= Tetanurae sensu Sereno, 1998
Definition- (Passer domesticus <- Torvosaurus tanneri) (modified)

Avetheropoda Paul, 1988
Definition- (Allosaurus fragilis + Passer domesticus) (Holtz et al., 2004; modified from Padian et al., 1999; modified from Currie and Padian, 1997)
= Dinoaves Bakker, 1986
= Tetanurae sensu Novas, 1992
Definition- (Allosaurus fragilis + Passer domesticus) (modified)
= Neotetanurae Sereno, Wilson, Larsson, Duthell and Sues, 1994
Definition- (Allosaurus fragilis + Passer domesticus) (modified from Sereno, 1998)
Other definitions- (Sinraptor dongi + Carcharodontosaurus saharicus + Allosaurus fragilis + Passer domesticus) (Sereno, 2005)
= Neotetanurae sensu Sereno, 2005
Definition- (Sinraptor dongi + Carcharodontosaurus saharicus + Allosaurus fragilis + Passer domesticus)
Comments- Sereno's newest (2005) definition of Neotetanurae differs from the original (Sereno, 1998) by adding Sinraptor and Carcharodontosaurus as internal specifiers. I suppose it would preserve content better if sinraptorids or carcharodontosaurids end up just basal to carnosaurs + coelurosaurs (Paul, 1988; Coria and Salgado, 1995; Longrich, 2001; Paul, 2002). However, if carcharodontosaurids are ceratosaurs (Bonaparte et al., 1990) or sinraptorids are megalosauroids (Kurzanov, 1989), the original intent of Neotetanurae would be lost. The latter two situations seem less likely than the former, so Sereno's redefinition may be more advantageous than not.

unnamed avetheropod (Young and Sun, 1957)
Late Jurassic
Kelaza Formation, Xinjiang, China
Material- (IVPP V903) (~6 m; ~600 kg) anterior dentary, three teeth
Comments- Originally referred to cf. Szechuanosaurus, that genus is an indeterminate averostran. Molnar (1974) noted the lateral dentary shelf was similar to Labocania, and Mapusaurus has one too (Coria and Currie, 2006). Chure (2000) noted the typically theropod teeth (recurved with small serrations) distinguish the taxon from segnosaurs, which also have a lateral dentary shelf. He referred it to Theropoda indet..
References- Young and Sun, 1957. Note on a fragmentary carnosaurian mandible from Turfan, Sinkiang. Vertebrata PalAsiatica. 1(2) 2027-2036.
Molnar, 1974. A distinctive theropod dinosaur from the Upper Cretaceous of Baja California (Mexico). J. Paleontol. 48(5), 1009-1017.
Chure, 2000. A new species of Allosaurus from the Morrison Formation of Dinosaur National Monument (Utah-Colorado) and a revision of the theropod family Allosauridae. Ph.D. dissertation, Columbia University, 1-964.
Coria and Currie, 2006. A new carcharodontosaurid (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from the Upper Cretaceous of Argentina. Geodiversitas. 28(1), 71-118.

unnamed avetheropod (Turner, Hwang and Norell, 2007)
Berriasian-Barremian, Early Cretaceous
Huhteeg Svita, Mongolia
Holotype
- (IGM coll.) postorbital (60 mm)
Comments- The heavily rugose texture and straight anterior process suggest assignment to Carnosauria or Tyrannosauroidea.
Reference- Turner, Hwang and Norell, 2007. A Small Derived Theropod from Oosh, Early Cretaceous, Baykhangor Mongolia. American Museum Novitates. Number 3557, 27 pp.

Marshosaurus Madsen, 1976
M. bicentissimus Madsen, 1976
Kimmeridgian-Tithonian, Late Jurassic
Morrison Formation, Colorado?, Utah, US
Holotype- (UUVP 2826) ilium (375 mm)
Paratypes-........(UUVP 2832) ischium (305 mm)
........(UUVP 2878) ischium
........(UUVP 4736) pubis (393 mm)
?(UUVP 40-555) dentary
(UUVP 1845) ilium
?(UUVP 1846) maxilla
?(UUVP 1864) maxilla
(UUVP 1882) ilium
(UUVP 2742) ilium
?(UUVP 3236) premaxilla
?(UUVP 3454) dentary
?(UUVP 3502) dentary
?(UUVP 4695) maxilla
Referred- ?(BYUVP 5201) proximal caudal vertebra (53 mm) (Britt, 1991)
?(CMNH 21704) posterior skull, posterior lower jaw, cervical series, anterior dorsal series, dorsal rib, scapula, humerus (Chure, Madsen and Britt, 1993)
?(UUVP 99) caudal vertebra (Britt, 1991)
?(UUVP 441) caudal vertebra (Britt, 1991)
?(UUVP 5247) caudal vertebra (Britt, 1991)
?(UUVP 5780) caudal vertebra (Britt, 1991)
Comments- Naish (DML, 2001) alludes to European Marshosaurus remains.
Chure et al. (1997) thought this species is a basal tetanurine, closer to Megalosaurus and Eustreptospondylus than more advanced carnosaurs. Characters found in coelurosaurs include the constricted tooth roots, a lateral dentary groove containing foramina, posterior serrations much larger than anterior serrations, serrations on anterior carinae restricted to distal half of tooth, reduced anterior pubic foot, open obturator notch in pubis and ischium 2/3 the length of the pubis.
And of the supposed primitive characters placing it near megalosauroids-
1. a long braincase is found in most coelurosaurs, such as ornithomimids and dromaeosaurids.
2. a rectangular laterotempral fenestra is seen in basal coelurosaurs like Proceratosaurus, Ornitholestes and Scipionyx.
3. camerate vertebral pneumaticity is seen in dromaeosaurids, but most basal coelurosaurs are unknown for this character.
4. a bowed pubic shaft is found in Coelurus, Ornitholestes, Mirischia and to a lesser degree in some other basal forms.
5. the small pubic boot is seen in Scipionyx and Nqwebasaurus.
6. long low ilia are present in Ornitholestes, Compsognathus, Sinosauropteryx and other such taxa.
7. inclined axial intercentra are only found in Sinraptor and Monolophosaurus to my knowledge.
8. I know of no coelurosaur with cervical epipophyses approaching the height of the neural spines.
9. opisthocoelus cervical centra are found in Eotyrannus, Calamosaurus and Compsognathus.
10. a moderately expanded scapular blade is present in Sinosauropteryx, Compsognathus and Nqwebasaurus.
11. open obturator notches are known in Mirischia and Coelurus.
12. short massive humeri are found in Sinosauropteryx.
This undescribed material is only referred to Marshosaurus based on similarities in dorsal neural spines to those referred to Marshosaurus (found in the type locality). They contain no pelvic material, though the posterior dentary and maxilla might be preserved.
References- Madsen, 1976. A second new theropod dinosaur from the Late Jurassic of East Central Utah. Utah Geol. 3: 51-60.
Britt, 1991. Theropods of Dry Mesa Quarry (Morrison Formation, Late Jurassic), Colorado, with emphasis on the osteology of Torvosaurus tanneri. Brigham Young University Geology Studies 37 p. 1-72.
Chure, Madsen and Britt, 1993. New Data on Theropod Dinosaurs from the Late Jurassic Morrison FM. (MF). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 13(3) 30A.
Chure, Britt and Madsen, 1997. A new specimen of Marshosaurus bicentesimus (Theropoda) from the Morrison Formation (Late Jurassic) of Dinosaur National Monument. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 17(3) 38A.
http://dml.cmnh.org/2001Mar/msg00328.html

Carnosauria Huene, 1920
Definition-
(Allosaurus fragilis <- Passer domesticus) (modified from Holtz et al., 2004; modified from Holtz, 1995)
= Allosauria Paul, 1988
= Allosauroidea sensu Sereno, 1998
Definition- (Allosaurus fragilis <- Passer domesticus) (modified)

unnamed possible carnosaur (Williston, 1902)
Early-Middle Albian, Early Cretaceous
Kansas
Material- centrum
References- Williston, 1902. Notes on some new or little-known extinct Reptiles: Kansas University Science Bulletin, n. 1, p. 247-254.
Lane, 1946. A survey of the fossil vertebrates of Kansas Part III: The Reptiles: Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science, v. 49, n. 3, p. 289-332.

unnamed possible carnosaur (Young, 1958)
Late Cretaceous
Tsanmakou, Shanxi, China
Material- (IVPP V969) caudal vertebra, distal scapula, distal ischia, proximal tibia, proximal fibula, metatarsal II, phalanx
Reference- Young, 1958. The first record of Dinosaurian remains from Shansi: Vertebrata PalAsiatica, v. 2, n. 4, p. 231-236.

unnamed possible Carnosauria (Tamura, Okazaki and Ikegami, 1991)
Late Cenomanian-Turonian, Late Cretaceous
Upper Mifune Group, Japan
Material- (Mifune Board of Education Laboratory coll.) four teeth, tibia, fibula, distal metatarsal II, distal metatarsal III
(Kitakyusyu Museum of Natural History coll.) tooth
(Kitakyusyu Museum of Natural History coll.) two dorsal neural arches, fibula
Comments- This material was said to be Allosaurus-like by Tamura et al. (1991), but Chure (2000) excluded it from Allosauridae. He also identified a femur originally placed with these specimens as pterosaurian. The teeth were said to resemble Fukuiraptor, and this material may come from that or another basal carnosaur.
References- Tamura, Okazaki and Ikegami, 1991. Occurrence of Carnosaurian and Herbivorous Dinosaurs from Upper Formation of Mifune Group, Japan: Mem. Faculty of Education, Kumanomoto University, Natural Science, n. 40, p. 31-45.
Chure, 2000. A new species of Allosaurus from the Morrison Formation of Dinosaur National Monument (Utah-Colorado) and a revision of the theropod family Allosauridae. Ph.D. dissertation, Columbia University, 1-964.

unnamed possible carnosaur (Ghevariya and Srikami, 1994)
Middle Jurassic
Patcham Formation, India
Material- caudal vertebrae
Reference- Ghevariya and Srikarni, 1994, Dinosaur Fauna from Mesozoic Rocks of Western India: In: Gondwana Nine, v. 1, Ninth International Gondwana Symposium, p. 143-163.

undescribed possible carnosaur (Flynn, Simpson, Razafimanastoa, Andriatompohavana and Totovolohy, 1997)
Middle Jurassic
Madagascar
Material- teeth, two presacral vertebrae
Reference- Flynn, Simpson, Razafimanastoa, Andriatompohavana and Totovolohy, 1997. New Triassic and Jurassic Vertebrates from Madagascar: Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, v. 17, supplement to n. 3, Abstracts of Papers, Fifty-seventh Annual Meeting Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, Field Museum, Chicago, Illinois, October 8-11, p. 46a.

undescribed possible carnosaur (Rich, Roland, Gangloff and Hammer, 1997)
Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous
Suntar Series, Russia
Reference- Rich, Roland, Gangloff and Hammer, 1997. Polar Dinosaurs: In: Encyclopedia of Dinosaurs, edited by Currie, P. J., and Padian, K., Academic Press, p. 562-573.

unnamed carnosaur (Knoll, Buffetaut and Bulow, 1999)
Callovian, Middle Jurassic
Marnes de Dives, France
Material- (Bulow coll. 25192) braincase
Comments- Allain (2002) states this is probably an allosaurid. It is not Piveteausaurus or Streptospondylus.
Reference- Knoll, Buffetaut and Bulow, 1999. A theropod braincase from the Jurassic of the Vaches Noires Cliffs (Normandy, France): osteology and palaeoneurology. Bull. Soc. Geol. France, 170(1):103-109.
Allain, 2001. Redescription of Streptospondylus altdorfensis, Cuvier’s theropod dinosaur, from the Jurassic of Normandy, Geodiversitas 23(3) : 349-367.

undescribed carnosaur (Kirkland, 2005)
Barremian, Early Cretaceous
Yellow Cat Member of Cedar Mountain Formation, Utah, US

Comments- Kirkland (2005) listed a "large carnosaurid perhaps related to Utah’s state fossil, the Late Jurassic Allosaurus" as coming from the Yellow Cat Member.
Reference- Kirkland, 2005. Utah’s Newly Recognized Dinosaur Record. Utah Geological Survey: Survey Notes. 37(1), 1-5.

Erectopodidae Huene, 1932
Erectopus Huene, 1923
E. superbus (Sauvage, 1882) Huene, 1923
= Megalosaurus superbus Sauvage, 1882
= Erectopus sauvagei Huene, 1932
(Valanginian-Barremian?)-Albian, Early Cretaceous
unnamed unit, Meuse, France; Romania?
Lectotype- (MNHN 2001-4) anterior maxilla
Plastotype- (MNHN 2001-4; holotype of Erectopus sauvagei) several dorsal centra (lost), dorsal ribs (lost), partial sacrum (lost), several caudal vertebrae (lost), distal radius (lost), distal ulna (lost), metacarpal I (lost), incomplete phalanx I-1 (35 mm), partial manual ungual I, incomplete phalanx II-I, phalanx II-2, partial manual ungual II, distal metacarpal III, phalanx III-1, proximal phalanx III-2, partial ilium, femur (480 mm), proximal tibia, distal tibia, proximal fibula, calcaneum, metatarsal II (230 mm)
Paratypes- ? two teeth (43, 52 mm) (Sauvage, 1876)
? two teeth, distal fibula, two metatarsals (Sauvage, 1882)
Referred- ? two teeth (Huene, 1926)
? tooth (Huene, 1926)
? two metatarsals (Huene, 1926)
? femur (Huene, 1926)
? two pedal phalanges (Huene, 1926)
?(FSL coll.) two tooth fragments (FABL 20 mm) (Lapparent and Zbyszewski, 1957)
Comments- Contra Huene (1932), Sauvage (1882) did not designate the teeth described in 1876 as a holotype. Thus, Erectopus superbus can be based on diagnostic material. Allain (2005) designated the partial maxilla as the lectotype. Contrary to Huene (1932), the teeth are comparable in size to those preserved in the maxilla associated with postcrania. Thus his separation of the postcrania as Erectopus sauvagei is uneccessary and misleading, as Sauvage originally used the postcrania as the basis of E. superbus, waiting until more than teeth were known to erect the taxon. The material may not belong to one specimen, since a much larger distal femur was found in the same area.
Huene (1926) reidentified several elements from Sauvage’s (1882) description. The clavicle, and metacarpals are a scapula and distal radius and ulna respectively. However, it seems the scapular identification is in error, and the element is actually an ilium (Chure, 2000). The pedal phalanx II-1 included in the holotype by Huene (1926), comes from a different locality is excluded from the specimen (Chure, 2000). Allain (2005) reidentified the posterior mandible as an anterior maxilla.
Huene (1926) referred two teeth also from Meuse, France previously described by Sauvage (1876), and a tooth from an unnamed formation (Valanginian-Barremian) previously described by Simionescu (1913) to the species. These and tooth fragments referred by Lapparent and Zbyszewski (1957) are probably not referrable to the same species, which is probably indeterminate in any case. A referred distal femur from Gault Boulogne-sur-Mer is crocodilian.
Allain (2002) found Erectopus to emerge as a carnosaur in an unpublished phylogenetic analysis, which was also the conclusion of his 2005 redescription of the material.
References- Sauvage, 1876. Notes sur les reptiles fossiles. Bull. Soc. Geol. France (ser. 3)4: 435-442.
Sauvage, 1882. Recherches sur les reptiles trouves dans le Gault de l'est du bassin de Parts. Mem. Soc. Geol. France (ser. 3)2:1-42.
Simionescu, 1913. Megalosaurus aus der Unterkreide der Dobrogea. Chi. Min. Geol. Palaeontol. 1913: 686-687.
Huene, 1923. Carnivorous Saurischia in Europe since the Triassic. Bull. Geol. Soc. Am. 34: 449-458.
Huene, 1926. The carnivorous Saurischia in the Jura and Cretaceous formations, principally in Europe. Revista Museo de La Plata, 29, 35-167.
Huene, 1932. Die fossile Reptil-Ordnung Saurischia, ihre Entwicklung und Geschichte. Monog. Geol. Pal. 4 (1) pts. 1 and 2, viii + 361 pp.
Lapparent and Zbyszewski, 1957. Les Dinosauriens dual: Services Geologiques du Portugal, Memoire n. 2, new series, p. 1-63.
Chure, 2000. A new species of Allosaurus from the Morrison Formation of Dinosaur National Monument (Utah-Colorado) and a revision of the theropod family Allosauridae. Ph.D. dissertation, Columbia University, 1-964.
Allain, 2002. The phylogenetic relationships of Megalosauridae within basal tetanurine theropods (Dinosauria). JVP, 22(3) 31A.
Allain, 2005. The enigmatic theropod dinosaur Erectopus superbus (Sauvage, 1882) from the Lower Albian of Louppy-le-Ch'teau (Meuse, France). In Carpenter (ed.). The Carnivorous Dinosaurs. Indiana University Press. 72-86.
E? sp. indet. (Stromer, 1934)
Early Cenomanian, Late Cretaceous
Baharija Formation, Egypt
Material- (IPHG 1912 VIII 78) tibia
(IPHG 1912 VIII 85) femur (800 mm)
(IPHG 1912 VIII 190) (juvenile) femur
Reference- Stromer, 1934. Ergebnisse der Forschungsreisen Prof. E. Stromers in den Wüsten Ägyptens. II. Wirbeltierreste der Baharîje-Stufe (unterstes Cenoman). 13. Dinosauria. Abh. Bayer. Akad. Wiss., Math.-Nat. Abt., (n. s.) 22 1-79, 3 pls.

Gasosaurus Dong and Tang, 1985
G. constructus Dong and Tang, 1985
Bathonian-Callovian, Middle Jurassic
Xiashaximiao Formation, Sichuan, China
Holotype- (IVPP V7264) four cervical vertebrae, seven dorsal vertebrae, (sacrum 279 mm) first sacral vertebra (68 mm), second sacral vertebra (59 mm), third sacral vertebra (41 mm), fourth sacral vertebra (52 mm), fifth sacral vertebra (63 mm), seven caudal vertebrae, humerus (237 mm), ilium (369 mm), pubis (332 mm), ischium (338 mm), femur (425 mm), tibia (370 mm), fibula, metatarsal II, metatarsal III
Paratype- ?(IVPP V7265) three teeth
Referred- material (Holtz, 2000)
Comments- Traditionally associated with megalosauroids, Holtz (2000) recently found it to be a basal coelurosaur in his analyses. This was based on the upturned femoral head, anterior trochanter cleft from the head, and proximal fibula being >75% the proximal tibial width. However, he also indicated new undescribed specimens suggest Gasosaurus is a carnosaur, perhaps a sinraptorid (Currie pers. comm. 1998 to Holtz). It is provisionally placed in that position here pending restudy.
References- Dong and Tang, 1985. A new Mid-Jurasic theropod (Gasosaurus constructus gen et sp. nov.) from Dashanpu, Zigong, Sichuan Province, China. Vertebrata PalAsiatica. 23(1), 77-82.
Holtz, 2000. A new phylogeny of the carnivorous dinosaurs. Gaia 15. 5-61.

Lourinhanosaurus Mateus, 1998
L. antunesi Mateus, 1998
Early Tithonian, Late Jurassic
Sobral Unit of Lourinha Formation, Portugal
Holotype- (ML 370) (4 m) cervical vertebrae, dorsal vertebrae, sacral vertebrae, caudal vertebrae, chevrons, ilia, partial pubes, partial ischia, partial femora, tibia, fibula, proximal metatarsal, 32 gastroliths
Referred- (ML 555) femur (Antunes and Mateus, 2003)
(ML 565) adult teeth, more than 200 embryonic elements including skull and jaw elements, four teeth, vertebrae, scapulae, femora, tibiae and metatarsi, more than 180 eggs, nests (Mateus and Mateus, 1997)
distal caudal vertebra (Mateus, pers. comm, 2002)
Comments- The specimen had 32 gastroliths and the enveloping sediment preserved the negative imprint of 3 additional gastroliths. The maximum observed gastrolith length is 22 millimetres. Near the pebbles there were three small bone fragments that seem to be food remains. The gastroliths have been found in the rib cage below the eleventh dorsal vertebra. The high number, concentration and relative size of the gastroliths suggest that they belong to this specimen, and that they had not been swallowed when eating other dinosaur's stomach. Mateus (pers. comm., 2002) refers one distal caudal previously referred to Megalosaurus insignis (Lapparent and Zbyszewski, 1957) to Lourinhanosaurus.
References- Lapparent and Zbyszewski, 1957. Les dinosauriens du Portugal. Mémoires du Service géologique du Portugal, 2:1-63.
Mateus and Mateus, 1997. Eggs, nest and embryos of theropod dinosaur in Upper Jurassic level of Lourinha, Portugal. Documents of the International Conference Dinosaurs in Mediterranean. Tunis 30.
Mateus, Mateus, Antunes, Mateus, Taquet, Ribeiro and Manuppella, 1997. Couvee, oeufs et embryons d'un Dinosaure Theropode du Jurassique de Lourinha (Portugal). C.R Acad. Sci. Paris, Sciences de la terre et des planètes, 325: 71-78.
Mateus, 1998. Lourinhanosaurus antunesi, a new Upper Jurassic Allosauroid (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from Lourinhã (Portugal). Memórias da Academia de Ciências de Lisboa. 37: 111-124.
Mateus, Mateus, Antunes, Mateus, Taquet, Ribeiro and Manuppella, 1998. Upper Jurassic theropod dinosaur embryos from Lourinhã (Portugal). Memórias da Academia de Ciências de Lisboa. 37: 101-110.
Mateus, Taquet, Antunes, Mateus and Ribeiro, 1998. Theropod dinosaur nest from Lourinha, Portugal. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 18(3) 61A.
Mateus, Antunes and Taquet, 2001. Dinosaur ontogeny: The case of Lourinhanosaurus (Late Jurassic, Portugal). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 21 (Suppl. 3): 78A.
Ricqles, Mateus, Antunes and Taquet, 2001. Histomorphogenesis of embryos of Upper Jurassic Theropods from Lourinhã (Portugal). Comptes rendus de l'Académie des sciences - Série IIa - Sciences de la Terre et des planètes. 332(10): 647-656.
Antunes and Mateus, 2003. Dinosaurs of Portugal. Comptes Rendus Palevol 2, Systematic Paleontology: 77–95.

Monolophosauridae Bakker, 1997
Monolophosaurus
Zhao and Currie, 1994
= "Jiangjunmiaosaurus" anonymous, 1987
M. jiangi Zhao and Currie, 1994
= "Monolophosaurus jiangjunmiaoi" Dong, 1992
= "Monolophosaurus dongi" Grady, 1993
Bathonian-Callovian, Middle Jurassic
Wucaiwan Formation, China
Holotype- (IVPP 84019) (5.71 m) skull (670 mm), mandible, atlas, axis (61.8 mm), third cervical vertebra (67.1 mm), fourth cervical vertebra (69.3 mm), fifth cervical vertebra (70.6 mm), sixth cervical vertebra (69.6 mm), seventh cervical vertebra (67.8 mm), eighth cervical vertebra (72.3 mm), ninth cervical vertebra (68.4 mm), tenth cervical vertebra (67.3 mm), most cervical ribs, (dorsal series 942.3 mm) first dorsal vertebra (60 mm), second dorsal vertebra (60.6 mm), third dorsal vertebra (60.9 mm), fourth dorsal vertebra (65.5 mm), fifth dorsal vertebra (70 mm), sixth dorsal vertebra (71.2 mm), seventh dorsal vertebra (74 mm), eighth dorsal vertebra (79.6 mm), ninth dorsal vertebra (79.5 mm), tenth dorsal vertebra (78.8 mm), eleventh dorsal vertebra (80.9 mm), twelfth dorsal vertebra (81.5 mm), thirteenth dorsal vertebra (79.8 mm), dorsal ribs 1-13, (sacrum 367.2 mm), first sacral vertebra (82.8 mm), second sacral vertebra (75.4 mm), third sacral vertebra (67.4 mm), fourth sacral vertebra (69.5 mm), fifth sacral vertebra (72.1 mm), first caudal vertebra (78 mm), second caudal vertebra (76.1 mm), third caudal vertebra (74.2 mm), fourth caudal vertebra (74.9 mm), fifth caudal vertebra (78.7 mm), sixth caudal vertebra (78.5 mm), ilia (498 mm), pubes (495 mm), ischia (390 mm)
Diagnosis- (after Rauhut, 2000) large midline crest on skull, formed by the premaxillae, nasals, lacrimals and anterior ends of the frontals.
References- Dong, 1992. Dinosaurian Fauna's of China. 188 pp. Ocean press/ Springer-Verlag, Beijing/Berlin.
Grady, 1993. The Dinosaur Project, pp. 261. McFarlane, Ross & Walters, Toronto.
Zhao and Currie, 1994. A large crested theropod from the Jurassic of Xinjiang, People's Republic of China. Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences 30: 2027-2036.
Rauhut, 2000. The interrelationships and evolution of basal theropods (Dinosauria, Saurischia). Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. Bristol [U.K.], 1-440.

unnamed clade
Diagnosis- (after Azuma and Currie, 2000) differs from Allosaurus in- distinct vertical ridge marking the medial margin of the fibular contact with the ascending process; deeper upper horizontal groove with a sharper anterior edge above the condyles; shallower lower groove across the condyles; stronger crescentic groove on the posterior surface of the ascending process.
(after Holtz et al., 2004) dorsal pleurocoels absent.
Comments- Although Fukuiraptor and "Allosaurus" "robustus" seem to be extremely similar, Siamotyrannus is only tentatively placed as their relative based on Holtz et al. (2004).

"Allosaurus" "robustus" Chure, 2000 vide Glut, 2003
Early Aptian, Early Cretaceous
Wonthoggi Formation of Strzelecki Group, Victoria, Australia
Material- (NMV Pl50070) (~6 m) astragalus
Comments- Chure (2000) is the first person to publish the name Allosaurus "robustus", previously confined to a museum label. He goes into depth regarding the supposed Allosaurus synapomorphies given by Molnar et al. (1981, 1985). The fibular facet on the ascending process is found in Torvosaurus and coelurosaurs too. The presence of an inflection in the ascending process' medial margin cannot be determined with certainty. Similarly, the calcanear notch would be higher up if present and not confluent with the lower horizontal groove. The upper horizontal grrove extending across the base of the ascending process is also found in Elaphrosaurus, Afrovenator, Poekilopleuron, "Szechuanoraptor" zigongensis, sinraptorids, Deltadromeus and several other neotheropods. Chure notes it differs from Allosaurus in having a more parallel-sided ascending process, lacking a thickened medial edge on that process, having a vertical groove running up the caudal face of the ascending process, lacking a circular pit at the caudal base of the acsending process, having a weaker lower horizontal groove, having a sharper anterior edge on the upper horizontal groove, and lacking an extensive cranial depression on the ascending process. He refers it to the Avetheropoda.
I agree with Azuma and Currie (2000) that this astragalus is most similar to Fukuiraptor, which shares the characters listed above. However, in Fuikuiraptor, the ascending process extends further medially, has a sharper ventrolateral corner, and is narrower posteroventrally. "Allosaurus" "robustus" seems to be a valid taxon of basal carnosaur.
Names in theses aren't usually listed in this website, and this one is only because it was later published by Glut (2003). Glut's work includes a caveat to the effect that it is not available to establish new taxonomy however, so the name remains unofficial.
References- Molnar, Flannery and Rich, 1981. An allosaurid theropod dinosaur from the early Cretaceous of Victoria, Australia. Alcheringa 5 p. 141-146.
Welles, 1983. Allosaurus (Saurischia, Theropoda) not yet in Australia. Journal of Paleontology. 57 196
Molnar, Flannery and Rich, 1985. Aussie Allosaurus after all. Journal of Paleontology. 59 1511-1513
Chure, 1998. A reassessment of the Australian Allosaurus and its implications for the Australian refugium concept. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 18(suppl. 3): 34A.
Chure, 2000. A new species of Allosaurus from the Morrison Formation of Dinosaur National Monument (Utah-Colorado) and a revision of the theropod family Allosauridae. Ph.D. dissertation, Columbia University, 1-964.
Glut, 2003. Dinosaurs - The Encyclopedia - Supplement 3. McFarland Press, Jefferson, NC.

Fukuiraptor Azuma and Currie, 2000
F. kitadaniensis Azuma and Currie, 2000
Albian, Early Cretaceous
Kitadani Formation of the Akaiwa Subgroup of the Tetori Group, Japan
Holotype- (FPDM 97122, 96082443) (~4.2 m) (subadult) two maxillary fragments, two dentary fragments, premaxillary tooth (>17 mm), four maxillary teeth (12.6->37 mm), three dentary teeth (18.5-34 mm), five teeth, cervical centrum, dorsal centrum, dorsal neural arch, distal caudal vertebra, coracoid, humeri, ulna, manual ungual I, phalanx II-2, manual ungual II, pubes, ischia, femur (507 mm), proximal tibia, distal fibula, astragalus, metatarsal I, phalanx I-1, metatarsal II, metatarsal III, phalanx III-1, phalanx III-2, phalanx IV-2
Referred- (FPDM-V96080810) maxillary tooth (50 mm) (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
(FPDM-V96081134) tooth (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
?(FPDM-V970730003) (~1.10 m) (juvenile) incomplete femur (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
(FPDM-V97080208) maxillary tooth (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
?(FPDM-V97080937) (~1.10 m) (juvenile) femur (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
?(FPDM-V9708102884) partial femur (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
(FPDM-V97081128) dentary tooth (33.4 mm)(Currie and Azuma, 2006)
(FPDM-V97081201) (~1.71 m) (juvenile) femur (196 mm) (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
(FPDM-V970813046) (~925 mm) (juvenile) femur (116.3 mm) (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
?(FPDM-V97081330) (~1.08 m) (juvenile) femur (134.9 mm) (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
(FPDM-V970821039) (~978 mm) (juvenile) femur (122.7 mm) (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
(FPDM-V97082330) maxillary tooth (17 mm) (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
(FPDM-V97082367) maxillary tooth (?23 mm) (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
?(FPDM-V97082553) humerus (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
(FPDM-V97082574) maxillary tooth (33 mm) (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
(FPDM-V97082728) maxillary tooth (>41 mm) (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
?(FPDM-V97120001) (~1.10 m) (juvenile) proximal femur (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
(FPDM-V97122BNA3) (~1.65 m) (juvenile) femur (200 mm) (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
(FPDM-V97122BNA12) (~2.02 m) (juvenile) femur (244 mm) (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
(FPDM-V9712229) maxillary fragment, tooth (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
(FPDM-V980721002) dentary tooth (18 mm) (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
(FPDM-V98072302) (~1.07 m) (juvenile) femur (134.2 mm) (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
(FPDM-V980724112) dentary tooth (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
(FPDM-V980801101) tooth (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
(FPDM-V980803001) premaxillary tooth (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
(FPDM-V980803120) maxillary tooth (>24 mm) (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
(FPDM-V980803123) tooth (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
(FPDM-V980804135) maxillary tooth (>17.6 mm) (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
(FPDM-V980804144) tooth (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
(FPDM-V980805018) (~735 mm) (juvenile) femur (92.2 mm) (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
(FPDM-V980805101) maxillary tooth (>33 mm) (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
(FPDM-V980806009) tooth (>27 mm) (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
(FPDM-V980810141) maxillary tooth (34 mm) (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
?(FPDM-V98081028) (~1.19 m) (juvenile) partial femur (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
(FPDM-V980813008) maxillary tooth (23 mm) (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
?(FPDM-V980813017) (~1.05 m) (juvenile) femur (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
(FPDM-V980815020) dentary tooth (>27.5 mm) (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
(FPDM-V980815176) dentary tooth (>25 mm) (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
(FPDM-V98081540) maxillary tooth (54.8 mm) (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
(FPDM-V980819055) maxillary tooth (>32 mm) (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
(FPDM-V980819173) tooth (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
(FPDM-V981200001) dentary tooth (>39 mm) (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
?(FPDM-V98120001) (~1.19 m) (juvenile) partial femur (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
?(FPDM-V98120002) (~1.42 m) (juvenile) partial femur (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
(FPDM-V981200012) dentary tooth (6 mm) (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
?(FPDM-V9812638) (~1.07 m) (juvenile) partial femur (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
?(FPDM-V99090901) (~1.02 m) (juvenile) distal femur (Currie and Azuma, 2006)
Diagnosis- (modified from Azuma and Currie, 2000) narrow dentary; teeth with oblique blood grooves; ratio of ulna to humerus is 0.92; relatively larger hands with better developed unguals than Allosaurus.
Comments- The supposed ilium is more probably a Fukuisaurus pubis (Jansma, pers. comm. 2004).
Most of the elements listed under 'holotype' were found associated in one small area of the Kitadani quarry. The left humerus was given the separate call number FPMN 96082443. A maxillary fragment, a dentary fragment, nine teeth, the cervical centrum, the dorsal neural arch and the coracoid were found in the same level, but in different areas of the quarry. They are all the right size to belong to the holotype, but this can not be proven. The posterior maxillary fragment figured in Azuma and Currie (2000) is actually a referred specimen (FPDM-V9712229) (Currie and Azuma, 2006). At least fourteen individuals are preserved in the type quarry, based on femoral number. The more similar-sized pairs of femora possibly belong to single individuals (99090901 and 980813017; 9812638 and 97080937; 970730003 and 97120001; 98081028 and 98120001). The provisionally referred femora are similar to Fukuiraptor and not obviously coelurosaurian. Several other specimens (humerus, manual phalanx I-1, three manual unguals, three tibiae, pedal phalanx III-2) were found in the quarry. Some are not referrable to Fukuiraptor (a straight manual ungual and humerus), but others may be.
References- Azuma and Currie, 1995. A new giant dromaeosaurid from Japan. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 15(3) 17A.
Azuma and Currie, 2000. A new carnosaur (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Lower Cretaceous of Japan. Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences 37 (12): 1735-1753.
Currie and Azuma, 2006. New specimens, including a growth series of Fukuiraptor (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from the Lower Cretaceous Kitadani Quarry of Japan. J. Paleont. Soc. Korea. 22(1), 173-193.
F. sp. indet. (Chure, Manabe, Tanimoto and Tomida, 1999)
Late Cenomanian-Early Turonian, Late Cretaceous
Jobu Formation of Mifune Group, Japan
Material- (MDM 341) tooth (53 mm)
Comments- Originally referred to Carcharodontosauridae due to its enamel wrinkles, these are shared by Fukuiraptor, which is similarly known from Japan. Currie and Azuma (2006) found the width/FABL ratio and posterior serration size matched Fukuiraptor more closely than carcharodontosaurids.
Reference- Chure, Manabe, Tanimoto and Tomida, 1999. An Unusual Theropod Tooth from the Mifune Group (Late Cenomanian to Early Turonian), Kumamoto, Japan. in Tomida, Rich, and Vickers-Rich, eds., Proceedings of the Second Gondwanan Dinosaur Symposium. National Science Museum (Tokyo) Monographs, No. 15, pp. 291-296.
Currie and Azuma, 2006. New specimens, including a growth series of Fukuiraptor (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from the Lower Cretaceous Kitadani Quarry of Japan. J. Paleont. Soc. Korea. 22(1), 173-193.

Siamotyrannus Buffetaut, Suteethorn and Tong, 1996
S. isanensis Buffetaut, Suteethorn and Tong, 1996
Berraisian-Barremian, Early Cretaceous
Sao Khua Formation, Thailand
Holotype- (PW9-1) five dorsal vertebrae, sacrum, caudal vertebrae 1-13, several chevrons, ilium (820 mm), pubis, ischium
Referred- ? teeth, tibia (Buffetaut and Suteethorn, 1998)
Comments- Although originally assigned to the Tyrannosauroidea (Buffetaut et al., 1996), Pharris (DML, 1997), Rauhut (2000) and Holtz et al. (2004) determined it is carnosaurian.
Rauhut argues against the assignment of Siamotyrannus to the Tyrannosauroidea because the structure in the figure is not a medioventral shelf on the ilium, that other theropods have vertical lateral ilial ridges and proximolateral ischial scars, and that the pubic foot is broken posteriorly, so its length cannot be determined. However, he fails to mention the narrow second and third sacral centra, well-marked insertion of the transverse process of sacral 1 on the ilium and other minor characters cited by Buffetaut et al.. It grouped with allosauroids in his preliminary analysis, before it was excluded to limit the number of MPT's.
References- Buffetaut, Suteethorn and Tong, 1996. The earliest known tyrannosaur from the Lower Cretaceous of Thailand. Nature 381(6584): 689-691.
http://dml.cmnh.org/1997Jun/msg00271.html
Buffetaut and Suteethorn, 1998. Early Cretaceous dinosaurs from Thailand and their bearing on the early evolution and biogeographical history of some groups of Cretaceous dinosaurs. in Lucas, Kirkland and Estep, eds.. Lower and Middle Cretaceous Terrestrial Ecosystems. New Mexico Museum of Natural History Bulletin 14.
Rauhut, 2000. The interrelationships and evolution of basal theropods (Dinosauria, Saurischia). Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. Bristol [U.K.], 1-440.
Holtz, Molnar and Currie, 2004. Basal Tetanurae. In Weishampel, Dodson and Osmolska. The Dinosauria Second Edition. University of California Press. 861 pp.

Allosauroidea
Marsh, 1878 vide Currie and Zhao, 1994
Definition-
(Allosaurus fragilis + Sinraptor dongi) (Holtz et al., 2004; modified from Padian and Hutchinson, 1997)
Other definitions- (Allosaurus fragilis <- Passer domesticus) (Sereno, 2005; modified from Sereno, 1998)

unnamed allosauroid (Naish, 2003)
Valanginian, Early Cretaceous
Hastings Group, England
Material- (HASMG G.378; = HASTM GG98 of Benton and Spencer, 1995) proximal tibia (~550 mm)
Comments- This specimen differs from Neovenator, though it resembles the latter and Allosaurus more than Fukuraptor or Sinraptor. It may be referrable to Becklespinax.
References- Benton and Spencer, 1995. Fossil Reptiles of Great Britain. Chapman & Hall, London.
Naish, 2003. A definitive allosauroid (Dinosauria; Theropoda) from the Lower Cretaceous of East Sussex. Proceedings of the Geologists' Association. 114, 319-326.

unnamed possible allosauroid (Canudo et al., 2005)
Late Tithonian-Middle Berriasian, Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous
Villar del Arzobispo Formation, Spain
Material- (IPS-G1) tooth (82.74 mm)
References- Canudo, Aurell, Barco, Cuenca-Bescós, and Ruiz-Omeñaca, 2005. The dinosaurs of the Villar del Arzobispo Formation (middle Tithonian–lower Berriasian) in Galve (Teruel). Geogaceta. 38: 39-42.
Canudo, Ruiz-Omenaca, Aurell, Barco and Cuenca-Bescos, 2006. A megatheropod tooth from the late Tithonian - middle Berriasian (Jurassic-Cretaceous transition) of Galve (Aragon, NE Spain). N. Jb. Geol. Palaont. Abh. 239 (1), 77- 99.

unnamed possible allosauroid (Infante, Canudo, and Ruiz-Omenaca, 2005)
Early Barremian, Early Cretaceous
Mirambel Formation, Spain
Material- (LAD4r-1) tooth (~22 mm)
Reference- Infante, Canudo, and Ruiz-Omeñaca, 2005. First evidence of theropod dinosaurs in the Mirambel Formation (lower Barremian, Lower Cretaceous) in Castellote, Teruel. Geogaceta. 38:31-34.

unnamed possible allosauroid (Ruiz-Omenaca, Canudo and Infante, 2005)
Early Barremian, Early Cretaceous
Camarillas Formation, Spain
Material- (MPZ2005/316-317) teeth
Reference- Ruiz-Omenaca, Canudo and Infante, 2005. Presencia de un posible Alosaurido (Dinosauria: Theropoda) en el Cretacico inferior (Barremiense Inferior) de la Maca 3, (Galve, eruel): XXI Jornadas de la Sociedad Espanola de Paleontologia, p. 117-118.

Becklespinax Olshevsky, 1991
B. altispinax (Paul, 1988) Olshevsky, 1991
= Acrocanthasaurus altispinax Paul 1988
= Altispinax altispinax (Rauhut, 2003) Paul, 1988
= Altispinax "lydekkerhueneorum" Pickering, 1984 vide Pickering, 1995
Barremian, Early Cretaceous
Upper Weald Clay, England
Holotype- (BMNH R1828) eighth dorsal vertebra, ninth dorsal vertebra, tenth dorsal vertebra
Comments- Naish (DML, 2004) notes he found Becklespinax to be an allosauroid in his unpublished thesis. This is provisionally accepted here.
Huene (1923) stated that if the dorsal vertebrae (BMNH R1828; later made the holotype of Becklespinax altispinax) were shown to belong to Megalosaurus dunkeri, it would be renamed Altispinax. Kuhn (1939) was the first author to definitively tie a species to the genus, making Altispinax dunkeri official. The conditional nature of Huene's (1923) statement prevents it from attaching the name Altispinax to the vertebrae by ICZN rules (contra Rauhut, 2000).
Pickering (1995) attempted to make BMNH R1828 the lectotype of Altispinax "lydekkerhueneorum", which included as paratypes the holotype of Valdoraptor oweni and several additional specimens (BMNH R604, 604a-b, 604d). However, the species altispinax and oweni have priority (Pickering incorrectly considered them nomina rejecta, which cannot occur without an ICZN decision), and there is no evidence these specimens are conspecific. This makes Pickering's species (which is a nomen nudum in any case) an objective junior synonym of Becklespinax altispinax.
References- Huene, 1923. Carnivorous Saurischia in Europe since the Triassic. Bulletin of the Geological Society of America. 34: 449-458.
Kuhn, 1939. Beitrage zur Keuperfauna von Halberstadt. Palaeontol. Z. 2: 258-286.
Paul, 1988. Predatory Dinosaurs of the World. Simon & Schuster, New York.
Olshevsky, 1991."A Revision of the Parainfraclass Archosauria Cope, 1869, Excluding the Advanced Crocodylia," Mesozoic Meanderings #2 (1st printing): iv + 196 pp.
Pickering, 1995. "Jurassic Park: Unauthorized Jewish Fractals in Philopatry," A Fractal Scaling in Dinosaurology Project, 2nd revised printing, Capitola, California: 478 pp. [January 27, 1995].
Rauhut, 2000. The interrelationships and evolution of basal theropods (Dinosauria, Saurischia). Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. Bristol [U.K.], 1-440.
http://dml.cmnh.org/2002Jan/msg00247.html
http://dml.cmnh.org/2004Dec/msg00086.html

Megaraptor Novas, 1998
= "Megaraptor" Shreeve, 1997
Diagnosis- (after Calvo et al., 2004) manual unguals I and II enlarged and highly transversely compressed.
M. namunhuaiquii Novas, 1998
= "Megaraptor namuhualquii" Shreeve, 1997
Late Turonian-Early Coniacian, Late Cretaceous
Portezuelo Formation of Rio Neuquen Subgroup, Argentina

Holotype- (MCF-PVPH 79) ulna (332 mm), phalanx I-1 (188 mm), manual ungual I (339 mm), distal metatarsal III (~375 mm)
Referred- (MUCPv 341) cervical vertebra, two proximal caudal vertebrae, three chevrons, incomplete scapula, coracoid, radius, ulna, semilunate carpal, ulnare, metacarpal I (106 mm), phalanx I-1 (182 mm), manual ungual I (350 mm), metacarpal II (170 mm), phalanx II-1 (108 mm), phalanx II-2 (104 mm), manual ungual II (235 mm), metacarpal III (119 mm), phalanx III-1 (56 m), phalanx III-2 (41 mm), phalanx III-3 (56 mm), manual ungual III (65 mm), metacarpal IV (4 mm), pubis (480 mm), metatarsal IV (Calvo et al., 2004)
?(MUCPv 381, 384, 386, 387, 391) ten teeth (Veralli and Calvo, 2004)
Diagnosis- (after Novas, 1998; Lamanna, 2004; Calvo et al., 2004) cervical vertebrae with elongate elliptical pleurocoels; blade-like olecranon process; ulna stout and triangular in distal view; manual phalanx I-1 subquadrangular in proximal view, with dorsal portion wider than ventral portion; proximodorsal depression on manual ungual I absent; lateral vascular groove in manual ungual III absent; metatarsal III with deep and wide extensor ligament pit; distal end of metatarsal IV narrower than shaft.
Comments- Originally thought to have an enlarged hyperextensible pedal ungual II, a new specimen (Calvo et al., 2002) shows this is actually manual ungual I. This specimen indicates Megaraptor is more basal than the deinonychosaurs it was previously allied with. In particular, it preserves opisthocoelous cervical vertebrae and four metacarpals. The caudal centra are pleurocoelous, perhaps indicating carcharodontosaurid affinities. The numerous carcharodontosaurid teeth at the same locality may therefore belong to Megaraptor.
References- Novas, 1998. Megaraptor namunhuaiquii, gen. et sp. nov., a large-clawed, Late Cretaceous theropod from Patagonia. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 18(1): 4-9.
Calvo, Porfiri, Veralli and Novas, 2002. Megaraptor namunhuaiquii (Novas, 1998), a new light about its phylogenetic relationships. Primer Congreso latinoamericano de Paleontología de Vertebrados. Santiago de Chile, Octubre del 2002. p.20.
Veralli and Calvo, 2003. New findings of carcharodontosauid teeth on Futalognko quarry (Upper Turonian), north Barreales Lake, Neuquén, Argentina. Ameghiniana. 40(4, suppl.):74R.
Calvo, Porfiri, Veralli, Novas and Pobletei, 2004. Phylogenetic status of Megaraptor namunhuaiquii Novas based on a new specimen from Neuquén, Patagonia, Argentina. Ameghiniana (Rev. Asoc. Paleontol. Argent.) - 41 (4): 565-575.
Lamanna, 2004. Late Cretaceous dinosaurs and crocodiliforms from Egypt and Argentina. PhD Thesis. University of Pennsylvania. 305 pp.
Veralli and Calvo, 2004. Dientes de terópodos carcharodontosáuridos del Turoniano superior-Coniaciano inferior del Neuquén, Patagonia, Argentina. Ameghiniana. 41(4):587-590.
M. sp. nov. (Martinez et al., 1999)
Middle Cenomanian-Turonian, Late Cretaceous
Lower Member of Bajo Barreal Formation, Argentina

Material- (UNPSJB-PV 944) (subadult) first dorsal vertebra (~64 mm), two dorsal ribs, three incomplete mid caudal vertebrae, partial manual ungual I (~294 mm), phalanx II-2, manual ungual II fragment, partial manual ungual III, femoral fragment, fibular fragment, distal metatarsal II, two fragmentary pedal phalanges
(UNPSJB-PV 958) manual ungual I (~370 mm), manual ungual III, fragmentary femur, fragmentary tibia, incomplete fibula, distal metatarsal I, metatarsal II (~280 mm), incomplete phalanx II-1, phalanx II-2 (~62 mm), phalanx III-2 (~71 mm), two fragmentary pedal phalanges, fragments
Diagnosis- proximodorsal depression on manual ungual I; lateral vascular groove in manual ungual III well defined.
Reference- Martinez, Lamanna, Smith, Casal and Luna, 1999. New Cretaceous theropod material from Patagonia. JVP 19(3) 62A.
Lamanna, 2004. Late Cretaceous dinosaurs and crocodiliforms from Egypt and Argentina. PhD Thesis. University of Pennsylvania. 305 pp.

Sigilmassasauridae Russell, 1996
Sigilmassasaurus Russell, 1996
Diagnosis- large cervicodorsal hypapophyses; cervicodorsal centra >150% wider than tall.
Comments- Russell (1996) suggested Stromer's (1934) Spinosaurus B was referrable to his new genus Sigilmassasaurus. Sereno et al. (1996) later referred the specimen of Spinosaurus B and the material of Sigilmassasaurus to Carcharodontosaurus, based on the supposedly broad cervical vertebra found with the holotype. However, the latter centrum is only 118% broader than tall anteriorly, while Sigilmassasaurus' is 196% and Spinosaurus B's is 176%. The cervical referred to Carcharodontosaurus by Russell (1996) resembles the holotype more, having a ratio of 116%. The cervical (SGM-Din 3) referred to Carcharodontosaurus by Sereno et al. has a ratio of 170%, and is more likely that of Sigilmassasaurus. While positional variation is possible, other carcharodontosaurids lack vertebrae resembling the Sigilmassasaurus morphotype, leading me to concur with Novas et al. (2005) that Spinosaurus B and SGM-Din 3 belong to Sigilmassasaurus, which is not a junior synonym of Carcharodontosaurus.
References- Stromer, 1934. Ergebnisse der Forschungsreisen Prof. E. Stromers in den Wüsten Ägyptens. II. Wirbeltierreste der Baharîje-Stufe (unterstes Cenoman). 13. Dinosauria. Abh. Bayer. Akad. Wiss., Math.-Nat. Abt., (n. s.) 22 1-79, 3 pls.
Russell, 1996. Isolated dinosaur bones from the Middle Cretaceous of the Tafilalt, Morocco. Bulletin du Muse'um national d'Histoire naturelle (4e se'r.) 18:349-402.
Sereno, Dutheil, Iarochene, Larsson, Lyon, Magwene, Sidor, Varricchio and Wilson, 1996. Predatory Dinosaurs from the Sahara and Late Cretaceous Faunal Differentiation. Science 272(5264): 986-991.
Novas, de Valais, Vickers-Rich and Rich, 2005.A large Cretaceous theropod from Patagonia, Argentina, and the evolution of carcharodontosaurids. Naturwissenschaften.
S. brevicollis Russell, 1996
Cenomanian, Late Cretaceous
Kem Kem Formation, Morocco
Holotype- (CMN 41857) posterior cervical or anterior dorsal vertebra (121 mm)
Paratypes- (CMN 41772) dorsal vertebra (162 mm)
(CMN 41774) posterior cervical vertebra (67 mm)
(CMN 41775) mid caudal vertebra (94 mm)
(CMN 41776) dorsal vertebra (~150 mm)
(CMN 41790) posterior cervical vertebra (~127 mm)
(CMN 41850) anterior dorsal vertebra (152 mm)
(CMN 41851) dorsal vertebra (157 mm)
(CMN 41853) mid caudal vertebra (110 mm)
(CMN 41854) mid caudal vertebra (110 mm)
(CMN 41855) distal caudal vertebra (59 mm)
(CMN 41856) posterior cervical or anterior dorsal vertebra (146 mm)
(CMN 41858) posterior cervical or anterior dorsal vertebra
(CMN 50402) dorsal vertebra
(CMN 50407) dorsal vertebra (98 mm)
(CMN 50428) dorsal vertebra
(CMN 50800) dorsal vertebra (88 mm)
Referred- (SGM-Din 3) cervical vertebra (Sereno et al., 1996)
Diagnosis- (after Russell, 1996) (compared to S. sp nov. 1) broader and more flexed cervicodorsal centra; smaller cervicodorsal pleurocoel with inflated centrum wall dorsal to it; more ventrally projected cervicodorsal parapophyses; broader cervicodorsal hypapophysis; less constricted distal caudal centra; smaller distal caudal neural canal.
References- Russell, 1996. Isolated dinosaur bones from the Middle Cretaceous of the Tafilalt, Morocco. Bulletin du Muse'um national d'Histoire naturelle (4e se'r.) 18:349-402.
Sereno, Dutheil, Iarochene, Larsson, Lyon, Magwene, Sidor, Varricchio and Wilson, 1996. Predatory Dinosaurs from the Sahara and Late Cretaceous Faunal Differentiation. Science 272(5264): 986-991.
S. sp. nov. 1
Barremian-Albian(?), Early Cretaceous
Lower Kem Kem Formation(?), Morocco
Material- (CMN 41629) posterior cervical or anterior dorsal vertebra (150 mm)
?(CMN 41862) distal caudal vertebra (58 mm)
Diagnosis- (after Russell, 1996) (compared to S. brevicollis) narrower and less flexed cervicodorsal centra; larger cervicodorsal pleurocoel with planar centrum wall dorsal to it; more laterally projected cervicodorsal parapophyses; narrower cervicodorsal hypapophysis; more constricted distal caudal centra; larger distal caudal neural canal.
Comments- Russell (1996) suggested CMN 41629 and 41862 could be from a separate species, based on differences from the other Sigilmassasaurus specimens. Positional variation is unlikely, as the parapophyses are at the same level as the S. brevicollis holotype. Ontogenetic variation is similarly unlikely,as they are comparable in size with the holotype. Their dark color may indicate they derive from the base of the Kem Kem Formation, which may make them Early Cretaceous.
Reference- Russell, 1996. Isolated dinosaur bones from the Middle Cretaceous of the Tafilalt, Morocco. Bulletin du Muse'um national d'Histoire naturelle (4e se'r.) 18:349-402.
S. sp. nov. 2
Early Cenomanian, Late Cretaceous
Baharija Formation, Egypt
Material- (IPHG 1922 X45; material of Spinosaurus B) two teeth, anterior cervical centrum (117 mm), cervical vertebra (~140 mm), anterior dorsal centrum (~135 mm), incomplete posterior dorsal vertebra (140 mm), posterior dorsal vertebra (160 mm), partial dorsal rib, two proximal dorsal ribs (?), partial gastralia, mid caudal vertebra (89 mm), distal caudal vertebra (83 mm), five caudal vertebrae (96, 88, 82, 86, >57 mm) (Stromer, 1934)
(IPHG coll.) two ilial fragments, distal femur, tibiae (565, 600 mm), phalanx III-1, two pedal digit IV phalanges, pedal ungual (Stromer, 1934)
Diagnosis- (after Russell, 1996) intermediate between S. brevicollis and S. sp. nov. 1 in - cervicodorsal centrum width; cervicodorsal pleurocoel size; ventrolateral projection of parapophyses; cervicodorsal hypapophysis width. resembles S. brevicollis in having an inflated cervicodorsal centrum dorsal to the pleurocoel. (after Sereno et al., 1996) distal caudal vertebrae with anteroposteriorly compressed neural spines.
Comments- Russell (1996) noted that the Spinosaurus B material was intermediate in cervicodorsal morphology between CMN 41629 and S. brevicollis. It may be the sister taxon of S. brevicollis, or an anagenetic ancestor. Any such speculations based solely on cervicodorsal morphology are tentative of course.
References- Stromer, 1934. Ergebnisse der Forschungsreisen Prof. E. Stromers in den Wüsten Ägyptens. II. Wirbeltierreste der Baharîje-Stufe (unterstes Cenoman). 13. Dinosauria. Abh. Bayer. Akad. Wiss., Math.-Nat. Abt., (n. s.) 22 1-79, 3 pls.
Russell, 1996. Isolated dinosaur bones from the Middle Cretaceous of the Tafilalt, Morocco. Bulletin du Muse'um national d'Histoire naturelle (4e se'r.) 18:349-402.
S? sp. indet. (Medeiros and Schultz, 2002)
Cenomanian, Late Cretaceous
Alcantara Formation of the Itapecuru Group, Brazil
Reference- Medeiros and Schultz, 2002. The dinosaurian fauna of "Laje do Coringa", middle Cretaceous of northeastern Brazil. Arquivos do Museu Nacional, Rio de Janeiro 60(3):155-162.

Sinraptoridae Currie and Zhao, 1994
Definition
- (Sinraptor dongi <- Allosaurus fragilis, Carcharodontosaurus saharicus) (Holtz et al., 2004)
Other definitions- (Sinraptor dongi <- Allosaurus fragilis) (modified from Padian and Hutchinson, 1997)
(Sinraptor dongi <- Allosaurus fragilis, Monolophosaurus jiangi, Cryolophosaurus ellioti, Carcharodontosaurus saharicus) (modified from Sereno, 1998)
(Sinraptor dongi <- Allosaurus fragilis, Carcharodontosaurus saharicus, Passer domesticus) (Sereno, 2005)
= Metriacanthosaurinae Paul, 1988
= Sinraptoridae sensu Padian and Hutchinson, 1997
Definition- (Sinraptor dongi <- Allosaurus fragilis) (modified)
= Sinraptoridae sensu Sereno, 1998
Definition- (Sinraptor dongi <- Allosaurus fragilis, Monolophosaurus jiangi, Cryolophosaurus ellioti, Carcharodontosaurus saharicus) (modified)
= Sinraptoridae sensu Sereno, 2005
Definition- (Sinraptor dongi <- Allosaurus fragilis, Carcharodontosaurus saharicus, Passer domesticus)
Comments- Sereno's (2005) definition differs from Holtz et al.'s (2004) by including Passer as an external specifier, which I view as superfluous, since a (Allosaurus, Carcharodontosaurus (Sinraptor, Passer)) topology has never been advocated. Megalosaurus might be a better choice for a tertiary external specifier, to cover traditional phylogenies prior to 1993.

Metriacanthosaurus Walker, 1964
M. parkeri (Huene, 1923) Walker, 1964
= Megalosaurus parkeri Huene, 1923
= Altispinax parkeri (Huene, 1923) Huene, 1932
Early-Middle Oxfordian, Late Jurassic
Upper Oxford Clay, England
Holotype- (OUM J.12144) three anterior dorsal vertebrae (110 mm), posterior dorsal neural arch, partial posterior dorsal centrum, incomplete first sacral vertebra, second sacral centrum, first caudal vertebra, nine proximal caudal vertebrae, incomplete ilium (~765 mm), distal pubes, incomplete ischia, femora (800 mm), proximal tibia
Referred- ?(BMNH 40517) distal fibula
? maxilla (Bakker et al., 1992)
Diagnosis- (after Rauhut, 2000) dorsal margin of the ilium with a pronounced kink over the posterior part of the acetabulum.
References- Huene, 1923. Carnivorous Saurischia in Europe since the Triassic. Bulletin of the Geological Society of America. 34: 449-458.
Huene, 1932. Die fossile Reptile-Ordnung Saurischia, ihre Entwicklung und Geschichte. Monogr. Geol. Palaeontol. (Pt. I and II, Ser. I) 4, 1-361.
Walker, 1964. Triassic reptiles from the Elgin area: Ornithosuchus and the origin of carnosaurs. Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London B 248, 53-134.
Bakker, Kralis, Siegwarth and Filla, 1992. Edmarka rex, a new, gigantic theropod dinosaur from the Middle Morrison Formation, Late Jurassic of the Como Bluff outcrop region. With comments on the evolution of the chest region and shoulder in theropods and birds, and a discussion of the five cycles of origin and extinction among giant dinosaurian predators: Hunteria, v. 2, n. 9, p. 1-24.
Rauhut, 2000. The interrelationships and evolution of basal theropods (Dinosauria, Saurischia). Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. Bristol [U.K.], 1-440.
M? "reynoldsi" Welles, Powell and Pickering vide Pickering, 1995
Early-Late Bathonian, Middle Jurassic
Chipping Norton Formation, Great Oolite?, England
Material- (BMNH R413) metatarsal III (Lydekker, 1888)
(BMNH R8303) maxilla
(BMNH R8304) anterior dentary
(BMNH R8305) dentary
(BMNH R9665) metatarsal III
(BMNH R9668) ischium
(BMNH R9672) proximal caudal vertebra
(BMNH R9673) proximal caudal vertebra
(BMNH R9674) partial anterior cervical vertebra
(BMNH R9675) mid caudal vertebra
(BMNH R9676) mid caudal vertebra
(BMNH R9677) proximal caudal vertebra
(BMNH R9679) sacrum
(BMNH R9680) sacrum
(GSM 37523) dorsal vertebra
(OUM J.13720) proximal caudal vertebra
(OUM J.29799) proximal caudal vertebra
(OUM J.29800) scapula
(SDM 44.1) maxilla (Reynolds, 1939)
(SDM 44.4) sacrum (Reynolds, 1939)
(SDM 44.5) mid caudal vertebra
(SDM 44.7) distal caudal vertebra
(SDM 44.6) posterior dorsal vertebra (Reynolds, 1939)
(SDM 44.10) dorsal vertebra (Reynolds, 1939)
(SDM 44.14) coracoid (Reynolds, 1939)
(SDM 44.15) coracoid (Reynolds, 1939)
(SDM 44.16) proximal scapula (Reynolds, 1939)
(SDM 44.17) proximal scapula (Reynolds, 1939)
(SDM 44.18) humerus
(SDM 44.19) ilium (Reynolds, 1939)
(SDM 44.20) incomplete ischium
(SDM 44.22) humerus
(SDM 44.24) femur
(SDM 44.25) distal metatarsal IV
Diagnosis- (from Pickering, online 2005) differs from M. parkeri in ilium having a more horizontal crest; the anterior blade is lower; the posterior blade is also lower, but begins much higher above the base of the peduncle, with a much greater area exposed below the spine; the pubic peduncle is longer; the ischial peduncle is much longer, the notch more open.
Comments- Any association between the above specimens is unknown to the author, so referral to the same taxon is provisional, pending details to be published by Pickering. At least some of the above material was originally referred to Megalosaurus bucklandii. The holotype is intended to be SDM 44.19. Also included in Pickering's hypodigm is a femur (SDM 44.24) which was found by Day and Barrett (2004) to be comparable to several other femora originally referred to Megalosaurus bucklandii. These femora may belong to M? "reynoldsi", as might other material currently assigned to M. bucklandii. However, the femora are not referrable to Metriacanthosaurus, since the latter has a strongly sigmoidal femur and sinraptorids have deep extensor grooves, medially oriented heads, and no groove between the lateral condyle and tibiofibular crest. They resemble abelisaurs instead. Pickering has yet to provide any characters which might justify referring any of the above remains to Metriacanthosaurus, and the listed apomorphies are either plesiomorphic, vague or of uncertain quality.
References- Lydekker, 1888. Catalogue of the Fossil Reptilia and Amphibia in the British Museum (Natural History), Cromwell Road, S.W., Part 1. Containing the Orders Ornithosauria, Crocodilia, Dinosauria, Squamata, Rhynchocephalia, and Proterosauria: British Museum of Natural History, London, 309pp.
Reynolds, 1939. A collection of reptile bones from the Oolite near Stow-on-the-Wold, Gloucestershire. Geol. Mag. 76:193-214.
Pickering, 1995. "Jurassic Park: Unauthorized Jewish Fractals in Philopatry," A Fractal Scaling in Dinosaurology Project, 2nd revised printing, Capitola, California: 478 pp. [January 27, 1995].
Day and Barrett, 2004. Material Referred to Megalosaurus (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Middle Jurassic of Stonesfield, Oxfordshire, England: one taxon or two? Proceedings of the Geologists' Association. 115, 359-366.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/paleo_bio_dinosaur_ontology/message/8453

Yangchuanosaurus Dong, Chang, Li, Zhou, 1978
Y. shangyouensis Dong, Chang, Li, Zhou and Chang, 1978
= Yangchuanosaurus magnus Dong, Zhou and Zhang, 1983
= Metriacanthasaurus shangyouensis (Dong, Chang, Li, Zhou, 1978) Paul, 1988
Oxfordian, Late Jurassic
Shangshaximiao Formation, Sichuan, China
Holotype- (CV 00215) (7.9 m, 1.33 tons, subadult) skull (780 mm), mandibles (780 mm), axis (64 mm), third cervical vertebra (78 mm), fourth cervical vertebra (95 mm), fifth cervical vertebra (115 mm), sixth cervical vertebra 118 mm), seventh cervical vertebra (120 mm) eighth cervical vertebra (138 mm), ninth cervical vertebra (114 mm), tenth cervical vertebra (95 mm), fourteen cervical ribs (eighth 500 mm), first dorsal vertebra (120 mm), second dorsal vertebra (120 mm), third dorsal vertebra (120 mm), fourth dorsal vertebra (120 mm), fifth dorsal vertebra (125 mm), sixth dorsal vertebra (130 mm), seventh dorsal vertebra (130 mm), eighth dorsal vertebra (128 mm), ninth dorsal vertebra (130 mm), tenth dorsal vertebra (130 mm), eleventh dorsal vertebra (135 mm), twelfth dorsal vertebra (132 mm), thirteenth dorsal vertebra (133 mm), twenty-four dorsal ribs (100-1080 mm), first sacral vertebra (130 mm), second sacral vertebra (110 mm), third sacral vertebra (91 mm), fourth sacral vertebra (100 mm), fifth sacral vertebra (105 mm), first caudal vertebra (98 mm), second caudal vertebra (102 mm), third caudal vertebra (100 mm), fourth caudal vertebra (96 mm), fifth caudal vertebra (106 mm), sixth caudal vertebra (118 mm), seventh caudal vertebra (108 mm), eighth caudal vertebra (107 mm), ninth caudal vertebra (115 mm), tenth caudal vertebra (110 mm), eleventh caudal vertebra (110 mm), twelfth caudal vertebra (110 mm), twelve chevrons (to 199 mm), distal scapula, fragmentary humerus, ilia, pubes, ischia, femora (850 mm), tibiae (755 mm), fibulae, astragalus, calcaneum, several pedal phalanges(?)
Referred- (Beijing Museum of Natural History coll.) skeleton (Dong, 1988)
(CV 00216; holotype of Yangchuanosaurus magnus) (10.5 m; 3.1 tons) partial skull (1.11 m), mandibles (1.17 m), axis (115 mm), third cervical vertebra, fifth cervical vertebra, sixth cervical vertebra, eighth cervical vertebra, tenth cervical vertebra, first dorsal vertebrae, second dorsal vertebra, sixth dorsal vertebra, eighth dorsal vertebra, tenth dorsal vertebra, twelfth dorsal vertebra, first sacral vertebra (145 mm), second sacral vertebra (135 mm), third sacral vertebra (120 mm), fourth sacral vertebra (111 mm), fifth sacral vertebra (120 mm), first caudal vertebra (130 mm), second caudal vertebra (125 mm), third caudal vertebra (125 mm), fourth caudal vertebra (120 mm), four mid caudal vertebrae, ilium, incomplete ischium, femur (950 mm), pedal phalanx I-1, pedal phalanx III-1
References- Dong, Chang, Li and Zhou, 1978. Note on a new carnosaur Yanchuangosaurus shangyuanensis gen. et sp. nov.) from the Jurassic of Yangchuan District, Szechuan Province: Kexue Tongabao, v. 5, p. 302-304.
Dong, Zhou and Zhang, 1983, The Dinosaurian Remains from Sichuan Basin, China: Palaeontologia Sinica, whole number 162, new series C, n. 23, p. 1-145.
Dong, 1988. Dinosaurs of China. English Ed. (text by A.C. Milner), 114 pp. China Ocean Press, Beijing and British Museum (Natural History), London.
Paul, 1988. Predatory Dinosaurs of the World. Simon & Schuster, New York.

Sinraptor Currie and Zhao, 1994
S. dongi Currie and Zhao, 1994
Bathonian-Oxfordian, Middle Jurassic-Late Jurassic
Shishugou Formation, Xinjiang, China
Holotype- (IVPP 10600) (7.62 m) skull (900 mm), mandible, two ceratobranchials (500 mm), atlas, axis (78 mm), third cervical vertebra (74 mm), fourth cervical vertebra (85 mm), fifth cervical vertebra (80 mm), partial sixth cervical vertebra, partial seventh cervical vertebra, partial eighth cervical vertebra, ninth cervical vertebra (100 mm), tenth cervical vertebra (87 mm), incomplete cervical ribs 2-10, (dorsal series 1426.3 mm) first dorsal vertebra (83.5 mm), second dorsal vertebra (94 mm), third dorsal vertebra (95.5 mm), fourth dorsal vertebra (101.5 mm), fifth dorsal vertebra (110 mm), sixth dorsal vertebra (115 mm), seventh dorsal vertebra (113 mm), eighth dorsal vertebra (118 mm), ninth dorsal vertebra (113 mm), tenth dorsal vertebra (119 mm), eleventh dorsal vertebra (120 mm), twelfth dorsal vertebra (122 mm), thirteenth dorsal vertebra (122 mm), dorsal ribs 1-11, gastralia, first sacral vertebra (108 mm), second sacral centrum (78.5 mm), third sacral centrum (99 mm), fourth sacral centrum (104.5 mm), partial fifth sacral vertebra, fifth sacral rib, first caudal vertebra (77 mm), proximal caudal vertebra (103 mm), proximal caudal vertebra (102.5 mm), proximal caudal vertebra (87.5 mm), proximal caudal vertebra (85 mm), proximal caudal vertebra (95.5 mm), proximal caudal vertebra (110 mm), scapulae (755 mm), sternum, proximal phalanx I-1, metacarpal II (135 mm), phalanx II-2 (87 mm), metacarpal III (122 mm), phalanx III-1 (38 mm), manual ungual III (81 mm), metacarpal IV (57 mm), ilia (682 mm), pubes (700 mm), ischia (650 mm), femora (876 mm), tibiae (776, 769 mm), fibulae (729, 697 mm), astragali, calcanea, distal tarsal III, distal tarsal IV, metatarsal I (90 mm), phalanx I-1 (66 mm), pedal ungual I (66 mm), metatarsal II (360 mm), phalanx II-1 (135 mm), phalanx II-2 (107 mm), pedal ungual II (111 mm), metatarsal III (410 mm), phalanx III-1 (135 mm), phalanx III-2 (98 mm), phalanx III-3 (74 mm), pedal ungual III (90 mm), metatarsal IV (375 mm), phalanx IV-1 (98 mm), phalanx IV-2 (82 mm), phalanx IV-3, pedal ungual IV (86 mm), metatarsal V (65 mm)
Paratype- (IVPP coll.) nine teeth
Referred- skull, cervical vertebrae (Clark et al., 2002)
Diagnosis- (after Currie and Zhao, 1994) longer, lower premaxilla; more numerous and elaborate accessory maxillary fossae; posterior postorbital process with reduced lateral exposure; longer subtemporal bar.
References- Dong, 1992. Dinosaurian Faunas of China. China Ocean Press, Beijing. 1-188.
Currie and Zhao, 1994. A new carnosaur (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from the Jurassic of Xinjiang, People's Republic of China. Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences 30 p. 2037-2081.
Clark, Xu, Forster, Wang and Andres, 2002. New small dinosaurs from the Upper Jurassic Shishugou Formation at Wucaiwan, Xinjiang, China. JVP 22(3) 44A.
S. hepingensis (Gao, 1992) Currie and Zhao, 1994
= Yangchuanosaurus hepingensis Gao, 1992
Oxfordian, Late Jurassic
Shangshaximiao Formation, Sichuan, China
Holotype- (ZDM 0024) (8.84 m) skull (1.04 m), stapes, lower jaws (1 m), teeth (61x28x13 mm), preatlas, atlantal intercentrum, neural arch, odontoid process, axis, cervicals 3-10 (890 mm), cervical ribs, dorsal vertbrae 1-13 (1.55 m), dorsal ribs, gastralium, sacrum, caudal vertebrae 1-35, ten chevrons, scapulae (760, 740 mm), coracoids (250 mm), ilium, pubis, ischium, femur (980 mm)
References- Gao, 1992. Yangchuanosaurus hepingensis, a new species of carnosaur from Zigong, Sichuan. Vertebrata PalAsiatica 30 313-324.
Currie and Zhao, 1994. A new carnosaur (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from the Jurassic of Xinjiang, People's Republic of China. Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences 30 p. 2037-2081.
Gao, 1999. A complete carnosaur skeleton from Zigong, Sichuan. Sichuan Science & Technology Press. Chengdu.

Carcharodontosauridae Stromer, 1931
Definition-
(Carcharodontosaurus saharicus <- Allosaurus fragilis, Sinraptor dongi, Passer domesticus) (Sereno, 2005)
Other definitions- (Carcharodontosaurus saharicus <- Allosaurus fragilis, Sinraptor dongi, Monolophosaurus jiangi, Cryolophosaurus ellioti) (modified from Sereno, 1998)
(Carcharodontosaurus saharicus <- Allosaurus fragilis, Sinraptor dongi) (Holtz et al., 2004)
= Carcharodontosauridae sensu Sereno, 1998
Definition- (Carcharodontosaurus saharicus <- Allosaurus fragilis, Sinraptor dongi, Monolophosaurus jiangi, Cryolophosaurus ellioti) (modified)
= Acrocanthosauridae Molnar, 2001
= Carcharodontosauridae sensu Holtz et al., 2004
Definition- (Carcharodontosaurus saharicus <- Allosaurus fragilis, Sinraptor dongi)
Comments- Sereno's 2005 definition differs from Holtz et al.'s (2004) by including Passer as an external specifier. The only times carcharodontosaurids have been placed in Coelurosauria is when tyrannosaurids were as well (Bakker et al., 1988; Paul, 1988), and they have often been placed closer to tyrannosaurids than to Allosaurus or Passer (Paul, 1988; Kurzanov, 1989; Molnar et al., 1990). So Tyrannosaurus would be a more useful tertiary external specifier than Passer. The remote possibility of a relationship to ceratosaurs (Bonaparte et al., 1990) might suggest Carnotaurus should be used as an additional external specifier.
References- Molnar, 2001. Theropod paleopathology: a literature survey: In: Mesozoic Vertebrate Life, new research inspired by the paleontology of Philip J. Currie, edited by Tanke, D. H., and Carpenter, K., Indiana University Press, p. 337-363.

unnamed carcharodontosaurid (Goodwin et al., 1999)
Tithonian, Late Jurassic
Mugher Mudstone, Ethiopia
Material- (UCMP 170802) partial tooth
(UCMP 172477) tooth fragment
(UCMP 172478) fragmentary tooth
Comments- Referred to cf. Acrocanthosaurus sp. by Goodwin et al. (1999), but this is unlikely given the provenance.
Reference- Goodwin, Clemens, Hutchison, Wood, Zavada, Kemp, Duffin and Schaff, 1999. Mesozoic continental vertebrates with associated palynostratigraphic dates from the northwestern Ethiopian plateau. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 19(4):728-741.

undescribed carcharodontosaurid (Calvo et al., 2004)
Albian, Early Cretaceous
Gorro Frigio Formation, Argentina
Material- (MEF 1157) cervicals, caudals, scapula
Reference- Calvo, Porfiri, Veralli, Novas and Pobletei, 2004. Phylogenetic status of Megaraptor namunhuaiquii Novas based on a new specimen from Neuquén, Patagonia, Argentina. Ameghiniana (Rev. Asoc. Paleontol. Argent.) - 41 (4): 565-575.

undescribed carcharodontosaurid (Alcober, Sereno, Larsson, Martinez and Varricchio, 1998)
Santonian-Early Campanian, Late Cretaceous
Rio Colorado Subgroup, Argentina
Material- partial skeleton including quadrate, vertebrae including axis, gastralia, furcula, ilium, pubis and astragalus
Description- large canal near the base of the quadrate suggest and avian course for the pneumonic siphonium; camellate pneumaticity in postcranium; axis extremely pneumatic; pneumatic cavities present in centra, neural arches, furcula and ilium; gastralia fused at midline; furcula present; large pubic foot; ascending process of astragalus taller than other allosauroids and closer to coelurosaurs.
Reference- Alcober, Sereno, Larsson, Martinez and Varricchio, 1998. A Late Cretaceous carcharodontosaurid (Theropoda: Allosauroidea) from Argentina. JVP 18(3) 23A

unnamed possible carcharodontosaurid (Buffetaut, Mechin and Salessy, 1988)
Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Gres a Reptiles Formation, France
Material- maxilla (240 mm)
Comments- Originally described as an abelisaurid, but probably a carcharodontosaurid instead (Carrano and Sampson, 2002).
References- Buffetaut, Mechin and Mechin-Salessy, 1988. Un dinosaure théropode d’affinités gondwaniennes dans le Crétacé supérieur de Provence. C.R. Acad. Sci. Paris. t. 306. Sér. II: 153-158.
Carrano and Sampson, 2002. Ceratosaurs: A global perspective. JVP 22(3) 41A.

unnamed carcharodontosaurid (Russel, 1996)
Albian, Early Cretaceous
Kem Kem Formation, Morocco
Material- (CMN 41859) dentary fragment
(CMN 41861) dentary fragment (teeth FABL 6-14 mm )
Comments- Originally described as cf. Majungasaurus sp., these are carcharodontosaurid instead (Carrano and Sampson, 2002).
References- Russell, 1996. Isolated dinosaur bones from the Middle Cretaceous of the Tafilalt, Morocco. Bulletin du Muse'um national d'Histoire naturelle (4e se'r.) 18:349-402.
Carrano and Sampson, 2002. Ceratosaurs: A global perspective. JVP 22(3) 41A.

Neovenator Hutt, Martill and Barker, 1996
= "Neovenator" Naish, 1996
N. salerii Hutt, Martill and Barker, 1996
= "Neovenator salerii" Naish, 1996
Barremian, Early Cretaceous
Wessex Formation, England
Diagnosis- (modified from Hutt et al., 1996) five premaxillary teeth; external naris twice as long as high and twice as long as dental margin of premaxilla; large maxillary fenestra with narrow interfenestral bar; tooth crowns one quarter total tooth length; distinct dorsal groove on pedal unguals. (after Naish et al., 2001) dorsolateral nasal crests rise high above skull roof; medial premaxillary surfaces with interlocking ridge and groove system; dental serrations complete across tooth tips.
Holotype- (BMNH R10001; MIWG 6348) (~7.5 m) premaxillae, maxilla, nasal, anterior dentary, teeth (crown to 40 mm), axis, five cervical vertebrae, cervical rib fragments, ten dorsal vertebrae, dorsal rib fragments, several gastralia, three sacral vertebrae, twenty-two caudal vertebrae, three chevrons, scapulocoracoid, incomplete ilium, incomplete pubes (~670 mm), incomplete ischia, femur (750 mm), tibia (670 mm), fibula (660 mm), metatarsal II (330 mm), metatarsal IV (325 mm), pedal phalanges, pedal unguals
Paratype- (MIWG 6352) two sacral vertebrae, incomplete ilium, pubes
Referred- (MIWG 4199) (~10 m) phalanx (Hutt, 2001)
?(MIWG 5470) partial skeleton (Hutt, 2001)
(MIWG coll.) proximal caudal vertebrae, pedal phalanges (Naish et al., 2001)
References- Hutt, Simmonds and Hullman, 1990. Predatory dinosaurs from the Isle of Wight: Proceedings of the Isle of Wight Natural History and Archaeological Society, v. 9., p. 137-146.
Naish, 1996. Isle of Wight: Dinosaur Discoveries, Issue 1, p. 15.
Hutt, Martill and Barker, 1996. The first European allosauroid dinosaur (Lower Cretaceous, Wealden Group, England). Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie Monatsheft. 1996(10):635-644.
Hutt, 2001, Appendix, catalogue of Wealden Group Dinosauria in the Museum of Isle of Wight Geology: In: Dinosaurs of the Isle of Wight. edited by Martill and Naish. The Palaeontological Association, p. 411-422.
Naish, Hutt and Martill, 2001. Saurichian dinosaurs 2: theropods: In: Dinosaurs of the Isle of Wight. edited by Martill and Naish. The Palaeontological Association, p. 242-309.

Acrocanthosaurus Stovall and Langston, 1950
= "Acrocanthus" Langston, 1947 vide Czaplewski, Cifelli and Langston, 1994
A. atokensis Stovall and Langston, 1950
= "Acracanthus atokaensis" Langston, 1947 vide Czaplewski, Cifelli and Langston, 1994
Late Aptian-Middle Albian, Early Cretaceous
Antlers Formation, Oklahoma, US

Holotype- (MOU 8-0-S9 or OMNH 10146) (9.9 m) lacrimal, partial jugal, partial postorbital, incomplete squamosal, frontals, parietals, braincase, ectopterygoid, articular, fragment of surangular, fragment of angular, atlantal intercentrum, axial fragment, partial third cervical vertebra (96 mm), incomplete fourth cervical vertebra (98 mm), incomplete fifth cervical vertebra (123 mm), sixth cervical neural arch, partial seventh cervical centrum (153 mm), incomplete eighth cervical vertebra (158 mm), ninth cervical vertebra (168 mm), incomplete tenth cervical vertebra (153 mm), three incomplete cervical ribs, fifth dorsal vertebra (107 mm), sixth dorsal vertebra (110 mm), seventh dorsal vertebra, twelfth dorsal centrum (128 mm), thirteenth dorsal centrum (125 mm), eight dorsal neural spines, five posterior dorsal ribs, gastralium, two caudal centra, two proximal chevrons, coracoid, pubes (~838 mm), ischium (~621 mm), distal femur (~950 mm), tibia (~865 mm), fibulae (801 mm), astragalus, metatarsal III (416 mm)
Paratypes- (MOU 8-0-S8 or OMNH 10147) (11.29 m) two dorsal centra, four dorsal neural spines, eight posterior dorsal ribs, first caudal vertebra, second caudal vertebra (128 mm), third caudal vertebra (138 mm), fourth caudal vertebra (140 mm), ninth caudal vertebra (149 mm), tenth caudal vertebra (146 mm), eleventh caudal vertebra (141 mm), twelfth caudal vertebra (140 mm), eighteenth caudal vertebra, nineteenth caudal vertebra (131 mm), twentieth caudal vertebra (134 mm), twenty-first caudal vertebra (135 mm), twenty-second caudal vertebra, twenty-third caudal vertebra (124 mm), proximal chevron, pubes, proximal femur (~950 mm), fragmentary tibia (~958 mm), metatarsal II (416 mm), metatarsal III (445 mm), phalanx III-1 (145 mm)
(OMNH 3031) four gastralia
Referred- (NCSM 14345; OMNH 10168) (11.5 m) skull (1.29 m), mandibles (1.315 m), presacral vertebral fragments, cervical rib, several partial dorsal ribs, gastralia fragments, over fourteen caudal vertebrae (120-160 mm), six chevrons, scapula (970 mm), coracoid (360 mm), humerus (370 mm), radius (220 mm), ulna (255 mm), radiale, ulnare, semilunate carpal, metacarpal I (62 mm), phalanx I-1 (111 mm), metacarpal II (116 mm), phalanx II-1 (101 mm), phalanx II-2 (103 mm), manual ungual II (124, 144 mm), metacarpal III (89 mm), phalanx III-1 (50 mm), phalanx III-2 (42 mm), phalanx III-3 (60 mm), manual ungual III (71, 75 mm), incomplete femur (~1.277 m), incomplete tibia, partial astragalus, calcaneum, metatarsal I (111 mm), phalanx I-1 (70 mm), pedal ungual I, metatarsal II (410 mm), phalanx II-1 (55 mm), phalanx II-2 (122 mm), partial metatarsal III (~439 mm), phalanx III-1 (160 mm), phalanx III-2 (115 mm), partial metatarsal IV, phalanx IV-1 (85 mm), phalanx IV-2 (70 mm), phalanx IV-3 (58 mm), phalanx IV-4, pedal ungual IV, metatarsal V (200 mm) (Currie and Carpenter, 2000)
(OMNH 51788) tooth (Lipka, 1998)
? teeth (Nydam et al., 1997)
Middle-Late Aptian
Arundel Formation, Maryland, US

(USNM 497718) tooth (Lipka, 1998)
(USNM 497722) tooth (Lipka, 1998)
(USNM 497723) tooth (Lipka, 1998)
(USNM 497724) tooth (Lipka, 1998)
(USNM 497725) tooth (Lipka, 1998)
(USNM 497726) tooth (Lipka, 1998)
Early Albian, Early Cretaceous
Ruby Ranch Member of Cedar Mountain Formation, Utah, US

(CEU 5107) tooth (Kirkland et al., 1997)
Albian-Cenomanian, Early-Late Cretaceous
Turney Ranch Formation, Arizona, US
(ASDM coll.) tooth (Ratkevich, 1997)
Aptian-Middle Albian, Early Cretaceous
Trinity Group, Texas

?(SMU 62271) teeth (Thurmond, 1974)
Aptian, Early Cretaceous
Twin Mountains Formation, Texas, US
(SMU 74646) (1.87 tons) incomplete jugal, ectopterygoid, palatine, partial surangular, articular, partial prearticular, partial splenial, rostral tooth (84 mm tall, 31 by 19.5 mm wide), partial tooth, axis (101 mm), partial third cervical vertebra, partial fourth cervical vertebra, partial fifth cervical vertebra (158 mm), partial sixth cervical vertebra (180 mm), seventh cervical neural spine, eighth cervical neural spine, ninth cervical neural spine, tenth cervical centrum, two posterior cervical zygapophyseal assemblies, seven partial cervical ribs, first dorsal centrum (295 mm), partial second dorsal vertebra (268 mm),partial third dorsal vertebra, partial fourth dorsal vertebra, partial fifth dorsal centrum, partial sixth dorsal vertebra, partial seventh dorsal vertebra, partial eighth dorsal vertebra, incomplete ninth dorsal vertebra (135 mm), incomplete tenth dorsal vetrtebra (144 mm), partial eleventh dorsal vertebra, partial twelfth dorsal vertebra, partial thirteenth dorsal vertebra, ten dorsal neural spines, nineteen partial dorsal ribs, dorsal rib fragments, gasteralia, partial first sacral vertebra (170 mm), incomplete second sacral vertebra (160 mm), incomplete third sacral vertebra (160 mm), partial fourth sacral vertebra, fifth sacral fragment, two sacral neural spines, first caudal vertebra (117 mm), second caudal vertebra (124 mm), fifth caudal vertebra (139 mm), sixth caudal vertebra (135 mm), eighth caudal vertebra (135 mm), fifteenth caudal vertebra (140.5 mm), sixteenth caudal vertebra (150 mm), seventeenth caudal vertebra (142 mm), eighteenth caudal vertebra (141 mm), ninteenth caudal vertebra (141 mm), twenty-second caudal vertebra, twenty-eighth caudal vertebra (133 mm), twenty-ninth caudal vertebra (131 mm), thirtieth caudal vertebra, proximal scapula, distal scapula, incomplete pubes, ischia (844 mm), femora (1090 mm), distal metatarsal II (Harris, 1998)
Early Cretaceous
US

? femur (Langston, 1974)
? teeth (Gallup, 1975)
Comments- Harris (1998) believes the tooth (UUVP 904) described by DeCourten (1991) does not belong to Acrocanthosaurus because the serrations are too coarse. However, Kirkland et al. (1997) mention cf. Acrocanthosaurus sp., which is a tooth (CEU 5107) with finer serrations (Harris, 1998).
SMU 62271 were said to be similar to Allosaurus, so are provisionally assigned to Acrocanthosaurus here based on provenance.
Currie and Carpenter (2000) found Acrocanthosaurus to be an allosaurid, but of their thirteen characters supporting this, at least four are primitive (promaxillary and maxillary fenestrae; axial intercentrum subparallel to axis ventral margin; paired anterior and posterior processes at base of chevrons; pubic foramen present in distal pubis), three are also found in Giganotosaurus (basioccipital participates in basal tubera; distal ends of paroccipital processes below foramen magnum; internal carotid opening pneumatized), one in Carcharodontosaurus (separation of trigeminal nerve branches complete), and five aren't known in Carcharodontosaurus or Giganotosaurus (long basipterygoid processes; reduced external mandibular
fenestra; pronounced notch between acromion and coracoid; sigmoidal humerus; metacarpal IV absent). So there are actually no characters published by Currie and Carpenter that support placing Acrocanthosaurus in the Allosauridae. Giganotosaurus and Carcharodontosaurus are clearly more closely related to each other than Acrocanthosaurus is to either, but there's no reason to believe the latter is not carcharodontosaurid.
References- Langston, 1947. unpublished Master's Thesis.
Stovall and Langston, 1950. Acrocanthosaurus atokensis, a new genus and species of Lower Cretaceous Theropoda from Oklahoma. Amer. Mid. Nat. 43 696-728, 4 figs., 4 pls.
Langston, 1974. Nonmammalian comanchean tetrapods: Geoscience and Man, v. 8, p. 77-102.
Thurmond, 1974. Lower Vertebrate Faunas of the Trinity division in North-Central Texas: Geoscience and Man, v. 8, April 1, p. 103-129.
Gallup, 1975. Early Cretaceous Dinosaurs and associated vertebrates from north-central Texas in the field Museum of Natural History: Thesis, presented to the Faculty of the Graduate School of The University of Texas at Austin in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts, The University of Texas at Austin, January 1975, 159pp.
DeCourten, 1991. The Long Waik quarry and tracksite: unveiling the mysterious Early Cretaceous of the Dinosaur Triangle region. in Averett (ed.). Guidebook for Dinosaur quarries and tracksites tour, western Colorado and eastern Utah. Grand Junction: Grand Junction Geological Society. 19-25.
Czaplewski, Cifelli, and Langston, 1994. Catalog of type and figured fossil vertebrates, Oklahoma Museum of Natural History. Oklahoma Geological Survey Special Publication 94: 1-35.
Kirkland, Britt, Burge, Carpenter, Cifelli, DeCourten, Eaton, Hasiotis and Lawton, 1997. Lower to Middle Cretaceous dinosaur faunas of the Central Colorado Plateau: a key to understanding 35 million years of tectonics, sedimentology, evolution, and biogeography. Brigham Young University Geology Studies. 42, 69-103.
Nydam, Cifelli, Brinkman and Gardner, 1997. Preliminary report on the vertebrate fauna of the Antlers Formation (Lower Cretaceous: Aptian-Albian) of Oklahoma: Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, v. 17, supplement to n. 3, Abstracts of Papers, Fifty-seventh Annual Meeting Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, Field Museum, Chicago, Illinois, October 8-11, p. 67a.
Ratkevich, 1997. Dinosaur remains of southern Arizona. in D.L. Wolberg, E. Stump and G.D. Rosenberg (eds.), Dinofest International, pp. 213-221. Philadelphia: Academy of Natural Sciences.
Harris, 1998. A Reanalysis of Acrocanthosaurus atokensis, its Phylogenetic Status, and Paleobiogeographic Implications, Based on a New Specimen from Texas. New Mexico Museum of Natural History Bulletin 13: 1-75.
Harris, 1998. Large, Early Cretaceous theropods in North America. in Lucas, Kirkland and Estep (eds.). Lower and Middle Cretaceous Terrestrial Ecosystems. New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin, 14, 225-228.
Lipka, 1998. The affinities of the enigmatic theropods of the Arundel Clay facies (Aptian), Potomac Formation, Atlantic Coastal Plain of Maryland. in Lucas, Kirkland and Estep (eds.). Lower and Middle Cretaceous Terrestrial Ecosystems. New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin. 14, 229-234.
Currie and Carpenter, 2000. A new specimen of Acrocanthosaurus atokensis (Theropoda, Dinosauria) from the Lower Cretaceous Antlers Formation (Lower Cretaceous, Aptian) of Oklahoma, USA. Geodiversitas 22 (2) : 207-246.
Franzosa and Rowe, 2005. Cranial endocast of the Cretaceous theropod dinosaur Acrocanthosaurus atokensis. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 25(4), 859–864.
A? sp. indet. (Burge, 1996)
Barremian, Early Cretaceous
Yellow Cat Member of the Cedar Mountain Formation, Utah, US

Material- teeth, bone fragments
Reference- Burge, 1996. New Dinosaur Discoveries in the Lower Cretaceous of Southeastern Utah: Proceedings of Southwest Paleontological Society and Mesa Southwest Museum, Mesa, Arizona, v. 4, p. 85-105.
A? sp. indet. (Cranwell, 2003)
Late Early Cretaceous
Shellenberger Canyon Formation, Arizona, US

Material- caudal centra
Reference- Cranwell, 2003. New evidence of dinosaurs from the Shellenberger Canyon Formation (Lower Cretaceous) of southeastern Arizona, USA: In: Southwest Paleontological Symposium 2002, Guide to Presentations, Mesa Southwest Museum, unnumbered.

unnamed clade (Carcharodontosaurus saharicus <- Acrocanthosaurus atokensis)
Comments- This subset of carcharodontosaurids is characterized by wrinkled tooth enamel, among other characters.

unnamed Carcharodontosauridae (Rich, Rich, Lanus, Rich and Vacca, 1999)
Aptian, Early Cretaceous
Cerro Castano Member of the Cerro Barcino Formation, Chubut, Argentina; Brazil
Material- (MPEF-PV 1160-1167, 1169) nine tooth fragments
(MPEF-PV 1168) dentary tooth (69.6 mm)
Comments- May be referrable to Tyrannotitan, based on provenance.
References- Kellner and Campos, 1998. Review of Cretaceous theropods and sauropods from Brazil. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 18(3), 55A.
Rich, Vickers-Rich, Novas, Cuneo, Puerta and Vacca, 1998. Theropods from the "Middle" Cretaceous Chubut Group of the San Jorge Sedimentary Basin, central Patagonia. A preliminary note. GAIA 15:111-115.
Vickers-Rich, Rich, Lanus, Rich and Vacca, 1999. 'Big Tooth' from the Early Cretaceous of Chubut Province, Patagonia: A Possible Carcharodontosaurid. in Tomida, Rich, and Vickers-Rich, eds., pp. 85-88.

undescribed Carcharodontosauridae (Rich et al., 1998)
Albian-Cenomanian, Early Cretaceous-Late Cretaceous
Bayo Overo Member of the Cerro Barcino Formation, Chubut, Argentina
Material- (MPEF-PV 1171-1174) tooth, three tooth fragments
Comments- From the same locality as "Megalosaurus" inexpectatus, so may be referrable to that taxon.
Reference- Rich, Vickers-Rich, Novas, Cuneo, Puerta and Vacca, 1998. Theropods from the "Middle" Cretaceous Chubut Group of the San Jorge Sedimentary Basin, central Patagonia. A preliminary note. GAIA 15:111-115.

undescribed carcharodontosaurid (Calvo, Rubila and Moreno, 1999)
Early Cenomanian, Late Cretaceous
Candeleros Formation of Rio Limay Subgroup, Neuquen, Argentina
Material- maxilla, dentary, cervical vertebrae, dorsal vertebrae, sacral vertebrae, caudal vertebrae, chevrons, ilia, pubis, femur, tibia, pedal elements
Reference- Calvo, Rubila and Moreno, 1999.

undescribed carcharodontosaurid (Martinelli and Forasiepi, 2004)
Campanian-Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Allen Formation, Rio Negro, Argentina
Material- (MACN-PV RN 1086) tooth
Reference- Martinelli and Forasiepi, 2004. Late Cretaceous vertebrates from Bajo de Santa Rosa (Allen Formation), Río Negro province, Argentina, with the description of a new sauropod dinosaur (Titanosauridae). Revista del Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales, nuevo serie 6(2):257-305.

undescribed carcharodontosaurid (Medeiros and Schultz, 2002)
Cenomanian, Late Cretaceous
Alcantara Formation of the Itapecuru Group, Brazil
Material- teeth
Comments- Referred to Carcharodontosaurus sp. by Medeiros and Schultz (2002), but this is unlikely given the location.
Reference- Medeiros and Schultz, 2002. The dinosaurian fauna of "Laje do Coringa", middle Cretaceous of northeastern Brazil. Arquivos do Museu Nacional, Rio de Janeiro 60(3):155-162.
Castro, Bertini, Santucci and Medeiros, 2005. Fossils from the Coroata Locality, undifferentiated geological unity, Itapecuru Group, Lower/Middle Albian from the Sao Luis-Grajau Basin, Maranhao State, North/Northeastern Brazil : In: II Congresso Latino-Americano de Paleontologia de Vertebrados, Rio De Janeiro Museu Nacional, edited by Kellner, A. W. A., Henriques, D. D. R., and Rodrigues, T., Boletim de Resumos, p. 75-76.
Elais, Bertini and Medeiros, 2005. Review of the occurrences concerning isolated amniotes teeth, in the Cretaceous deposits from the Maranhao State: In: II Congresso Latino-Americano de Paleontologia de Vertebrados, Rio De Janeiro Museu Nacional, edited by Kellner, A. W. A., Henriques, D. D. R., and Rodrigues, T., Boletim de Resumos, p. 99-100.

undescribed Carcharodontosauridae (Canudo, Salgado, Barco, Bolatti and Ruiz-Omenaca, 2004)
Late Cenomanian-Early Turonian, Late Cretaceous
Cerro Lisandro Formation, Rio Negro, Argentina
Material- (Endemas PV-2) tooth
teeth
Reference- Canudo, Salgado, Barco, Bolatti and Ruiz-Omenaca, 2004. Dientes de dinosaurios teropodos y sauropodos de la Formacion Cerro Lisandro (Cenomaniense superior-Turoniense inferior, Cretacico superior) en Rio Negro (Argentina): Geo-Temas, v. 6, n. 5, p. 31-34.

undescribed Carcharodontosauridae (Novas, Martinez, de Valais and Ambrosio, 1999)
Turonian, Late Cretaceous
Mata Amarilla Formation, Santa Cruz, Argentina
Material- teeth
Reference- Novas, Martinez, de Valais and Ambrosio, 1999.

undescribed Carcharodontosauridae (Kellner and Campos, 1998)
Turonian-Santonian, Late Cretaceous
Adamantina Formation of the Bauru Group, Brazil

Material- (MMR/UFU-PV 005) tooth (Candeiro et al., 2006)
(UFRJ-DG 379-Rd) tooth (Candeiro et al., 2004)
Description- strong enamel ridges on teeth similar to carcharodontosaurids.
References- Kellner and Campos, 1998. Review of Cretaceous theropods and sauropods from Brazil. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 18(3), 55A.
Silva and Kellner, 1999. Novos dentes de Theropoda do Cretaceo continental do Brasil. Paleontologia em Destaque, Boletim Informativo da Sociedade Brasileira de Paleontologia 14(26).
Candeiro, Abranches, Abrantes, Avilla, Martins, Moreira, Torres and Bergqvist, 2004. Dinosaurs remains from western São Paulo state, Brazil (Bauru Basin, Adamantina Formation, Upper Cretaceous). Journal of South American Earth Sciences. 18:1-10.
Candeiro, Martinelli, Avilla and Rich, 2006. Tetrapods from the Upper Cretaceous (Turonian-Maastrichtian) Bauru Group of Brazil: a reappraisal. Cretaceous Research.
Candeiro, Santos, Rich, Marinho and Oliveira, 2006. Vertebrate fossils from the Adamantina Formation (Late Cretaceous), Prata paleontological district, Minas Gerais State, Brazil: Geobios, v. 39, p. 319-327.

undescribed Carcharodontosauridae (Candeiro, Martinelli, Avilla and Rich, 2006)
Late Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous
Marilia Formation of the Bauru Group, Brazil

Material- (CPP 124, 127, 129a, 152, 156, 197, 199, 200, 208, 216, 241, 375/1, 376, 447-449, 474, 475) eighteen teeth
Reference- Candeiro, Martinelli, Avilla and Rich, 2006. Tetrapods from the Upper Cretaceous (Turonian-Maastrichtian) Bauru Group of Brazil: a reappraisal. Cretaceous Research.

undescribed carcharodontosaurid (Sereno, Beck, Dutheil, Gado, Larsson, Lyon, Marcot, Rauhut, Sadleir, Sidor, Varricchio, Wilson and Wilson, 1998)
Aptian, Early Cretaceous
Elrhaz Formation, Niger
Material- (mid-sized) teeth
Reference- Sereno, Beck, Dutheil, Gado, Larsson, Lyon, Marcot, Rauhut, Sadleir, Sidor, Varricchio, Wilson and Wilson, 1998. A Long-Snouted Predatory Dinosaur from Africa and the Evolution of the Spinosaurids. Science 282(5392): 1298–1302.

undescribed carcharodontosaurid (Sereno et al., unpub.)
Aptian, Early Cretaceous
Elrhaz Formation?, Niger
Material- (~9 m) jaw bones, teeth, vertebrae, pelvic elements including pubis
Comments- Sereno notes the postorbital structure and wrinkled enamel suggest it is carcharodontosaurid.
Reference- http://www.projectexploration.org/niger2000/10_03_2000_2.htm

unnamed Carcharodontosauridae (Rauhut, 1999)
Cenomanian, Late Cretaceous
Wadi Milk Formation, Sudan
Material- (Vb-607) proximal caudal centrum (137 mm)
(Vb-717) proximal caudal centrum (136 mm)
?(Vb-718) pedal phalanx III-2 (105 mm)
?(Vb-849) distal tarsal III, proximal metatarsal III
(Vb-870) mid caudal centrum (130 mm)
(Vb-871) mid caudal vertebra (136 mm)
Comments- Pleurocoels in Vb-607 and Vb-871 may indicate referral to Carcharodontosaurus. Vb-871 is from a different taxon than Vb-607, Vb-717 and Vb-870, based on the deeper ventral groove, less prominent ventral keel, and more distally developed pleurocoels. The limb elements are only tentatively referred to Carcharodontosauridae, based on similarity to allosauroids.
References- Werner, 1991. Aspects on Terrestrial Upper Cretaceous ecosystems of Egypt and Northern Sudan: Fifth Symposium on Mesozoic Terrestrial Ecosystems and Biota, extended abstracts-edited by Kielan-Jaworowska, Z., Heintz, N., and Nakrem, H. A., Contributions from the Paleontological Museum, University of Oslo, no. 364, 1991, p. 71-72.
Werner, 1993. Late Cretaceous continental vertebrate fauns of Niger and Northern Sudan: In: Geosicentific Research in Northeast Africa. Edited by Thorweihe, U., and Schandelmier, S., Proceedings of the international Conference on Geoscientific Research in Northeast Africa/Berlin/Germany/17-19 June 1993, p. 401-405.
Werner, 1994. Die kontinentale Wirbeltierfauna aus der unteren Oberkreide des Sudan (Wadi Milk Formation): Berliner geowiss. Abh. E, v. 13, p. 221-249.
Rauhut, 1999. A dinosaur fauna from the Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian) of northern Sudan. Palaeontologia Africana. 35:61-84.

"Megalosaurus" inexpectatus Corro, 1966
Albian-Cenomanian, Early Cretaceous-Late Cretaceous
Bayo Overo Member of the Cerro Barcino Formation, Chubut, Argentina
Holotype- teeth
Comments- Corro (1974) notes that this taxon has wrinkled enamel similar to Carcharodontosaurus saharicus, so it is provisionally assigned to the Carcharodontosauridae. It must be noted that some other taxa have such wrinkles too though (e.g. Fukuiraptor).
References- Corro, 1966. Un nuevo dinosaurio Carnivoro del Chubut (Argentina). Communicaciones Mus. Argent. Cien. Nat. "Bernardino Rivadavia". Paleontol. 1:1-4.
Corro, 1974. Un nuevo megalosaurio (Carnosaurio) del Cretacico de Chubut (Argentina). Communicaciones Mus. Argent. Ciencias Nat. "Bernardino Rivadavia" Paleontol. 1: 37-44.

Carcharodontosaurus Stromer, 1931
C. saharicus (Deperet and Savornin, 1925) Stromer, 1931
= Megalosaurus saharicus Deperet and Savornin, 1925
= Dryptosaurus saharicus (Deperet and Savornin, 1928)
Albian (-Cenomanian?),
Continental Intercalaire, Algeria; (Baharija Formation, Egypt?; Kem Kem Formation, Morocco?)
Holotype- (destroyed) two teeth
Referred- ?(CMN 41817) tooth (54x27x12 mm) (Russell, 1996)
?(CMN 41818) tooth (67x36x22 mm) (Russell, 1996)
?(CMN 41819) tooth (69x34x16 mm) (Russell, 1996)
?(CMN 41859) maxillary fragment (Russell, 1996)
?(CMN 41908) tooth (30x24x11 mm) (Russell, 1996)
?(CMN 41910) tooth (23x19x6 mm) (Russell, 1996)
?(CMN 50792) cervical vertebra (148 mm) (Russell, 1996)
?(FPDM-V6211) fragmentary skull (Azuma, 2005)
?(IPHG 1912 VIII 68) ilium (Stromer, 1934)
(IPHG 1922 X46; holotype of Carcharodontosaurus) partial maxilla, maxillary teeth, nasals, frontals, parietals, supraoccipital, partial exoccipital-opisthotics, axis, anterior cervical vertebra (100 mm), cervical vertebra, proximal dorsal rib, proximal caudal vertebra (145 mm), proximal chevron (150 mm), partial chevron, manual ungual, incomplete pubes (>1 m), partial ischium, femora (1.26 m), fibula (880 mm) (Stromer, 1931)
?(MNNHN coll.) twelve teeth (to FABL of 42 mm), few mid caudal vertebrae (~70-100 mm) (Lapparent, 1960)
(SGM-Din 1) (12.79 m) incomplete skull (missing premaxillae, squamosals, quadratojugals) (~1.6 m) (Sereno et al., 1996)
? teeth, ilium (Lavocat, 1954)
? teeth (Taquet, 1976)
?teeth (Sadleir, 1998)
?remains (Smith et al., 2001)
Comments- Megalosaurus saharicus is based on two teeth from the Albian Continental Intercalaire of Algeria (Deperet and Sevornin, 1925). Later, Stromer (1931) described a partial skeleton from the Early Cenomanian Baharija Formation of Egypt and referred it to this species, creating the genus Carcharodontosaurus for it. An incomplete skull from the Cenomanian Kem Kem Formation of Morocco closely resembling Stromer's specimen was reported by Sereno et al. (1996). Brusatte and Sereno (2005) report a new species of Carcharodontosaurus, which differs in some cranial characters from Stromer's and Sereno et al.'s specimens. Dental differences are not reported, however, making referral of isolated teeth to either species uncertain. In fact, no diagnostic differences have been noted between the teeth of Carcharodontosaurus, Giganotosaurus and Mapusaurus. Thus the referral of isolated teeth to any particular derived carcharodontosaurid taxon is based solely on locality. This includes the holotype of Megalosaurus saharicus, perhaps indicating Stromer's specimen should be made a neotype for the species. The ilium (IPHG 1912 VIII 68) referred to Carcharodontosaurus by Stromer (1934) does not necessarily belong to this taxon, and may be abelisauroid (?= Deltadromeus or Bahariasaurus). Twelve teeth and a few mid caudal vertebrae from the type locality were described by Lapparent (1960). The teeth are described as having enamel wrinkles as in derived carcharodontosaurids and being very similar to the holotype, though the caudals' referral is uncertain. They are referred here to C. saharicus based on provenance. Russell (1996) described a maxillary fragment, cervical vertebra and teeth from the Kem Kem Formation of Morocco, which though closely resembling those in Stromer's specimen, are only referred to the species saharicus based on provenance. The same can be said for teeth from that locality mentioned by Lavocat (1954) and Sadlier (1998), though Lavocat's teeth were not only compared to Carcharodontosaurus, but also Tendaguru taxa and Tyrannosaurus, so may not be referrable to carcharodontosaurids at all. Smith et al. (2001) reported new remains of cf. Carcharodontosaurus from the Baharija Formation of Egypt. Sereno et al. (1996) referred the specimen of Spinosaurus B and the material of Sigilmassasaurus to Carcharodontosaurus saharicus, but this is not followed here (see Sigilmassasaurus entry).
References- Deperet and Savornin, 1925. Sur Ia decouverte d'une faune de vertebres albiens a Timintoun (Sahara occidental). C. R. Acad. Sci. Paris 181:1108-1111.
Stromer, 1931. Wirbeltiere-Reste der Baharijestufe (unterstes Cenoman). Ein Skellett-Rest von Carcharodontosaurus nov. gen.. Abh. Bayer. Akad. Wiss., Math.-Nat. Abt. (N. F.) 9 1-23, 1 pl.
Stromer, 1934. Ergebnisse der Forschungsreisen Prof. E. Stromers in den Wüsten Ägyptens. II. Wirbeltierreste der Baharîje-Stufe (unterstes Cenoman). 13. Dinosauria. Abh. Bayer. Akad. Wiss., Math.-Nat. Abt., (n. s.) 22 1-79, 3 pls.
Lavocat, 1954. Sur les Dinosauriens du continental intercalaire des Kem-Kem de la Daoura. C. R. 19th Internatl. Geol. Congr. 1952: 65-68.
Lapparent, 1960. Les dinosauriens du "Continental intercalaire" du Sahara central. Mem. Soc. Geol. France 88A: 1-57.
Taquet, 1976. Geologie et Paleontologie du gisement de Gadoufaoua (Aptian du Niger): Cahires Paleont, 191pp.
Rauhut, 1995. Zur systematischen Stellung der afrikanischen Theropoden Carcharodontosaurus Stromer 1931 und Bahariasaurus Stromer 1934. Berliner geowissenschaftliche Abhandlungen E16 (Gundolf-Ernst-Festschrift): 357-375.
Russell, 1996. Isolated dinosaur bones from the Middle Cretaceous of the Tafilalt, Morocco. Bulletin du Muse'um national d'Histoire naturelle (4e se'r.) 18:349-402.
Sereno, Dutheil, Iarochene, Larsson, Lyon, Magwene, Sidor, Varricchio and Wilson, 1996. Predatory Dinosaurs from the Sahara and Late Cretaceous Faunal Differentiation. Science 272(5264): 986-991.
Sidleir, 1998. Theropod teeth from the Cretaceous of Morocco. JVP 18(3) 74A.
Larsson, 2001. Endocranial anatomy of Carcharodontosaurus saharicus (Theropoda: Allosauroidea) and its implications for theropod brain evolution. pp. 19-33. in Tanke, Darren H. & Carpenter, Kenneth, eds., 2001. Mesozoic Vertebrate Life: New Research inspired by the Paleontology of Philip J. Currie, Indiana University Press, Bloomington & Indianapolis, Indiana: xviii + 542 pp.
Smith, Lamanna, Lacovara, Dodson, Smith, Poole, Giegengack and Attia, 2001. A giant sauropod dinosaur from an Upper Cretaceous mangrove deposit in Egypt. Science 292:1704-1706.
Azuma, 2005. The Flying Dinosaurs: Fukui Prefectural Dinosaur Museum, 118pp.
Brusatte and Sereno, 2005. A new specis of Carcharodontosaurus (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Cenomanian of Niger and its implications for allosauroid phylogeny. JVP 25(3), 40A.
C. sp. nov. (Brusatte and Sereno, 2005)
Cenomanian, Late Cretaceous
Echkar Formation of the Tegama Group, Niger
Material- partial maxilla
Referred- braincase, teeth, anterior dentary
Diagnosis- (after Brusatte and Sereno, 2005) ventral margin of antorbital fossa not laterally swollen; robust medial ridge on maxilla; more slender, laterally divergent laterosphenoid alae; unspecified maxillary and endocast characters.
Comments- This is reportedly a new species of Carcharodontosaurus, with both Stromer's (1931) partial skeleton and Sereno et al.'s (1996) skull belonging to another species, provisionally called C. saharicus (though the holotype teeth may not be diagnostic to species level; see C. saharicus entry). However, Mapusaurus shares the laterally swollen ventral antorbital fossa margin with C. saharicus, but not C. sp. nov.. Furthermore, the synapomorphies uniting C. saharicus with C. sp. nov. to the exclusion of other carcharodontosaurids are as yet unreported.
References- Sereno, Wilson, and Conrad, 2004. New dinosaurs link southern landmasses in the mid-Cretaceous. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B. 271(1546):1325-1330.
Brusatte and Sereno, 2005. A new specis of Carcharodontosaurus (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Cenomanian of Niger and its implications for allosauroid phylogeny. JVP 25(3), 40A.
C? sp. indet. (Lapparent, 1953)
Albian-Early Cenomanian, Early Cretaceous-Late Cretaceous
Tegama Group, Niger
Material- (MNNHN coll.; from In Abangarit) two braincase fragments, 137 teeth (anterior teeth- 80x33 mm, 77x31 mm, 62x28 mm, 64x27 mm, 54x26 mm; lateral teeth- 125x47 mm, 70x45 mm, 105x40 mm, 90x37 mm, 87x36 mm), proximal caudal vertebra (120 mm), distal caudal vertebra, manual phalanx II-2 (60 mm), pedal ungual II (90 mm) (Lapparent, 1960)
Comments- This material was not found associated, so could belong to multiple individuals of several large theropod taxa (Deltadromeus, Bahariasaurus, Spinosaurus, Sigilmassasaurus, etc.). Over a hundred of the teeth are carcharodontosaurid, however. Carcharodontosaurid material may be referrable to Carcharodontosaurus sp. nov., based on provenance.
References- Lapparent, 1953. Gisements de dinosauriens dans le "Continental intercalaire" d'In Abangharit (Saharia meridional): Compte rendu hebdomadaire des seances de l’Academie des Sciences Paris, v. 236, p. 1905-1906.
Lapparent, 1960. Les dinosauriens du "Continental intercalaire" du Sahara central. Mem. Soc. Geol. France 88A: 1-57.
C? sp. indet. (Schluter and Schwarzhans, 1978)
Albian, Early Cretaceous
Chenini Formation, Tunisia
Material- four teeth
References- Schluter and Schwarzhans, 1978.
Bouaziz, Buffetaut, Ghanmi, Jaeger, Martin, Mazin and Tong, 1988. Nouvelles decouvertes de vertebres fossiles dans l'Albien du Sud tunisien: Bulletin de la societie geologiques de France, 8th series, tomo 4, n. 2, p. 335-339.
Benton, Bouaziz, Buffetaut, Martill, Ouaja, Soussi and Trueman, 2000. Dinosaurs and other fossil vertebrates from fluvial deposits in the Lower Cretaceous of Southern Tunisia: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, v. 157, p. 227-246.
Buffetaut and Ouaja, 2002. A new specimen of Spinosaurus (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from the Lower Cretaceous of Tunisia, with remarks on the evolutionary history of the Spinosauridae: Bulletin de la societie geologiques de France, tomo 173, n. 5, p. 415-421.
C? sp. indet. (Lapparent, 1951)
Early Cretaceous
Dahar, Tunisia
Material- nine teeth
Reference- Lapparent, 1951. Decouverte de dinosauriens associes la und faunad de reptiles et de poissons, dans le Cretaceous inferieur de l'extreme sud tunisien: Compte rendu hebdomadaire des seances de l’Academie des Sciences Paris, v. 232, p. 1430-1432.
C? sp. indet. (Lapparent, 1960)
Albian-Early Cenomanian, Early Cretaceous-Late Cretaceous
Continental Intercalaire, Tunisia
Material- (MNNHN coll.) five teeth (Lapparent, 1960)
Comments- These teeth are said to have Carcharodontosaurus' 'characteristic thickness and form', so may be carcharodontosaurid.
Reference- Lapparent, 1960. Les dinosauriens du "Continental intercalaire" du Sahara central. Mem. Soc. Geol. France 88A: 1-57.
C? sp. indet. (Lapparent, 1960)
Aptian-Albian, Early Cretaceous
Elrhaz Formation, Niger
Material- (MNNHN Td. 2250) teeth (Taquet, 1976)
(MNNHN Td. 2269) teeth (Taquet, 1976)
(MNNHN coll.) anterior tooth (70 mm), lateral tooth fragment, mid caudal vertebra (>85 mm), radius (~110 mm), manual ungual (85 mm), pedal phalanx (85 mm) (Lapparent, 1960)
Comments- This material described by Lapparent was not found associated, so could belong to multiple individuals of several large theropod taxa (Deltadromeus, Bahariasaurus, Spinosaurus, Sigilmassasaurus, etc.). The tooth fragment has carcharodontosaurid enamel wrinkles.
References- Lapparent, 1960. Les dinosauriens du "Continental intercalaire" du Sahara central. Mem. Soc. Geol. France 88A: 1-57.
Taquet, 1976. Geologie et Paleontologie du gisement de Gadoufaoua (Aptian du Niger): Cahires Paleont, 191pp.
C? sp. indet. (Lapparent, 1960)
Berriasian-Barremian, Early Cretaceous
Irhazer Group, Niger
Material- (MNNHN coll.) partial cervical vertebra, two dorsal vertebrae (120 mm), two sacral vertebrae (280 mm combined), mid caudal vertebra (115 mm), three caudal vertebrae (100, 110, 120 mm), two distal chevrons (Lapparent, 1960)
Comments- This material was not found associated, so could belong to multiple individuals of several large theropod taxa (Deltadromeus, Bahariasaurus, Spinosaurus, Sigilmassasaurus, etc.).
Reference- Lapparent, 1960. Les dinosauriens du "Continental intercalaire" du Sahara central. Mem. Soc. Geol. France 88A: 1-57.
C? sp. indet. (Lapparent, 1960)
Early Cretaceous
Continental Intercalaire, Niger
Material- (MNNHN coll.; from Tefidet) two mid caudal vertebrae (85 mm) (Lapparent, 1960)
(from Akarazeras) teeth (Taquet, 1976)
Comments- This material was not found associated, so could belong to multiple individuals of several large theropod taxa (Deltadromeus, Bahariasaurus, Spinosaurus, Sigilmassasaurus, etc.).
References- Lapparent, 1960. Les dinosauriens du "Continental intercalaire" du Sahara central. Mem. Soc. Geol. France 88A: 1-57.
Taquet, 1976. Geologie et Paleontologie du gisement de Gadoufaoua (Aptian du Niger): Cahires Paleont, 191pp.
C? sp. indet. (Lapparent, 1960)
Early Cretaceous
Continental Intercalaire, Sahara Desert
Material- (MNNHN coll.) eight vertebrae, partial humerus, distal manual phalanx (Lapparent, 1960)
Comments- This material was not found associated, so could belong to multiple individuals of several large theropod taxa (Deltadromeus, Bahariasaurus, Spinosaurus, Sigilmassasaurus, etc.).
Reference- Lapparent, 1960. Les dinosauriens du "Continental intercalaire" du Sahara central. Mem. Soc. Geol. France 88A: 1-57.
C? sp. indet. (Buffetaut, 1989)
Late Albian-Early Cenomanian, Early Cretaceous
Tegama Formation?, Morocco
Reference- Buffetaut, 1989. New remains of the enigmatic dinosaur Spinosaurus from the Cretaceous of Morocco and the affinities between Spinosaurus and Baryonyx. Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie Monatshefte 1989(2):79-87.
C? sp. indet. (Lapparent, 1960)
Albian, Early Cretaceous
Continental Intercalaire, Algeria
Material- ?(MNNHN coll.; from Alrar) caudal vertebra (60 mm), pedal ungual III (100 mm) (Lapparent, 1960)
(MNNHN coll.; from Aoulef) dorsal centrum (75 mm), proximal caudal centrum (105 mm), few mid caudal vertebrae (~70-100 mm), caudal vertebra (80 mm) (Lapparent, 1960)
(from Oued Boudjihane) teeth (Bassoullet and Iliou, 1967)
Comments- This material was not found associated, so could belong to multiple individuals of several large theropod taxa (Deltadromeus, Bahariasaurus, Spinosaurus, Sigilmassasaurus, etc.). A manual ungual from Dijoua referred to C. saharicus by Lapparent matches bone taxon J of Russell (1996), a possible oviraptorosaur. A distal metatarsal from Alrar referred to C. saharicus by Lapparent is actually a manual phalanx and matches bone taxon I of Russell, which may belong to the same species as bone taxon J.
References- Lapparent, 1960. Les dinosauriens du "Continental intercalaire" du Sahara central. Mem. Soc. Geol. France 88A: 1-57.
Bassoullet and Iliou, 1967. Discovery of dinosaurs associated with crocodilians and fish in the Lower Cretaceous of the Saharan Atlas (Algeria). Société Géologique de la France, Comptes Rendus Sommaire des Sciences. 1967:294-295.
Russell, 1996. Isolated dinosaur bones from the Middle Cretaceous of the Tafilalt, Morocco. Bulletin du Muse'um national d'Histoire naturelle (4e se'r.) 18, 349-402.
C? sp. indet. (Bond and Bromley, 1970)
Late Jurassic or Early Cretaceous
Gokwe Formation, Zimbabwe
Material- teeth
Reference- Bond and Bromley, 1970. Sediments with the remains of Dinosaurs near Gokwe, Rhodesia: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, v. 8, p. 313-327.

Giganotosaurinae Coria and Currie, 2006
Definition- (Giganotosaurus carolinii, Mapusaurus rosea <- Carcharodontosaurus saharicus) (modified from Coria and Currie, 2006)
Diagnosis- (after Coria and Currie, 2006) femur with a weak fourth trochanter; shallow and broad extensor groove.
Comments- Rich et al. (2005) proposed placing Tyrannotitan outside of a Giganotosaurus + Carcharodontosaurus clade, based on mediolaterally compressed teeth and caudal pleurocoels or vascular foramina in the latter two taxa. However, Carcharodontosaurus and Giganotosaurus do not have more compressed teeth than other carnosaurs. Also, the vascular foramina of Giganotosaurus are not necessarily homologous to the pleurocoels of Carcharodontosaurus, and are seen in the more basal carcharodontosaurid Acrocanthosaurus as well. Thus the arrangement of Coria and Currie is followed, where Carcharodontosaurus is outside of a Giganotosaurinae consisting of Giganotosaurus, Mapusaurus and Tyrannotitan. Giganotosaurinae is poorly supported, but is provisionally accepted pending more detailed analysis of carcharodontosaurid interrelationships.
References- Novas, de Valais, Vickers-Rich and Rich, 2005.A large Cretaceous theropod from Patagonia, Argentina, and the evolution of carcharodontosaurids. Naturwissenschaften.
Coria and Currie, 2006. A new carcharodontosaurid (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from the Upper Cretaceous of Argentina. Geodiversitas. 28(1), 71-118.

Mapusaurus Coria and Currie, 2006
= "Mapusaurus" Fiorillo and Eberth, 2004
M. roseae Coria and Currie, 2006
= "Mapusaurus rosae" Papolio, 2004
Late Cenomanian, Late Cretaceous
Huincul Formation of Rio Limay Subgroup, Argentina
Holotype- (MCF-PVPH-108.1) nasal
Paratypes- (MCF-PVPH-108.2) partial dentary
(MCF-PVPH-108.3) (~5.5 m; juvenile) partial dentary
(MCF-PVPH-108.4) postorbital
(MCF-PVPH-108.5) incomplete lacrimal/prefrontal
(MCF-PVPH-108.6) quadrate
(MCF-PVPH-108.7) angular fragment
(MCF-PVPH-108.8) anterior dentary tooth (65x33x20 mm)
(MCF-PVPH-108.9) mid dentary tooth (71x32x17 mm)
(MCF-PVPH-108.10) posterior tooth (41x25x13 mm)
(MCF-PVPH-108.11) maxillary fragment
(MCF-PVPH-108.12) anterior nasal fragment
(MCF-PVPH-108.14) manual ungual II(?)
(MCF-PVPH-108.15) partial surangular
(MCF-PVPH-108.16) tooth (50x28x15 mm)
(MCF-PVPH-108.17) posterior nasal fragment
(MCF-PVPH-108.18) pedal phalanx IV-2
(MCF-PVPH-108.19) pedal phalanx IV-1
(MCF-PVPH-108.21) pedal phalanx IV-2
(MCF-PVPH-108.22) pedal phalanx IV-2
(MCF-PVPH-108.23) pedal phalanx III-1
(MCF-PVPH-108.24) pedal phalanx III-2
(MCF-PVPH-108.25) partial femur, pedal phalanx III-2
(MCF-PVPH-108.26) pedal phalanx III-1
(MCF-PVPH-108.27) pedal phalanx II-2(?)
(MCF-PVPH-108.28) pedal phalanx III-3
(MCF-PVPH-108.31) (~6.4 m) metatarsal III (454 mm)
(MCF-PVPH-108.32, 34-36) (~6.0-6.1 m) metatarsal II, metatarsal II (385 mm), metatarsal III (434 mm), metatarsal IV
(MCF-PVPH-108.33, 188) (~6.5-7.2 m) metatarsal II (450 mm), metatarsal III (460 mm)
(MCF-PVPH-108.37) (~7.3 m) metatarsal IV (475 mm)
(MCF-PVPH-108.38, 200) (~6.6 m) metatarsal II (415 mm), metatarsal III (>410 mm)
(MCF-PVPH-108.39) partial dentary
(MCF-PVPH-108.41) tooth (FABL >23 mm)
(MCF-PVPH-108.42) tooth (33x17.7x13.5 mm)
(MCF-PVPH-108.43) tooth (53x31x14.5 mm)
(MCF-PVPH-108.44) (~9.9 m) femur
(MCF-PVPH-108.45) incomplete humerus (~300 mm)
(MCF-PVPH-108.46) radius
(MCF-PVPH-108.48) fused proximal metacarpal II and III
(MCF-PVPH-108.50) scapula
(MCF-PVPH-108.51) partial fibula
(MCF-PVPH-108.52) partial tibia
(MCF-PVPH-108.53) partial tibia
(MCF-PVPH-108.54) partial femur
(MCF-PVPH-108.57) partial femur
(MCF-PVPH-108.58) (~9.7 m) tibia
(MCF-PVPH-108.59) partial femur
(MCF-PVPH-108.61) partial femur
(MCF-PVPH-108.62) partial tibia
(MCF-PVPH-108.63) partial tibia
(MCF-PVPH-108.64) partial femur
(MCF-PVPH-108.65) partial femur
(MCF-PVPH-108.66) partial tibia
(MCF-PVPH-108.67) (~8.1 m) tibia
(MCF-PVPH-108.68) (~9.8 m) tibia (1.04 m)
(MCF-PVPH-108.69) scapular fragment
(MCF-PVPH-108.70) incomplete astragalus
(MCF-PVPH-108.71) partial coracoid
(MCF-PVPH-108.73) partial tibia
(MCF-PVPH-108.75) mid caudal vertebra
(MCF-PVPH-108.76) mid caudal vertebra (165 mm)
(MCF-PVPH-108.78) mid caudal vertebra
(MCF-PVPH-108.79) distal caudal vertebra (97 mm)
(MCF-PVPH-108.80) posterior dorsal centrum (165 mm)
(MCF-PVPH-108.81) proximal caudal vertebra (140 mm)
(MCF-PVPH-108.82) anterior dorsal vertebra (87 mm; excluding anterior ball)
(MCF-PVPH-108.83) axial neural arch
(MCF-PVPH-108.84) mid dorsal neural arch
(MCF-PVPH-108.85) dorsal neural arch
(MCF-PVPH-108.89) fifth sacral centrum (135 mm)
(MCF-PVPH-108.90) mid cervical neural arch
(MCF-PVPH-108.95) proximal ischium
(MCF-PVPH-108.96) proximal ischium
(MCF-PVPH-108.97) dorsal chevron
(MCF-PVPH-108.100) lacrimal
(MCF-PVPH-108.101) lacrimal
(MCF-PVPH-108.102) quadrate
(MCF-PVPH-108.103) posterior dentary tooth (24x20x9 mm)
(MCF-PVPH-108.106) anterior dorsal rib
(MCF-PVPH-108.109) manual phalanx II-2 (80 mm)
(MCF-PVPH-108.110) tooth (81.5x30x10.5 mm)
(MCF-PVPH-108.111) tooth (77x38x17 mm)
(MCF-PVPH-108.113) tooth (54x19x8.5 mm)
(MCF-PVPH-108.114) tooth
(MCF-PVPH-108.115) maxilla
(MCF-PVPH-108.116) furcula or anterior gastralium
(MCF-PVPH-108.120) tooth (36x22 mm)
(MCF-PVPH-108.124) metatarsal II
(MCF-PVPH-108.125) partial dentary
(MCF-PVPH-108.128) ilium (1.05 m)
(MCF-PVPH-108.131) tooth (?x19x8 mm)
(MCF-PVPH-108.132) (~8.4 m) fibula
(MCF-PVPH-108.138) maxilla, tooth (47x23 mm)
(MCF-PVPH-108.139) partial prearticular
(MCF-PVPH-108.141) tooth (39x28x12 mm)
(MCF-PVPH-108.142) maxilla
(MCF-PVPH-108.145) (~12.2 m) pubic shaft
(MCF-PVPH-108.148) proximal pubis
(MCF-PVPH-108.149) proximal pubis
(MCF-PVPH-108.153) postorbital
(MCF-PVPH-108.162) cervical epipophysis
(MCF-PVPH-108.165) ischium (1.01 m)
(MCF-PVPH-108.166) tooth (42x23x16 mm)
(MCF-PVPH-108.167) incomplete jugal
(MCF-PVPH-108.168) jugal
(MCF-PVPH-108.169) partial maxilla, tooth (68 mm)
(MCF-PVPH-108.170) quadrate
(MCF-PVPH-108.171) tooth (56x29x16 mm)
(MCF-PVPH-108.173) tooth (>73x37 mm)
(MCF-PVPH-108.176) tooth
(MCF-PVPH-108.177) postorbital
(MCF-PVPH-108.179) splenial
(MCF-PVPH-108.180) tooth
(MCF-PVPH-108.181) ilial fragment (>1.05 m)
(MCF-PVPH-108.183) incomplete lacrimal/prefrontal
(MCF-PVPH-108.185) (~12.2 m) scapular fragment
(MCF-PVPH-108.187) scapular fragment
(MCF-PVPH-108.189) (~8.3 m) fibula
(MCF-PVPH-108.196) fibula
(MCF-PVPH-108.198) pedal ungual II or IV
(MCF-PVPH-108.201) (~6.3 m) metatarsal III (450 mm)
(MCF-PVPH-108.202) (~12.6 m) fibula (860 mm)
(MCF-PVPH-108.203) (~10.2 m) femur
(MCF-PVPH-108.205) mid caudal vertebra (120 mm)
(MCF-PVPH-108.209) first sacral centrum
(MCF-PVPH-108.210) dorsal chevron
(MCF-PVPH-108.220) partial fibula
(MCF-PVPH-108.230) gastralium fragment
(MCF-PVPH-108.233) (~9.5 m) femur
(MCF-PVPH-108.234) partial femur (1.30 m)
(MCF-PVPH-108.245) partial ilium (~1.05 m)
(MCF-PVPH-108.246) metatarsal I
(MCF-PVPH-108.247) distal caudal vertebra (44 mm)
(MCF-PVPH-108) few dorsal ribs, hundreds of dorsal rib fragments, gastralium fragments, more than nine pedal phalanges
Diagnosis- (after Coria and Currie, 2006) upper quadratojugal process of jugal splits into two prongs; small anterior mylohyoid foramen positioned above dentary contact with splenial; second and third metacarpals fused; humerus with broad distal end and little separation between condyles; brevis fossa of ilium extends deeply into excavation dorsal to ischial peduncle.
Comments- The above material comes from at least nine individuals.
This taxon was discovered in 1995, but only reported to Coria in 1997, when he and Currie examined the material. It was announced at that years Society of Vertebrate Paleontology meeting, and described briefly in an abstract (Coria and Currie, 1997). At the time, only the remains of an 8 meter long specimen were known, and it was identified as an adult. Coria and Currie returned to the site in 1998 to discover the presence of at least six individuals, some of which Currie said could be larger than Giganotosaurus’ holotype. The largest specimens are MCF-PVPH-145, 185 and 202, which are about 100-103% the size of the Giganotosaurus holotype.
The association of several individuals was suggested to be due to pack behavior. This was reported to the popular media in May 1999, and later described in another abstract (Eberth et al., 2000). Later (Eberth and McCrea, 2001), the minimum number of individuals was increased to eight. This paper finds the probable cause of death to be drought and notes the bones experienced at least two flooding events and were exposed and trampled over more than one season. However, they state several alternatives exist besides gregarious behavior to explain the find, including environmental stress and breeding. In the final publication, Coria and Currie (2006) raised the minimum number of individuals to nine.
It was reported on the internet that a magazine had termed the taxon Giganotosaurus "argentine", but this has yet to be confirmed and would be a nomen nudum in any case. Fiorillo and Eberth (2004) used the name "Mapusaurus" in their taphonomy chapter in The Dinosauria 2nd. edition, probably by accident. Papolio (2004) listed it as "Mapusaurus rosae" in a field guide.
References- Coria and Currie, 1997. A new theropod from the Rio Limay Formation. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 17(3) 40A.
Eberth, Currie, Coria, Garrido and Zonneveld, 2000. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 20 (3).
Eberth and Crea, 2001. Were large theropods gregarious? Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 21(3) 46A-47A.
Fiorillo and Eberth, 2004. Dinosaur taphonomy. in Weishampel, Dodson and Osmolska, 2004. The Dinosauria: Second Edition.
Papolio, 2004. "Animales Prehistóricos de América del Sur".
Coria and Currie, 2006. A new carcharodontosaurid (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from the Upper Cretaceous of Argentina. Geodiversitas. 28(1), 71-118.

Giganotosaurus Coria and Salgado, 1995
G. carolinii Coria and Salgado, 1995
Early Cenomanian, Late Cretaceous
Candeleros Formation of Rio Limay Subgroup, Neuquen, Argentina
Holotype- (MUCPv-Ch1) (12.2 m, 5 tons) (skull- ~1.8 m) premaxilla, maxilla, maxillary teeth (74, 97 mm), nasal, lacrimal, postorbital, quadrates (410 mm), braincase, anterior dentary, dentary tooth, tooth (>82x45x18 mm), tooth (102x39.5x22 mm), tooth (88x33.5x20 mm), axis, most postaxial cervical vertebrae, most dorsal vertebrae, dorsal ribs, first caudal vertebra, caudal vertebrae 7-21, two distal caudal vertebrae, eight chevrons, scapula (727 mm), coracoid, ilium (1.54 m), pubes (1.11 m), ischia (1.2 m), femora (1.43 m), tibia (1.12 m), fibula (835 mm), metatarsi, pedal elements
Referred- (FPDM coll.) tooth (87x44.2x19.5 mm) (Coria and Currie, 2006)
(MUCPv-52) tooth (90 mm) (Calvo, 1999)
(MUCPv-95) (~13.2 m, 6.2 tons) (skull ~1.95 m) incomplete dentary, teeth (Calvo and Coria, 2000)
tooth (56x31.5x17 mm) (Coria and Currie, 2006)
teeth (Valais and Apesteguia, 2001)
References- Coria and Sagado, 1994. A giant theropod from the middle Cretaceous of Patagonia, Argentina. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 14(3), 22A.
Coria and Salgado, 1995. A new giant carnivorous dinosaur from the Cretaceous of Patagonia. Nature 377:224–226.
Calvo, 1999. Dinosaurs and other vertebrates of the Lake Ezequiel Ramos Mexia area, Neuquen - Patagonia, Argentina. in Tomida, Rich and Vickers-Rich (eds.). Proceedings of the Second Godwanan Dinosaur Symposium. 13-45.
Calvo and Coria, 2000. New specimen of Giganotosaurus carolinii supports it as the largest theropod ever found. Gaia 15, pp. 117-122.
Valais and Apesteguia, 2001. Dientes asignables a Giganontosaurus (Carcharodontososauria, Theropoda) provenientens de “La Buitera”, Formacion Candeleros, provincia de Rio Negro: Ameghiniana, v. 38, n. 4, supplement, p. 6R-7R.
Coria and Currie, 2002. The braincase of Giganotosaurus carolinii (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Upper Cretaceous of Argentina. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 22(4), 802–811.
Coria and Currie, 2006. A new carcharodontosaurid (Dinosauria, Theropoda) from the Upper Cretaceous of Argentina. Geodiversitas. 28(1), 71-118.

Tyrannotitan Novas, de Valais, Vickers-Rich and Rich, 2005
T. chubutensis Novas, de Valais, Vickers-Rich and Rich, 2005
Aptian, Early Cretaceous
Cerro Castano Member(?) of the Cerro Barcino Formation, Chubut, Argentina
Holotype- (MPEF-PV 1156) (~11.4 m) partial dentaries, teeth, third to eighth dorsal vertebrae, eleventh to fourteenth dorsal vertebrae, ribs, proximal caudal vertebra, chevrons, proximal scapula, coracoid, distal humerus, ulna, ilial fragments, incomplete pubes, ischia, femur, fibula, metatarsal II
Paratype- (MPEF-PV 1157) (~12.2 m) jugals, dentary (680 mm), teeth, atlas, ninth cervical vertebra, seventh dorsal vertebra, tenth dorsal vertebra, thirteenth dorsal vertebra, ribs, five sacral centra, distal caudal vertebrae, femur (1.40 m), incomplete metatarsal II, phalanx II-1, phalanx II-2, pedal ungual II, phalanx III-3
Diagnosis- (after Novas et al., 2005) teeth with bilobate denticles on rostral carina; deep mental groove on dentary; posterior dorsal vertebrae with strongly developed ligament scars on neural spines.
Comments- Novas et al. (2005) list three pedal phalanges as being present in the holotype ("2.I, 2.II and 3.III"), but also illustrate an ungual supposedly from digit II, which wouldn't correspond to any of these. It's possible the preserved phalanges are I-2, II-2 and III-3 instead. The skeletal reconstruction only shows two phalanges- ungual III and a distal phalanx.
References- Rich, Vickers-Rich, Novas, Cúneo, Puerta and Vacca, 2000. Theropods from the Middle Cretaceous Chubut Group of the San Jorge sedimentary basin, Central Patagonia. A preliminary note. GAIA 15:111-115.
Novas, de Valais, Vickers-Rich and Rich, 2005.A large Cretaceous theropod from Patagonia, Argentina, and the evolution of carcharodontosaurids. Naturwissenschaften.

Allosauridae Marsh, 1878
Definition- (Allosaurus fragilis <- Sinraptor dongi, Carcharodontosaurus saharicus, Passer domesticus) (Sereno, 2005)
Other definitions- (Allosaurus fragilis <- Sinraptor dongi) (modified from Padian and Hutchinson, 1997)
(Allosaurus fragilis <- Sinraptor dongi, Monolophosaurus jiangi, Cryolophosaurus ellioti, Carcharodontosaurus saharicus) (modified from Sereno, 1998)
(Allosaurus fragilis <- Sinraptor dongi, Carcharodontosaurus saharicus) (Holtz et al., 2004)
= Labrosauridae Marsh, 1882
= Antrodemidae Stromer, 1934
= Allosaurinae Marsh, 1878 sensu Paul, 1988
= Allosauridae sensu Padian and Hutchinson, 1997
Definition- (Allosaurus fragilis <- Sinraptor dongi) (modified)
= Allosauridae sensu Padian et al., 1999
Definition- (Allosaurus fragilis <- Sinraptor dongi) (modified)
= Allosauridae sensu Holtz et al., 2004
Definition- (Allosaurus fragilis <- Sinraptor dongi, Carcharodontosaurus saharicus)
Comments- Sereno's 2005 definition differs from Holtz et al.'s (2004) by including Passer as an external specifier. In this case, I agree it's useful for cases like Paul (2002), Longrich (2001) and Coria and Salgado (1995). I wonder if Tyrannosaurus might be a useful external specifier as well, as tyrannosaurids and allosaurids have often been posited as sister groups (Paul, 1988; Kurzanov, 1989; Molnar et al., 1990). However, in all these cases, Carcharodontosaurus was seen as an intermediate between Allosaurus and Tyrannosaurus, which would keep tyrannosaurids from being allosaurids under Sereno's and Holtz et al.'s definitions.

unnamed allosaurid (Perez-Moreno, Sanz, Sudre and Sige, 1993)
Early Valanginian, Early Cretaceous
unnamed formation, Gard, France
Material- (MM-2) proximal manual phalanx II-2
(MM-8) fragmentary dorsal rib
(MM-9) fragmentary dorsal rib
(MM-11) manual ungual II
(MM-12) manual ungual III (~82 mm)
(MM-13) manual ungual III
(MM-14) manual phalanx III-2 (~50 mm)
(MM-15) manual phalanx III-3 (67 mm)
(MM-16) metacarpal III (10.2 mm)
(MM-17) manual ungual II (~114 mm)
(MM-18) manual phalanx II-1 (10.2 mm)
(MM-19) metacarpal I (82 mm)
(MM-20) humerus (~210 mm)
(MM-21) scapular fragment
Comments- Similar to Allosaurus in the medial concavity of metacarpal I, in which it is unlike Acrocanthosaurus. Thus it is provisionally referred to this family.
References- Perez-Moreno, Sanz, Sudre and Sige, 1993. A theropod dinosaur from the Lower Cretaceous of Southern France. Rev. Paleobiol., Spec. Vol., 7: 173-181.

unnamed allosaurid (Zinke, 1998)
Early Kimmeridgian, Late Jurassic
Alcobaca Formation, Portugal
Diagnosis- (after Zinke, 1998) differs from Allosaurus in lacking downward-pointing blood grooves.
Material- (IPFUB GUI D 66) tooth (Rauhut, 2000)
(IPFUB GUI D 191-194) four teeth (~8.75 mm)
(IPFUB GUI Th 4) (juvenile) maxilla (Rauhut and Fecner, 2005)
Comments- Chure (2000) doubted they could be referred to Allosauridae, with the rather weak defense of "they are just more similar to Allosaurus than other taxa", which would be in itself an acceptable reason to refer them to this family.
References- Zinke, 1998. Small theropod teeth from the Upper Jurassic coal mine of Guimarota (Portugal). Palaontologische Zeitschrift 72: 179-189.
Chure, 2000. A new species of Allosaurus from the Morrison Formation of Dinosaur National Monument (Utah-Colorado) and a revision of the theropod family Allosauridae. Ph.D. dissertation, Columbia University, 1-964.
Rauhut, 2000. The dinosaur fauna from the Guimarota mine, Chapter 11: In: Guimarota, A Jurassic Ecosystem, edited by Martin T., and Krebs B., Verlag Dr. Friedrich Pfeil, p. 75-82.
Rauhut and Fecner, 2005. Early development of the facial region in a non-avian theropod dinosaur: Proceedings of the Royal Society, b, v. 171, 1179-1183.

unnamed possible allosaurid (Raath and McIntosh, 1987)
Tithonian, Late Jurassic
Kadze Formation, Zimbabwe
Material- (QG 65) two femora
Reference- Raath and McIntosh, 1987. Sauropod dinosaurs from the central Zambezi Valley, Zimbabwe, and the age of the Kadzi Formation. South African Journal of Geology 90(2):107-119.

unnamed possible allosaurid (Park et al., 2000)
Hauterivian, Early Cretaceous
Hasandong Formation of the Shindong Group, South Korea
Material- (KPE 8004) tooth
(KPE 8005) tooth
References- Park, Yank, and Currie, 2000. Early Cretaceous dinosaur teeth of Korea. in Lee (ed.), 2000. International Dinosaur Symposium for Kosong County in Korea. Paleontological Society of Korea Special Publication. 4:85-98.
Lee, 2003. Dinosaur bones and eggs in South Korea. Memoir of the Fukui Prefectural Dinosaur Museum. 2:113-121.

unnamed possible allosaurid (Dong, 1997)
Barremian-Albian, Early Cretaceous
Xinminbao Group, Gansu, China

Material- (IVPP V.11122-3) tooth (24 mm)
Comments- Though referred to the Allosauridae by Dong (1997), Chure (2001) found no support for this assignment and considered it Theropoda indet.. The tooth is moderately tall and recurved with both mesial and distal serrations. The former may be confined to the apical half and seem subequal in size to the distal ones.
References- Dong, 1997. On small theropods from Mazongshan Area, Gansu Province, China. Pp. 13-18. in Dong, Z., ed. Sino-Japanese Silk Road Dinosaur Expedition. China Ocean Press, Beijing. 114 p.
Chure, 2000. A new species of Allosaurus from the Morrison Formation of Dinosaur National Monument (Utah-Colorado) and a revision of the theropod family Allosauridae. Ph.D. dissertation, Columbia University, 1-964.

undescribed allosaurid (Matsukawa and Obata, 1994)
Aptian-Albian, Early Cretaceous
Zouyun Formation, Mongolia
Comments- Matsukawa and Obata (1994) report through personal communication with Mateer (1992) that an indeterminate allosaurid was discovered in the Aptian-Albian Zouyun Formation of Mongolia.
Reference- Matsukawa and Obata, 1994. Cretaceous, a contribution to dinosaur facies in Asia based on molluscan paleontology and stratigraphy. Cretaceous Research 101-125.

Antrodemus Leidy, 1870
A. valens (Leidy, 1870) Leidy, 1870
= Poekilopleuron valens Leidy 1870
= Megalosaurus valens (Leidy, 1870) Nopsca, 1901
= Allosaurus valens (Leidy, 1870) Gilmore, 1920
Morrison Formation?, Colorado, US
Late Jurassic?
Holotype- (USNM 218) posterior half of sixth? caudal centrum (~125 mm)
Diagnosis- Indeterminate at the level of Allosaurus at least.
Comments- Chure (2000) finds that this specimen is probably Allosaurus based on comparison to other Morrison genera, though I'd be curious to see how it compares to other carnosaurs. He states that it cannot be determined which species of Allosaurus it belongs to, so it is indeterminate at that level at least. One good reason Chure has for retaining the name Allosaurus is that even though its holotype is also indeterminate to the species level, there is a topotype from the same quarry. The exact provenence of Antrodemus on the other hand, is unknown.
References- Leidy, 1870. Remarks on Poicilopleuron valens, Clidastes intermedius, Leiodon proriger, Baptemys wyomingensis, and Emys stevensonianus. Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia 1870: 3-5.
Nopcsa, 1901. Synopsis und Abstammung der Dinosaurier. Foldt. Kozl. 31: 247-288.
Gilmore, 1920. Osteology of the carnivorous Dinosauria in the United States National Museum, with special reference to the genera Antrodemus (Allosaurus) and Ceratosaurus. Bull. U. S. Nat. Mus. CX 1-154, 36 pls., 78 text-figs.

"Madsenius" Lambert, 1990
"M. trux" unpublished
Kimmeridgian-Tithonian, Late Jurassic
Morrison Formation, US
Material- partial skull, other remains?
Comments- This was orginally reported in a children's book. Olshevsky (online, 2004) stated that Bakker’s type species for "Madsenius" will be "M. trux". Bakker is supposedly describing this taxon based on material previously referred to Allosaurus.
References- Lambert, 1990. The Dinosaur Data Book.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/paleo_bio_dinosaur_ontology/message/6655

Saurophaganax Chure, 1995
= "Saurophagus" Stovall vide Ray, 1941
S. maximus Chure, 1995
= "Saurophagus maximus" Stovall vide Ray, 1941 (preoccupied Swainson, 1831)
= Allosaurus maximus (Chure, 1995) Smith, 1998
Late Kimmeridgian, Late Jurassic
Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation, Oklahoma, US
Holotype- (OMNH 1123) anterior dorsal neural arch
Paratypes- (OMNH 780) manual ungual I
(OMNH 1102) mid chevron
(OMNH 1104) mid chevron
(OMNH 1122) proximal caudal neural arch
(OMNH 1126) pedal phalanx III-3
(OMNH 1127) manual phalanx III-1
(OMNH 1128) incomplete manual ungual III
(OMNH 1135) atlas
(OMNH 1142) partial quadrate
(OMNH 1152) lateral tooth
(OMNH 1153) lateral tooth
(OMNH 1180) partial mid chevron
(OMNH 1191) metatarsal III
(OMNH 1192) metatarsal III
(OMNH 1193) metatarsal IV
(OMNH 1306) metatarsal IV
(OMNH 1338) partial ilium, pedal ungual IV
(OMNH 1364) radius
(OMNH 1370) tibia (955 mm)
(OMNH 1396) metatarsal IV
(OMNH 1415) radius
(OMNH 1425) distal pubis
(OMNH 1433) two anterior sacral centra, sacral rib
(OMNH 1434) incomplete ulna
(OMNH 1438) mid chevron
(OMNH 1439) mid chevron
(OMNH 1444) mid cervical vertebra
(OMNH 1446) partial posterior cervical centrum
(OMNH 1450) anterior dorsal centrum
(OMNH 1461) metatarsal II
(OMNH 1680) lateral tooth
(OMNH 1681) distal metatarsal I
(OMNH 1684) mid chevron
(OMNH 1685) mid chevron
(OMNH 1693) distal humerus
(OMNH 1703) proximal ischium
(OMNH 1707) proximal pubis
(OMNH 1708) femur (1059 mm)
(OMNH 1737) proximal ischium
(OMNH 1771) postorbital
(OMNH 1904) proximal caudal vertebra
(OMNH 1906) anterior dorsal centrum
(OMNH 1911) pedal phalanx IV-1
(OMNH 1912) pedal ungual IV
(OMNH 1914) pedal ungua IV
(OMNH 1915) pedal ungual I
(OMNH 1916) pedal phalanx III-1
(OMNH 1918) pedal phalanx II-1
(OMNH 1919) pedal phalanx III-2
(OMNH 1920) manual phalanx II-2
(OMNH 1921) manual phalanx II-1
(OMNH 1924) metatarsal III
(OMNH 1925) pedal phalanx III-3
(OMNH 1927) mid caudal vertebra
(OMNH 1928) mid caudal vertebra, metacarpal I
(OMNH 1929) metacarpal II
(OMNH 1935) humerus (545 mm)
(OMNH 1947) fifth sacral vertebra
(OMNH 2114) femur
(OMNH 2145) partial quadrate
(OMNH 2146) mid cervical vertebra
(OMNH 2147) mid cervical vertebra
(OMNH 2149) distal tibia
(OMNH 2154) incomplete scapula
(OMNH 4016) partial scapula
(OMNH 4666; lectotype of "Saurophagus maximus") tibia
(OMNH 10357) proximal caudal vertebra
(OMNH 10373) pedal phalanx III-1
(OMNH 10375) pedal phalanx IV-2
(OMNH 10376) pedal phalanx I-1
(OMNH 10377) pedal phalanx I-1
(OMNH 10381) femur
(OMNH 10732) pedal phalanx III-1
(OMNH 52384) pedal phalanx II-2
(OMNH 52385) pedal phalanx II-1
(OMNH 52386) pedal phalanx III-2
(OMNH 52387) pedal phalanx III-2
(OMNH 52388) pedal phalanx III-3
(OMNH 52389) pedal phalanx IV-1
(OMNH 52390) pedal phalanx IV-2
(OMNH 52391) pedal phalanx IV-3
(OMNH 52392) pedal phalanx IV-3
(OMNH 52394) pedal ungual II
(OMNH 52393) pedal ungual II
(OMNH 52395) pedal ungual III
(OMNH coll.) several posterior dorsal centra, metacarpal III, three incomplete fibulae, two metatarsal II's, pedal phalanx III-1, pedal ungual
Diagnosis- (after Chure, 2000) postorbital lacks rugosity; atlas lacks prezygapophysis for proatlas, does not roof over neural canal; some cervicals with nearly vertical postzygapophyses; horizontal lamina along base of each side of pectoral neural spines arising from spine base cranially, free caudally; pleurocoels well developed further posteriorly than Allosaurus; chevrons craniocaudally expanded distally; femur bowed laterally; no astragalar butress on anterodistal tibia; distomedial crest of tibia more strongly developed than Allosaurus; metatarsal IV less divergent distally than Allosaurus.
Comments- At least four individuals are represented by the OMNH material. Although Chure (1995) accepted the validity of the name Saurophagus maximus, he later (2000) viewed it as a nomen nudum.
References- Ray, 1941. Big for his day. Nat. Hist. 48 36-39, illustr.
Chure, 1995. A reassessment of the gigantic theropod Saurophagus maximus from the Morrison Formation (Upper Jurassic) of Oklahoma, USA. Sixth Symposium on Mesozoic Terrestrial Ecosystems and Biota. Pp. 103-106.
Smith, 1998. A morphometric analysis of Allosaurus. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 18(1): 126-142.
Chure, 2000. A new species of Allosaurus from the Morrison Formation of Dinosaur National Monument (Utah-Colorado) and a revision of the theropod family Allosauridae. Ph.D. dissertation, Columbia University, 1-964.

"Wyomingraptor" Bakker, 1997
Kimmeridgian-Tithonian, Late Jurassic
Morrison Formation, Wyoming, US
Material- (TATE coll.) (juvenile?) humerus, ulna, radius, semilunate carpal, manus
Description- arm 25-30% shorter compared to body than in Allosaurus; very robust; radius and ulna shorter than manual ungual I; manual ungual I long and straight with large flexor tubercle.
Comments- This name was published in the column "Dr. Bob's Dinofacts" in response to a question from a reader. It is suggested (though not formally proposed) as a new generic name for a carnosaur presently on display at the Tate Museum under the label Allosaurus. A photo is online here.
References- Bakker, 1997. Dr. Bob's Dinofacts. Tate Geological Times 5(2) March/April 1997: p. 3.
Hand and Bakker, 2000. Implications of the Functional Morphology of a New Allosaurid Forearm from the Como Bluffs. The Florida Symposium on Dinosaur Bird Evolution. Publications in Paleontology No.2, Graves Museum of Archaeology and Natural History 17.

Allosaurus Marsh, 1877
= Creosaurus Marsh, 1878
= Epanterias Cope, 1878
= Labrosaurus Marsh, 1879
Diagnosis- (modified from Chure, 2000) fenestrate dorsal wall of maxillary antrum; spindle-shaped foramen on lateral surface of sacral centrum 4; obturator process with long anteriorly directed lamina that extends to level of puboischiadic contact.
Comments- It has become common (e.g. Paul, 1988; Britt, 1991) to recognize two types of normal-sized Morrison Allosaurus- one with a shorter snout and pointed lacrimal horns (usually called A. fragilis) and another with a long snout and rounded lacrimal horns (usually called A. atrox, and sometimes separated as Creosaurus). While A. fragilis sensu stricto has been based mainly on the A. fragilis topotype, the 'A. atrox' morphology has not been based on the Creosaurus atrox holotype. Thus, actual discussion of the latter specimen will appear further down, while the long-snouted morphotype will be called 'A. atrox' for this section. Regarding the supposedly shorter skull of A. fragilis, Chure (2000) notes the only short skull known is that of USNM 4734, which was found disarticulated. When it was reconstructed by Gilmore (1920), he had to "comprimise in regard to the exact articulation of the elements". There are large plaster filled gaps in the specimen, the contact between the maxilla, jugal and lacrimal is missing, the dentary is from another specimen (USNM 8335), the other mandible is
plaster, the palate is fragmentary, and the postorbital regions are distorted judging by their asymmetry. Chure notes the maxilla is reconstructed too far posteriorly, as the lacrimal articulation of the dorsal process is projecting into the antorbital fenestra. The angle between the maxillary body and its dorsal process is similar to other Allosaurus specimens, which wouldn't make sense if the snout were shorter. Similarily, the angle between the anterior and ventral lacrimal processes is in the middle of the range Allosaurus exhibits, with Cleveland-Lloyd 'A.atrox' specimens showing marked variation. The nasal of USNM 4734 is
broken and the anterior part moved dorsally and rotated ventrally. The lacrimal horn shape shows many intermediates between tall and triangular (USNM 4734) and low and rounded (DINO 2650). There is an example of a triangular lacrimal on a long skull (MOR 693). Contra Paul, triangular lacrimals are known from the Cleveland-Lloyd quarry (eg. UU 40-581). Though Paul claimed 'A. atrox' has a more robust neck, therte is no difference when cervical width/length ratios are compared. Similarily, though Paul claimed 'A. atrox' has a more robust forelimb, no difference was noted when humeral circumference and length were quantitatively compared (circumference/length ratio .45 in A. fragilis, .36-.49 in 'A. atrox'). Finally, both "species" are found in the same quarry, as evidenced by AMNH 600 (referred to A. fragilis by Paul) and AMNH 666 (which he referred to 'A. atrox'). This is contrary to the stratigraphic distinction supported by Bakker and others. In conclusion, there is no evidence for the fragilis/atrox dichotomy advocated by Paul and Bakker. All Allosaurus are long-snouted.
References- Marsh, 1877. Notice of new dinosaurian reptiles from the Jurassic formation. Amer. Jour. Sci. 3 pp. 514-516.
Cope, 1878. On the saurians of the Dakota Cretaceous of Colorado. Nature 18: 476.
Marsh, 1878. Notice of new dinosaurian reptiles. Am. J. Sci. (ser. 3)15: 241-244.
Marsh, 1879, Principal characters of American Jurassic dinosaurs. Part 1: American Journal of Science, 3rd series, v. 16, p. 411-416.
Gilmore, 1920. Osteology of the carnivorous Dinosauria in the United States National Museum, with special reference to the genera Antrodemus (Allosaurus) and Ceratosaurus. Bull. U. S. Nat. Mus. CX 1-154, 36 pls., 78 text-figs.
Paul, 1988. Predatory Dinosaurs of the World. Simon & Schuster, New York.
Britt, 1991. Theropods of Dry Mesa Quarry (Morrison Formation, Late Jurassic), Colorado, with emphasis on the osteology of Torvosaurus tanneri. Brigham Young University Geology Studies 37 p. 1-72.
Chure, 2000. A new species of Allosaurus from the Morrison Formation of Dinosaur National Monument (Utah-Colorado) and a revision of the theropod family Allosauridae. Ph.D. dissertation, Columbia University, 1-964.
A. "jimmadseni" Chure, 2000 vide Glut, 2003
Kimmeridgian, Late Jurassic
Brushy Basin Member?, Salt Wash Member of Morrison Formation, Utah, Wyoming, US
Material- ?(BYU 571/8901) (adult) incomplete skull (lacking dorsal snout), mandible, atlas, axis, partial scapula, coracoid, humerus (420 mm), pubis, femur, tibia, metatarsal II (Smith et al., 1999)
(DINO 11541) (5.6 m, 614 kg, subadult) right half of skull (630 mm), stapes, partial sclerotic ring, mandible, (presacral column 1.814 m) second through eleventh cervical vertebrae, sixth through eighth cervical ribs, first through twelfth dorsal vertebrae, second through twelfth dorsal ribs, eighteen rows of gastralia, sacrum (438 mm), firsth through eighth caudal vertebrae (722 mm), midcaudal vertebra, sixteen distal caudal vertebrae (991 mm), seventeen chevrons, scapulae, coracoids (133 mm), furcula, humeri, radius, ulna, carpus, manus, keratinous sheath of manual ungual I, ilia, pubes, ischia (454 mm), femora, tibiae, fibulae, astragalus, calcaneum, distal tarsals 3, distal tarsal IV, metatarsal I, metatarsal II (182 mm), phalanx II-1, phalanx II-2, metatarsal III (225 mm), phalanx III-1, phalanx III-2, metatarsal IV (195 mm), phalanx IV-1, phalanx IV-2, phalanx IV-3, phalanx IV-4, pedal ungual IV (Chure, 2000)
(NAMAL coll.) (4 m; juvenile) (skull 360 mm) maxilla, prefrontal, postorbital, jugals, quadratojugals, squamosals, quadrates, vomer, palatine, pterygoids, partial braincase, dentaries, splenials, surangulars, prearticulars, articular, hyoids, cervical vertebrae 3-10, dorsal vertebrae 1-13, ribs, gastralia, sacrum, caudal vertebrae except some mid caudals, pectoral girdle, forelimbs, hindlimb, skin impression (300^2 mm) (Pinegar, Loewen, Cloward, Hunter and Weege, 2003)
(NAMAL coll.) (8.8 m; adult) material including pubis (Pinegar, Loewen, Cloward, Hunter and Weege, 2003)
Diagnosis- (after Chure, 2000) compared to A. fragilis- cranial narial fossa less well defined; row of neurovascular foramina below antorbital fenestra in maxilla; large foramen between lacrimal and jugal at posteroventral corner of antorbital fossa; larger maxillary antrum; rounded lacrimal horn (distortion?); lateral pneumatic recess of lacrimal absent (distortion?); lateral vertical ridge on lacrimal horn; lacrimal horn not rugose; straight ventral margin of jugal; parietals fused posteriorly; parietals taller than wide in posterior view; basipterygoid recess well marked and invasive; myohyloid foramen nearly enclosed ventrally; retroarticular process shorter posteriorly; teardrop-shaped internal mandibular fenestra; nineteen dentary teeth; axial intercentrum rotated dorsally; axial intercentrum with flared rim; odontoid process of axis tall and narrow in anterior view; third cervical neural spine slanted posteriorly; fourth through sixth neural spines more anteroposteriorly elongate; cervical pleurocoels change in size throughout the vertebral column; cervical epipophyses mediolaterally compressed; eleven cervical vertebrae; main hypapophysis on presacral 11; accessory ossifications on the anterior and posterior edges of proximal caudal neural spines; more pronounced notch between acromion process and anterior coracoid edge; scapular blade not as expanded distally; coracoid extremely thin anteriorly; more gracile ulna; longer thinner olecranon process; ulnar entocondyle lower; straighter ulnar shaft; proximal and distal ulnar ends offset by about 45 degrees; low vertical ridge above acetabulum; anteroposteriorly elongate obturator notch in pubis delimited by triangular processes; pubic boot less tall and massive; femoral head is directed ventromedially; strongly developed mediodistal crest on femur; less curved cnemial crest; elongate proximolateral corner of pedal phalanx III-2.
Comments- DINO 11541 is intended as the holotype. This was discovered in 1990, though the skull was not located until 1996. The only other fossil in the quarry is DINO 16456, which consists of six proximal caudals and chevrons of a much larger theropod. It is unfortunately difficult to continue collection of this specimen. Names in theses aren't usually listed in this website, and this one is only because it was later published by Glut (2003). Glut's work includes a caveat to the effect that it is not available to establish new taxonomy however, so the name remains unofficial.
Description- Only the left half of the skull is preserved, but every element is represented except the vomer. The sclerotic ring is preserved, as it is in A. fragilis specimen MOR 693. It probably contained around 32 plates. The ninth cervical centrum has two pairs of pleurocoels. There is uncertainty regarding the number of cervicals versus dorsals. No ribs were found in the transition area, but Chure (2000) identifies presacral 11 as being a cervical based on the parapophysis, which is located entirely on the centrum. I think it may be a dorsal because it has a hypapophysis. The accessory ossifications on the caudal neural spines are compared to laminar spinous processes in Alligator cervicals, and hypothesized to be the result of a well developed ligamentum elasticum interlaminare. I feel A. fragilis may have had similar structures, though they were unossified. This is because A. fragilis has a similar step in the anterior edge of its caudal neural spines, which are filled with the accessory ossifications in A. "jimmadseni". There are eighteen rows of gastralia in the complete series. The first is composed of only two elements, but the rest are composed of four. Gilmore (1920) erroneously thought there were seven elements in each row in A. fragilis because USNM 4734 sustained an injury in that area that broke many gastralia, forming false joints between them. His "single median gastralium" was a furcula. The humeri are dissimilar from each other, though only partially due to postmotrem deformation it seems. The manus is complete except for the distal portions of unguals I and III. Manual ungual III has a weak proximodorsal lip. There is a nutrient foramen on the ilium, above the acetabulum and anterior to the vertical ridge. Chure suggests the supposedly pneumatic foramen in Piatnitzkysaurus' ilium is actually neurovascular, and cites a Megalosaurus ilium (BMNH R1100) with a similar structure. The obturator process of the ischium has a remarkably elongate proximal corner, extending anteriorly past the pubic peduncle. Examination of other Allosaurus specimens indicates this was the normal condition, and that the thin lamina had broken off in most specimens.
Smith et al. (1999) described a specimen from the Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation in Utah which I tentatively refer to A. "jimmadseni" based on the straight ventral jugal margin, dorsally rotated axial intercentrum and slightly flared axial intercentral rim. It has a perhaps pathologically fused ectopterygoid and pterygoid (right side only), less disinct coracoid tuber, and humerus with greater torsion than A. fragilis. Bybee and Smith (1999) note it has an ossified sphenethmoid, very thin parasphenoid rostrum, posteriorly oriented basisphenoid recess, coalesced cranial nerve foramina at base of occipital condyle, and more horizontally oriented paroccipital processes than A. fragilis.
Skin impressions found with the juvenile consist of 2-3mm wide scales (Pinegar et al., 2003).
References- Gilmore, 1920. Osteology of the carnivorous Dinosauria in the United States National Museum, with special reference to the genera Antrodemus (Allosaurus) and Ceratosaurus. Bull. U. S. Nat. Mus. CX 1-154, 36 pls., 78 text-figs.
Chure and Madsen, 1996. On the presence of furculae in some non-maniraptoran theropods. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 16(3): 573-577.
Glut, 1997. Dinosaurs - The Encyclopedia. McFarland Press, Jefferson, NC. 1076pp.
Chure, 1999. The wrist of Allosaurus and the evolution of the semilunate carpal. JVP 19(3) 38A.
Bybee and Smith, 1999. A large, unusual allosaurid skull from Eastern Utah. SVP 19(3) 35A.
Smith, Richmond and Bybee, 1999. Morphological variation in a large specimen of Allosaurus fragilis, Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation, Eastern Utah. in Gillette, ed. Vertebrate Paleontology in Utah. pp. 135-141.
Chure, 2000. A new species of Allosaurus from the Morrison Formation of Dinosaur National Monument (Utah-Colorado) and a revision of the theropod family Allosauridae. Ph.D. dissertation, Columbia University, 1-964.
Chure, 2000. New Data on the Gastral Basket of Allosaurus. The Florida Symposium on Dinosaur Bird Evolution. Publications in Paleontology No.2, Graves Museum of Archaeology and Natural History 13.
Glut, 2003. Dinosaurs - The Encyclopedia - Supplement 3. McFarland Press, Jefferson, NC.
Pinegar, Loewen, Cloward, Hunter and Weege, 2003. A juvenile allosaur with preserved integument from the basal Morrison Formation of Central Wyoming. JVP 23(3), 87A-88A.
unnamed clade (atrox + fragilis + europaeus < "jimmadseni")
Diagnosis- ventral margin of jugal deflected at midlength.
A. atrox (Marsh, 1878) Paul, 1987
= Creosaurus atrox Marsh, 1878
= Antrodemus atrox (Marsh, 1878) Gilmore, 1920
Late Kimmeridgian, Late Jurassic
Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation, Wyoming, US
Holotype- (YPM 1890) premaxilla with teeth, jugal, three teeth, hyoid, anterior dorsal neural spine, proximal rib of posterior dorsal, second and third sacral centra, third sacral rib, two incomplete proximal caudal neural arches, two mid caudal centra, four ends of distal caudal centra, incomplete distal caudal vertebra, sternum? (lost), ilium (710 mm), astragalus, distal tarsal III, pedal phalanx II-1, pedal phalanx III-1, pedal ungual III, pedal phalanx IV-1
Diagnosis- second and third sacral centra with V-shaped venter; vertical ridge over acetabulum like A. "jimmadseni".
Comments- This specimen is from the Late Kimmeridgian Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation in Wyoming. The jugal shows an A. fragilis-like ventral deflection, but the ilium has an A. "jimmadseni"-like vertical ridge that Chure (2000) states "is not present on any A. fragilis specimen". Chure never mentions either of these characters in reference to systematic position and merely refers A. atrox to Allosaurus sp.. Indeed, he says there are no characters to differentiate it from either species. Odd. A. atrox also has a fossa on the dorsal jugal process that is apparently natural. An A. fragilis specimen (AMNH 5753) has a similarily placed, but shallower fossa. Finally, Chure notes that the second and third sacrals of A. atrox are V-shaped ventrally in section, unlike those of either Allosaurus species. The fourth and fifth sacrals of A. "jimmadseni" have this type of venter, but the fourth sacral centra of all Allosaurus specimens have a large (pneumatic?) lateral
foramen, unlike these sacrals. So the sacrum is different from other Allosaurus specimens, no matter which vertebrae are represented. I think there is a possibility Allosaurus atrox is a valid species, but will withold final judgement until Chure's work is published without the typos and inconsistant statements in this thesis.
References- Marsh, 1878. Notice of new dinosaurian reptiles. Am. J. Sci. (ser. 3)15: 241-244.
Paul, 1987. The science and art of restoring the life appearance of dinosaurs and their relatives: a rigorous how-to guide. In Dinosaurs Past and Present. Volume II (S.J. Czerkas and E.E. Olson, Eds.), pp. 4 -49. Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History/Univ. of Washington Press. Seattle.
Gilmore, 1920. Osteology of the carnivorous Dinosauria in the United States National Museum, with special reference to the genera Antrodemus (Allosaurus) and Ceratosaurus. Bull. U. S. Nat. Mus. CX 1-154, 36 pls., 78 text-figs.
Chure, 2000. A new species of Allosaurus from the Morrison Formation of Dinosaur National Monument (Utah-Colorado) and a revision of the theropod family Allosauridae. Ph.D. dissertation, Columbia University, 1-964.
A. fragilis Marsh, 1877
pr= Allosaurus lucaris Marsh, 1878
= Epanterias amplexus Cope, 1878
= Camptonotus amplus Marsh, 1879
pr= Labrosaurus lucaris (Marsh, 1878) Marsh, 1879
= Labrosaurus ferox Marsh, 1884
= Camptosaurus amplus (Marsh, 1879) Marsh, 1885
= Allosaurus ferox Marsh, 1896
= Labrosaurus fragilis (Marsh, 1877) Nopsca, 1901
pr= Antrodemus lucaris (Marsh, 1878) Hay, 1902
= Antrodemus fragilis (Marsh, 1877) Lapparent and Zbyszewski, 1957
= Antrodemus ferox (Marsh, 1896) Ostrom and McIntosh, 1966
= Allosaurus amplexus Paul, 1988
= Allosaurus "whitei" Pickering, 1996
pr= Allosaurus "carnegeii" Levin, 2003
Kimmeridgian-Early Tithonian, Late Jurassic
Brushy Basin and Salt Wash Members of the Morrison Formation, Colorado, Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation, New Mexico, Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation, Utah, Brushy Basin and Salt Wash Members of the Morrison Formation, Wyoming, US
Diagnosis- (modified from Chure, 2000) two large laterally open lacrimal foramina; proportionally shorter metacarpal I than A. "jimmadseni".
Holotype- (YPM 1930) tooth (55 mm), incomplete cervical or anterior dorsal centrum; incomplete posterior dorsal centrum (85 mm), posterior dorsal centrum (105 mm), two dorsal rib fragments, humeral fragment, pedal phalanx III-1 (109 mm)
Topotype- (USNM 4734) (7.4 m, 1.01 tons) skull (682 mm), atlas (28 mm), axis (85 mm), third cervical vertebra (105 mm), third cervical rib (268 mm), fourth cervical vertebra (102 mm), fourth cervical rib, fifth cervical vertebra (109 mm), fifth cervical rib, sixth cervical vertebra (111 mm), sixth cervical rib, seventh cervical vertebra (115 mm), eighth cervical vertebra (115 mm), eighth cervical rib, ninth cervical vertebra (123 mm), ninth cervical rib, tenth cervical vertebra, (dorsal series ~1107 mm) first dorsal vertebra (88 mm), second dorsal vertebra (77 mm), third dorsal vertebra (74 mm), fourth dorsal centrum (72 mm), fifth dorsal vertebra (74 mm), sixth dorsal vertebra (81 mm), seventh dorsal vertebra (~81 mm), eighth dorsal vertebra, ninth dorsal vertebra (85 mm), tenth dorsal vertebra (94 mm), eleventh dorsal vertebra (93 mm), twelfth dorsal vertebra (99 mm), thirteenth dorsal vertebra (106 mm), dorsal ribs, gastralia, (sacrum 536 mm) first sacral vertebra (116 mm), second sacral vertebra (104 mm), third sacral vertebra (104 mm), fourth sacral vertebra (108 mm), fifth sacral vertebra (104 mm), thirty-three caudal vertebrae, scapulae, coracoids, furcula, humerus (310 mm), radius (222 mm), ulna (263 mm), intermedium, radiale, ulnare, distal carpal II, distal carpal III, metacarpal I (73 mm), phalanx I-1 (136,138 mm), manual ungual I (118, 120 mm), metacarpal II (125, 122 mm), phalanx II-1 (94, 94 mm), phalanx II-2 (102 mm), manual ungual II (95 mm), metacarpal III (105, 97 mm), phalanx III-1 (50, 42 mm), phalanx III-2 (41, 43 mm), phalanx III-3 (52, 55 mm), manual ungual III (61, 59 mm), ilia (672, 720 mm), pubes (680 mm), ischia (575 mm), femora (770 mm), tibia (690 mm), fibula (623 mm), astragalus (132 mm wide, 115 mm high), calcaneum, distal tarsal III, distal tarsal IV, metatarsal I (85 mm), phalanx I-1 (70 mm), pedal ungual I (~70 mm), metatarsal II (270 mm), phalanx II-1 (120 mm), phalanx II-2 (80 mm), metatarsal III (327 mm), phalanx III-1 (110 mm), phalanx III-2 (~90 mm), phalanx III-3 (66 mm), metatarsal IV (275 mm), phalanx IV-1 (75 mm), phalanx IV-2 (50 mm), phalanx IV-3 (30 mm), phalanx IV-4 (29 mm) (Gilmore, 1920)
Neotype- (DINO 2560, =UUVP 6000) (7.9 m, 1.32 tons) complete skull (845 mm), nearly complete skeleton (lacking caudal vertebra 1, chevrons, forearms, several pedal phalanges) femora (880, 850 mm), tibiae (730, 745 mm), metatarsi (375, 372 mm) (Madsen, 1976)
Referred- (AMNH 507) premaxilla, maxilla, teeth (Chure, 2000)
(AMNH 600) skull (810 mm) (Osborn, 1900)
(AMNH 666; intended holotype of Allosaurus "whitei") skull (885 mm), hyoid, second through ninth cervical vertebrae, first through thirteenth dorsal vertebrae, sacrum, ilium pubes, proximal ischia (Osborn, 1900)
(AMNH 680) (9.7 m; 2.3 tons) dorsals 5-7, four proximal caudal vertebrae, ilium, pubes, ischia, femur (1.008 m), tibiae, fibulae, astragali, calcaneum, metatarsus, pedal phalanges (Chure, 2000)
(AMNH 704) dorsals, ribs, sacrum, nine caudals, pelvis, (Chure, 2000)
(AMNH 728) pubes (Chure, 2000)
(AMNH 813) two anterior dorsal vertebrae, five posterior dorsal vertebrae, dorsal ribs, sacrum, two proximal caudal vertebrae, ilium, pubis, ischium (Chure, Fiorillo and Jacobsen, 2000)
(AMNH 851) mandible, teeth (Chure, 2000)
(AMNH 5753; =4753 of Glut, 1997) partial skull (maxilla, jugal, quadratojugal, quadrate, ectopterygoid, partial pterygoid, braincase), second through ninth cervical vertebrae, first through fourteenth dorsal vertebrae, sacrum, mid caudal, chevron, scapula, coracoid, furcula, ilium, pubes, ischium, femur (Chure, 2000)
(AMNH 5767; holotype of Epanterias amplexus) axis, sixth or seventh cervical centrum, first dorsal neural arch, coracoid (328 mm long), distal metatarsal IV (Cope, 1878)
(AMNH 6125) (Chure, 2000)
(BYU 2028) premaxilla, partial maxilla, nasal, dentary (Smith and Lisak, 2001)
(BYU 4981) (Chure, 2000)
(BYU 5125) lacrimal (Britt, 1991)
(BYU 5524) ischium (Perez-Moreno et al., 1999)
(BYU 8901) (Chure, 2000)
(CM 11844) skull, mandible, incomplete skeleton lacking forelimbs (McIntosh, 1981)
....(CM 11868) partial skull, cervical vertebrae, ribs, scapulocoracoid (McIntosh, 1981)
....(DNM 171) fibula (McIntosh, 1981)
(MCZ 3897) premaxilla, femur (Madsen, 1976)
(NMMNH P-26083) sacral vertebrae 4 and 5, caudal vertebrae 1-4, chevrons 1-4, ilium, ischia, femur (1.04 m), tibia (910 mm), fibula, pedal phalanges (Williamson and Chure, 1996)
(UMNH 10781; = UUVP 3811) neural spines, transverse processes (Carpenter, Sanders, McWhinney and Wood, 2005)
(USNM 2315; holotype of Labrosaurus ferox; probably the same individual as USNM 4734- Bakker, 2000) dentary, teeth (Marsh, 1884)
(USNM 8335) maxilla, teeth, dentary (Gilmore, 1920)
(USNM 8367) atlas, axis (89 mm), third cervical vertebra (105 mm), fourth cervical vertebra (106 mm), fifth cervical vertebra (111 mm), sixth cervical vertebra (121 mm), seventh cervical vertebra (125 mm), eighth cervical vertebra (120 mm), ninth cervical vertebra (122 mm), tenth cervical vertebra, partial cervical ribs 2-10, first dorsal vertebra, second dorsal vertebra (89 mm), third dorsal vertebra (78 mm), fifth dorsal vertebra (85 mm), sixth dorsal vertebra (80 mm), seventh dorsal vertebra (88 mm), eighth dorsal vertebra (87 mm), ninth dorsal vertebra (94 mm), tenth dorsal vertebra (96 mm), eleventh dorsal vertebra (99 mm), twelfth dorsal vertebra, thirteenth dorsal vertebra (102 mm), eleven dorsal ribs, gastralia, fourth sacral vertebra (152 mm), fifth sacral vertebra (132 mm), first caudal vertebra (121 mm), first chevron, second caudal vertebra (123 mm), second chevron, third caudal vertebra (125 mm), third chevron, fourth caudal vertebra (120 mm), fourth chevron (252 mm), fifth caudal vertebra (118 mm), fifth chevron, sixth caudal vertebra (120 mm), seventh caudal vertebra (120 mm), seventh chevron, mid caudal vertebra (144 mm), partial ilium, pubes (740 mm), ischia (650 mm) (Gilmore, 1920)
(USNM 8423) maxillae, five dorsal centra, (sacrum 540 mm), first sacral vertebra (~90 mm), second sacral vertebra (99 mm), third sacral vertebra (104 mm), fourth sacral vertebra (120 mm), fifth sacral vertebra (114 mm), three caudal centra, manual bones, partial ilia, broken pubes, broken ischia, femora (805 mm), metatarsal II (320 mm), phalanx II-1 (122 mm), metatarsal III (353 mm), phalanx III-1 (116 mm), phalanx III-2 (94 mm), phalanx III-3 (74 mm), metatarsal IV (324 mm), phalanx IV-2 (72 mm), pedal ungual IV (~75 mm) (Gilmore, 1920)
(UUVP 3) (Molnar, 1991)
(UUVP 10-245) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 30) humerus (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 30-76) ulna (Hanna, 2002)
(UUVP 30-293) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 30-723) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 30-778) humerus (Peterson, Isakson and Madsen, 1972)
(UUVP 30-783) metatarsal IV (Hanna, 2002)
(UUVP 33) basicranium (Chure and Madsen, 1996)
(UUVP 40) basicranium, pedal phalanx III-1 (Madsen, 1976; Chure and Madsen, 1996)
(UUVP 40-601) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 40-603) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 40-604) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 40-722) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 71-1) (Molnar, 1991)
(UUVP 71-3) (Molnar, 1991)
(UUVP 71-151) (Molnar, 1991)
(UUVP 86) radius (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 139) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 177) two distal caudal vertebrae (Peterson, Isakson and Madsen, 1972)
(UUVP 200) dentary (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 273) humerus (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 294) basicranium (Chure and Madsen, 1996)
(UUVP 387) partial furcula (Chure and Madsen, 1996)
(UUVP 652) postorbital (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 687) radius (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 699) dentary (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 702) dentary (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 740) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 778) humerus (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 837) chevron (Peterson, Isakson and Madsen, 1972)
(UUVP 856) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 1010) proximal caudal vertebra (Hanna, 2002)
(UUVP 1086) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 1169) humerus (Hanna, 2002)
(UUVP 1403) jugal (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 1528) scapula (Peterson, Isakson and Madsen, 1972)
(UUVP 1622) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 1657) pedal phalanx III-1 (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 1685) postorbital (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 1847) posterior dorsal rib (Peterson, Isakson and Madsen, 1972)
(UUVP 1848) phalanx (Peterson, Isakson and Madsen, 1972)
(UUVP 1849) three distal caudal vertebrae (Peterson, Isakson and Madsen, 1972)
(UUVP 1850) caudal vertebrae (Peterson, Isakson and Madsen, 1972)
(UUVP 1851) pedal phalanx IV-1 (Peterson, Isakson and Madsen, 1972)
(UUVP 1852) premaxilla (Peterson, Isakson and Madsen, 1972)
(UUVP 1853) pedal ungual II (Peterson, Isakson and Madsen, 1972)
(UUVP 1854) metacarpal (Peterson, Isakson and Madsen, 1972)
(UUVP 1855) metacarpal (Peterson, Isakson and Madsen, 1972)
(UUVP 1856-1858) bone (Peterson, Isakson and Madsen, 1972)
(UUVP 1862) postorbital (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 1863) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 1865) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 1866) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 1869) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 1872) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 1873) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 1875) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 1876) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 1878) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 1879) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 1895) dentary (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 1896) dentary (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 1898) dentary (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 1900) dentary (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 1903) dentary (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 1904) dentary (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 1905) dentary (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 1906) dentary (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 1907) dentary (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 1908) dentary (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 1909) dentary (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 1910) dentary (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 1927) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 1934) postorbital (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 1936) postorbital (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 1945) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 1991) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 2001) dentary (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 2067) basicranium (Chure and Madsen, 1996)
(UUVP 2175) postorbital (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 2252) cervical rib (Peterson, Isakson and Madsen, 1972)
(UUVP 2456) dentary (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 2545) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 2600) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 2753) dorsal rib (Hanna, 2002)
(UUVP 2758) postorbital (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 2843) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 2850) basicranium (Chure and Madsen, 1996)
(UUVP 2903) dentary (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 2939) pedal phalanx (Hanna, 2002)
(UUVP 2997) phalanx (Hanna, 2002)
(UUVP 3036) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 3203) basicranium (Chure and Madsen, 1996)
(UUVP 3243) ischium (Peterson, Isakson and Madsen, 1972)
(UUVP 3287) basicranium (Chure and Madsen, 1996)
(UUVP 3304) basicranium (Chure and Madsen, 1996)
(UUVP 3389) dentary (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 3435) humerus (Peterson, Isakson and Madsen, 1972)
(UUVP 3529) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 3607) humerus (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 3670) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 3694) femur (905 mm)
(UUVP 3724) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 3758) postorbital (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 3771) two mid caudal vertebrae, chevron (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 3773) chevron (Peterson, Isakson and Madsen, 1972)
(UUVP 3810) dentary (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 3811) dorsal vertebra (Hanna, 2002)
(UUVP 3995) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 4029) dentary (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 4122) postorbital (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 4159) phalanx (Peterson, Isakson and Madsen, 1972)
(UUVP 4201) bone (Peterson, Isakson and Madsen, 1972)
(UUVP 4320) chevron (Peterson, Isakson and Madsen, 1972)
(UUVP 4387) humerus (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 4556) postorbital (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 4596) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 4674) postorbital (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 4792) humerus (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 4895) caudal vertebrae (Peterson, Isakson and Madsen, 1972)
(UUVP 4908) humerus (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 4946) rib (Hanna, 2002)
(UUVP 5160) postorbital (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 5256) two caudal vertebrae, chevron (Hanna, 2002)
(UUVP 5315) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 5346) basicranium (Chure and Madsen, 1996)
(UUVP 5427) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 5490) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 5496) humerus (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 5501) humerus (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 5566) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 5582) postorbital (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 5583) basicranium (Chure and Madsen, 1996)
(UUVP 5599) scapula (Peterson, Isakson and Madsen, 1972)
(UUVP 5626) chevron (Peterson, Isakson and Madsen, 1972)
(UUVP 5658) distal caudal vertebra (Hanna, 2002)
(UUVP 5659) distal caudal vertebra (Hanna, 2002)
(UUVP 5660) rib (Hanna, 2002)
(UUVP 5661) rib (Hanna, 2002)
(UUVP 5669) pedal phalanx IV-2 (Hanna, 2002)
(UUVP 5748) dentary (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 5753) furcula (Chure and Madsen, 1996)
(UUVP 5748) basicranium (Chure and Madsen, 1996)
(UUVP 5754) furcula (Chure and Madsen, 1996)
(UUVP 5843) basicranium (Chure and Madsen, 1996)
(UUVP 5849) basicranium (Chure and Madsen, 1996)
(UUVP 5942) basicranium (Chure and Madsen, 1996)
(UUVP 5943) basicranium (Chure and Madsen, 1996)
(UUVP 5961)
(UUVP 5969) basicranium (Chure and Madsen, 1996)
(UUVP 5985) ilium, ischium (Hanna, 2002)
(UUVP 6023) scapula, femur (245 mm) (Rothschild and Tanke, 2005)
(UUVP 6100) partial furcula (Chure and Madsen, 1996)
(UUVP 6101) furcula (Chure and Madsen, 1996)
(UUVP 6102) partial furcula (Chure and Madsen, 1996)
(UUVP 6132) partial furcula (Chure and Madsen, 1996)
(UUVP 6625) proximal caudal vertebra (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 6737) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 6740) premaxilla (Madsen, 1976)
(UUVP 6788) pedal phalanx III-1 (Hanna, 2002)
(UUVP 6912) basicranium (Chure and Madsen, 1996)
(UUVP 10093) dentary (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 10111) postorbital (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 10136) cervical vertebra (Hanna, 2002)
(UUVP 10154) humerus (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 10161) humerus (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 10173) jugal (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 10220) pedal phalanx II-1 (Hanna, 2002)
(UUVP 10250) dentary (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 10908) pedal phalanx IV-1 (Hanna, 2002)
(UUVP 11690) furcula (Chure and Madsen, 1996)
(UUVP 40607) postorbital (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 40609) postorbital (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP 40610) postorbital (Smith et al., 1999)
(UUVP A1-1) (Molnar, 1991)
(UUVP Q-6) (Molnar, 1991)
(UUVP Q-19) (Molnar, 1991)
(UUVP X31) (Molnar, 1991)
(UUVP coll.) rib (Hanna, 2002)
?(YPM 1879; holotype of Camptonotus amplus) distal tarsal III, distal tarsal IV, metatarsal I, phalanx I-1, pedal ungual I, metatarsal II, phalanx II-1, phalanx II-2, pedal ungual II, metatarsal III, phalanx III-1, phalanx III-2, phalanx III-3, metatarsal IV, phalanx IV-1, phalanx IV-2, phalanx IV-3, phalanx IV-4 (Marsh, 1879)
(YPM 1893; holotype of Allosaurus ferox) partial skull (premaxillae, partial maxilla, partial jugal, nasal fragment,skull roof or palatal fragments, teeth), partial dentaries, partial surangular, dorsal central fragment, dorsal rib fragments, scapular fragment, incomplete pedal ungual (Marsh, 1884)
(YPM 1931; holotype of Allosaurus lucaris) three posterior cervical vertebrae, second pectoral vertebra, fourth and fifth pectoral vertebrae (fused), mid-dorsal vertebra, neural spines and zygopophyses, proximal scapulae, incomplete coracoids, humeri, partial ulna, proximal metacarpal II, phalanx II-1, proximal phalanx II-2 (Marsh, 1878)
....(YPM 46147) manual ungual
(YPM 6223) (Chure, 2000)
(YPM 6224) (Chure, 2000)
(YPM 6293) (Chure, 2000)
(YPM coll.) surangular, prearticular, articular, hyoid, three teeth, ninth cervical centrum, first through third dorsal centrum, two partial posterior dorsal vertebrae, incomplete posterior dorsal rib, five proximal caudal vertebrae, three distal caudal centra, fragments of ten distal caudal centra, base of neural arch, vertebral transverse process, zygopophyseal fragments (Chure, 2000)
Comments- Unfortunately, the holotype cannot be identified as A. fragilis or A. "jimmadseni", although it is definitely Allosaurus. The nearly complete specimen USNM 4734 was designated the topotype by Chure (2000), as it comes from the same quarry as the holotype.
The holotype is from the Late Kimmeridgian Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation in Colorado.
Allosaurus lucaris is from the Late Kimmeridgian Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation in Colorado. It was originally diagnosed by the opisthocoelous anterior dorsal centra with ventral keels and anteriorly placed parapophyses that are the usual characters of Allosaurus. The holotype is a partial mandible, hyoid, partial posterior cervical, dorsal and caudal vertebrae, many vertebral fragments, a humerus and a partial forelimb. It shows no unique characters, and Chure (2000) refers it to A. fragilis without specifying why it is not A. "jimmadseni".
Epanterias amplexus
is from the Early Tithonian Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation in Colorado. The taxon is based on an axis, mid cervical centrum, first dorsal neural arch, coracoid and distal metatarsal IV. The axial intercentrum is not dorsally rotated, without a flared rim, and an anteriorly semicircular odontoid process. These are like A. fragilis, not A. "jimmadseni". Compared to Saurophaganax, it has differently oriented cervical parapophyses, and no dorsal paraspinal lamina. Thus, Chure (2000) refers Epanterias to Allosaurus fragilis, though he says Epanterias has a less laterally compressed axial centrum, less rectangular distal outline of metatarsal IV and better developed lateral condyle in that element. I provisionally agree, but Chure never adresses the differences he finds, which is confusing.
Allosaurus ferox is based on YPM 1893 (partial skull, partial dentaries, partial surangular, dorsal central fragment, dorsal rib
fragments, scapular fragment, incomplete pedal ungual). Marsh (1896) diagnosed it by the presence of a maxillary fenestra, which is now known to be present in all Allosaurus specimens. The few unique features (sinuous ventral premaxillary margin, convex ventral maxillary margin) are caused by incorrect restoration, though the antorbital fossa is better developed than most
specimens. The deflected ventral jugal margin shows it is synonymous with A. fragilis.
Allosaurus "whitei" was based on a skull with hyoid, presacral column, sacrum and pelvis (AMNH 666). It was diagnosed by the same characters Paul (1988) used to distinguish 'A. atrox', so is invalid for the same reasons. Chure (2000) rejects the validity of the name, as Pickering (1996) didn't follow ICZN Article 7 Recommendation 7a, Article 8a or Recommendation 8A. It is therefore a nomen nudum in addition to being a junior synonym of A. fragilis.
Allosaurus "carnegeii" was used in a caption for the cover of the June 2003 issue of Discover Magazine (Levin, 2003). Pending examination of the photo to determine which specimen it represents, it is assumed to be A. fragilis here.
The holotype of Hysirophus discurus (Cope, 1878) does not contain Allosaurus elements, contra Glut, 1997 (Chure, 2000). The holotype of "Laelaps" trihedrodon (Cope, 1877) is lost, so cannot be assigned to Allosaurus or another genus (Chure, 2000).
NMMNH P-26083 (Williamson and Chure, 1996) from the Late Jurassic Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation in New Mexico is assigned to Allosaurus because the femoral shaft is straight in anterior view and the tibial facet for the astragalar ascending process is well marked. It is assigned to A. fragilis based on the apparent lack of accessory ossifications on the anterior and posterior edges of proximal caudal neural spines, dorsal directed femoral head, more curved cnemial crest, and lack of an elongate proximolateral corner on pedal phalanx III-2. The strongly curved cnemial crest, twisted tibial shaft, and flattened medial surface of the medial tibial condyle are unique characters.
References- Marsh, 1877. Notice of new dinosaurian reptiles from the Jurassic formation. Amer. Jour. Sci. 3 pp. 514-516.
Cope. 1878. A new opisthocoelous dinosaur. American Naturalist 12(6):406
Marsh, 1878. Notice of new dinosaurian reptiles. Am. J. Sci. (ser. 3)15: 241-244.
Marsh, 1879. Principal characters of American Jurassic dinosaurs. Part 1: American Journal of Science, 3rd series, v. 16, p. 411-416.
Marsh, 1884. Principal characters of American Jurassic dinosaurs. Part VIII. The order of Theropoda. Amer. Jour. Sci. 3 pp. 329-340.
Marsh, 1885.
Marsh, 1896. The dinosaurs of North America. U.S. Geological Survey, 16th Annual Report, 1894-95, pp. 133-244.
Osborn, 1900, Reconsideration of the evidence for a common Dinosaur-Avian stem in the Permian: American Naturalist, v. 34, n. 406, p. 777-799.
Nopcsa, 1901. Synopsis und Abstammung der Dinosaurier. Foldt. Kozl. 31: 247-288.
Hay, 1902. Bibliography and catalogue of the fossil Vertebrata of North America. Bull. U. S. Geol. Surv. CLXXIX 1-868.
Gilmore, 1920. Osteology of the carnivorous Dinosauria in the United States National Museum, with special reference to the genera Antrodemus (Allosaurus) and Ceratosaurus. Bull. U. S. Nat. Mus. CX 1-154, 36 pls., 78 text-figs.
Lapparent and Zbyszewski, 1957. Les dinosauriens du Portugal. Mémoires du Service géologique du Portugal, 2:1-63.
Ostrom and McIntosh, 1966. Marsh's Dinosaurs,The collection from Como Bluff. Yale Univ. Press. New Haven, CT.
Petersen, Isakson and Madsen, 1972. Preliminary studies of paleopathologies in the Cleveland-Lloyd dinosaur collection: Utah Academy of Science Proceedings, v. 49, p. 45-47.
Madsen, 1976. Allosaurus fragilis: a revised osteology. Utah Geol. Mining Surv. Bull., 109: 1-163.
McIntosh, 1981. Annotated catalogue of the Dinosaurs (Reptilia, Archosauria) in the Collections of Carnegie Museum of Natural History: Bulletin of the Carnegie Museum of Natural History, n. 18, p. 1-67.
Paul, 1988. Predatory Dinosaurs of the World. Simon & Schuster, New York.
Britt, 1991. Theropods of Dry Mesa Quarry (Morrison Formation, Late Jurassic), Colorado, with emphasis on the osteology of Torvosaurus tanneri. Brigham Young University Geology Studies 37 p. 1-72.
Molnar, 1991. The Cranial morphology of Tyrannosaurus rex: Palaeontographica Abt. A, v. 217, lfg. 4-6, p. 137-176.
Chure and Madsen, 1996. The furcula in allosaurid theropods and its implication for determining bird origins. Society of Vertebrate Paleontology. P. 28A.
Chure and Madsen, 1996. Variation in aspects of the tympanic pneumatic system in a population of Allosaurus fragilis from the Morrison Formation (Upper Jurassic). JVP 16(1): 63-66.
Pickering, 1996."King Kong. Unauthorized Jewish Fractals in Philopatry". A Fractal Scaling in Dinosaurology Project, pp. 5-13.
Williamson and Chure, 1996. A large allosaurid from the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation (Brushy Basin Member), West-Central New Mexico. Museum of Northern Arizona Bulletin. 60: 73-79.
Glut, 1997. Dinosaurs - The Encyclopedia. McFarland Press, Jefferson, NC. 1076pp.
Breithaupt, Chure and Southwell, 1999. AMNH 5753: The world’s first free-standing theropod skeleton. JVP 19(3) 33A.
Smith, Richmond and Bybee, 1999. Morphological variation in a large specimen of Allosaurus fragilis, Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation, Eastern Utah. in Gillette, ed. Vertebrate Paleontology in Utah. pp. 135-141.
Chure, 2000. A new species of Allosaurus from the Morrison Formation of Dinosaur National Monument (Utah-Colorado) and a revision of the theropod family Allosauridae. Ph.D. dissertation, Columbia University, 1-964.
Chure, Fiorillo and Jacobsen, 2000. Prey bone utilization by predatory dinosaurs in the late Jurassic of North America, with comments on prey bone use by dinosaurs throughout the Mesozoic: In: Aspects of Theropod Paleobiology, edited by Perez-Moreno, B. P., Holtz, T. Jr., Sanz, J. L., and Moratalla, J., Gaia, n. 15, p. 227-232.
Loewen and Sampson, 2000. Femoral ontogeny in Allosaurus fragilis (Theropoda: Allosauroidea) from the Late Jurassic Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry, Central Utah. JVP 20(3) 54A.
Rayfield, 2000. Allosaurus fragilis: Mechanical behavior of the skull and implications for feeding strategy. JVP 20(3) 63A.
Rayfield, Norman, Horner, Horner, Smith, Thomason and Upchurch, 2001. Cranial design and function in a large theropod dinosaur. Nature 409: 1033-1037.
Smith and Lisak, 2001. An unusual specimen of Allosaurus from southeastern Utah: Brigham Young University Geology Studies, v. 46, p. 93-98.
Hanna, 2002. Multiple injury and infection in a sub-adult theropod dinosaur Allosaurus fragilis with comparisons to allosaur pathology in the Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry collection: Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, v. 22, n. 1, p. 76-90.
Levin, 2003. Dinosaur family values. Discover. 24(6) 34-41.
Baziak, 2004. Intraspecific variation and ontogeny in cranial elements of Allosaurus fragilis from the Late Jurassic Cleveland-Lloyd dinosaur quarry of Central Utah. JVP 24(3).
Carpenter, Sanders, McWhinney and Wood, 2005. Evidence for predator-prey relationships, examples for Allosaurus and Stegosaurus: In: The Carnivorous Dinosaurs, Edited by Carpenter, K., III. Theropods as living animals, p. 325-350.
Rothschild and Tanke, 2005. Theropod Paleopathology, state-of-the-art review: In: The Carnivorous Dinosaurs, Edited by Carpenter, K., III. Theropods as living animals, p. 351-365.
A. europaeus Mateus, Walen and Antunes, 2006
Kimmeridgian, Late Jurassic
Porto Novo Member of Lourinha Formation, Portugal

Holotype- (ML 415) posterior skull, sclerotic ring, posterior mandible, fourth to sixth cervical vertebrae, fourth to sixth cervical ribs
Kimmeridgian, Late Jurassic
Camadas de Alcobaca Formation, Portugal
Paratype
- ? (MNHNUL/AND.001) lacrimal?, partial frontal, partial quadrate, teeth, last dorsal vertebra, several dorsal ribs, gastralia, first sacral vertebra, proximal caudal vertebra, mid-caudal vertebra, five distal caudal vertebrae, chevrons, partial ilium, pubes, ischium (~410 mm), femur, tibia, fibula, astragalus?, calcaneum?, metatarsal II, metatarsal III, metatarsal IV (Perez-Moreno et al., 1999)
Diagnosis- (modified from Mateus et al., 2006) jugal participation in the antorbital fenestra; maxilla forked posteriorly; truncated ventroposterior process of the maxilla; nasal with two pneumatic foramina (the anterior foramen twice the size of the posterior); posteroventral projection of the jugal more than twice the posterodorsal projection; large anterior surangular foramen; squamosal contacts the quadratojugal by a sigmoidal suture; squamosal projects ventrally into laterotemporal fenestra; lacrimal horn narrow in lateral view; rugose dorsal rim of the nasal; the occipital condyles above the squamosal-quadratojugal contact; the anterior tip of quadratojugal is anterior to the laterotemporal fenestra; the lateral lamina of lacrimal is subtle; palatine contacts the pterygoid dorsoposteriorlly; and ventral tip of the postorbital reaches the lower rim of the orbit.
References- Perez-Moreno, Chure, Pires, Marques da Silva, Dos Santos, Dantas, Povoas, Cachão, Sanz and Galopin de Cavalho, 1999. On the presence of Allosaurus fragilis (Theropoda: Carnosauria) in the Upper Jurassic of Portugal: first evidence of an intercontinental species. Journal of the Geological Society of London 59, p. 449-452.
Antunes and Mateus, 2003. Dinosaurs of Portugal: Comptes Rendus Palevol, v. 2, p. 77-95.
Mateus, Walen and Antunes, 2006. The large theropod fauna of the Lourinha Formation (Portugal) and its similarity to the Morrison Formation, with a description of a new species of Allosaurus. in Foster and Lucas, eds.. Paleontology and Geology of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation. New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin 36.
A. sp. indet.
Kimmeridgian-Early Tithonian, Late Jurassic
Brushy Basin and Salt Wash Members, Morrison Formation, Colorado, Salt Wash Member, Morrison Formation, Montana, Brushy Basin and Salt Wash Members, Morrison Formation, New Mexico, Brushy Basin Member, Morrison Formation, Oklahoma, Brushy Basin and Salt Wash Members, Morrison Formation, South Dakota, Brushy Basin and Salt Wash Members, Morrison Formation, Utah, Brushy Basin and Salt Wash Members, Morrison Formation, Wyoming, US
Material- (AMNH 275) (Pickering, 1996)
(AMNH 290) (~9.5 m) hindlimb including femur (985 mm), tibia (810 mm), metatarsus (423 mm) (Osborn, 1899)
(AMNH 324) hindlimb including metatarsus (352 mm) (Osborn, 1899)
(AMNH 496) (Pickering, 1996)
(AMNH 530) femur, tibia, fibula
(AMNH 726) (Pickering, 1996)
(AMNH 736) (Pickering, 1996)
(AMNH 737) (Pickering, 1996)
(AMNH 5752) (Pickering, 1996)
(AMNH 6128) (Pickering, 1996)
(AMNH 5780) five tooth crowns (Chure, 2001)
(AMNH coll.) twelve teeth (Brown, 1935)
(BMS E25840) humerus (Smith et al., 1999)
(BYU 725) jugal (Smith et al., 1999)
(BYU 4878) humerus (Smith et al., 1999)
(BYU 5097) humerus (Smith et al., 1999)
(BYU 5098) humerus (Smith et al., 1999)
(BYU 5099) humerus (Rothschild and Tanke, 2005)
(BYU 9249) postorbital (Smith et al., 1999)
(BYU 9466) incomplete specimen (Smith et al., 1999)
(BYU 10296) humerus (Smith et al., 1999)
(BYU 10602) dentary (Smith et al., 1999)
(BYU coll.) nearly 200 elements (Britt, 1991)
(CEU 1719) humerus (Smith et al., 1999)
(CM 82) proximal caudal centrum (Steel, 1970)
(CM 1254) premaxilla, two teeth, two sacral vertebrae, humerus, ischia, four metatarsals, several phalanges (Steel, 1970)
(CM 2045) femur (Steel, 1970)
(CM 3382) tooth (McIntosh, 1981)
(CM 3383) vertebrae (McIntosh, 1981)
(CM 3387) humerus (McIntosh, 1981)
(CM 10002) proximal tibia, proximal fibula (Steel, 1970)
(CM 11843) (juvenile) skull, several vertebral centra, ribs, coracoid (McIntosh, 1981)
(CM 21703) skull, presacral vertebraecaudal vertebrae, ilium, ischium (McIntosh, 1981)
(CM 21705) caudal centrum (McIntosh, 1981)
(CM 21713) ischium, metatarsal, other material (McIntosh, 1981)
(CM 21721) ischium, metatarsal, other material (McIntosh, 1981)
(CM 21726) femur (McIntosh, 1981)
(CM 21736) scapulocoracoid (McIntosh, 1981)
(CM 21757) three caudal vertebrae (McIntosh, 1981)
(CM 21769) distal femur (McIntosh, 1981)
(CM 33901) several vertebrae (McIntosh, 1981)
(CM 33903) gastralia (McIntosh, 1981)
(CM 33957) two caudal vertebrae (McIntosh, 1981)
(CM 33965) two proximal caudal centra, four neural spines (McIntosh, 1981)
(CM 36037) caudal vertebra (Steel, 1970)
(CM 37004) distal metatarsal (McIntosh, 1981)
(CM 38341) caudal vertebra, ungual (McIntosh, 1981)
(CM 38349) several incomplete metatarsals (McIntosh, 1981)
(CMNH 10936) humerus (Smith et al., 1999)
?(CPS 99; referred to Epanterias amplexus) proximal and distal caudal vertebrae (Bakker, 1988)
(DNM C4) femur
(DNM D4) femora
(DNM 4741) ilium (Meyer and Hoops, 1993)
(DNM 4818) humerus (Meyer and Hoops, 1993)
(DNM 4822) (juvenile) ulna (Meyer and Hoops, 1993)
(DNM coll.) (Leader and Small, 1999)
(KUVP 1392) pectoral girdle, partial limb (Williston, 1901)
(LACM coll.)
(MOR 693; Big Al) incomplete (95%) skeleton including cervical vertebrae, dorsal vertebrae, dorsal ribs, gastralia, caudal vertebrae, chevrons, scapula, manual phalanx I-1, ilium, metatarsals III and V, pedal phalanx III-1 and pedal ungual II (Breithaupt, 1996)
?(MWC coll.) eggs (Hirsch, 1994)
(NMC 38454) dentary, humerus (Smith et al., 1999)
(NMMNH P-26071) tooth (Lucas et al., 1996)
(NMMNH P-26073) tooth (Lucas et al., 1996)
(NMMNH P-26074) tooth (Lucas et al., 1996)
(PU 3) humerus (Smith et al., 1999)
(PU 4) humerus (Smith et al., 1999)
(PU 6) dentary (Smith et al., 1999)
(PU 7) postorbital, humerus(Smith et al., 1999)
(PU 11) dentary (Smith et al., 1999)
(PU 12) dentary (Smith et al., 1999)
(ROM 5091) dentary, humerus, metacarpal I, metacarpal II, metacarpal III (Smith et al., 1999)
(SDSM 25248) premaxilla, jaw fragment, teeth (Foster and Martin, 1994)
(SMM 66-42-1) humerus (Smith et al., 1999)
(TATE 542-544) (adult) three teeth (Bakker, 1997)
(TATE 550) (juvenile) tooth (Bakker, 1997)
(UDSH C-LQ 004) distal caudal (Reid, 1990)
(UDSH C-LQ 066) rib (Reid, 1990)
(UDSH C-LQ 068) tibia (Reid, 1990)
(UDSH C-LQ 077) manual unguals (Reid, 1990)
(UDSH C-LQ 109) radius (Reid, 1990)
(UDSH C-LQ 113) pubis (Reid, 1990)
(UDSH C-LQ coll.) sixty-one elements (Reid, 1990)
(UMEM coll.) humerus (Smith et al., 1999)
(UMNH 5918) pubis (Kolb, Davis and Gillette, 1996)
(UMNH 5919) scapula (Kolb, Davis and Gillette, 1996)
(UMNH 5920) fragmentary ilium (Kolb, Davis and Gillette, 1996)
(UMNH 5921) sacral vertebra (Kolb, Davis and Gillette, 1996)
(UMNH 5922) cervical rib (Kolb, Davis and Gillette, 1996)
(UMNH 5923) sacral vertebra (Kolb, Davis and Gillette, 1996)
(UMNH 5924) sacral vertebra (Kolb, Davis and Gillette, 1996)
(UMNH 5925) chevron (Kolb, Davis and Gillette, 1996)
(UMNH 5926) chevron (Kolb, Davis and Gillette, 1996)
(UNL 50038) humerus (Smith et al., 1999)
(UNL 50039) humerus (Smith et al., 1999)
(UNL coll.) dentary (Smith et al., 1999)
(USNM 2323) eight cervical centra, eleven dorsal centra, two sacral centra, many cervical and dorsal neural processes, ribs, ilium, ischia (490 mm), femur (645 mm) (Gilmore, 1920)
(USNM 2328) ilium (Hay, 1909)
(USNM 7336) astragalus (208 mm wide, 172 mm high) (Gilmore, 1920)
(USNM 8257) manual ungual II (Gilmore, 1920)
(USNM 8302) manual ungual III (Gilmore, 1920)
(USNM 8405) (sacrum 575 mm), first sacral vertebra (120 mm), second sacral vertebra (96 mm), third sacral vertebra (107 mm), fourth sacral vertebra (125 mm), fifth sacral vertebra (118 mm), manual phalanges, metatarsal, pedal phalanges (Gilmore, 1920)
(USNM 8423) humerus (Smith et al., 1999)
(UW coll.) several dorsal vertebrae, pelvic elements, hindlimb, partial pes (Hunter and Breithaupt, 2005)
(WDIS 011) quadrate (Bakker, 2000)
(WDIS 536) maxillary tooth (Bakker, 2000)
(WDIS 911) fragmentary quadrate (Bakker, 2000)
(WDIS coll.) two dorsal vertebrae (Rothschild and Tanke, 2005)
(YPM 4944) humerus (Smith et al., 1999)
(YPM 55898) two fragmentary teeth (Chure, 2000)
(YPM coll.) maxilla, jugal, partial dentary
partial tibia (Gregory, 1938)
tooth (Stokes, 1964)
incomplete postcranial skeleton (Paton, 1975)
teeth (Rigby, 1982)
teeth (Lucas and Hunt, 1985)
fragmentary skeletons (Armstrong et al., 1987)
teeth (Chure and Englemann, 1989)
ribs, eighteen caudal vertebrae, scapula, metatarsal (Holt, 1990)
tooth (Bollan, 1991)
teeth, skeletal elements (Kirkland and Armstrong, 1992)
teeth, caudal centra, phalanx (Foster and Martin, 1994)
tooth (Fiorillo and May, 1996)
teeth, caudal vertebra, femur, distal metatarsal IV (Forster, 1996)
?(referred to Epanterias amplexus) skull (Bakker,1997)
partial skeleton including caudal vertebra, ilium (811 mm), pubis (Fiorillo and Madsen, 1997)
incomplete skeleton including ilium (811 mm) and pubis (Chure and Fiorillo, 1997)
tibia, fibula, three metatarsals, phalanx (Cooley and Schmidt, 1998)
teeth (Turner and Peterson, 1999)
(juvenile) metatarsals (Bader, 2003)
220 teeth (5-23 mm), elements (Foster, 2005)
Comments- This material has not been examined in light of A. "jimmadseni", though most is probably A. fragilis. Some is probably indeterminate at the level of Allosaurus or Allosauridae.
The referred eggs are Preprismatoolithus coloradensis (Hirsch, 1994), since P. sp. are referrable to Lourinhanosaurus antunesi.
Kirkland and Carpenter (1994) reported Allosaurus remains from the Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation in Colorado, which were described in more detail by Foster (2005).
In addition, abundant unspecified Allosaurus material (not listed above) has been reported from the localities listed above, but has not been described or illustrated. Refer to Turner and Patterson (1999), Ostrom and McIntosh (1999) and Foster (2003) for specifics.
References- Osborn, 1899. Fore and hind limbs of carnivorous and herbivorous dinosaurs from the Jurassic of Wyoming. Dinosaur contributions, no. 3: Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, v. 13, p. 161-172.
Hay, 1909. On certain genera and species of Carnivorous Dinosaurs, with special reference to Ceratosaurus nasicornis Marsh: Proceedings of the United States National Museum, v. 35, p. 351-366.
Gilmore, 1920. Osteology of the carnivorous Dinosauria in the United States National Museum, with special reference to the genera Antrodemus (Allosaurus) and Ceratosaurus. Bull. U. S. Nat. Mus. CX 1-154, 36 pls., 78 text-figs.
Brown, 1935. Sinclair Dinosaur Expedition 1934: Natural History, v. 36, p. 3-15.
Gregory, 1938. The San Juan County, A geographic and geologic reconnaissance of Southeastern Utah: United States Geological Survey professional paper, v. 188, p. 59.
Stokes, 1964. Fossilized Stomach Contents of a Sauropod Dinosaur: Science, v. 143, p. 576-577.
Steel, 1970. Saurischia: Handbuch der Palaoherpetologie, teil 14, p. 1-87.
Paton, 1975. A catalogue of fossil vertebrates in the Royal Scottish Museum, Edinburgh, Part Four/Amphibia & Reptilia: Royal Scottish Museum, Information Series in Geology, n. 3, p. 1-33.
McIntosh, 1981. Annotated catalogue of the Dinosaurs (Reptilia, Archosauria) in the Collections of Carnegie Museum of Natural History: Bulletin of the Carnegie Museum of Natural History, n. 18, p. 1-67.
Lucas and Hunt, 1985. Dinosaurs From the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation in New Mexico: New Mexico Journal of Science, v. 25, p. 1-12.
Armstrong, Averett, Averett, McReynolds and Wolny, 1987. Mid-Mesozoic Paleontology of the Rabbit Valley area, Western Colorado: In: Dinosaur Triangle Paleontological Field Trip, 1987, p. 37-43.
Chure and Englemann, 1989. The Fauna of the Morrison Formation in Dinosaur National Monument: Mesozoic/Cenozoic Vertebrate Paleontology: Classic Localities, Contemporary Approaches, Salt Lake City, Utah to Billings, Montana, July 19-27, 1989. Field Trip Guidebook T322, p. 8-14.
Holt, 1990. The Dinosaurs of the Grand River Valley: 13th Annual Meeting of the Colorado-Wyoming Academy of Sciences, p. 28-29.
Reid, 1990. Zonal "Growth rings" in Dinosaurs: Modern Geology, v. 15, p. 19-48.
Britt, 1991. Theropods of Dry Mesa Quarry (Morrison Formation, Late Jurassic), Colorado, with emphasis on the osteology of Torvosaurus tanneri. Brigham Young University Geology Studies 37 p. 1-72.
Bollan, 1991. The Bollan Stegosaurus: In: Guidebook for Dinosaur Quarries and Tracksites Tour, Western Colorado and Eastern Utah, editor Averett, W. R., Grand Junction Geological Society Grand Junction, Colorado, p. 53-54.
Kirkland and Armstrong, 1992. Taphonomy of the Mygatt-Moore (M&M) Quarry, Middle Brushy Basin Member, Morrison Formation (Upper Jurassic) Western Colorado: Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, v. 12, supplement to n. 3, Abstracts of Papers, Fifty-Second Annual Meeting, Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto, Ontario, October 28-31, p. 37A.
Laws, 1993. A specimen of Allosaurus fragilis from Big Horn County, Wyoming exhibiting several pathologies. Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, 53rd annual meeting, Albuquerque, NM, Abstracts of Papers, v. 13, no. 3, p. 46.
Meyer and Hoops, 1993. What Kind of Bone is That?: Dinosaur Nature Association, p. 12.
Foster and Martin, 1994, Late Jurassic Dinosaur Localities in the Morrison Formation of Northeastern Wyoming: Forty-Fourth Annual Field Conference-1994. Wyoming Geological Association Guidebook, p. 115-126.
Hirsch, 1994. Upper Jurassic eggshells from the Western Interior of North America. Dinosaur Eggs and Babies. Pp. 137-150. Cambridge Univ. Press. New York.
Kirkland and Carpenter, 1994. North America's first pre-Cretaceous ankylosaur (Dinosauria) from the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation of western Colorado. Brigham Young University Geology Studies, 40:25-42.
Laws, 1995. Description and analysis of the pathologies of a sub-adult Allosaurus fragilis (MOR 693). Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, Rocky Mountain Section, 47th annual meeting, Bozeman, MT, v. 27, no. 4, p. 43.
Breithaupt, 1996. The discovery of a nearly complete Allosaurus from the Jurassic Morrison Formation, eastern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming. In Forty-Seventh Annual Field Conference Guidebook (C.E. Brown, S.C. Kirkwood, and T.S. Miller, Eds.), pp. 309-313 Wyoming Geological Association, Casper.
Fiorillo and May, 1996. Preliminary report of the taphonomy and depositional setting of a new dinosaur locality in the Morrison Formation (Brushy Basin Member) of Curecanti National Recreation Area, Colorado: In: The Continental Jurassic, editor Morales, M., 1996, Museum of Northern Arizona Bulletin, n. 60, p. 555-561.
Forster, 1996. Fossil Vertebrate Localities in the Morrison Formation (Upper Jurassic) of Western South Dakota: In: The Continental Jurassic, editor Morales M., 1996, Museum of Northern Arizona Bulletin, n. 60, p. 255-263.
Kolb, Davis and Gillette, 1996. The Theropod Dinosaur Allosaurus Marsh from the Upper Part of the Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation (Upper Jurassic) near Green River, Utah. Geology and Resources of the Paradox Basin: Utah Geological Association Guidebook 25, editors Huffman, A. C. Jr., Lund, W. R., and Godwin, L. H., p. 339-349.
Laws, 1996. Paleopathological Analysis of a sub-adult Allosaurus fragilis (MOR 693) from the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation with multiple injuries and infections. M.S. thesis, Montana State University, Bozeman, 61 p.
Lucas, Williamson, Estep, Hunt and Anderson, 1996. Jurassic Fossil Vertebrates from New Mexico: In: The Continental Jurassic, Edited by Morales, M., 1996, Museum of Northern Arizona Bulletin, n. 60, p. 235-241.
Pickering, 1996."King Kong. Unauthorized Jewish Fractals in Philopatry". A Fractal Scaling in Dinosaurology Project, pp. 5-13.
Bakker, 1997. Raptor family values: Allosaur parents brought great carcasses into their lair to feed their young. In “Dinofest International”, Proceedings of a Symposium, Academy of Natural Sciences, eds Wolberg, Sump and Rosenberg, 51-63 .
Chure and Fiorillo, 1997. One Big Al to go and hold the mayo: Evidence of scavenging of a specimen of Allosaurus from the Morrison Formation (Late Jurassic) of Wyoming: : Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, v. 17, Supplement to no. 3, p. 38A.
Fiorillo and Madsen, 1997.
Cooley and Schmitt, 1998. An anastomosed fluvial system in the Morrison Formation (Upper Jurassic) of Southwest Montana: In: The Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation: An Interdisciplinary Study, Denver Museum of Natural History, Denver USA, May 26-28, 1994, edited by Carpenter, K., Chure, D. J., and Kirkland, J. I., Modern Geology, v. 22, part 1, p. 171-208.
Leader and Small, 1999. An Upper Jurassic microvertebrate site, Moffat County, Colorado: Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, v. 18, supplement to n. 3, Abstracts of papers. Fifty-eighth annual meeting, Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, Snowbird Ski and Summer Resort, Snowbird, Utah, September 30-October 3, p. 58a.
Ostrom and McIntosh, 1999. Marsh's Dinosaurs: The Collections from Como Bluff. Yale University Press, New Haven, 1-388 .
Smith, Richmond and Bybee, 1999. Morphological variation in a large specimen of Allosaurus fragilis, Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation, Eastern Utah. in Gillette, ed. Vertebrate Paleontology in Utah. pp. 135-141.
Turner and Peterson, 1999. Biostratigraphy of dinosaurs in the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation of the Western Interior, U.S.A.. in Gillette (ed.), Vertebrate Paleontology in Utah, Utah Geological Survey Miscellaneous Publication. 99-1:77-114.
Bakker, 2000. Brontosaur killers: Late Jurassic allosaurids as sabre-tooth cat analogues: In: Aspects of Theropod Paleobiology, edited by Perez-Moreno, B. P., Holtz, T. Jr., Sanz, J. L., and Moratalla, J., Gaia, n. 15, p. 145-158.
Chure, 2001. On the Type and Referred Material of Laelaps trihedrodon Cope 1877 (Dinosauria: Theropoda). in Tanke and Carpenter, eds.. Mesozoic Vertebrate Life: New Research inspired by the Paleontology of Philip J. Currie, Indiana University Press, Bloomington & Indianapolis, Indiana. 10-18.
Bader, 2003. The local flora and fauna of a site in the Upper Morrison Formation (Upper Jurassic) of northeastern Wyoming: Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, v. 23, supplement to n. 3, abstracts of papers, sixty-third annual meeting, Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, Science museum of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota, October 15-18, p. 30a-31a.
Foster, 2003. Paleoecological analysis of the vertebrate fauna of the Morrison Formation (Upper Jurassic), Rocky Mountain region, U.S.A.. New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin. 23:1-95.
Foster, 2005. Evidence of size-classes and scavenging in the theropod Allosaurus fragilis at the Mygatt-Moore Quarry (Late Jurassic), Rabbit Valley, Colorado. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 25(3):59A.
Hunter and Breithaupt, 2005. Rising from the dust: an Allosaurus’ journey to the 21st century: Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, v. 25, supplement to n. 3, abstracts of papers, sixty-fifth annual meeting, Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, Mesa Southwest Museum and Phoenix Marriott Mesa, Mesa, Arizona, October 19-22, 2005, p. 72a-73a.
Rothschild and Tanke, 2005. Theropod Paleopathology, state-of-the-art review: In: The Carnivorous Dinosaurs, Edited by Carpenter, K., III. Theropods as living animals, p. 351-365.
A? sp. (Lu and Hu, 1998)
Late Jurassic
Shanxi, China
Material- fragmentary caudal vertebrae
Reference- Lü and Hu, 1998. Dinosaur remains from Datong Suburb, Shanxi Province. Vertebrata PalAsiatica 36(3):252-256.
A? sp. indet.
Callvonian-Oxfordian, Middle Jurassic-Late Jurassic
Djaskoian Formation, Russia
Material- (PIN 4874/2) six teeth (10-15 mm)
Comments- These were referred to Allosaurus sp. because they were said to be similar to "Labrosaurus" stechowi and "Labrosaurus" (=Ceratosaurus) sulcatus, and the type species of Labrosaurus (L. lucaris) is a junior synonym of Allosaurus. However, the Djaskoian teeth appear to lack the distinctive fluting found in "L." stechowi and C. sulcatus (which are both ceratosaurids), while L. lucaris doesn't preserve teeth. They are tentatively kept s Allosaurus sp. here, pending comparison to other large theropods.
Reference- Kurzanov, Efimov, and Gubin, 2003. New archosaurs from the Jurassic of Siberia and Mongolia. Paleontological Journal 37(1):53-57.