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Palatine Hill

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Italian  Monte Palatino,   four-sided plateau rising 131 feet (40 m) south of the Forum in Rome and 168 feet (51 m) above sea level. It has a circumference of 5,700 feet (1,740 m). The city of Rome was founded on the Palatine, where archaeological discoveries range from prehistoric remains to the ruins of imperial palaces.

The Palatine is topographically intricate and scenically attractive, despite a general starkness that…


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More from Britannica on "Palatine Hill"...
40 Encyclopædia Britannica articles, from the full 32 volume encyclopedia
>Palatine Hill
four-sided plateau rising 131 feet (40 m) south of the Forum in Rome and 168 feet (51 m) above sea level. It has a circumference of 5,700 feet (1,740 m). The city of Rome was founded on the Palatine, where archaeological discoveries range from prehistoric remains to the ruins of imperial palaces.
>Seven Hills of Rome
group of hills on or about which the ancient city of Rome was built. The original city of Romulus was built upon Palatine Hill (Latin: Mons Palatinus). The other hills are the Capitoline, Quirinal, Viminal, Esquiline, Caelian, and Aventine (known respectively in Latin as the Mons Capitolinus, Mons Quirinalis, Mons Viminalis, Mons Esquilinus, Mons Caelius, and Mons ...
>The Palatine
   from the Rome article
The origins of Rome, as of all ancient cities, are wrapped in fable. The Roman fable is of Romulus and Remus, twin sons of Mars, abandoned on the flooding Tiber and deposited by the receding waters at the foot of the Palatine. Suckled by a she-wolf, they were reared by a shepherd and grew up to found Rome, Romulus being obliged to execute Remus for disobeying one of the ...
>cryptoporticus
a covered gallery that was a characteristic feature of the ancient Roman palazzo. It was usually designed to provide shade and a cool place for walking. Such a gallery was part of the Roman emperor Diocletian's Palace at Spalatro (Split, Croatia) and the House of the Cryptoporticus in Pompeii. Sometimes the cryptoporticus served a dual purpose; a vaulted passage, partly ...
>Evander
in Classical mythology, a migrant from Pallantium in Arcadia (central part of the Peloponnesus) who settled in Italy and founded a town named Pallantion, after his native place. The site of the town, at Rome, became known as the Palatine Hill, for his son Pallas and daughter Pallantia. Evander was the son of the goddess Carmentis (or Carmenta) and the god Hermes. ...

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6 Student Encyclopedia Britannica articles, specially written for elementary and high school students
Rome, the City of the Seven Hills
   from the Roman Empire article
Halfway down the Italian peninsula, on the west coast, is a small river called the Tiber. The coastal plain south of the river was known as Latium in ancient times, after the people who lived there—the Latins. These people were shepherds and farmers.
Romulus and Remus
The legendary founders of the city of Rome were Romulus and Remus. They were said to be the twin sons of Mars, the god of war, and Rhea Silvia, the daughter of Numitor, king of Alba Longa. Rhea had been forced to become a vestal virgin by her uncle, Amulius, who had deposed Numitor. When Rhea gave birth, Amulius imprisoned Rhea Silvia and ordered servants to cast the ...
From Castle to Palace
   from the castle article
The terms castle and palace have often been used interchangeably, but originally they had different purposes. Castles were fortifications, while palaces have been built for centuries solely as residences for kings and nobles.
Pagan Rome
   from the architecture article
Roman concrete was a fluid mixture of lime and small stones poured into the hollow centers of walls faced with brick or stone and over curved wooden molds, or forms, to span spaces as vaults. The Mediterranean is an active volcanic region, and a spongy, light, tightly adhering stone called pozzolana was used to produce a concrete that was both light and extremely strong.
Central Rome
   from the Rome article
The ancient center of Rome is encircled by the Aurelian Wall (Muro Torto), which dates from about AD 270. Built of concrete-faced bricks, it girdled about 4 square miles (10 square kilometers). It was later extended but now includes only 4 percent of the modern municipality. Central Rome is by far the smallest of the city's administrative zones and encompasses small wards ...

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