Open Social Web

September 5, 2007

A Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web

Filed under: Open Social Web — jsmarr @ 5:31 am

Preamble:
There are already many who support the ideas laid out in this Bill of Rights, but we are actively seeking to grow the roster of those publicly backing the principles and approaches it outlines. That said, this Bill of Rights is not a document “carved in stone” (or written on paper). It is a blog post, and it is intended to spur conversation and debate, which will naturally lead to tweaks of the language. So, let’s get the dialogue going and get as many of the major stakeholders on board as we can!

A Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web
Authored by Joseph Smarr, Marc Canter, Robert Scoble, and Michael Arrington
September 4, 2007

We publicly assert that all users of the social web are entitled to certain fundamental rights, specifically:

  • Ownership of their own personal information, including:
    • their own profile data
    • the list of people they are connected to
    • the activity stream of content they create;
  • Control of whether and how such personal information is shared with others; and
  • Freedom to grant persistent access to their personal information to trusted external sites.

Sites supporting these rights shall:

  • Allow their users to syndicate their own profile data, their friends list, and the data that’s shared with them via the service, using a persistent URL or API token and open data formats;
  • Allow their users to syndicate their own stream of activity outside the site;
  • Allow their users to link from their profile pages to external identifiers in a public way; and
  • Allow their users to discover who else they know is also on their site, using the same external identifiers made available for lookup within the service.

165 Comments »

  1. first!!

    woohoo. sign me up. i love the direction this is going. the more social networks i participate in, the more i need some standards of openness and portability.

    i’ve recently written on my own experience with facebook blocking my ability to message members of my own group, among other criticisms.

    http://urltea.com/1cat

    Mmmmm, microformats.

    Comment by Baratunde Thurston — September 5, 2007 @ 6:22 am

  2. Might I add another bold bullet point?

    transparency (in human-readable form) about the operating rules governing social websites. Those running social networks, for example, should outline clearly what is prohibited and what classifies a user as spam. Having features disabled or accounts closed is worse than losing an address book because there is no mechanism to backup your messages, connections, etc (at least not until there are more open standards defining these attributes and activities).

    Comment by Baratunde Thurston — September 5, 2007 @ 6:25 am

  3. Thanks, thanks, thanks …

    This is what we want to do with communipedia. Where can I undersign ?

    Comment by Marco — September 5, 2007 @ 6:28 am

  4. I think you’re confusing “rights” with “facilitators”.

    Re: “using a persistent URL or API token and open data formats;”

    Why should all social media sites *have* to have some standardized token? Advocating for something to be “open format” sounds deceptively democratic and free, but what if it isn’t? What if it leads to harassment, thefy, invasion, or merely the loss of integrity or immersion? Social media sites should have the right to remain walled gardens with proprietary systems if they want. Indeed, ironically, such systems might be better protectors of people’s privacy and integrity that “openness” that is supposed to “facilitate” but winds up doing stuff like spamming all your email address book with Quechep invitations.

    Example: my Second Life avatar name I wanted to use on Facebook is stolen by a griefer just because he can. It has no integrity, no rights accrue to it unless I go through the arduous process of trademarking it.

    It might be that balancing control of personal data versus facilitation isn’t an issue of “rights”; it’s an issue of political judgement, social consensus, and should be democratically decided in different communities for different purposes, not set in stone as “the law”.

    Comment by Prokofy Neva — September 5, 2007 @ 6:39 am

  5. Baratunde’s right…there’s no revenue-restricting reason for any social website to be opaque, is there? Rule transparency should be minimum table stakes for any social network.

    Comment by Weave — September 5, 2007 @ 6:46 am

  6. […] Noch nie wurde unsere Idee von Communipedia so gut in Worte gefasst wie in diesen Zeilen. A Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web […]

    Pingback by ekaabo Blog » Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web — September 5, 2007 @ 6:46 am

  7. I find this proposal consistent with people’s privacy rights entrenched in constitutions, bills of rights and (sort of implied in Australia who does not have a bill of rights) and as such should be applauded.

    As mentioned this is a blog post and as such is not entrenched in legislation, it mirrors the original “bill of rights” from England where this was proposed legislation and people’s intentions. This is not an “entrenched bill of rights” meaning that it has no legal weight and is merely a code that some people support.

    For this to be enforceable it would need to be an entrenched bill of rights which exists as a separate legal instrument that falls outside of the normal jurisdiction of a country’s legislative body (thanks wikipedia)

    The web does not have any infrastructure to support giving legal weight to whatever final wording is decided upon. I think that instead of having a “bill of rights” as such you should have a petition of rights which is signed by members of social networks to pressure the owners of these to adhere to the principles entrenched within.

    Comment by Andrew — September 5, 2007 @ 6:55 am

  8. There’s no way policies such as Privacy Policy, TOS, AUP, TOU and etc are going to protect user interests in social networking circles, and definitely we are in need of something like this to make sure we are in total control of our own information (instead of the provider such as Facebook).

    I am all in for this Bill!

    Comment by Ryan Lin — September 5, 2007 @ 7:34 am

  9. came across this link

    http://www.irintech.com/x1/blogarchive.php?id=1521

    Comment by dave — September 5, 2007 @ 7:52 am

  10. Polish translation is already made here: http://wnet.bblog.pl/wpis,karta;praw;uzytkownikow;sieci;spolecznych;,6400.html

    Regards,
    Piotrek

    Comment by pwrzosin — September 5, 2007 @ 8:11 am

  11. Yes! I’d be interested in signing up to this.

    I wrote about this the other day after many frustrations with Facebook in particular, and have been following this and the Data Sharing Summit since with interest.

    http://www.yetanotherblog.com/2007/09/02/inside-out-social-networking/

    Comment by Sven Latham — September 5, 2007 @ 8:12 am

  12. wow, i’m glad to see the other side of the technology coin take interest in a discussion that’s been brewing since last fall’s rootscamp dc.

    if you’re looking for people who are political and are already evangelizing a solution, check out the integration proclamation . maybe, just maybe, we’ll find solutions to the digital inequalities that plague our disparaging worlds.

    noel

    Comment by noneck — September 5, 2007 @ 8:30 am

  13. Seems like common sense to me, but many of the social networks succeed because they are closed systems. I agree with data portability, but doubt many - if any - of the social networks would acquiesce with any of these demands. Companies like Facebook are social networks, yes, but we have to remember that they’re primarily in it for the marketing/advertising opportunities the data in their network presents.

    Comment by Chris Harrison — September 5, 2007 @ 8:52 am

  14. […] Open Social Web: A Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web. (ht: StevenRay) Seems like common sense to me, but many of the social networks succeed because they are closed systems. I agree with data portability, but doubt many - if any - of the social networks would acquiesce with any of these demands. Companies like Facebook are social networks, yes, but we have to remember that they’re primarily in it for the marketing/advertising opportunities the data in their network presents. Tags: aside, opensocialweb, socialnetworking, web 2.0 Permalink You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site. […]

    Pingback by cdharrison.com » Open Social Web — September 5, 2007 @ 8:53 am

  15. Thanks for starting this dialogue. You’ve got my full support. Look forward to the conversation and collaboration.

    Comment by Emily Chang — September 5, 2007 @ 9:10 am

  16. Simple request: Let me delete my mails and documents! I detected some weeks ago that on Google Docs, even when I delete documents from the trash, they are only hidden from the UI. Deleted documents continue to exist (proof here: http://www.line-of-reasoning.com/issues/privacy-issue-google-docs-seems-to-not-delete-but-only-hide-documents-when-the-trash-is-emptied/ ).

    What if Google would not only have an issue with deletion of documents on Google Docs?
    What if also none of your mails would be ever deleted?
    What if even a draft of a mail that you wrote but that you never sent and that you even never saved would be still stored on Google Mail because the new Google Mail “auto-save” feature saved it anyhow?
    This would be not a problem at all because you have nothing to hide?
    You never wrote something where you later were happy that you did not share or sent it to someone (you boss, your wife)?
    You would not feel uncomfortable if there is even only a theoretical small chance that people can still at some point get access to this against your will?

    I think it is our responsibility as users to put pressure on the service providers to find a solution. Why not create an independent organization that will check architecture/software and will do regular inspections of service providers? They could get in return a label for their homepage , something like “your rights respected”. This would give us users the opportunity to make up our mind upfront and choose wisely what services we would like to use (and make then those services through our usage big and important).

    Comment by Ralf Scharnetzki — September 5, 2007 @ 9:17 am

  17. […] מוצלחת במיוחד אפשר למצוא פה: ב open social web, משאבל מפרסמים פולו-בק, אני מניחה שנראה עוד הדים בקרוב […]

    Pingback by רשת סוציאלית חדשה, פועלי העולם התאחדו — September 5, 2007 @ 9:48 am

  18. i like some of the basic ideas here (reminds me strongly of the original attention work of gillmor et al) but one serious problem is that we don’t respect others enough. people don’t take any responsibity for: “Control of whether and how such personal information is shared with others” - to whit, the quechup fiasco. Its not just about abusive service providers, but also contacts that don’t fully respect the value of each others details. We’re all publishers. We’re all subscribers.

    Comment by James Governor — September 5, 2007 @ 10:33 am

  19. Absolutely great idea!

    More than happy to take part and I’ll shortly link to this site too from my own blog.

    It really is a great idea.

    Kind regards

    Podcast Junky UK

    Comment by podcastjunky — September 5, 2007 @ 10:49 am

  20. […] the Open Social Web, a consortium of social networking evangelists, have outlined the basis of a Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web - which […]

    Pingback by Will Facebook Adhere to OSW Bill of Rights? — September 5, 2007 @ 11:12 am

  21. Hear hear!

    Comment by Remco Kouwenhoven — September 5, 2007 @ 11:51 am

  22. This is a great initiative.

    I feel that you have rightly identified the question of trust as key to opening up the potential of the social web. As it stands, I have 2 concerns about the social web as it currently exists

    1. The service providers gather and hold a lot of personal information which they may be tempted to secretly exploit in ways they know I would probably object to. Can we trust them to resist this temptation?

    2. The databases in which they hold this information make an attractive trophy target for hackers ( i know , i know, but it was only yesterday that The Pentagon revealed that their systems were breached by Chinese agents). Can we trust hackers to resist this challenge?

    Given that stupid questions can sometimes provoke the most interesting answers I wonder if there is a working/workable technical solution that would fragment and spread my profile data and history across a wide variety of locations with each possibly operated by licensed/trusted third parties.

    If possible, such a system might confer 2 possible benefits:

    1. The trusted third parties could monitor the kind of queries being sent to the databases and recognize if the service providers were making ‘unusual’ queries.

    2. Personal data would be spread around several silos making it more tiresome and difficult for hackers to capture and recompile more complete profiles of individuals.

    I’d love to hear from anyone who has any ideas how this system might be possible/impossible.

    Comment by Niall Larkin — September 5, 2007 @ 12:01 pm

  23. Hiya guys…

    Count me in. Not that I’m some kinda heavy hitter in the social networking world. Simply because I care about intellectual property, openness, portability, and wall-less-ness.

    I’d love to know how such a bill might be enforced. Would you be asking places like FaceBook and that other one that noone uses anymore… whatsitcalledagain? uh… oh yeah… MySpace… to sign up and declare themselves to be signatories?

    Blue skies
    love
    Roy

    Comment by Roy Blumenthal — September 5, 2007 @ 12:25 pm

  24. Hi there -

    To what extent did Duncan Work’s “A Call for a Social Networking Bill of Rights” from 2004 feed into your thinking on this? It seems like his basic principles pretty well match up with what you’re outlining, but there’s one piece you don’t seem to have touched: “the right to know who is collecting what and for what purposes.”

    That right may be implied in what you’ve outlined here, but I think that it certainly merits explicit mention: you have the right to know (and control) *all* the information that the network has on you, not just information that you’ve provided or information that’s deemed “personal,” and you also have the right to know what the network is doing with that information.

    - Whit

    Comment by W.B. McNamara — September 5, 2007 @ 12:46 pm

  25. […] was one of the core reasons we initially developed the software. So it’s very pleasing to see a bill of rights for users of the social web posted - where else? - on a […]

    Pingback by Nuclear Sledgehammer » Blog Archive » The social web bill of rights — September 5, 2007 @ 12:49 pm

  26. Good idea, but should include some more elements (and maybe a reference). And should apply to the web as a whole, not just the social networking part of it.
    http://www.downes.ca/post/184

    The Cyberspace Charter of Rights

    Preamble
    Electronic technology in the late twentieth century has given rise to a new environment, commonly known as Cyberspace, in which the citizens of the world may freely interact and communicate with each other.

    As individuals, corporations and nations inhabit cyberspace, new laws, protocols and practises have demonstrated a potential for new limitations on the rights and liberties enjoyed by free citizens around the world.

    It is reasonable and prudent, therefore, to declare those rights we consider essential to the maintenance of a free and open society in Cyberspace.

    1. Access
    Where access is defined as the capacity to send and receive communications through electronic means, including the internet, and where persons are defined as citizens of any nation, state or territory,
    1. All persons have the right to access electronic communications.
    2. All persons may send and receive communications from any point on the network.

    2. Freedom of Speech
    Where ideas and beliefs are the words, images, or other information created by a particular person,
    1. CyberCitizens may express any idea or belief without limitation.
    2. CyberCitizens may transmit their ideas or beliefs to any person who is willing to receive them.

    3. Personal Privacy
    Where personal information is information regarding the name, gender, address, nationality, or other information associated with a particular person,
    1. CyberCitizens own their personal information.
    2. CyberCitizens may at any time regulate the use of their personal information by other persons or parties.

    4. Security of Communication
    Where communications is the transfer of ideas and beliefs from one place to another,
    1. CyberCitizens have the right to secure communication, that is, communication which will not be intercepted, redirected, or otherwise diverted or duplicated.
    2. CyberCitizens may communicate in the language of their choice. This includes the right to create a language (for example, by encryption) which cannot be understood by any other party.
    3. CyberCitizens may communicate with each other under the identity of their choice, including self-designated handles or pseudonyms, or anonymously.

    5. Intellectual Property
    Where intellectual property is any idea or belief created by a particular person,
    1. CyberCitizens own their own intellectual property.
    2. CyberCitizens may at any time regulate the use of their intellectual property by other persons or parties.

    6. Reference
    Where Reference is the mention of an idea or belief, as in the case of citations, quotations, or links,
    1. CyberCitizens may refer to any other person’s intellectual property.
    2. CyberCitizens may express their own ideas or beliefs about any other person’s intellectual property.

    7. Quiet Enjoyment
    Where quiet enjoyment is the use of electronic communications without interruption or interference,
    1. CyberCitizens have the right to quiet enjoyment of their own communications system, that is, they shall not be subject to arbitrary search and seizure of their computers or other communications equipment.
    2. CyberCitizens may regulate their own communications, that is, they have the right to refuse unsolicited or unwanted communications.

    Comment by Stephen Downes — September 5, 2007 @ 1:03 pm

  27. […] honestly laughed when I saw the new "Open Social Web" Bill of Rights launched yesterday, not because it isn't to some extent a useful idea, […]

    Pingback by Open Social Web - Google + Feedburner Really Is Bad For RSS | Andy Beard - Niche Marketing — September 5, 2007 @ 1:06 pm

  28. […] Ακολουθεί το σύνολο των γραπτών θεμελιωδών αρχών στα Ελληνικά. Το αγγλικό κείμενο μπορείτε να βρείτε στη διεύθυνση http://opensocialweb.org/2007/09/05/bill-of-rights/. […]

    Pingback by Μια Διακήρυξη Δικαιωμάτων για τους χρήστες του Κοινωνικού Ιστού — September 5, 2007 @ 1:56 pm

  29. I’d like to expand as well.

    Respect of privacy and defaulting to “sharing the least amount of data possible” when adding new features;

    An example of not respecting this would be Facebook’s recent people search feature.

    Even though they share very little data (my photo?), this feature should be *off* by default, and users given an incentive to turn it on.

    Comment by Tara — September 5, 2007 @ 2:11 pm

  30. There is Now a “Bill of Rights” for Users of the Social Web

    Ever since I started working on the “open social web”, I’ve wanted to co-author some kind of crisp and clean manifesto or “bill of rights” to explain to all the social sites what their users will increasingly ask of them,…

    Trackback by Plaxo's Personal Card — September 5, 2007 @ 2:37 pm

  31. 100% agree. Count me in.

    Comment by Sean Bohan — September 5, 2007 @ 3:00 pm

  32. Absolutely, absolutely!

    Ownership, Control, Freedom, and Transparency. Thanks for starting the ball rolling on this one, and sign me up. As more and more people move more of their lives online this is a must. As this happens, the online world must reflect the offline world more and more. The Bill Of Rights should become a badge much like consumer safety ombudsman symbols.

    I’ve been reading Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s Social Contract for inspiration in creating our Naked Manifesto and this quote from the first page stuck out for me:

    “And whenever I reflect upon governments, I am happy to find that my studies always give me fresh reasons for admiring that of my own country.”

    ~biff~

    Comment by Biff — September 5, 2007 @ 3:17 pm

  33. How can I help you spread this? I am not a techie, but I have a big mouth. I would love to have more control over my information, and so would everyone I have ever known.

    Comment by francinehardaway — September 5, 2007 @ 3:47 pm

  34. Bill of Rights for participants on the social Web

    Just saw this post today on Scoble’s blog. The key info from the concept is around:

    1. Ownership of our own personal information.
    2. Control of whether and how such personal information is used.
    3. Freedom to grant persistent access to our personal i…

    Trackback by Small World Labs — September 5, 2007 @ 4:33 pm

  35. Sounds good to me, so far. Count me in. I’ll try and check back from time to time to engage in any conversation and debate that may be occurring on this topic.

    Comment by Adam Snider — September 5, 2007 @ 4:39 pm

  36. Yes. I like it. Great job guys.

    Comment by Andrew Mager — September 5, 2007 @ 4:40 pm

  37. […] Open Social Web’s Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web “There are already many who support the ideas laid out in this Bill of Rights” (from A Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web � Open Social Web) […]

    Pingback by elliptical . . . : Blog Archive : Open Social Web's Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web — September 5, 2007 @ 4:44 pm

  38. […] Loïc, llego a esta declaración de derechos de los usuarios de la web social desarrollada por Joseph Smarr, Marc Canter, Robert Scoble y Michael Arrington y publicada en Open […]

    Pingback by Carta de derechos de los usuarios de la web social » El Blog de Enrique Dans — September 5, 2007 @ 5:52 pm

  39. Its a positive effort to build consensus regarding what users prefer in terms of privacy policies, the digital rights management of their indexable data, and the intellectual property of their profiles.

    If someone comments on my profile, is that MY comment, since I created the venue? Or, is it, their comment, since they penned it?

    There is no single solution. Different paradigms would encourage people to participate along different lines.

    Regarding the ‘demands’ of the ‘rights’, I believe this is a little lofty, and I’m a pie-in-the-sky technoanarchist.

    If syndicating your profile data became as easy as using feedburner.com, or one click to have an XML copy of your profile data, then, its not needed to force the old sites to comply. Users who want portable data will download their XML format of their data. If service providers don’t provide this feature, a hack, widget, or browser toolbar that scrapes information while logged in will get the data easily. Others will just pull and explicitly format the public data which is not formatted.

    Its like saying each blog service provider HAS to support RSS as a matter of principle.

    Thats was never necessary. RSS is good enough that blog places that don’t support it aren’t relevant.

    No demands are necessary, if the technology facilitates for enough people.

    What’s needed is the equivalent of an open source “typepad / wordpress” for Social Publishing, complete with Digital Rights management, syndication ability, and the ability for decentralized indexing.

    That takes care of the interface, and the network backend…but, leaves open the issue of “who do you trust with your data, your feed, your URI”?

    As many other posters have remarked, there will be the need for one or more ‘trust brokers’ that help people authenticate users and servers that meet the user-policies they wish to adhere to.

    The major difference is that the interface, the index catalog, and the trust brokers aren’t all the same people. This lets you choose your favorite interface from facebook, along with tons of data from myspace, but gives you some filters and DRM to control your data’s syndication and your profile’s access.

    The social publishing process needs to fragment, then the market will be more healthy regarding meeting people’s needs for privacy, and syndication managment.

    I believe that social media is the killer app of the semantic / semiotic web.

    If you consider social the most important and underdeveloped vertical search with the most need for structure, then distributed, peer-based indexing and standardized document types are the way of the future.

    I’ll leave you with a word from the founders:

    Of course a distributed systems like Gloss [Gravano 94] or Harvest will often be the most efficient and elegant technical solution for indexing, but it seems difficult to convince the world to use these systems because of the high administration costs of setting up large numbers of installations. Of course, it is quite likely that reducing the administration cost drastically is possible. If that happens, and everyone starts running a distributed indexing system, searching would certainly improve drastically.
    http://infolab.stanford.edu/~backrub/google.html

    http://webstrategist.com

    My social publishing project - http://connectsociety.com

    And, Digg this - sioc-project.org

    Comment by Matthew Robson — September 5, 2007 @ 6:32 pm

  40. […] A Bill of Rights for social media users has people talking. I found this little tidbit by one of the commentators buried deep down on the page: Ownership, Control, Freedom, and Transparency. Thanks for starting the ball rolling on this one, and sign me up. As more and more people move more of their lives online this is a must. As this happens, the online world must reflect the offline world more and more. […]

    Pingback by » Do Social Media Need A Bill of Rights? Search Engine Optimization Journal — September 5, 2007 @ 6:44 pm

  41. Wishful thinking.

    What big corporation would be willing to take this on and COMMIT to it?

    I would also like to have a Bill of Rights that would End Global Poverty and a Bill that will End Corporate and Government Corruption.

    Wouldn’t that be nice?

    Please stop building castles in the sky.

    Comment by Steve Gibson — September 5, 2007 @ 7:26 pm

  42. […] The actual article is available here. […]

    Pingback by privacy, freedom and the Bill of Rights - social networking « Interaction Designer — September 5, 2007 @ 7:34 pm

  43. […] A Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web « Open Social Web A proposal for individual rights in a world encased in social networks. Amazing that these aren’t truths already. (tags: social+networking portability socialmedia socialnetworking socialsoftware rights joseph+smarr marc+canter robert+scoble michael+arrington social) […]

    Pingback by links for 2007-09-05 — September 5, 2007 @ 8:23 pm

  44. […] A group of some of the leading names of the Digitari of our era — Joseph Smarr, Marc Canter, Robert Scoble, and Michael Arrington — teamed up to write and post what they’re calling “A Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web.“ […]

    Pingback by The FASTForward Blog » Social Web Bill of Rights: Does It Apply Inside the Firewall?: Enterprise 2.0 Blog: News, Coverage, and Commentary — September 5, 2007 @ 8:40 pm

  45. Too bad none of the authors of this Bill of Rights are actually entrepreneurs responsible for building the social web. You’re in no position to make this bill of rights happen.

    Comment by Ilya Lichtenstein — September 5, 2007 @ 9:08 pm

  46. Ilya, I think you’re way off base. Joseph Smarr is the Chief Platform Architect of Plaxo, and Marc Canter is a very seasoned entrepreneur who is currently CEO of Broadband Mechanics. This is not an esoteric debate for the sake of debate, but part of a plan for opening up the social web through pragmatic cooperation between the companies in the space.

    Comment by John McCrea — September 5, 2007 @ 9:16 pm

  47. It’s great to see this sort of thing coming together - it is very similar to the Media 2.0 Best Practices I proposed earlier in the year.

    I think that a combination of the two would be ideal - a broader focus and a little more depth.

    Read more about it here (manual trackback): http://www.particls.com/blog/2007/09/social-bill-of-rights-media-20-best.html

    Are amendments planned?

    Comment by Chris Saad — September 5, 2007 @ 10:28 pm

  48. […] of Rights for Users of the Social Web” was created by multiple authors and posted on Open Social Web.   Here it is: We publicly assert that all users of the social web are entitled to certain […]

    Pingback by » A Bill of Rights for the social web? Socialtastic: Social Media Blog — September 6, 2007 @ 12:10 am

  49. […] A Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web Attention Trust principles (re)applied to Social Networking Sites by Joseph Smarr (Plaxo), Marc Canter, Robert Scoble and Michael Arrington. Ownership of profile data, connections, activity. Control of whether/how data is shared. Freedom to grant access. (tags: socialsoftware socialnetworking social_software social_networking activism manifesto opensocialweb rights socialmedia) […]

    Pingback by Pascal Van Hecke - Daily Links » Blog Archive » links for 2007-09-06 — September 6, 2007 @ 12:49 am

  50. If this “Bill of Rights” were actually adopted by online social networks, that would be amazing. However, it is possible this would eat into their money making scheme. Take MySpace for example, they thrive on advertising and information.

    I am all for making the sites more “open”, but I don’t see something like this happening anytime soon.

    Thank goodness for widgets that help to make this happen…

    Comment by Kirshan Murphy — September 6, 2007 @ 12:53 am

  51. […] Robert Scoble og Michael Accrington i spidsen har sat sig for at forsøge at introducere en “Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web” - en slags frihedserklæring for brugere af sociale netværk. Og mens idéen kan være både […]

    Pingback by Utopisk kamp for datarettigheder : Vad NU! — September 6, 2007 @ 4:56 am

  52. […] A Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web « Open Social Web A few hotshots have gotten together and drafted a very sensible list of rights every user of a social website should be entitled to. I don’t see anything I disagree with, but do wonder how easy it’s going to be to sell to clients. (Not that I won’t try.) (tags: social rights socialweb socialgraph socialsoftware) […]

    Pingback by links for 2007-09-06 (Leapfroglog) — September 6, 2007 @ 6:25 am

  53. I’m in…

    Comment by Dennis Howlett — September 6, 2007 @ 7:06 am

  54. […] A Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web. […]

    Pingback by Dati & Utenti « Moto browniano. La verità, vi prego, sul Web 2.0 — September 6, 2007 @ 7:36 am

  55. A Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web

    In essence, this is just what NoseRub ist all about. It’s really nice to see, that something is moving here!

    We publicly assert that all users of the social web are entitled to certain fundamental rights, specifically:

    Ownership of their own per…

    Trackback by NoseRub Blog — September 6, 2007 @ 9:04 am

  56. Web social : rendez nous le contr�le de nos donn�es !

    J’ai lu avec int�r�t la D�claration des Droits de l’Utilisateur 2.0 qui est une excellente id�e mais il est vraiment dommage que la r�flexion n’ait pas �t� port�e un peu plus loin pour approcher davantage mon r�ve de geek qui se concr�tise peu

    Trackback by Biologeek : Ubuntu, bio-informatique et geekeries libres d'un bio-informaticien au quotidien. — September 6, 2007 @ 9:33 am

  57. […] A Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web. Die Amerikaner. Die habens immer mit “Bill of Rights”. In diesem Fall ist das aber mal eine töfte Sache. So töfte, dass ich das ich sie hier promt nochmal abdrucken mag. […]

    Pingback by anmut und demut - A Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web — September 6, 2007 @ 9:48 am

  58. […] que encuentro en el blog de Enrique Dans. Tras el código de conducta para bloggers ahora toca la declaración de derechos de los usuarios de la web social. Reproduzco aqui la […]

    Pingback by Declaración de derechos de los usuarios de la web social — September 6, 2007 @ 10:39 am

  59. […] original em inglês: A Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web. Partilhar na web Respostas em RSS Certamente! no seu […]

    Pingback by  Certamente! Carta de Direitos para o utilizador da web social — September 6, 2007 @ 10:46 am

  60. Nice. I support it. Portuguese translation available here: Carta de Direitos para o utilizador da web social.

    Comment by Paulo Querido — September 6, 2007 @ 10:53 am

  61. Very good idea, there is a strong need of interoperability, and instead of a SSO, we want there rules to be followed. Let the microformats be buried !

    Comment by Tim — September 6, 2007 @ 12:01 pm

  62. I totally agree with everything in that Bill of Right. I think it has deep philosophical implications since it states rather clearly what is private and what is not on Internet and as such it redefines what an Individual is on the net.

    Comment by Louis — September 6, 2007 @ 12:22 pm

  63. A new step in Web 2 (in english)

    Propose us your services, but let us deal the information.
    (We’ve got the power because we’ve got the information, and we know that).

    Trackback by Information Timothee MervilloN — September 6, 2007 @ 12:49 pm

  64. Don’t know why there is no trackback, but I posted my thoughts on GNC http://www.geeknewscentral.com/archives/007271.html I agree with Steve Gibson that there is little chance that companies will willingly adopt this. There is interest for them to claim they do when there is demand from their consumers, but no inherent imperative for them to keep their word.

    This could potentially be enforced by using a mixture of licensing and market forces. Consumer demand for the bill could push companies to license themselves as “BoR compliant” and penalties in the license contract could penalize them for infractions. I expand on this in my post if you are interested.

    Comment by Matthew — September 6, 2007 @ 2:01 pm

  65. […] Ακολουθεί το σύνολο των γραπτών θεμελιωδών αρχών στα Ελληνικά. Το αγγλικό κείμενο μπορείτε να βρείτε στη διεύθυνση http://opensocialweb.org/2007/09/05/bill-of-rights/. […]

    Pingback by metablogging.gr » Blog Archive » Διακήρυξη δικαιωμάτων κοινωνικού ιστού. — September 6, 2007 @ 2:29 pm

  66. I agree. Very good idea. I can translate this page in french, for french people, who prefer discuss in french. Like me…

    Cette “Déclaration des droits pour utilisateurs de médias sociaux” est probablement un peu utopique, mais c’est avec des utopies que l’on forge un meilleur monde!

    Si j’ai précisé “médias sociaux”, c’est par ce que le web social, comporte certes les réseaux sociaux, mais également les autres outils utilisant des systèmes sociaux.

    ::

    Comment by Patrick B. — September 6, 2007 @ 3:04 pm

  67. […] A Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web - ソーシャルウェブ・ユーザの権利章典 September 7th, 2007 原典: A Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web […]

    Pingback by A Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web - ソーシャルウェブ・ユーザの権利章典 « dew lop — September 6, 2007 @ 3:50 pm

  68. […] you haven’t already, you should have a look at The Bill of Rights for the Open Social Web. I had a chat with Dave Wallace about it before we recorded the Extraordinary Everyday Lives Show […]

    Pingback by Naked Yak » Blog Archive » The Internet for Public Good — September 6, 2007 @ 4:17 pm

  69. I would like to see something else added to the list: the right for the user to demand that all information and material submitted by them is deleted permanently by the system. Too many systems have no option to delete an account, or make it very difficult.

    Comment by Steve Mansfield-Devine — September 6, 2007 @ 5:11 pm

  70. Thanks !

    We did a spannish translation. You can find it here:

    http://www.lacapsula.com/2007/09/05/open-social-web/

    Comment by matias — September 6, 2007 @ 5:29 pm

  71. […] for a Social Web Bill of Rights? Making a minor splash in my newsreader yesterday was “A Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web,” jointly composed by some folks who are pretty prominent in the growing roster of social […]

    Pingback by Open Thread: Time for a Social Web Bill of Rights? « Web Worker Daily — September 6, 2007 @ 6:00 pm

  72. Rights are worth the guns you have to enforce them.

    The key for the bill of rights might be to model some of it on how the creative commons folks have made their moves.

    Instead of demanding rights, allow for a positive feedback cycle by creating levels of openness that people can advertise in specific ways. I may license my work BY-SA, but others may insist on BY-NC-SA. Each of those has recognizable icons like RSS that indicate what you can get.

    So let me advertise on my site a standard for people’s “mydata” rights. I could say that I keep everything private, but allow openid authentication. Or my social site might let you get an export of any of your data, but not let you link to external signifiers (maybe i’m very concerned about spammers or link farmers…)

    Give me a way to advertise just how open I am that is universally recognizable. Something that implies a CONTRACT of sorts between me and my users. Then you’ve got something.

    I really think you can solve a number of these issues with cool icons and an independent group to guide the idea. Look at the improbable growth and success of the CC guys.

    Comment by Matt Katz — September 6, 2007 @ 7:14 pm

  73. As published to http://skypejournal.com/blog/2007/09/rights_in_social_media.html

    Marc Canter and friends are proposing a A Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web (BORUS). These demands could certainly apply to Skype. As catchy as it is, BORUS is a shallow attempt to codify broader, deeper rights in cyberspace. It’s like petitioning for the right to print an afternoon edition of the local newspaper on paper instead of fighting for Freedom of Speech with heart, guns, money and blood. So…

    18 Questions to the Authors:

    1. Would you apply these rights to enterprise/intranet social networks?

    2. Do your rights supercede an employer’s rights to manage workplace information, especially if it is to comply with laws and regulations?

    3. How do we define “ownership”? Can we spell this out?

    4. “activity stream of content they create” conflates two different sets of data. Do I own my “activity stream”, the metadata describing my activity on the site, including which pages I visit, forms I fill out, things I click? Would this include things like web site log files? Do I own “content I create” even if it is a collaborative work?

    5. Do you provide exceptions for “except to comply with the law” and “to operate our site” to the “Control of whether and how such personal information is shared with others”?

    6. Can we provide a model Terms Of Service that encapsulates these ideas?

    7. Must these rights be transferable? What do you want to happen when a company agreeing to these rights is bought by a company that does not agree?

    8. Must a company agree to provide escrow for this data, in the event of bankruptcy or takeover by an organization that does not comply with BORUS? Failing escrow, would you rather have the company commit to destroying all copies of your data than having it fall into non-BORUS hands?

    9. In addition to syndication, should your host be required to keep permanent archives of your data? Some sites discard old data.

    10. Should you be allowed to download your data in a documented, machine readable form? Blog services, starting with Dave Winer’s Manila, have done this for years.

    11. Do your rights of ownership include withdrawing public posts and public comments, even killing open public groups you may have created, should you choose to disappear from view on their site?

    12. Do I have the right to edit information about me in other people’s address books?

    13. Which of these rights extend to groups of people or other objects I’ve defined in your network?

    14. Is the “Allow their users to discover who else they know is also on their site, using the same external identifiers made available for lookup within the service” subject to “Control of whether and how such personal information is shared with others”?

    15. Does “personal information” include information about you obtained from third parties? The way credit card companies or people-search firms do? Or the way online advertising agencies do? For example, if a facebook app shows your eBay score to other people, do you have the right to compel the site to hide that otherwise public information?

    16. What are “external identifiers”? Are you referring to OpenID style logins? Or my usernames in other networks?

    17. Some networks, like Skype, decentralize data, making it hard or impossible to comply with some of the syndication and linking or web access clauses. Can the language be generalized?

    18. Should you insist on services defaulting to privacy instead of openness when they expose profiles to public search engines?

    I wrote a “Desktop Bill of Rights” back in 1996 to set expectations between the LSI Logic IT department and its internal customers. Communication is great, governance is better. I like Matthew Green Smith’s suggestion: create a company to put a seal-of-approval on compliant services.

    Comment by Phil Wolff — September 6, 2007 @ 8:38 pm

  74. […] of yesterday’s big news in the blogosphere has been the Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web which was authored by Joseph Smarr (Plaxo), Marc Canter (Broadband Mechanics), Michael Arrington […]

    Pingback by Is a Bill of Rights Enough? at Not So Relevant — September 6, 2007 @ 8:38 pm

  75. […] More reports of Facebook doing ‘open’ on their own terms.  This is EXACTLY why we created our Bill of Rights!  […]

    Pingback by Marc’s Voice » Blog Archive » More blogging - the day before the DataSharingSummit — September 6, 2007 @ 9:07 pm

  76. As someone who has had published ideas leading in this direction (http://fooworks.com/about/ see microformats) I like this idea, but it is essentially unenforceable.

    Comment by Steve Mallett — September 7, 2007 @ 12:01 am

  77. […] all we need to do is follow the social bill of rights or just listen to Vanessa […]

    Pingback by The implications of people search–TechBizMedia — September 7, 2007 @ 5:51 am

  78. Sure I support this as well. But thosw who follow MicroContent Musings know this already.

    Comment by Arnaud Leene — September 7, 2007 @ 9:15 am

  79. […] his opinion now and he, along with Marc Canter, Joseph Smarr and Michael Arrington are promoting a bill of rights for users of social web. This is the right step in the right direction. Once users become aware of the need for openness in […]

    Pingback by Openness in the facebook world and why it is better to wake up now–Krishwords — September 7, 2007 @ 9:23 am

  80. I could not agree more. In fact this is what we are advocating at AllPeers. Check my last 2 posts on the topic:

    http://www.allpeers.com/blog/2007/09/06/its-all-about-sharing-and-control/

    How can we help?

    Comment by Cedric Maloux — September 7, 2007 @ 12:04 pm

  81. […] A Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web « Open Social Web A stab at a consistent set of “rights” for users of the Social Web. I have my reservations, but I’m curious what you think… (tags: manifesto socialmedia standards) […]

    Pingback by Community Guy » links for 2007-09-07 — September 7, 2007 @ 6:20 pm

  82. […] sure that anyone who supports OpenCouchSurfing will support the Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web: We publicly assert that all users of the social web are entitled to certain fundamental rights, […]

    Pingback by Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web at OpenCouchSurfing.org — September 7, 2007 @ 7:02 pm

  83. I’m currently working on security and safety issues for children and young people in the context of social networking services. Interested in how the bill could focus and take the arguments forward, and in how the principles can be used to support personalised learning, and web 2.0/social networking services as e-portfolio/personal learing environments. I’ve pressed for the importance of this on the side of educators evaluating services for a while now - if you’re interested in the bill in the context of education you might also be interested in http://aocnilta.co.uk/2006/11/15/personalisation-2/

    Comment by Josie Fraser — September 7, 2007 @ 8:05 pm

  84. […] Web” stellen Joseph Smarr, Marc Canter, Robert Scoble, und Michael Arringto eine Liste von Grundrechten von Nutzern sozialer Netzwerke zur […]

    Pingback by keimform.de » A Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web — September 7, 2007 @ 9:07 pm

  85. […] etc…see more on open social networks and architecture. This leads to data ownership and the social web bill of rights…see […]

    Pingback by Library clips :: Instead of sending an email… :: September :: 2007 — September 8, 2007 @ 3:42 am

  86. Great, I often wrote about that topic in my german blog. Support you -> http://www.blogh.de/759

    I think you’ll get lot of support in the german blogosphere…

    Comment by Peter Schink — September 8, 2007 @ 11:11 am

  87. […] A valuable statement of principles, perhaps. But will it accomplish anything? Companies like Quechup that don’t care about their users will continue to engage in all kinds of nefarious behaviour, and a Bill of Rights isn’t going to stop them. The only thing users can do is read the terms of service and privacy policy before clicking the “Submit” button (Prokofy Neva has some other concerns with a uniform bill of rights, which she outlines here). […]

    Pingback by Want some Quechup on your Rapleaf&#63 » mathewingram.com/work — September 9, 2007 @ 12:59 am

  88. […] these titans of the online world were strongly supportive of the core notions embodied in the Bill of Rights for users of the social […]

    Pingback by Facebook Snubs Data Sharing Summit « The Real McCrea — September 9, 2007 @ 3:20 am

  89. […] Control si Libertate in ceea ce priveste identitatea noastra digitala, mai e multa vreme. Open Social Web e deschis discutiilor pentru ca fiecare utilizator de platforme de social networking are, sau ar trebui sa aiba, ceva de […]

    Pingback by » Carta drepturilor sociale online ( tehnologie si gadgets ) — September 9, 2007 @ 1:15 pm

  90. La d�claration des droits des utilisateurs du web social

    4 personnalit�s du monde de l’internet 2.0, Joseph Smarr, Marc Canter, Robert Scoble et Michael Arrington ont publi� une “D�claration des droits des utilisateurs de logiciels sociaux” qui rappelle certains droits qu’ils entenden…

    Trackback by InternetActu.net — September 10, 2007 @ 8:03 am

  91. […] de l’internet 2.0, Joseph Smarr, Marc Canter, Robert Scoble et Michael Arrington ont publié une “Déclaration des droits des utilisateurs de logiciels sociaux” (pour en savoir plus : La déclaration des droits des utilisateurs du web social) Tags :cnil, […]

    Pingback by Cyril Rimbaud » Nouveaux usages, nouveaux dangers — September 10, 2007 @ 12:33 pm

  92. […] talking about member rights on CouchSurfing, I was interested to see this article that Dante forwarded about creating a bill of rights for members of the social web. I’m […]

    Pingback by Social Networking Rights at Callum Macdonald — September 10, 2007 @ 1:01 pm

  93. This is a great idea, but…

    The people who need the protection this ‘Bill of Rights’ will provide are:

    a) unlike the writers of this bill of rights in many, many ways (ie. not tech savvy, not white, not male, not wealthy…)

    b) often the minority (Many people who use social networks don’t care about rights and are often even the ones who infringe upon others’ rights. Civil rights are often about protecting the weak against the strong or the minority against the mob.)

    c) unlikely to participate in the project (because they either don’t know about it or don’t think it will be effective)

    If you’re sincere in your effort to create a bill of rights, you’ll need to think more about the people you want to protect and enable.

    Comment by Elaine Vigneault — September 10, 2007 @ 8:08 pm

  94. Thank goodness, when some people in the US are distracted by minor issues such as their government carrying out torture and indefinite detention without trial, there are folks who will bravely stand up for the REAL “fundamental rights”, like control over “the list of people they are connected to” in online social networks.

    Comment by Eric — September 10, 2007 @ 8:23 pm

  95. Thanks for starting this dialogue! You’ve got my full support!! Look forward to the conversation and collaboration, if i can help to spread the message!

    Comment by ConstantinoplE — September 10, 2007 @ 9:29 pm

  96. […] September 11th, 2007 in Uncategorized I brought the poster-sized version of the Bill of Rights back with me to Plaxo and snapped this picture of it. Tomorrow, at our weekly company meeting, […]

    Pingback by Bill of Rights (1.0) — with Signatures « The Real McCrea — September 11, 2007 @ 3:19 am

  97. […] there’s actually a big debate about who owns your personal data that you put out on MySpace, Facebook, Plaxo, […]

    Pingback by Church Tech Matters » A Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web — September 12, 2007 @ 4:19 am

  98. […] explicitly and implicitly revealed while using social networks. As was recently asserted in the Social Bill Of Rights and as has been advocated for a while by Attention Trust Principles, users want to own their […]

    Pingback by Social Graph: Concepts and Issues : Forecast-Blog — September 12, 2007 @ 9:47 am

  99. […] explicitly and implicitly revealed while using social networks. As was recently asserted in the Social Bill Of Rights and as has been advocated for a while by Attention Trust Principles, users want to own their […]

    Pingback by Social Graph: Concepts and Issues « iBrian — September 12, 2007 @ 9:57 am

  100. […] explicitly and implicitly revealed while using social networks. As was recently asserted in the Social Bill Of Rights and as has been advocated for a while by Attention Trust Principles, users want to own their […]

    Pingback by Social Graph: Concepts and Issues « Alex Iskold Technology Blog — September 12, 2007 @ 12:02 pm

  101. Information is fuel of Success.
    Why would owners of said information wish to turn it over to whom it came?

    It’s a noble fight you fight.

    Comment by Zak Nicola — September 12, 2007 @ 5:06 pm

  102. […] explicitly and implicitly revealed while using social networks. As was recently asserted in the Social Bill Of Rights and as has been advocated for a while by Attention Trust Principles, users want to own their […]

    Pingback by iAdvert.mobi » Social Graph: Concepts and Issues — September 12, 2007 @ 10:26 pm

  103. […] A good start: http://opensocialweb.org/2007/09/05/bill-of-rights/ […]

    Pingback by rogueestate.com » Blog Archive » Hey who wants to fill in another profile? — September 13, 2007 @ 12:05 am

  104. […] only issue with A Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web is that it seems to assume a […]

    Pingback by Assuming a Silo? | Garrick Van Buren .com — September 13, 2007 @ 2:59 am

  105. […] initiative récente, A Bill of Rights for the Social Web, tente de répondre à l’expansion des sites où le contenu est produit par les utilisateurs. […]

    Pingback by Signal » Blog Archive » web social ouvert contre vie privée — September 13, 2007 @ 9:41 pm

  106. […] reactie op de gedachten van Brad Fitzpatrick is op 5 september 2007 het initiatief “A Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web” ontstaan. De schrijvers van dit pamflet, waaronder Joseph Smarr van Plaxo, Marc Canter van […]

    Pingback by ViNT // Vision - Inspiration - Navigation - Trends » Open identiteit — September 14, 2007 @ 1:51 pm

  107. […] A Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web « Open Social Web (tags: socialnetworking socialsoftware manifesto socialmedia opensocialweb sociallyresponsiblemedia activism socialnetworks billofrights) […]

    Pingback by links for 2007-09-15 — September 15, 2007 @ 5:23 am

  108. Orwell.

    Please, Big Brother, leave the minds alone…

    Comment by Arrebenta — September 15, 2007 @ 2:37 pm

  109. […] partir de um post muito interessante sobre este aasunto apresento aqui uma reflexão sobre os direitos fundamentais de usuários de uma rede social e da […]

    Pingback by Governança de rede social: direitos dos usuários « Papagallis — September 17, 2007 @ 5:05 am

  110. y’all wrote:

    >Ownership of their own personal information…..

    I would like to suggest that such a concept is ludicrous on its face. One might as sensibly speak of owning the law of gravity, or tomorrow’s sunrise, or hurricane Katrina.

    Information is not property, and even the most rabid advocates of strict copyright have not asserted it so. (Some businesses have asserted property rights in “trade secrets”. The law does indeed support this claim. The law, in that instance, is an ass.)

    If I see Madonna making out with the Pope, this information is not proprietary to either of those parties. I witnessed it, and I am free by natural right to report it. If I’m at a party where I hear Madonna describing a makeout session with the Pope, I am similarly free to report that I heard her say that. If I’m at a party and I hear little Suzy Sunshine of Middleville USA talking about making out with her boyfriend, I am similarly free to report it. This may well mark me as a gossip, insufferably rude, and generally an a-hole. But I can still do it. If Suzy posts this on her MySpace page, I’m similarly free to drop a dime on her and snitch her out to her Mom, whether she likes it or not.

    Little Suzy is responsible for stopping and thinking before she posts her personal business in front of two billion Internet users world wide. She owns nothing in that situation but the red face of embarrassment and the sheepish grin of stupidity. There is no expectation of privacy in public places. Duh! That’s why we call them “public”.

    Somebody else said:

    >1. CyberCitizens own their personal information.
    >2. CyberCitizens may at any time regulate the use of their personal information by other persons or parties.

    What I already said. (See above)

    Have a nice day,
    -Steve

    Comment by Steve — September 17, 2007 @ 6:55 am

  111. […] «Билль о правах пользователей социальных сервисов» (A Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web), опубликованный в начале сентября в […]

    Pingback by Билль о правах пользователей « Блог социалиста-походные аналитические записки — September 17, 2007 @ 8:24 pm

  112. […] “Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web” was created by multiple authors and posted on Open Social Web.   Here it is: We publicly assert that all users of the social web are entitled to certain […]

    Pingback by A Bill of Rights for the social web? : Socialtastic — September 19, 2007 @ 1:50 am

  113. […] are singing a different song than Dave is.  This is what prompted Joseph Smarr to come to me to write up our BoR.  This split personality syndrome is typical of hyper growth startups - so I don’t blame you […]

    Pingback by Marc’s Voice » Blog Archive » Open letter to Mark Zukerberg — September 19, 2007 @ 9:26 pm

  114. A few weeks ago, I read a post on apophenia about Baratunde’s problems with being accused of spamming on facebook. I hate to say that I kind of dismissed it thinking, well he must have been abusing it and sending insane amounts of messages because I’d never heard of facebook disabling features from someone’s account. Then, today it happenned to me. I think that I added about 20 friends and messaged maybe ten more people within an hour. (All people that I actually know, too. I was friending and messaging high school classmates.) Apparently this was too much for facebook. So, I got a warning, which now pops up whenever I try to do anything, like send a message to my brother or write on a friend’s wall. So, Baratunde, I now feel your pain. Sorry I didn’t get it before.

    I think the most annoying part of all of it is that facebook won’t even tell me what I’ve done wrong precisely, so that I’ll be able to avoid it in the future. How are you suppossed to follow the rules if you don’t even know what the rules are?

    For those of you that haven’t seen it, here’s facebook’s policy on spamming:

    First, this sign pops up:
    Warning! Your account could be disabled.
    You are using this feature to spam other users. Continued misuse of Facebook’s features will result in your account being disabled. If you have any questions or concerns, you can visit our FAQ page here.

    Then if you click on you can read their policy. My favorite parts are:

    What are the limits?

    Unfortunately, Facebook cannot provide any specifics on the rate limits that we enforce. Please know, however, that the speed at which you are acting and the sheer number of actions you have made are both taken into account.

    and

    How long will the block last? Can it be lifted?

    The duration of the block varies depending on the nature of the offense, ranging from a few hours to a few days. When the block is over, please proceed with your site activity at a slower rate so as to avoid hitting another block or having your account disabled.

    Facebook will not lift this block for you until the entire penalty time has elapsed.

    So, I don’t know what I’ve done wrong, how to avoid doing it, or how long this “punishment” will last. Great…

    Comment by Maggie — September 20, 2007 @ 8:38 pm

  115. […] the Social Network Bill of Rights movement championing full access to personal data stored on social networking sites, it is […]

    Pingback by Full read/write access to Google Calendar | Gary Burge — September 21, 2007 @ 12:14 am

  116. […] Open Social Web versucht sich mal dann. Die Präambel ist schon mal gut: There are already many who support the ideas laid out in this Bill of Rights, but we are actively seeking to grow the roster of those publicly backing the principles and approaches it outlines. That said, this Bill of Rights is not a document “carved in stone” (or written on paper). It is a blog post, and it is intended to spur conversation and debate, which will naturally lead to tweaks of the language. So, let’s get the dialogue going and get as many of the major stakeholders on board as we can! […]

    Pingback by Bill of Rights für`s Social Web | FreieNetze — September 21, 2007 @ 3:57 pm

  117. Great start guys… As the founder and principle administrator of http://americanbusinessclub.com I’m going to put this in a section on our Network currently in BETA at http://ambizclub.ning.com

    Actually, I think it’s up the the operators of each individual site to keep abreast of just what people need and want in the area of ‘rights’ as well as tools that are relevent, and that will maximise their effectiveness online without leaving them open to all of the “crap” that may come with being “out there”.

    Not everyone takes this responsibility seriously, but I can assure you that we here, and especially myself, in setting the tone, if you will… do! Keep up the great work, and all the best of life, love and laughter is wished for all of you.

    Michael
    Web: http://www.americanbusinessclub.com
    Web: http://www.ambizclub.com
    Ambizclub! Network: http://ambizclub.ning.com
    (Join with me here; It’s fast, easy and free)
    Mobile: +995-55-138-095
    USA Voice/Fax: +1-215-975-6113
    Email: mb@americanbusinessclub.com
    Email: admin@ambizclub.com
    Skype: sirmichaelbrittingham http://www.americanbusinessclub.com/contact
    XING Forum Group: https://www.xing.com/net/abc/
    (The American Business Club!)
    (Join us now to keep up-to-date)
    Blog: http://ambizclub.blogspot.com
    Yahoo! Messenger: michaelbrittingham

    Comment by Mike Brittingham — September 28, 2007 @ 4:23 pm

  118. […] Stati Uniti arriva ora la proposta di un “Bill of rights” per iniziare ad abbattere questi steccati e ridare agli utenti quanto gli spetta. E cioè, […]

    Pingback by Web 2.0: è ora di una carta dei diritti per gli utenti » Panorama.it - Hitech e Scienza — September 28, 2007 @ 5:37 pm

  119. At the highest level of abstraction we are dealing with protecting our “Electronic Souls” - portraits of ourselves that are becomming deeply personal and intimate. This is a question that extends beyond social networks to all personal information.

    So while I applaud the effort, the scope is important. And there are legal questions surrounding the issue of personal information ownership that are rather complex. Personally I think we should just apply property rights, but the lawyers don’t tend to agree on that one. Check out some more on this here: http://brondmo.blogspot.com/2007/09/your-electronic-soul.html

    Comment by Hans Peter Brondmo — September 29, 2007 @ 3:36 pm

  120. […] proposed Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web was posted this morning by Joseph Smarr on Open Social […]

    Pingback by Musings & Meanderings » Blog Archive » Bill of Rights - Whose Rights? — September 29, 2007 @ 9:07 pm

  121. […] external profiles and links without limitation should be the norm, not to mention that they should “own” their profile data, social graph and activity […]

    Pingback by Between the Lines mobile edition — September 30, 2007 @ 4:57 pm

  122. […] external profiles and links without limitation should be the norm, not to mention that they should “own” their profile data, social graph and activity […]

    Pingback by Jacob Madison » Blog Archive » Facebook, LinkedIn, Xing making moves — October 1, 2007 @ 7:21 pm

  123. […] of rights would feed a false sense of self-importance among social web users.  The proposed Social Web Bill of Rights, includes sitpulations regarding ownership, control and freedom.  I’m sorry to say that […]

    Pingback by We the people of an over-inflated sense of self-importance « Blurred Absolutes — October 1, 2007 @ 7:28 pm

  124. […] our DataSharingSummit efforts or the BoR, recent beliefs on shared social graphs, white labeled open source plays, and ‘bringing […]

    Pingback by Marc’s Voice » Blog Archive » End of Q3 blogging from London (6th time this year) — October 3, 2007 @ 3:55 am

  125. […] of the social web now have a "Bill of Rights".  Plaxo's Joseph Smarr has taken the core principles of their privacy policy, […]

    Pingback by The Social Networking “Bill of Rights” — Alec Saunders .LOG — October 3, 2007 @ 10:10 am

  126. Let’s just imagine for a moment that I actually own the initial information about me in my Facebook page. Let’s say that numerous other sites including the media consume that information. Now imagine that I’m running for political office and I realize that something I said in my Facebook entry wasn’t entirely accurate and I want to correct it. What are my revocation rights? And how can I revoke all old copies without implementing some kind of DRM?

    Now consider the situation of the media organization that consumed my information. Are they not allowed to amass information about me, a politcal candidate? Is it relevant to the campaign that I said one thing when I wasn’t in the public eye, and another when I was?

    I’m afraid that statements about my right to control how my information is used are useless without statements about how to revoke the use of my information, especially if I have said something untrue or libelous about someone else. But that right to revoke information leads us to the conundrum of how to trust information that may be changed at any time to suit the current political climate.

    Some will argue that my contrived example is faulty because the courts recognize that public persons have less privacy than private persons. Unfortunately, I can become a public person overnight if someone posts a viral video about me on YouTube, or if I sue a celebrity.

    This Bill of Rights will need extremely careful legal design of it is to have the slightest chance of becoming law in even one country. For it to become law in multiple countries when there are different standards for public and private persons, support or otherwise for libel laws, etc., seems highly unlikely to me.

    Comment by Peter Quirk — October 5, 2007 @ 3:00 am

  127. […] Social WebBill of Rights Alex’s Iskold’s blog on the Attention Economy The Privacy Rights website An ancient […]

    Pingback by Blog On » Drupal — October 5, 2007 @ 11:48 am

  128. […] the punditocracy talking about the problem, in bill of rights format. (I suppose this post is a bit of a stone in a glass house on that count, […]

    Pingback by Luis Villa’s Blog / some free/open services links — October 7, 2007 @ 9:29 pm

  129. […] Bill of Righteous Intent” where he discusses the draft manifesto: A Bill of Rights for Users. I liked what I read.The manifesto supports the concept of what I’ve been […]

    Pingback by My data - let me use as I choose | Free CRM — October 16, 2007 @ 4:26 am

  130. […] Produite à l’initiative de Marc Canter, de Michael Arrington, de Robert Scoble, et de Joseph Smarr, voici ma tentative de traduction française de A Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web. […]

    Pingback by RU3 :: tentatives d’intelligence collective et de reseaux ouverts » La déclaration des droits pour les utilisateurs des réseaux sociaux — October 20, 2007 @ 9:34 pm

  131. Good idea! There is now a goup on Facebook to support it! http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=12672435301 Join!

    Comment by OlivierAuber — October 23, 2007 @ 8:19 am

  132. i am in. Blogged http://opengardensblog.futuretext.com/archives/2007/10/bill_of_rights.html
    Its a critical issue since I see the emergence of an ‘umbrella / meta social network’ i.e. a social network thats the first point of contact and which encomposes the web, the mobile web and the enterprise. To achieve that goal, we need the social network to be open and also an element of fine grained privacy control. Good initiative.

    Comment by Ajit Jaokar — October 27, 2007 @ 8:12 am

  133. Great! We will follow this principles in our service, myid.net !

    Comment by Kay — October 27, 2007 @ 3:12 pm

  134. Hi all, please take a look at:

    http://cslang.blogspot.com/

    I think it includes a lot of your ideas, plus the freedom from advertising!

    Comment by Charles Lang — October 27, 2007 @ 8:48 pm

  135. […] So we complained and even created a ‘Bill of Rights for Users of Social Media‘ .  Not only is that social graph data owned by the USER and not Facebook, but Facebook was […]

    Pingback by Marc’s Voice » Blog Archive » OpenSocial and SocialAds — October 31, 2007 @ 4:53 am

  136. […] Michael Arrington of Techcrunch followed up on September 5 with a user’s Bill of Rights. The blog post described how users had the right to own and control their own data, including data about […]

    Pingback by VentureBeat » Google-led gang to take on Facebook — Google’s OpenSocial to launch — October 31, 2007 @ 7:43 am

  137. genius. sign me up!

    Comment by Alfred Moya — October 31, 2007 @ 2:02 pm

  138. do it …. we agree

    Comment by drleon — October 31, 2007 @ 3:28 pm

  139. […] Google make their OpenSocial play, it’s worth going back a few weeks in history, when “A Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web” was published at opensocialweb.org: A Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web Authored by […]

    Pingback by OpenSocial Blog» Blog Archive » A Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web — November 1, 2007 @ 5:39 am

  140. Sign me up, this concept is a long time coming. I just read the article today in the NY Times http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/02/technology/02google.html?ref=business

    Gregory Masley CNE,CNA,MCSE
    greg@masleyassociates.com
    http://www.masleyassociates.com
    http://www.masleyassociates.info
    http://www.masleyassociates.com/roxymuzick
    http://www.masleyassociates.com/wordpress
    http://www.myspace.com/roxymuzick
    http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=516943479

    Comment by Greg Masley - RoxyMuzick — November 2, 2007 @ 2:06 am

  141. […] A Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web. Behövs det en standard för hur sociala nätverk kan handskas med vår privata information? […]

    Pingback by Panelen: OpenSocial, Social Graph och Twingly-rapporten at What’s Next — November 5, 2007 @ 5:26 am

  142. […] individuals and most importantly marketers. Let’s hope Facebook adheres to the proposed Open Social Bill of Rights and doesn’t lose customers to the competition otherwise instead of meeting your friends at […]

    Pingback by Facebook Predicts Your Future and it is Brand Advertising | S.E.O.gre Swamplog — November 7, 2007 @ 6:28 am

  143. Do not forget: I have the right to have multiple social graphs, and I have the right to avoid sharing information necessary for others to connect them.

    (paraphrased quote cuz I can’t be arsed to get the precise quote) “As you can see, we have quite a file on you, Mr. Anderson. While most people live their life, it seems that you have been living… two lives. One is Thomas A Anderson, programmer at a prestigious software company. The other is Neo, an underground hacker. One of these lives has a future. The other does not.”

    How about, “As you can see, we have quite a file on you, Ms. Llewellyn. While most people live their life, it seems that you have been living three lives. One is Gwen A Llewellyn, a manager for a state Department of Revenue. Another is Haute Fiction, a slashfic writer in the Harry Potter universe. And the third is Cyrian Bunnyhug, a masculine furry avatar in the world of Second Life. Only one of these lives has a future, Ms. Llewellyn. The other two do not.”

    I expect that I have this right (the right to withhold connecting data from public dissemination), even in the face of services that are open enough that third parties can query and otherwise get information on the various profiles I have.

    This ‘right’ needs to be made explicit.

    Comment by Kyle H — November 8, 2007 @ 1:21 am

  144. […] http://opensocialweb.org/2007/09/05/bill-of-rights/ […]

    Pingback by Open Ideas Sharing » Blog Archive » Build decentralized meta social network from blog — November 8, 2007 @ 11:37 pm

  145. Hi!

    Now, a french version:
    http://blog.opensocialweb.fr

    A french group on Facebook:
    http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=5826371826

    And the french redirection to this page:
    http://opensocialweb.fr

    ::

    Comment by Patrick B. — November 12, 2007 @ 11:45 pm

  146. […] de Robert Scoble, Michael Arrington, Marc Canter et Joseph Smarr, soit la création d’une déclaration des droits des utilisateurs du Web social en traduisant la déclaration et en créant un blogue sur le […]

    Pingback by émergenceweb : blogue » Blog Archive » Déclaration officielle des droits… Facebook pour viraliser ! — November 13, 2007 @ 5:29 pm

  147. Google is infamous for gathering personal information and then sharing it with Governments upon request *and even without said request*

    What a great scheme to further “regulate” the internet.

    Comment by Mick — November 17, 2007 @ 6:26 pm

  148. […] are cries from the heart (e.g The Open Social Web Bill of Rights) for my friendship, that relationship to another person, to transcend documents and sites. There is […]

    Pingback by Between the Lines mobile edition — November 22, 2007 @ 3:44 pm

  149. […] arrived, and been named by Tim Berners-Lee: There are cries from the heart (e.g The Open Social Web Bill of Rights) for my friendship, that relationship to another person, to transcend documents and sites. There is […]

    Pingback by The Gungle» Blog Archive » Giant Global Graph / Social Graph / Graph — November 23, 2007 @ 1:41 am

  150. Unfortunately doesn’t seem Facebook is respecting it; check Charlene’s experience with the “Facebook Beacon” here: http://blogs.forrester.com/charleneli/2007/11/close-encounter.html (my comments on that here:http://selvascano.spaces.live.com/blog/cns!D7439E6DC600CAE9!1459.entry)

    Comment by filibertoselvas — November 23, 2007 @ 8:35 am

  151. […] Charte - Bill of Rights - a été mise au point par Joseph Smarr (Plaxo.com , mais voici son blog ), Marc Canter […]

    Pingback by Transnets » Blog Archive » Charte de nos droits sur les réseaux sociaux — November 24, 2007 @ 4:22 am

  152. […] about the social graph now - long live the social graph.  Tim seems to be up on what’s up - and what we’ve been trying to do - so you can’t call him ’sleeping’ - and there’s really nothing really […]

    Pingback by Marc’s Voice » Blog Archive » Shopping Day blogging — November 24, 2007 @ 10:07 am

  153. […] around the web on social networking, you can see the tension between convenience, identity, and protection of […]

    Pingback by What the Heck was I Thinking!? :: The Internet and the Death of Distance, pt. 2 :: November :: 2007 — November 24, 2007 @ 10:59 pm

  154. […] social web Bill of Rights November 25, 2007 — kittent The Social Web Bill of Rights […]

    Pingback by social web Bill of Rights « Circulating Zen — November 25, 2007 @ 12:06 am

  155. […] creating our own rules.  That’s what the DataSharingSummit was all about, what  our ‘Bill of Rights for Users of  Social Media” is and what the new DataPortability.com site is all about.  No reason to sit around […]

    Pingback by Marc’s Voice » Blog Archive » Go out and kick some ass - Doc — November 26, 2007 @ 10:52 pm

  156. […] or Bill of Rights for the social Web has been proposed –Thoughts on the Social Graph and Open Social Web–but the people are not revolting, abandoning their social networks of choice, taking to the […]

    Pingback by Between the Lines mobile edition — November 27, 2007 @ 6:20 pm

  157. […] A Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web […]

    Pingback by poso.dk - om portable sociale netværk » Den social graf - hvad er nu det for noget? — November 28, 2007 @ 5:57 pm

  158. […] A Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web « Open Social Web - Et slags manifest for brugerens rettigheder på det sociale web. Lavet af flere fremtrædende personligheder. […]

    Pingback by poso.dk - om portable sociale netværk » Poso links for d. 28. November — November 29, 2007 @ 12:57 am

  159. […] is the things they are about which are important’ … There are cries from the heart (e.g The Open Social Web Bill of Rights) for my friendship, that relationship to another person, to transcend documents and sites. There is […]

    Pingback by Social Networking: un enorme social network chiamato Web (Parte 1) | Stalkk.ed — November 29, 2007 @ 8:19 pm

  160. […] and Information Science at Dominican University.  He has little to add, but is responding to “A Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web.” This ‘Bill of Rights,’ written by Joseph Smarr, Marc Canter, Robert Scoble, and Michael […]

    Pingback by A Finely Crafted Run-on Sentence » Yours, Mine and Ours — November 30, 2007 @ 4:26 am

  161. I support this initiative! Sign me up.

    Comment by Adrian — December 3, 2007 @ 12:47 pm

  162. I wish Mark Zuckerberg had read these principles and subscribed to them before he launched his egregious Beacon Advertising project. Without giving members the ability to block the service completely (to block the purchase information from flowing to Facebook), even with recent changes, Beacon is still an abomination!

    Comment by MacSmiley — December 4, 2007 @ 8:57 pm

  163. […] este contexto, me parece muy apropiado la Declaración de los Derechos de los Usuarios de Internet, lanzado bajo la iniciativa Open Social Web. Esta declaración expone lo […]

    Pingback by Facebook y la declaración de derechos de los usuarios de Internet — December 7, 2007 @ 1:05 pm

  164. […] and allow their users to export their data and social graphs. Yes or no?  Will they support the Bill of Rights of Users of Social Media?  Just how onerous will these TOSs gonna be?  I think once its clear what the […]

    Pingback by Marc’s Voice » Blog Archive » Addressing "what's up with OpenSocial" — December 8, 2007 @ 11:22 am

  165. […] a en particulier brandi son «Open Social Bill of Rights», celle qui vise à protéger les «social graphs» de ces derniers, donc leurs données […]

    Pingback by émergenceweb : blogue » Blog Archive » Paris jour 4 : Le Web3, suite et fin… — December 13, 2007 @ 5:51 pm

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