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Lothar Matthaus
Personal Data
Name: Lothar
Surname: Matthaus
Date of Birth: 21 Mar 1961
Birth Place: Erlangen
Height: 173 cm
Weight: 72 kg
Portrait of West German captain and midfielder Lothar Matthaeus taken 08 July 1990 in Rome before the start of the World Cup final against Argentina. AFP PHOTO
Career
Position: Midfielder/defender
Clubs: Borussia Monchengladbach (1979-84), Bayern Munich (1984-88), Inter Milan (Ita/1988-92), Bayern Munich (1992-March 2000), New York-New Jersey MetroStars (USA/May-Sep. 2000)
International appearances: 150
International goals: 23
International debut: 14/06/1980, West Germany - Holland (3-2)
Last international appearance: 20/06/2000, Germany - Portugal (0-3)
First international goal: 30/04/1986 - West Germany - Czechoslovakia (5-1)
Last international goal: 28/07/1999, Germany-New Zealand (2-0)

Playing CareerWorld Cup

Appearances: 5 (1982, 1986, 1990, 1994, 1998), 25 matches, 6 goals

Winner (1990), Finalist (1982, 1986), Quarter-finalist (1994, 1998)

European Championships

Winner (1980), semi-finalist (1988)

European Champions League

Finalist (1987, 1999)

UEFA Cup

Winner (1991, 1996)

West German (later became German) Championship

Winner (1985, 1986, 1987, 1994, 1997, 1999)

West German (later became German) Cup

Winner (1986, 1998)

German League Cup

Winner (1997, 1998, 1999)

German Supercup

Winner (1987)

Italian Championship

Winner (1988)

Italian Supercup

Winner (1989)

Other Honours

Ballon d'Or as European Player of the Year (1990)

Coaching career

Clubs : Rapid Vienna (Austria/Sept. 2001-May 2002), Partizan Belgrade (SEM/Dec. 2002 - Dec. 2003)

Coach of the Hungarian national team (since Jan. 1st 2004)

Serbia and Montenegro championship

Winner (2003)

Biography

Evergreen

German midfielder Lothar Matthaeus (r) fights for the ball with Portuguese midfielder Capucho during the Euro 2000 Group A soccer championships match between Portugal and Germany in Rotterdam, 20 June 2000.  (ELECTRONIC IMAGE)    EPA PHOTO  EPA/ED OUDENAARDEN
German midfielder Lothar Matthaeus (r) fights for the ball with Portuguese midfielder Capucho during the Euro 2000 Group A soccer championships match between Portugal and Germany in Rotterdam, 20 June 2000. (ELECTRONIC IMAGE) EPA PHOTO EPA/ED OUDENAARDEN
German defender Lothar Matthaus (R) is challenged by Mexican Jesus Arellano 29 June at the Stade de la Mosson in Montpellier, south of France, during the 16th Soccer World Cup second round match between Germany and Mexico. Germany defeated Mexico 2-1. (ELECTRONIC IMAGE) AFP PHOTO OMAR TORRES
German defender Lothar Matthaus (R) is challenged by Mexican Jesus Arellano 29 June at the Stade de la Mosson in Montpellier, south of France, during the 16th Soccer World Cup second round match between Germany and Mexico. Germany defeated Mexico 2-1. (ELECTRONIC IMAGE) AFP PHOTO OMAR TORRES

Evergreen Lother Matthaus, who already has an impressive record at both club (Bayern Munich and Inter Milan) and international level, also holds the European record of international appearances, having played an astonishing 150 times for Germany.

It could have been 180 had national team coach Bertie Vogts' (December 1984 - May 1998) decided controversially to leave him on the sidelines on many occasions.

At the World Cup in France in 1998, at the age of 37, the German sweeper entered the record books by playing in his fifth tournament (1982-1998), equalling the record until then held by Mexican goalkeeper Antonio Carbajal (1950-1966).

Formidable willpower

Brought into the national team at the age of 19 for the European championship-winning side in Italy (1980), Lothar Matthaus's promising club career began at Bayern Munich.

Germany's Lothar Matthaeus (R) and Dutch Edgar Davids battle for the ball during their friendly match in Amsterdam, Wednesday 23 February 2000.
Germany's Lothar Matthaeus (R) and Dutch Edgar Davids battle for the ball during their friendly match in Amsterdam, Wednesday 23 February 2000.

Conspicuously less talented than Franz Beckenbauer, it was thanks to his sheer will-power and tremendous work ethic that he made his mark.

Of all the German players who left to play in Italy during the 1990's, it was Matthaus who most profited from his time in the Serie A, where he learned vital new skills.

Within two seasons at Inter Milan Matthaus, who already had incredible stamina and a ferocious shot, became another player altogether, more skilful and with greater vision and subtlety.

Suddenly he was indispensable to the "Nationalmannschaft".

Beckenbauer, Germany's coach at the time, was quick to recognise the successful transition and named him captain for the 1990 World Cup in Italy.

A master conductor

There Matthaus began to conduct the German orchestra with brio and a powerful shot from the number 10 opened the scoring against Yugoslavia in a first round 4-1 win.

From then on he was content to a play marking role, notably against Czechoslovakia (1-0) in the quarter final.

With each game Matthaus dropped further and further back, while conducting his teammates with unswerving efficiency.

West Germany's national soccer team captain Lothar Matthaeus (C), holds aloft  the World Cup trophy as he celebrates with teammate Juergen Klinsmann (R) after  West Germany beat Argentina 1-0 in the World Cup final 08 July 1990 at the Olympic stadium in Rome.  AFP/EPA/DPA/ FRANK KLEEFELDT
West Germany's national soccer team captain Lothar Matthaeus (C), holds aloft the World Cup trophy as he celebrates with teammate Juergen Klinsmann (R) after West Germany beat Argentina 1-0 in the World Cup final 08 July 1990 at the Olympic stadium in Rome. AFP/EPA/DPA/ FRANK KLEEFELDT

In the final (like many of his teammates) he failed to shine against Argentina, but no-one was more proud, or happy when he fell into the arms of Beckenbauer in Rome with the trophy in his hands and his mission accomplished.

Berti Vogts called him into the national squad for the 1998 World Cup in France, where an ageing German side fell victim to the inspired Croatians in the quarter finals (0-3).

In March 2000, the irrepressible Matthaus left Germany for the United States for what was his last footballing adventure, a spell with the New York/New Jersey MetroStars.

His international career came to an end after a disappointing European Championships in 2000, when in the last group A match against Portugal (0-3) he notched up his 150th cap.

Matthaus moved into his first coaching post in September 2001 at Austrian side Rapid Vienna but was fired 8 months later after a string of disappointing results.

Former-Yugoslav outfit Partizan Belgrade then hired Matthaus to guide their ambitions in December, 2002 and he led the club to success in the first ever Serbia-Montenegro championship later that season.

He resigned somewhat surprisingly in December, 2003 citing personal reasons but immediately agreed to coach the Hungarian national team from January, 2004.