the original entrance. Interior: nesting boxes with lips of stone and brick.
Garendon Park, Outbuildings, Ashby Road (north side) - Grade II
Outbuildings, probably medieval in origin. Two bays to west of rubble stone, bay to east rubble stone faced, brick lined. Brick eaves. Swithland slate roof. Three engineering brick carriage arches.
Garendon Park, Boundary Wall, Ashby Road (north side) - Grade II
Length of massive dry stone rubble walling, perhaps medieval.
Loughborough University, Summer House & Garden Wall, Ashby Road (south side) - Grade II
Summerhouse and part of walled garden to Burleigh Hall (demolished); C18 red brick walls with central recess entered through segmental rusticated stone arch with carved head keystone. Pediment incorporating coat-of-arms above (originally supporting crest and urns, now lost). NB: This building is too altered to qualify for a II* rating, which it had on the previous list.
Loughborough University, Gardeners Cottage, Ashby Road (south side) - Grade II
House; C16/C17, left hand parts timber framed with brick nogging on stone plinth, right hand part rubble stone. Concrete pantile roofs. Double L plan. External stone stack, heightened in brick at right hand end. Brick bread oven roofed in Swithland slates. Mixed fenestration. Dormer. Plank door.
Holywell Farmhouse, formally listed as Holywell Farm Hall, Ashby Road (south side) - Grade II
Farmhouse; C15/C16, first floor rebuilt in brick late C18 or early C19. Rubble stone ground floor with squared stone quoins and entrance arch. Swithland slate roof. Three room cross passage plan. Two storeys. Right hand bay rendered. Massive stone ridge stack, heightened into 4 separate brick stacks, between central and right hand bays. Four centred entrance arch between left hand and central bays, with plank door recessed behind. Corresponding arch in original rear external wall, now within C19 rear extension. C19 and C20 three and 4-light windows.
Outbuildings to Holywell Farm, Ashby Road (south side) - Grade II
1½ bays of medieval outbuildings, consisting of 2 cruck trusses with collar and tie beams, ridge beam, purlins and wind braces. Walls rebuilt in brick, corrugated iron roof.
The Griffin Inn, Ashby Square (south side) - Grade II
Public house, early/mid C19, brick, painted cream, with stucco dressings, slate roof, 4 brick ridge stacks. Two storeys, 4 window range. Sash windows, some with glazing bars, with incised stucco window heads. Round headed central doorway. Later C19 pub front to right hand side, incorporating twin 4 panel doors (with rectangular fan lights above) flanking C20 replacement window, beneath bracketed frieze.
54, Baxter Gate (east side) - Grade II
Auction rooms, now hospital offices; late C19, brick with terracotta and tiling, plain tile roofs with lead capping and finials. Ecledic “Arts and Crafts”. Two storeys and attic. Carriage arch to left. Projecting main block with irregular asymmetrical fenestration. Central recessed door beneath oval window and triangular pediment, flanked by elliptical shop windows. First floor and attic oriel windows, linked by balusters. Decorative tiling and tile hanging at attic level. Steep pyramidal roof. Octagonal turret to left with round headed cusped blind arcading and ribbed conical roof.
General Baptist Meeting House, Baxter Gate (west side) - Grade II
“General Baptist Meeting House MDCCCXXVIII” on plaque, red brick, 2 storey, 5 window range front. Round headed windows (reglazed with stained glass within mullion and transom) in round headed recesses. Massive pediment across entire facade. C20 ground floor porch addition. Interior has gallery on 3 sides, carried on iron columns. Wrought iron railings and gates with lanterns, in front.
Moat House, Bramcote Road (west side) - Grade II
House; medieval origin, enlarged C17, altered C19. Stone, enlarged in brick, north front rendered. Gable ended Swithland slate roof, brick end stacks. Cross passage plan. North front: 4 window range, sash windows with glazing bars and keystones above. West front: stone built at northern end, diamond pane 2-light casement window to attic. South front: staircase projection, C19 porch. East front: stone plinth, 2 windows to each floor, 3-light casements to ground and 1st floor, one 2-light one blocked window at attic level. C18 staircase. North west ground floor room has 4 centred stone fireplace brought from Knightthorpe Hall at time of demolition.
1 and 2, Burton Street (west side) - Grade II
Pair of cottages, mid C19. Stuccoed, painted cream, with moulded stuccoed end stacks, and curved end gables. Roof not visible. Two storeys, 4 window range. Projecting ground floor with horizontal rustication, cornice and urn at left hand end (missing from right hand end). Slight further projection in centre frames doorways with round arched heads. Doors have 2 slim lights (no 1 retains etched glass) and fanlights above. Tripartite ground floor sash windows (separated by engaged columns) with keystone above (that to No 2 is mutilated). 1st floor has bracketed cornice and blocking course. 1st floor outer windows are segment headed sashes with glazing bars. 1st floor inner windows are smaller and round headed, with close set glazing bars incorporating stained glass.
Loughborough Grammar School, Burton Walks (north side) - Grade II
Grammar School, 1852 by John Morris and Charles Hebson. Of red brick with burnt headers (diaper pattern on chequered basement), stone dressings and slate roof. Gothic revival, with “perpendicular” window tracery throughout. Central block with 2 cross wings (originally open to the roof, now floored). Central 3-stage battlemented tower, with octagonal stair turret at rear, flanked by a 4-light window to either side. Central doorway with carved spandrels, 1st floor oriel window, then 3-light window with hoodmould, niche for statue above. Five bay cross wings with coped gables carrying pinnacles and finials. Canted bay windows. Octagonal lead capped lanterns at junctions of main block and cross wings.
Loughborough Grammar School Boarding House, Burton Walks (north side) - Grade II
Grammar School boarding house, 1852 by John Morris and Charles Hebson. Of red brick with burnt headers and stone dressings. Slate roof. “Tudor Gothic” revival. Two storeys and attic, 3 window range, 1-1-1, coped gabled projections at sides, with rectangular projecting bay windows at ground floor level. Mullioned and transomed windows, mostly sashes, some with hoodmoulds. Three light windows in gables, and central gabled dormer breaking through eaves. Left hand end stack, and ridge stack between central and right hand bays, rising as 4 octagonal shafts. Arched entrance into porch in right hand return front, with canted oriel window above. Inscription carved on bracket above entrance.
Lodge and Gate Screen to Loughborough Grammar School - Grade II
Alternatively known as: Lodge & Gate Screen to Loughborough Grammar School, Leicester Road

Lodge and gate screen. 1852. By John Morris and Charles Hebson of Lambeth. Red brick with burnt header diapering and stone dressings. Coped gables and a parapeted slate roof. Tudor Gothic style. The 2-storey house is on an L plan with gables on the wing ends and a polygonal turret in the reentrant angle which emerges above the eaves level as an octagonal lantern turret with stone pyramidal roof. The windows are mainly 2- and 3-light stone mullion casements with hoodmoulds. There are small single-light windows to the turret with blocked openings to the lantern. At first floor facing the drive to the school is a carved panel of a quatrefoil framing the initials TB for Thomas Burton, the Founder. Beyond the gate screen is the entrance which has a central doorway in a 4-centred arch and a single-light window either side, all within the same hood mould. The lodge rear is similar and has a small single-storey wing including a C20 extension.
INTERIOR. The interior has mainly C20 fittings but retains the dog-leg staircase with angled balusters and newels with shaped heads. The screen has a 4-centred pedestrian archway either side of the drive, the walling ending in an octagonal gate pier with pyramidal cap echoing that of the turret. On the far side of the drive the arch ends in a small gabled building in similar style with window to front and door to rear.
HISTORY: Loughborough Grammar School was founded in 1495 following the bequest of Thomas Burton. The school was originally in the centre of the town but in 1852 the Trustees of the Burton Charity rebuilt it on the present large site known as the Burton Walks. The school and combined headmaster's and boarding house together with this lodge were designed by John Morris and Charles Hebson who in 1851 designed the Grammar School at Wimborne Minster (listed Grade ll) in a similar Tudor style. The school building and boarding house were listed grade II in the mid 1980's.
SUMMARY OF IMPORTANCE: This is a finely detailed and carefully designed lodge and gate screen of 1852. It is in the Tudor Gothic style which is up-to-date for institutional buildings of the period. There is a carefully combined rich combination of materials: red brick and burnt header diapering with stone dressings. Because of the fine design, including this use of varied materials, the lodge and gate screen is of definite quality and with the main buildings it forms a significant group of mid C19 school buildings, at an ancient grammar school, originally founded in 1495.
6, Burton Walks (south side) - Grade II
House, now Grammar School offices. C1910, in the manner of C F A Voysey. Roughcast, painted pink, plain tile roofs, roughcast right hand end stack. Two storeys and attic. Main block parallel to street with taller right hand gabled cross wing with cat slide roof enclosing garage. Entrance at left hand side of this gable, with flat semi-circular hood suspended from decorative iron supports. Plank door with long hinges, decorative nail heads, heart shaped letter box panel and finger plate. Irregular fenestration, mostly long horizontal rows of casements with leaded lights, also circular window above door and tall staircase window to left of entrance, with “Art Nouveau” stained glass. Raking buttresses. Deep wooden eaves. Staircase hall has 8 panelled doors with brass “Art Nouveau” door furniture. Simple stair with heart shaped cut outs in balusters.
Castledine Street - Garage and attached walls between Nos 61 and 71 - Grade II
Garage and attached walls. 1914. For Edmund Denison Taylor.

DESCRIPTION: Red brick, some moulded brick and tilework. Plain tile domed roof. In Arts and Crafts style and in the form of an elaborate garden pavilion. Rectangular plan with canted corners. Single storey. Front to Castledine Street has pair of part-glazed doors within a wide basket arch of fine splayed tilework. Above is a tilework raised band, then a frieze of inset circles of brick and a tilework band which continues round the whole building. The canted corners to left and right and to rear have a round window with tilework keystones. To the sides are tall oval windows with large tilework keystones which rise to the band and splayed aprons which go down to the building’s plinth. Above the frieze is a dentil cornice and ornamental leadwork gutter and downpipes. The large domed roof has a wrought iron weathervane at its apex. To either side of the gargae curving out to the street and continuing parallel to it for approximately 10m. is a brick boundary wall. This has sunk panels each with a terracotta ornament in the cnetre and a moulded brick frame with curved corners. The wall has a coped top.

HISTORY: The garage was built by the owner of 6 Burton Walks (q.v.) at the end of the garden of which the garage stands. E. D. Taylor who had his house designed in the Voysey style, built this garage for his Rolls Royce. He was a director of the successful Loughborough firm, Taylor’s Bell Foundry (q.v.), which cast Great Paul for St Paul’s in London and exported bells all over the world.

SUMMARY OF IMPORTANCE: This garage of 1914, in the Arts and Crafts style, is of very high quality and has fine moulded brickwork and tilework decoration and is comparatively rare for the date. It is in the style of a garden pavilion with a domed roof and has a grandeur suitable to its first occupant, the owner’s Rolls Royce.

National Westminster Bank, Cattle Market (east side) - Grade II
Bank, “FW 1886” on plaque, by Fothergill Watson. Red brick with decorative terracotta and blue brick, stone dressings and bands. Plain tile roofs, with 2 richly moulded brick ridge stacks. “Arts and Crafts Gothic” style. Two storeys and attic. Fenestration mostly plate glass sash windows. Canopied entrance at left carried on pairs of columns with richly moulded capitals, beneath square tower with pyramidal roof. Central banking hall, lit by three 2-light windows within round heads, with transoms and cusped oculi, articulated by gable above. Eight window range offices to right: 1st floor windows linked by arcading, parapet of miniature blind pointed arcading above. Two hipped dormers with deep eaves carried on decorative brackets. Banking hall: square panelled “Jacobethan” ceiling of wood and plaster carried on massive brackets. Upper part of interior of exposed brick, down to decorative terracotta stringcourse. Lit to rear by three 2-light windows with plain oculi. Twin brick arches in north wall with central polished grey granite column and richly moulded capital.
37 and 38, Church Gate (south side) - Grade II
House, now shop; C16 and later; timber frame, front stuccoed, end walls rebuilt in brick, coped gable ended Swithland slate roof. One brick ridge stack. Two storey 5 window range. 1st floor has three 9-pane sash windows alternating with 2 blind recesses. Ground floor has one 9-pane sash window with shutters on right hand side, otherwise a jumble of C20 “Georgian” shop fronts, all beneath pent roof. One storey C19 extension to left hand side has 3 segment headed shop windows with keystones and canted angle with round headed doorway. Interior reveals some exposed timber framing, a simply chamfered rectangular stone fireplace and a room with C17 and C18 panelling, all on the first floor.
39 and 40, Church Gate (south side) - Grade II
House, C16 and later timber frame, stuccoed, gable ends. Swithland slate roof, 2 brick ridge stacks. Cross passage plan, 2 storeys in early C19, fronted as two 2 window range double fronted houses. Sash windows, glazing bars and shutters to ground floor. Bracketed doorcases. No 39 has rectangular fanlight and 6 panel door. Door to No. 40 replaced by round headed window. Bracketed box gutter.
Ruins of All Saints Church, Dishley, Derby Road (north side) - Grade II Scheduled Ancient Monument
East, north and south walls of ruined aisle less church, C12/C13; rubble stone with ashlar dressings. Triple lancet east window. North wall: round headed doorway with semi circular hoodmould, plank door. South wall (from east to west) lancet, blocked round headed doorway, ogee-headed lancet, base of porch. Interior has remains of piscina, sedilia, aumbry. Slate grave slabs including those to the Bakewell family C20 slate slab commemorating Robert Bakewell on north wall. Scheduled ancient monument.
Dishley Grange, Dishley (north side) - Grade II
House; 1845 (CMP and 1845 on shields in gables) rebuilding of earlier house. Brick with stone dressings, slate roof. Two storey, 4 window range, 1-2-1 coped gabled projection left and right. Sash windows (tripartite to ground floor) with glazing bars. Four panel door, rectangular fanlight above, and hoodmould with head stops. Previous house was home of Robert Bakewell, pioneer agriculturalist.
Dovecote, Dishley Grange, Derby Road, Dishley (north side) - Grade II
Dovecote, late C18, square plan, stone plinth, red brick with raised band, brick dentil cornice, pyramidal slate roof, white painted lantern.
Milestone, West of Dishley Grange, Dishley (south side) - Grade II
Milestone, made by “Gamble”, early C19, cast iron painted white with lettering painted black. Triangular prism with label above. Faces inscribed “To London 111” and “Derby 15”, label inscribed “Loughbro 2”.
The Elms, Elms Grove (south side) - Grade II
House, now part of University of Loughborough; early C19, ashlar. Two storeys , 3 window range. Projecting band between ground and 1st floors. Cornice and blocking course. Segmental headed recesses for windows on ground floor with cornice below tympana. Four columned Ionic porch with steps upon 3 sides, enclosing round headed entrance. 1st floor central window has flat pediment on console brackets above. Five windows to right hand return elevation (all modern or blocked) with flat pediment over central one. Rear elevation, 5 windows and pedimented doorcase. Stone cantilevered staircase in oval well beneath enriched cornice and lantern. Built for Thomas Warner, Hosiery Manufacturer.
12a, Fennel Street (north side) - Grade II
House; now offices. Early C19. Stucco, scored in imitation of ashlar, hipped Swithland slate roof, 2 ridge stacks. Two-storeys, double fronted, 3 window range. Eaves cornice, central full height shallow segmental headed recess. Eight pane sash windows. Central round headed doorway with archivolts and keystone, and radiating fanlight.
16, 17 and 17a, Fennel Street (north side) - Grade II
Terrace of houses, early C19, brick, rendered, plain tile roof, 4 brick ridge stacks. Three storeys, 5 window range. Central elliptical carriage arch. One door with rectangular fanlight above in centre of left hand part. Twin doors (right hand one probably later) with rectangular fanlights, in pilastered cases, in centre of right hand part. Flat projecting bands at all levels to 1st and 2nd floors. Original windows are 16-pane sashes to ground floor (where 3 survive) and 1st floor (where one survives) and 12-pane sashes to second floor (where 3 survive). Long (3 x 12-pane) windows to staircase projections in centre of each part to rear.
Emmanuel Church, Forest Road (north side) - Grade II
Church; 1835-7 by Thomas Rickman, with one bay chancel extension and vestry added to south 1909. Derbyshire sandstone with slate roofs. Six bay nave, aisles, chancel, western tower. “Decorated Gothic” style. Embattled parapet with pinnacles at either end. Nave clerestory. Tower has 3 light bell openings and traceried parapet with pinnacles. Interior has arcade carried on octagonal piers, western gallery carried on round cast iron columns and traceried brackets (galleries to north and south removed 1929). Square panelled ceilings with bosses. Monument to Richard Croslier by Thomas Brock, 1888, in form of lunette, showing corpse and mourners.
14, Forest Road (south side) - Grade II
House; early mid C19, of red brick (with some whitened headers) with Swithland slate roof and brick end stacks. Two storeys, 2 window range, double fronted. 16-pane sash windows with stone cills and moulded stucco window heads (possibly later). Slightly off centre door with blind window recess above. Doorcase with bracketed hood. Six-panel door with rectangular fanlight above. Rear wing, lit by cambered headed 3-light horizontally sliding sash windows, and later extension.
Taylors Bell Foundry, Freehold Street - Grade II
Bell foundry. 1859, later C19, 1898 and early C20. Red brick and Welsh slate roofs. Various ranges of 1 and 2 storeys and 2 towers. Main range facing Freehold Street is of later C19 and 2 storeys. 6-window range of a 20-pane window to left and five 4-pane sash windows to centre right and right. On ground floor are 2 doorways and a large double doorway to left, four 24-pane windows to centre, two 4-pane sashes to centre right, then a double doorway and further 4-pane sash. All openings have brick cambered heads. Moulded brick string course, moulded brick eaves and brick parapet. On right end are various sash windows with margin lights. To far left a 4-stage tower dated 1898. This has a 9-pane window with stone Gibbs surround, and, above, a round window with stone surround with keystones. The third stage has 4 rusticated stone pilasters on each face, a stone cornice, and a parapet with curved top, stone coping and ball finials. The left side of the tower facing Cobden Street is similar with datestone in parapet. Further range facing Cobden Street has tall brick stack, irregular fenestration and a double doorway. Rear range facing Peel Drive (Formerly Chapman Street) is dated 1859. A single storey, 7 window range of 5 iron framed 25-pane windows, and 2 similar 45-pane windows to left. Stone tablets inscribed J W T 1859. To the rear of the main range is an attached early C20 tower of 3 stages with plain tile hipped roof. The bottom stage has 2 sides open, being supported on an iron column and girders. Above these sides, on each face, are two 2-light leaded casements. The third stage is open, with timber framing between brick corner piers. Interior not inspected. History: the Taylor family, originally bell founders in St Neots and elsewhere, came to Loughborough in 1839. In 1858 J W Taylor bought this site and began new foundry buildings. An engraved letterhead of pre 1886 shows the buildings existing then being similar in appearance to those existing at present including that part on the east side of Cobden Street (qv) with three stacks. The business prospered and is reported to have been at one time the largest bell foundry in the world. Here were cast bells for St Paul’s Cathedral, London, including in 1881 ‘Great Paul’, the largest bell in the former British Empire and the largest properly rung bell in the world. Bells and carillons have been exported from this foundry to all parts of the former Empire, USA, and Holland. It is one of the two operational bell foundries remaining in the country. (The Taylor family, Leicester, 1933, passim; Mary Crocket, Bells in our lives, Newton Abbot, 1973, pp35-41; P L Taylor, Two Hundred Years of History, Loughborough, 1959, n.p. Tender for Rochdale Town Hall bells in 1886, in Loughborough Public Library pamphlets 750-800).
Carnegie Library, including 19 Packe Street - Grade II
Public library including linked former librarian's house. 1903-5. By Barrowcliff and Allcock of Loughborough. Red brick with terracotta dressings and slate roof with various tall stacks to house. Library in an exuberant Baroque style, to front, plainer to rear, and house in Vernacular Revival style. The main range is on the street, office to rear and house, which faces Packe St, is linked by a corridor. Main range is a high single storey and an unusual combination of a square which becomes an octagon surmounted by an octagonal pyramidal roof and large lantern with ogee lead covered dome and finial. Front is elaborate with a large central window with aedicule frontispiece surrounding it and ornamental turrets with open Agra-like lanterns at the corners above the triangular section formed by the change to the octagon. The whole has much terracotta decoration provided by the well-known and local firm of Hathernware. Rear ranges are plainer and have leaded-light, casement and sash windows. House has UPVC windows in original openings and a gabled front with a canted bay to left with leaded ogee pentice roof. Door to right under flat hood and windows over. Two gables face yard to left. In the mid 1960's a large library extension was built on to the main range. This involved the demolition of most of the original porch at the side, but it is remarkable that the interference to the rest of the building was kept to a minimum and the original walls and even a window survives covered over in present cupboards in the link.

INTERIOR: The main space survives unaltered and has Ionic half columns supporting the corner openings, an octagonal domed ceiling with plasterwork ribs, thermal windows with Art Nouveau style coloured glass and a huge central octagonal skylight with similar glass. The staircase hall survives with simple Art Nouveau iron balustrade to the staircase and coloured glass in the same style in the window above. The former reference library is the office for staff but remains unaltered and has a vaulted ceiling and also Art Nouveau detailed glass. The original lending library has been divided horizontally but retains the original ceiling. The house for the librarian, now storage, is linked by a corridor and the staircase, fireplaces, doors and other fittings survive.

HISTORY: The original library in Loughborough which opened in 1886 had become completely inadequate and this one was built 1903-5 following the offer of a substantial part of the funds by Andrew Carnegie, the famous philanthropist, who was at the time providing money for the building of many libraries in this country.

SUMMARY OF IMPORTANCE: This is an imaginatively designed and finely detailed public library, including linked former librarian's house, of 1903-5 by Barrowcliff and Allcock of Loughborough. It is in an exuberant Baroque style, with the house to rear in Vernacular Revival style. The main range has an octagonal pyramidal roof and the elaborate front has much terracotta decoration and ornamental turrets at the corners. Inside the main space survives unaltered and has an octagonal domed ceiling with plasterwork ribs, thermal windows with Art Nouveau style coloured glass and a huge central octagonal skylight with similar glass. Other areas retain good fittings and Art Nouveau style glass. The house for the librarian, now storage, is linked by a corridor and here the staircase, fireplaces, doors and other fittings survive. Although there was a large extension added in the mid 1960's, this impinges only minimally on the original building.

SOURCE.
The Municipal Journal, July 28, 1905, p.837-8.

2, Gregory Street (west side) - Grade II
Cottage, early C19, of brick, with plain tile roof and brick ridge stack. Two storeys, single fronted. Fielded 6 panel door in reeded doorcase to left. 24-pane 2-light horizontally sliding sash windows beneath shallow brick arches. A very rare intact survivor of a type of worker’s cottage once common in Loughborough.
Halfway House, Hazel Road (south end) - Grade II
House, C17 and later, timber framed on stone plinth with brick coped gables, rendered. C20 plain tile and pantile steep pitched roof, with one end and one ridge stack. Two storeys, 3 window range. C20 door and fenestration.
Park Grange, Hazel Road (south end) - Grade II
House; C18 with two C19 parallel gabled extensions to north (one incorporating present entrance). Brick with gable ended Swithland slate roof. C19 star plan brick end and ridge stacks. Two storeys. South front: 3 window range, raised brick bands above ground and 1st floors, blocked doorway. Mixed fenestration, including two 2-light horizontally sliding sash windows at 1st floor level.
Lodge to Aingarth, Leicester Road (east side) - Grade II
Lodge, originally to The Elms, now to Aingarth. Early C19, of ashlar, with shallow pitched slate roof. Later stuccoed addition to right hand side re-uses displaced stone window and doorcase. One storey. Cross plan. Sash windows with entablature above. Pediments to each face. One tripartite. Sash window facing road. Stone gate piers and railings in front.
Loughborough Cemetery Chapels, Leicester Road (west side) - Grade II
Pair of cemetery chapels, 1857, ashlar, slate roofs. Gothic Revival. Three bay buttressed chapel (and lower vestries to rear) with 2 light traceried windows, linked by 3 tall pointed carriage archways with gables above, and tower and spire over central one. Tower has buttresses and single light openings with ogee hoodmoulds, and spire has lucernes and is surmounted by a small cross.
Loughborough Cemetery Lodge, Gates & Railings, Leicester Road (west side) - Grade II
Lodge, gates and railings. Mid C19, Gothic Revival. Lodge: of brick with stone dressings, “fishscale” slate roof with gable end to road and subsidiary gable over entrance. One storey, single room, canted bay to east, arched entrance to south with hoodmould and head stops, and corbel above supporting wooden bracket. Decorative bargeboards. Gates and railings of cast iron, painted black and gold. Square gate piers with fleur de lys finials. Ornamental railings incorporating elongated cusped quatrefoils in panels.
Fearon Fountain, Market Place - Grade II
Drinking fountain, dated 1870 above north arch, restored 1981. Ashlar, with polished Aberdeen granite columns, and late C19 cast iron lamp above. Square based canopied structure on a rustic basement (raised on plain plinth dated 1981), carried on squat columns with stylised foliage capitals, with cusped, round headed arches, bracketed cornice, traceried gables (north one carries shield of arms) and polished marble basins to north and south. Lions’ heads to east and west. Inscribed “Our common mercies/loudly call/for praise to God/who gave them all”. Metal plaque to west records “The Fearon Fountain presented to the town by Archdeacon Fearon to mark the provision of Loughborough’s first public water supply in 1870. Renovated as part of the Market Place enhancement 1981”.
Town Hall, Market Place (east side) - Grade II
Town Hall, now theatre, 1855 by William Slater. Ashlar. Italianate. Two storeys, 9 window range, 3-3-3, central projection. Central C20 door, round headed sash windows with margin lights, moulded architraves and hoodmoulds (curved and bracketed to ground floor and flat to 1st floor). Central section has windows linked by arcading to right hand side. Moulded stringcourses between ground and 1st floors and at 1st floor cill level. Bracketed cornice surmounted by balustrade. Two stage bellcote with steep lead roof and weathervane. Clock, added later. Interior, remodelled c.1980 as a theatre, is not of special architectural interest. N Pevsner, Leicestershire and Rutland, p 177.

Midland Bank, 41, Market Place (east side) - Grade II
Bank, 1893 (on column), polished pink granite plinth. Portland stone front, Swithland slate roofs. “Mixed Renaissance” manner. Three-storeys, 6 window range, 1-4-1, entrance projections to each side. Main entrance, to left, has shallow distyle porch with part-fluted columns carrying plaques dated 1829 and 1893. similar columns appear between the 1st floor windows of the central block and, in pilaster form, flanking the subsidiary entrance to the right, which has a semi-circular window above, flanked by decorative finials. This doorway is now blocked. 1st floor columns carry “Free Ionic” entablature, with finials above. 2nd floor has “Corinthian” order, with shell-headed niches between columns. Parapet of round-headed arches with keystones carrying miniature obelisks. Three-light windows to main block, 2-light windows to entrance projections. Ground floor windows have 2 transoms, upper floors one. Lower panes in each case of clear glass, upper ones with decorative leading (except in 5 cases where replaced by modern ventilators). Steep roofs with decorative lead finials, hipped above central block, pyramidal above wings. Interior has been refitted and is not of special architectural interest.
9 Ivy Cottage, Meadow Lane (east side) - Grade II
House, C16/C17, altered and extended C19. Timber frame encased in stucco and painted cream, with hipped Swithland slate roof and 2 rendered brick ridge stacks. Two storeys. Not quite central 6 panelled door, lugged architrave and fanlight with glazing bars above, flanked by 2 modern 3-light windows. 1st floor has central blind panel with modern 3-light window to left and canted oriel to right. Hall and right hand front room have massive chamfered beams with decorative stops, and rooms at rear has beams with run out chamfers.
Holy Trinity Church, Moor Lane (south side) - Grade II
Church, 1878 by Sir A Blomfield. Of Charnwood granite rubble with ashlar dressings, plain tile roofs. “Geometrical” tracery. Three bay buttressed nave, transepts and chancel, flanked by 2 lower chapels. Vestry to south, possibly later. Stringcourse below windows. Bell on west gable. N Pevsner, Leicestershire and Rutland, p 177.
Burleigh Farmhouse (Tudor Farmhouse), Nanpantan Road (north side) - Grade II
Farmhouse; C17, timber framed with white painted brick infill, on brick plinth, with brick outshut, enlarged early mid C19, in brick, painted white, to south. Swithland slate roofs hipped over C19 part. Brick ridge stack to original house, twin stacks, diagonally set, in hip of C19 roof, 2 storeys throughout. North facade: fenestration mostly horizontally sliding sash windows with glazing bars. C20 door, not in original position. South facade: 1-1-1, central bay gabled and slightly projecting. Deep, bracketed eaves. Horizontally sliding sash windows, with hoodmoulds over. Central C20 door.
Outwoods Farm House, Nanpantan Road (south side) - Grade II
Farmhouse, C16/C17 timber frame, recased in brick C19, rendered and painted cream. Plain tile roof with brick end stacks. Two storeys, 2 window range. Cambered headed window openings, 3 light, C20 windows, C20 central porch off centre door. Brick dentil cornice. Exposed chamfered beams with decorative stops in ground floor rooms. Forms a group with farmyard buildings (qv).
Outwoods Farmyard Buildings, Nanpantan Road (south side) - Grade II
Farmyard of 3 ranges, early/mid C19. To south, canted stable range, east end of brick, west end of Charnwood granite with brick dressings, Swithland slate roof. Three cambered headed recessed entrances. To west, granary of Charnwood granite with brick dressings, Swithland slate roof. Two storeys, 3 cambered headed doorways and 5 circular ventilators, now blocked. Reed and plaster floor. To north, barn of Charnwood granite with brick dressings and later brick extension to west, Swithland slate roof. Rectangular ventilators, some blocked. Roof has 3 bays of tie beam trusses with angle struts. Forms a group with Outwoods Farmhouse (qv).
Gainsborough House, Nottingham Road (east side) - Grade II
House, early C19 (possibly earlier core), rendered and painted white, with hipped Swithland slate roof and 2 ridge stacks. Two storeys, 3 window range, double fronted. Complete wooden Doric entablature. 12-pane sash windows. Central 6-panelled door in architrave of fluted Doric pilasters, with radiating fanlight above. Distyle Doric porch.
Loughborough Railway Station, Nottingham Road (west side) - Grade II
Railway Station, incorporating main passenger building and attached platform canopy, and screen wall and canopy on subsidiary platform. C.1870, of white brick with red brick dressings and hipped slate roofs. Central booking hall with lower wings either side. Arched windows with keyed heads. Decorative cornices and chimneys. Only the canopy is missing. Platform elevation equally unaltered. Eight bays of ridge and furrow cast iron and glass canopy, the hipped ends have been removed. Similar canopy to subsidiary platform. Booking hall has original fittings.
K6 Kiosk outside Station, Nottingham Road - Grade II
Telephone kiosk. Type K6. Designed 1935 by sir Giles Gilbert Scott. Made by various contractors. Cast iron. Square kiosk with domed roof. Unperforated crowns to top panels and margin glazing to windows and door.
Knightthorpe Lodge, Old Ashby Road (north side) - Removed from list and demolished Sept 1990
Loughborough Masonic Hall Ltd, Orchard Street (north side) - Grade II
Independent Congregational Chapel, now Loughborough Masonic Hall; 1828 on plaque. Red brick with slate roof. Two storeys, 1-2-1 windows. Central projection beneath pediment with date plaque. Moulded brick band between ground and first floors, eaves cornice. Round headed windows with glazing bars. Central projection originally flanked by twin entrance - right hand one now blocked, left hand one replaced by smaller C20 door. Left hand side elevation, 3 windows. Extensions to right hand side and rear, not of architectural interest.
Our Lady’s Convent and School adj., Park Road (north side) - Grade II
Convent, with chapel, priest’s house and school. Begun 1850, and built slowly during the next few decades (Chapel 1863-4, school altered 1889, priest’s house late C19). By Charles Hansom. Red brick with whitened headers and stone dressings, Swithland slate roofs (school has plain tile roof) with white brick crosses in the gable ends. Gothic Revival. Convent buildings round cloister porch, with chapel to west and priest’s house and school to south. The school is linked to the convent by a range built 1855 to form 3 sides of a quadrangle. Two-storeys and attic. East facade of convent 7 window range. Four centred doorway to left. Two dormers and 2 red brick chimney stacks in slope of roof, the left hand one with 2 lancets. Fenestration mostly pairs of cusped lancets, some with transoms, with casement windows and glazing bars, beneath segmental brick relieving arches. Apsidal chapel with side chapels, lit by “Geometrical” traceried windows (ritual north windows C20), has waggon roof carried on corbels and west gallery. Reredos by Theodore Phyffers 1873. School rewindowed in keeping with convent and 2 storey porch and verandah added 1889. Mortuary chapel by Charles Hansom’s son, and infant’s school in Italianate style in grounds. House of Rosminian sisters, founded by Mary Agnes Amherst. C20 additions to school not of special architectural interest.
45-54 (10 Cottages), Pinfold Gate (north side) - Grade II
Terrace of 10 single fronted cottages, early mid C19, red brick with slate roof. Nos 45 to 53: ground floor with simple slatted door and single iron mullioned and transomed 3 light lattice window with holes for shutters in the chamfered brick jambs and stone cill. No rhythm in the arrangement of doors and windows, though the doors to Nos 45 and 46, 48 and 49, 50 and 51, 52 and 53 are coupled. 1st floor with a single iron mullioned 3 light lattice window with chamfered brick jambs and stone cill over the ground floor window. All windows with moulded brick drip course with lions’ masks at the corners. No. 54: as the other cottages but with an anse de panier archway leading to the rear and, above it, a window similar to the other 1st floor windows but without a drip course.
30-31, Pinfold Gate (south side) - Grade II
Pair of houses with workshops above. Early C19, red brick, slate roofs, brick end stacks. Three storeys. Ground and 1st floor of No. 30 as single fronted cottage, with original simple doorcase and cambered headed 3-light horizontally sliding sash windows. No 31 has C20 doors and shop front to ground floor, and 1st floor window renewed. 2nd floor workshops lit by four 3-light cambered headed windows, No 30 retaining horizontally sliding sash windows with glazing bars. Rear elevation 2nd floor has four 2-light windows (no. 30 retaining horizontally sliding sashes with glazing bars) linked by a wooden lintel suggesting the possibility of continued fenestration.
Carillon Tower, Queens Park - Grade II
War Memorial Tower, 1922-3 by Walter Tapper. Portland stone basement, brick tower with Portland stone dressings, copper bell storey and lantern. Classical style. Double doors to west open into ground floor museum room, lit in each face by a square headed window and above, a round headed window with lugged architrave and keystone, and leaded panes. Above this a similar window, then an oculus, then a small round headed opening. Unobtrusive, rectangular windows in the north face light the staircase in the north east corner. Small square recesses scattered throughout the brickwork. Arcaded and balustraded bell storey carrying octagonal parapet and lantern, surmounted by ball and cross. Inscribed above entrance, “This tower was erected in grateful memory of the men of Loughborough who gave their lives for freedom in the Great War 1914-1918”. Bronze plaques recessed in basement to east and west record names of the dead and, added to south, those who died in World War II. Square, paved and balustraded enclosure, with wide openings on each side.
Towles Mill, Queens Road (north side) - Grade II
Mill, c.1840. Red brick with stone dressings, plain tile roofs. Four storeys, 13 window range, plus north east corner windowless projection. Cornice and glazing bars. Central pediment with semi-circular window with glazing bars, and keystone. End gables, in form of pediments, have similar windows. Four pane sash windows otherwise, except to 2nd floor which has C20 two pane louvres. C20 extensions to west side and to rear.
1 and 2 (Chesterton House), Rectory Place (east side) - Grade II
Pair of semi-detached houses; late C18 or early C19. Red brick, No 1 with cement render obscuring window heads, hipped roof of concrete pantiles to No 1 and plain tiles to No 7, which has a dormer. Four brick stacks - 2 ridge stacks and one in each hip. Two storeys, 8 window range. Segmental headed ground and 1st floor window openings, with keystones. Sash windows with glazing bars and exposed sash boxes. No 2 has shutters to ground floor windows. Raised bands between storeys, dentil eaves. Pedimented doorcases one bay from each end and 6-panel doors with rectangular fanlights in panelled recesses.
3, Rectory Place (east side) - Grade II
House: C18 or early C19 front across 2 presumably earlier buildings. Stucco, with plain tile roof in 2 heights. Three brick ridge stacks. Two storey, double fronted, 3 window range. Projecting band between storeys. Brick eaves cornice. 12 pane sash windows to ground floor, 9 pane sash windows to 1st floor. Central door with bracketed canopy. Narrow right hand canted link to no. 2.
The Old Rectory, Rectory Place (north side) - Grade II* Previously an Ancient Monument - descheduled 20 Feb 97
Two bays of medieval hall-house, now ruinous, with parts of lower end rebuilt as museum. Late C13 or early C14 and later. Coursed rubble with ashlar dressings. Walls thickened, perhaps in C16 - cross passage doors (and probably also the windows) had 2-centred arches o exterior, 4-centred to interior. Lower end, 3 arched doorways (central one mutilated) into service area linked by ashlar surround with fine Geometrical traceried spandrels. Low cusped-headed doorway leading to staircase on right. Left-hand return front of lower end incorporates some old timbers arranged when this block was rebuilt as museum in the 1960s. at rear, part of ashlar surround to doorway opposite central opening from hall survives, below coping for gable of building beyond, presumably kitchen. Single-light cusped opening to first floor. The Rectory was enlarged at later dates - notably after a fire in 1826 - but in 1962 all save the medieval part was demolished.
Loughborough Central Station, Great Central road – Grade II
Railway station. 1898, for the Great Central Railway, designed by Edward Parry, resident engineer to the northern section of the GCR. Red brick with stone dressings and Welsh slate roof; cast-iron, steel and glass canopies. Two-storey entrance block with the entrance on the upper storey. Entrance block and offices on an overbridge, other offices on the island platform below. Three-bay front with central doorway - this with segmental arched head with keystone, 2-light mullion-and-transom windows on either side. Three-ridge canopy to the front supported on two cast iron columns, restored valancing. Roof behind with two parallel ridges. Gable ends with 2-light windows. Date and initials of the railway company 1898 GCR on gables. Panelled entrance hall with booking office with original fittings leads to stairway down to the platform. This has a central range of red brick buildings with panelled walls and plain doors and windows. Continuous roof canopy with fifteen ridges supported on steel brackets and with one further ridge right across carried on four cast iron columns which joins the roof to the foot of the staircase. This is said to be the largest platform canopy on a preserved railway.
History: This station was opened by the Great Central Railway on what was originally the Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway's London Extension when it was promoted in 1893. It became the GCR in 1897. Loughborough Central was opened on 15th March 1899 and closed on 5th May 1969. It was reopened on 23rd March 1974 as headquarters of the Great Central Railway (private). It is an almost completely unaltered station of 1898 which continues in traditional use as the centrepiece of a steam preservation society's railway line.
References: R.V.J.Butt, The Directory of Railway Stations. Patrick Stephens Limited, 1995. Information from Martin Hammond, Honorary Architect, Great Central Railway.
Platform Water Tank at Loughborough Central Station – Grade II
Railway water tank. 1899 for the Great Central Railway. Wrought and cast iron. Standard design of circular tank made of wrought iron plates on top of a cast iron column. It forms a group with Loughborough Central Station and is one of the very few examples of these water tanks surviving in situ, another two being at Loughborough as well.
History: Loughborough Central station was opened by the Great Central Railway on what was originally the Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway's London Extension when it was promoted in 1893. It became the GCR in 1897. Loughborough Central was opened on 15th March 1899 and closed on 5th May 1969. It was reopened on 23rd March 1974 as headquarters of the Great Central Railway (a private steam preservation line). It is an almost completely unaltered station of 1898 which continues in traditional use with a steam railway. References: R.V.J.Butt, The Directory of Railway Stations, Patrick Stephens Limited, 1995. Information from Martin Hammond, Honorary Architect. Great Central Railway.
North Water Tank at Loughborough Central Station – Grade II
Railway water tank. 1899 for the Great Central Railway. Wrought and cast iron. Standard design of circular tank made of wrought iron plates on top of a cast iron column. It forms a group with Loughborough Central station and is one of the very few examples of these water tanks surviving in situ, another two being at Loughborough as well. History: Loughborough Central station was opened by the Great Central Railway on what was originally the Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway's London Extension when it was promoted in 1893. It became the OCR in 1897. Loughborough Central was opened on 15th March 1899 and closed on 5th May 1969. It was reopened 23rd March 1974 as headquarters of the Great Central Railway (a private steam preservation line). It is an almost completely unaltered station of 1898 which continues in traditional use with a steam railway.
References: R.V.J.Butt, The Directory of Railway Stations. Patrick Stephens Limited, 1995. Information from Martin Hammond, Honorary Architect, Great Central Railway.
South Water Tank at Loughborough Central Station – Grade II
Railway water tank. 1899 for the Great Central Railway. Wrought and cast iron. Standard design of circular tank made of wrought iron plates on top of a cast iron column. It forms a group with Loughborough Central station and is one of the very few examples of these water tanks surviving in situ, another two being at Loughborough as well. History: Loughborough Central station was opened by the Great Central Railway on what was originally the Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway's London Extension when it was promoted in 1893. It became the OCR in 1897. Loughborough Central was opened on 15th March 1899 and closed on 5th May 1969. It was reopened 23rd March 1974 as headquarters of the Great Central Railway (a private steam preservation line). It is an almost completely unaltered station of 1898 which continues in traditional use with a steam railway.
References: R.V.J.Butt, The Directory of Railway Stations. Patrick Stephens Limited, 1995. Information from Martin Hammond, Honorary Architect, Great Central Railway.
Signal Box at Loughborough Central Station – Grade II
Railway signal Box. 1898 for the Great Central Railway. Red brick and timber framing with a Welsh slate roof. Red brick locking room with four 2x2 pane windows with stone cills. Upper floor with external timber staircase at the south end. The upper floor has 6 x 3 windows, each window has 2 x 3 panes in two sliding sashes. Bargeboarded gable with spike finial. Red brick stack in centre of rear wall. Interior not inspected, but it is reported to have the original locking frame; this remains in use for the working of Loughborough Central Station.
History: Loughborough Central station, of which this is the signal box, was opened by the Great Central Railway on what was originally the Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway's London Extension when it was promoted in 1893. It became the GCR in 1897. Loughborough Central was opened on 15th March 1899 and closed on 5th May 1969. It was reopened on 23rd March 1974 as headquarters of the Great Central Railway (a private steam preservation line. It forms part of a unique group. References: Information from Martin Hammond, Honorary Architect, Great Central Railway.
10, Sparrow Hill (east side) - Grade II
House, early-mid C18. Two late C18 cottages and one early-mid C19 cottage attached to the rear.
MATERIALS: Brick, render, pantile roof.
PLAN: Ground floor converted into one shop, two principal rooms on the first floor, staircase tower
and later infill at the back, three cottages attached to the rear.
EXTERIOR: A two-storey four-window brick house of early-mid C18 date. The front has been rendered and C20 shop windows inserted on the ground floor. The first-floor window frames are C18 with early C19 sashes, and above them are moulded brick eaves. The original steep-pitched roof has been re-covered in pantiles at the front and corrugated sheeting at the rear, with two dormer windows inserted. Attached to the back of the house are two late C18 brick cottages and a projecting early-mid C19 brick cottage, with C20 replacement windows. The area between the house and the first cottage was infilled at a later date.
INTERIOR: On the ground floor there is a heavy chamfered beam with bar stops, and the panelled door to the stairs has early C19 bottle glass. The main cellar has foundations of local granite and may predate the house. The staircase from ground to first floor has its original C18 treads (visible from the small cellar underneath), with a C19 replacement balustrade. The house retains its plan form on the first floor with two large principal rooms, both of which contain heavy chamfered bridging beams with bar stops. The doors to these rooms are the original C18 two-panelled doors and the windows have C18 frames with early C19 sashes. In the left-hand room the fireplace has been moved to a position nearer the window. In the right-hand room part of a cupboard with fielded panels survives to the left of the fireplace. The plank doors to the attic storey are early C19, with their original heavy hinges. The roof appears to be the C18 original and some of the purlins are visible through the plasterwork. The second cottage dating from the late C18 has a large open fireplace on the ground floor, with the original steepchamfered beam inside to improve the draught, and possible remnants of the original fire surround. In the early-mid C19 cottage there are two identical round-arched fireplaces surviving on the first floor with cable moulding.
SUBSIDIARY FEATURES: At the rear of the site is a block used for meat preparation, possibly tripe processing, which probably dates from the 1920s. The interior is of white glazed bricks and has a raised work surface containing two basins with taps underneath and a storage area to the left.
HISTORY: 10 Sparrow Hill faces the churchyard of the medieval parish church of All Saints, and may originally have formed part of the Manor House complex. The house at the front of the site dates from the early-mid C18, with two cottages of the late C18 and one of the early-mid C19 attached to the rear. According to the local authority, the building was at some time two public houses, the Shakespearian and the Crown and Thistle. Shop windows were inserted into the ground floor of the house in the C20. The 1920s block at the rear of the site connected with meat preparation may indicate use of the premises as a butcher's shop at that time.
SOURCES:
Ordnance Survey Maps 1886, 1903, 1919.
Kathryn A. Morrison, English Shops and Shopping: An Architectural History (Yale, 2003), 86-89.
SUMMARY OF IMPORTANCE: 10 Sparrow Hill is an early-mid C18 brick house in a prominent position opposite the medieval parish church, with two late C18 cottages and an early-mid C19 cottage attached to the rear. It is of special historic and architectural interest due to the extent of survival of C18 fabric, particularly in the first- floor interior. Features of interest include heavy chamfered beams with bar stops, two-panelled doors, window frames, stair treads, roof purlins and granite foundations in the cellar. Interest is added by early C19 features such as bottle-glass door, window sashes and plank doors. Features of interest in the cottages are late C18 and early-mid C19 fireplaces. There is some minor interest in the meat preparation block at the rear of the site.
11 and 12, Sparrow Hill (east side) - Grade II
House, now 2 shops. Probably C16 in origin. Timber framed (post and panel framing is visible through the partly demolished building to the right) but with stuccoed front elevation of early C19 character. Two storeys, 3 window range, 1-1-1 with central gabled projection. Angle quoins, bargeboards to gable. 1st floor central sash window, flanked by C20 three light windows. C20 shop fronts to ground floor. Swithland slate roof. Massive stone chimney stack heightened in brick. Interior first floor medieval stone fireplace, with angle columns carved out of the inner faces of the jambs and with a plain flat head. Rear timber framed wing partly rebuilt in brick and later brick extension parallel to main block.
58-60, Sparrow Hill (west side) - Grade II
Terrace of 3 houses, “Parks Millwright 1854” on tablet, red brick with light headers and painted stone dressings, plain tile roof, 3 brick stacks on larger front slope of roof of asymmetrical pitch. Three storeys, 5 window range. 16-pane sashes to ground and 1st floors, 12-pane sashes to 2nd floor. Bracketed cills and heads with incised panels. Three 4-panel doors with rectangular fanlights above. Elliptical carriage arch with keystone and abaci to left. Listed as an intact example of an early Victorian terrace in close proximity to other listed buildings.
The Windmill Public House, Sparrow Hill (west side) - Grade II
Public house, perhaps C16 in origin, facade mostly C19. Timber framed, rendered, with gable end rebuilt in brick, all painted white. Plain tile roof and one brick ridge stack. Two storeys, 3 window range. Central C19 door in moulded surround with hood band over. Ground floor has C19 sash windows in segment headed stucco architraves. 1st floor has 2 light horizontally sliding sash windows.
Church of All Saints, Steeple Row (east side) - Grade II
Church, mainly C14, restored and enlarged 1862 by G G Scott. Of ashlar. Nave and aisles (with secondary south aisle added 1862 between south transept and porch), transepts, chancel, 4-stage C15 west tower. Four bay nave with pinnacles and battlements. Three light aisle windows with decorated tracery. Three light C15 clerestory windows, 2 to each bay. Chancel with perpendicular windows to north and south, but decorated 5-light east window. Tower: west doorway with shields and leaves carved in the spandrels, 5-light perpendicular west window, 3-light blind window above. Bell stage has 2 tall 2-light windows with transoms and quatrefoil heads flanked by blank panels with identical tracery. Pinnacles and battlements above (restored 1950). Interior: very lofty tower arch. Quatrefoil arcade piers. C19 roofs. Sedilia and piscina in chancel. Piscina and aumbry in south chapel. C19 wrought iron altar table in south aisle. Fine monument to Joanna Walters, d.1673, carved with angels holding a curtain to either side of inscription tablet, and the shrouded bodies of a woman and 2 babies beneath. Some C15 brasses. Fine collection of carved Swithland slate headstones in churchyard. N Pevsner, Leicestershire and Rutland.
Rosebery School, Storer Road - Grade II
Former school, built in 1897 and extended c.1899. Designed by George H. Barrowcliff for the Loughborough School Board in a mixed Renaissance Revival style.

MATERIALS: Red brick with terracotta mouldings, tile roof, copper-clad cupola and spire.

PLAN: A double-height central hall, with single-storey classroom ranges on three sides and a corner entrance for teachers. A smaller hall for infants was added to the SE with classrooms to one side and
cloakrooms to another.

EXTERIOR: The main front to Storer Road is a long single-storey red-brick classroom range with a gabled roof and eight cross-gables. The four bays at the lower end were built for the junior school in 1897 and the four bays at the higher end for the infants' school c.1899. The junior end has alternating small and large gables, while at the infants end there are two large gables in the centre with smaller ones on either side. The original C19 timber-framed windows survive. Each bay has three windows, a large mullion and transom window flanked by two smaller sashes, with the sash windows in the smaller gable bays being under the main roof. The last bay at the top end of the infants' range has only one window. There are terracotta mouldings over the windows; the ones in the smaller gables are scroll-shaped and have little cartouches with the monogram 'LSB' for Loughborough School Board. The gables have terracotta coping and hip-knobs. The end gables have terracotta pediments and scrolls at the apex and prominent chimney stacks. Behind the classroom range rises the roof of the central hall, which was re-covered in pantiles in 1990. The two gable-ends have terracotta pediments, scrolls and semi-circular mouldings. The SE gable end also has a round-arched window with hood mould. There are prominent chimney stacks at either end, the SE one with its original capping. In the centre of the roof is an octagonal wooden bell-cote with a cupola with copper fishscale tiles, surmounted by a copper-clad spire. The original heavy bell cast by John Taylor & Co. of Loughborough was removed for safety reasons and is now in the care of the Leicestershire museum service along with other school memorabilia. The Rosebery Street elevation presents an interesting composition of masses, with the gable-ends of the central hall and classroom range at the back and two classroom gable-ends in front. One of these is angled to fit the street corner and has a hip-knob and 'LSB' cartouche. Next to it, also at an angle, is a flat-roofed teachers' entrance block with a recessed doorway and boot-scraper. It has a terracotta string-course, crenellated parapet with terracotta coping, and terracotta plaques inscribed 'Rosebery Street Board Schools' and '1897'. The small toilet block added to the left of the teachers' entrance in the later C20 and the extension to the boys' entrance block on the NW side are not of interest. To the rear facing the playground is a further classroom range with four cross-gables with hip-knobs and terracotta scrolls over the windows. On the left side is the extended boy's entrance block which has a terracotta string-course, crenellated parapet with terracotta coping and a boot-scraper similar to those on the teachers' entrance. The infants' hall has two cross-gables also with hip-knobs and terracotta scrolls over the windows. The temporary classroom block and shelter in front of the infants' hall are not of interest.

INTERIOR: The principal feature is the fine wooden ceiling in the central hall, which consists of square matchboarding panels laid in different directions, punctuated by ventilation panels with floriated piercework. The heavy tie-beams are supported by buttresses with ornate triple-scroll brackets and wooden braces with single brackets. The hall retains its original glazed partitions to the classrooms, with a wide moulded cornice above. The doors, architraves, clerestorey windows, chimney-piece, parquet flooring and dado are all original. The matchboarding rising from the chimney-piece to the ceiling appears to be a later addition, possibly due to changes in ventilation. The equipment store on the SE side of the hall is not of interest. The classrooms have false ceilings but retain their original roofs above. The infant's hall in a plainer style retains its original roof and mouldings as well as a glazedbrick fireplace.

SUBSIDIARY FEATURES: On Rosebery Street, there are iron railings and a pair of red-brick gate piers with large terracotta ball finials and terracotta plaques inscribed 'boys' on the left and 'entrance' on the right. On George Street, there are iron railings and a pair of red-brick gate piers with large terracotta ball finials and terracotta plaques inscribed 'girls' on the left and 'infants' on the right. On the SW corner of the site, abutting No. 1 George Street, there is a further red-brick gate pier with a large terracotta ball finial. A long red-brick wall with buttresses marks the rear boundary of the playground, from Rosebery Street to George Street. At right angles to it, in the centre of the playground, there is a buttressed wall which originally divided the playground into areas for boys and girls/infants.

HISTORY: Rosebery School was built for the Loughborough School Board in two successive phases. The junior school was built in 1897, the date which appears on the Rosebery Street front, and was designed to accommodate 300 boys and 300 girls. The infants' school was designed in 1899 (according to a dated plan by the architect) and was built soon after, as it appears on the 1903 Ordnance Survey map. Both phases were designed by George Harry Barrowcliff (1864-1924), who was educated at Loughborough Grammar School. He was articled to George Hodson in 1881, and commenced independent practice in Loughborough in 1888. In 1899 he formed the partnership of Barrowcliff & Allcock. Barrowcliff's design for Rosebery junior school and a floor plan were illustrated in the Building News of 24 December 1897. The school was named after the Earl of Rosebery, Prime Minister in 1894-95 and Leader of the Liberal Party until 1896. It was built to serve an area historically referred to as 'Messenger's Village', as it housed both the workers and owners of the internationally-renowned firm of Messenger & Co., which specialised in building conservatories and glasshouses. Founded by Thomas Goode Messenger in Loughborough High Street in 1858, Messenger & Co. moved its factory to Cumberland Road in 1884 and was further extended in 1895. The building of Rosebery School to the east of the factory site in 1897 is closely related to this expansion. The Conservation Area around Ashby Road and Storer Road survives as an almost complete Victorian urban community, illustrating the rapid development of Loughborough town during the latter years of the C19 and early years of the C20. The historical Ordnance Survey maps show that in 1886 the area between Ashby Road and the railway line to the north was covered in fields and groves. By 1903 a complete transformation had taken place. A row of gentlemen's villas was built along Ashby Road, and the area to the north was densely packed with streets of terraced houses, in a grid pattern largely following the outlines of the old fields. Alongside the terraced houses were a handful of larger buildings: Rosebery School, St Peter's Church and Sunday School, the Messenger factory (Midland Horticultural Works) to the west, and the Loughborough Union Workhouse to the east. The building continued in use as a school until July 2006.
SOURCES:
Ordnance Survey maps for 1886, 1903, 1904.
'New Schools for the Loughborough School Board' (illustration), The Building News, 24 December
1897.
RIBA, Directory of British Architects 1834-1914 (Continuum, 2001), Vol. 1, 123.
Charnwood Borough Council, Ashby Road Conservation Area Character Statement (adopted
November 2005).
SUMMARY OF IMPORTANCE: Rosebery School was designed in two successive phases for the Loughborough School Board by George Barrowcliff. The junior school was built in 1897 and the infants' school c1899. It survives as a high-quality and intact example of a late C19 board school, with impressive massing and fine detailing both externally and internally. It retains its plan-form of single-storey classrooms around a doubleheight assembly hall. Significant features include an octagonal bell-cote with copper cupola and spire, terracotta scroll and cartouche mouldings, and a fine wooden panelled ceiling in the central hall. A number of subsidiary features survive including gate-piers with terracotta plaques indicating separate entrances for boys, girls and infants. The school occupies a prominent position in the conservation area and has added historical interest in connection with 'Messenger's Village' and the rapid development of Loughborough in the late C19.
St Peters Church, Storer Road - Grade II
Church. 1910-12. By W S Weatherley of London and G H Barrowcliff of Barrowcliff and Allcock, Loughborough. Lady Chapel 1958 by Albert Herbert of Leicester. Local Mountsorrel granite rubble with stone dressings and plain tile roof with stone coped gables with kneelers and finials. Gothic style with buttresses with set-offs. Plan of nave and chancel in one with north Lady Chapel and south organ chamber and vestry. Narrow passage aisles and north and south porches. Chancel has 7-light east window with Decorated tracery and 2-light windows to north and south. Lady Chapel has 3-light windows. Organ chamber to south has 2-light window and ashlar gabled bell-cote to side over vestry which has flat arched windows and curving parapet. Nave is of 5 bays and has 4 3-light clerestory windows either side over the aisles which have narrow lancets. North and south proches are similar and have moulded arches and double doors within with elaborate metal decoration. West end has 7-light window with fine Decorated tracery.
INTERIOR: Walls of buff coloured rendered plaster with ancaster stone dressings. East window has fine stained glass. Wooden reredos with carved and panelled altar canopy and riddle posts with angel finials, both designed by Weatherley. Elaborate sedilia and piscine in south wall. Carved choir stalls and communion rail. Organ of 1913 has panelled and carved case. Panelled and boarded chancel roof. Pulpit in carved wood on stone base. Nave arcades of moulded arches dying into hexagonal piers with shafts rising to panelled and boarded nave roof. Aisle roofs similar. Aisle lancets are filled with stained glass of 1920s and 1930s. Unusual font of beaten copper and iron. First World War memorial on west wall which was designed by Weatherley and made by Robinsons, Marsham Street, London, and which consists of a tryptich, the inner panel with the names of the Fallen and the inner sides of the doors with panels depicting Saints George and Michael.
HISTORY: This church replaced the earlier mission church which had been built in 1889 and extended in 1892 to serve a new community. This followed the development of several streets of housing principally for those employed by a large supplier of greenhouses and agricultural and other machinery, Messenger and Co.
SUMMARY OF IMPORTANCE: This is a carefully designed church which is built of the unusual purple granite of nearby Mountsorrel. The imposing line of the nave and chancel is augmented by the aisles, Lady Chapel and vestry. The interior is lofty and spacious with the nave arcades and passage aisles adding to the grandeur of the building. The good quality contemporary fittings survive together with stained glass of the first half of the C20 and the whole church is remarkably intact.
Church of All Saints, Thorpe Acre Road (east side) - Grade II
Church. 1845 by William Railton. Of ashlar, with slate roofs. “Decorated” gothic Revival. Of 5 bays, with traceried 2-light windows to north and south and 3-light windows to east and west. Coped gables. Western bellcote. Gabled porch to south incorporating arched entrance with headstops. Vestry added to north in 1913 in same manner. Open timber roof carried on corbels with tiny headstops.
80 (Reynalls), Woodthorpe (east side) - Grade II
House, C17 with later alterations. Granite plinth timber-framed with brick infill panels. Entrance front (to south) rebuilt in brick, gable ended Swithland slate roof, timber-framed gabled rear extension. Massive external stone stack with offsets at west end, heightened in brick. Two storeys, irregular 4 window range (one blocked), C20 fenestration.

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