Seti I

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Seti I welcomed by the goddess Hathor. Painted relief from KV 17, the Tomb of Seti I in the Valley of the KIngs. Limestone and pigment: height 2.26 m, width 1.05 m. Musée du Louvre Département des Antiquités égyptiennes E7.
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Seti I welcomed by the goddess Hathor. Painted relief from KV 17, the Tomb of Seti I in the Valley of the KIngs. Limestone and pigment: height 2.26 m, width 1.05 m. Musée du Louvre Département des Antiquités égyptiennes E7.

Seti I Menmaatre was the second ruler of the Nineteenth Dynasty of New Kingdom Egypt, having succeeded his father Ramesses I after his brief reign. After 16 years rule, Seti was succeeded as ruler by his son Ramesses II.

Contents

Building Program

Seti I continued the restoration of the traditional temple complexes, neglected and even vandalised during the Amarna Period. In many locations, the inscriptions of pre-Amarna rulers were restored where they had been struck out on the orders of Akhenaten, the names and images of the state god Amun recarved.

In addition to repairing the damage of the past, Seti I embarked upon an ambitious building program in this own right, focusing on the great religious centres of Thebes, Abydos, Memphis and Heliopolis.

In Thebes, Seti I promoted the construction of the Great Hypostyle Hall in the Great Temple of Amun at Karnak, a project intimately linked with his own mortuary temple at Abd el-Qurna immediately opposite Karnak on the opposite bank of the Nile.

Death and Burial

Seti I died—apparently suddenly—in his Year 16, aged approximately 50 years.

Seti's mummified body was interred in a richly-decorated tomb in the Valley of the Kings, now designated KV 17. Discovered by Giovanni Battista Belzoni in 1817, the tomb was revealed as the deepest of the New Kingdom royal sepulchres in the royal wadi—and the longest, at 137.19 metres in length. KV 17 is one of the most completely decorated tombs in the Valley, with painted raised relief decoration of extremely high quality that encompasses—for the first occasion within a royal tomb—a comprehensive program of religious texts[1]

Bibliography

  • Brand, Peter J. [1997], "The 'Lost' Obelisks and Colossi of Seti I", JARCE 34 (1997), pp.101-114.
    • [2000], The Monuments of Seti I—Epigraphic, Historical and Art Historical Analysis, [Probleme der Ägyptologie 16], Leiden, Boston and Köln: Brill, 2000. ISBN 9004117709
    • PhD Dissertation, University of Toronto, 1999 (PDF format), Canadian theses = Thèses canadiennes
  • Degrève, Agnès [2006], “La campagne asiatique de l'an 1 de Séthy Ier représentée sur le mur extérieur nord de la salle hypostyle du temple d'Amon à Karnak”, RdÉ 57 (2006), pp.47-76, pls.VIII-XIII.
  • Hornung, Erik [1991], The Tomb of Pharaoh Seti I = Das Grab Sethos' I., Zürich: Artemis Verlag, 1991. ISBN 3760810470
  • Kitchen, Kenneth A. [1975], Ramesside Inscriptions: Historical and Biographical I, Oxford, 1975.
  • Murnane, William J. [1990], The Road to Kadesh: a Historical Interpretation of the Battle Reliefs of King Sety I at Karnak, [ SAOC 42], Chicago:Oriental Institute, University of Chicago, second edition, 1990. (First edition published 1985). ISBN 0918986672

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