The 1.80 SDK has been in developers’ hands for a few weeks, and we can now report on the latest progress of the Sony system utilities and their memory usage. On this front, the 1.80 release has been nothing but good news for developers (and indirectly, consumers). This release heralds both a slew of new features, and, as anticipated, improved memory consumption.

First, both the main memory and graphic memory footprints have been reduced, reaching a new low of 48MB and 24MB respectively. That’s a 12MB reduction since the 1.60 release. The extra memory is sure to be welcome by developers.

The memory reductions are not just restricted to the base system. The various Network Platform utilities have also been addressed in this release. The Friend List utility has gone from 24MB to 16MB (while the online startup utility remains at 8MB). Several Network Platform sub-utilities (providing varying subsets of the functionality in the Friend List utility) have also experienced memory reductions. The video chat utility also sees its base memory requirement drop to 20MB (that number rises back to 26MB when the maximum number of users is reached).

Feature-wise, Sony has responded to requests developers have made (which we previously reported here), adding three new system utilities. The first is a picture export utility, which allows developers to export any pictures (usually screen shots) to the player’s photo profile. For continued symmetry’s sake, readers should note that no such functionality currently exists on the Xbox 360. Consumers will enjoy sharing screen shots of their victorious moments with their friends. You can expect a slew of developers to support this utility as it comes in at a scant 3MB.

The second new utility is a music utility, which will allow developers to give consumers the choice of streaming their own music in game. This utility’s current weight – a hefty 12MB – is likely to be reduced in future releases. Readers should note that the Xbox 360 supports a similar feature (at no extra cost to developers).

Third, a new system allows developers to use a registered PSP system as an extra display. Similar to the PSP remote play utility, this one will require 8MB. It does, however, open up a slew of possible uses for developers. No comparable functionality is available on the Xbox 360 (for obvious reasons).

This release to developers was another very positive step forward for Sony (building on the success of the 1.60 release). Large amounts of memory have been made available to developers, and requested features have been delivered in a relatively short-time frame. We eagerly await the 2.0 release and what new features that may bring, and urge readers to check back with us in the next few days for some thoughts.

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16 Responses to “PS3 1.80 SDK”

Awesome article Raoul. It’s exciting to see Sony striving to lower memory usage so much, looks like they’ve really tightened up their code. Hopefully they can tighten it up a bit more still. ;)

And the new features, wow — fantastic stuff right there. The custom soundtracks feature is a great addition and I’m really excited to see what developers do with the psp second display feature. Great read as usual!

-Colin

Thanks for the run down. My only wish is that many developers of older titles will throw us a bone and patch in some of these new features into their games(if possible).

[…] PS3 1.80 SDK [Inner Bits] […]

I have a question on this, Do you only use this memory overhead whilst you are using the feature it provides. When you want to browse and invite friends, that’s when it uses the memory, once your friend is invited, and the friends browser is closedm is the memory is freed up?

The reason I ask? You only use this memory overhear whilst you are using the feature it provides. When you want to browse and invite friends, that’s when it uses the memory, once your friend is invited, and the friends browser is closed the memory is freed up.

Now think about WHEN you are likely to uses the features ingame. Usually in the pause menu, whilst loading, or before you have actually played the game. You would be using them in the heat of action.

So the memory usage is usually moot for most things.

Ingame music is about the only one that requires permemant memory allocation, and even that I doubt, I think that quoted number is for music selection, not music playing.You only use this memory overhear whilst you are using the feature it provides. When you want to browse and invite friends, that’s when it uses the memory, once your friend is invited, and the friends browser is closed the memory is freed up.

Now think about WHEN you are likely to uses the features ingame. Usually in the pause menu, whilst loading, or before you have actually played the game. You would be using them in the heat of action.

So the memory usage is usually moot for most things.

Ingame music is about the only one that requires permemant memory allocation, and even that I doubt, I think that quoted number is for music selection, not music playing.

The reason I ask? Think about WHEN you are likely to uses the features ingame. Usually in the pause menu, whilst loading, or before you have actually played the game. You would be not be using most of them in the heat of action.

So the memory usage is usually moot for most things.

Ingame music is about the only one that requires permemant memory allocation, and even that I doubt, I think that quoted number is for music selection, not music playing.

Great news! It’s good to see those engineers working hard on PS3’s firmware and giving back more control to the Devs.

Can’t wait until Firmware version 2.00!

Can you imagine using the PSP as a rear view mirror for GTA IV?

I’ll say that again:

Can you imagine using the PSP as a rear view mirror for GTA IV?

That will be great (although I think it renders wing mirrors and rear view mirrors). Also, rainbox six, using the PSP display as a round the corner viewer, that will really make the player feel immersed, having to move and crane their head, right analogue making quick movements on the mirror, as in reality, trying to view a scene from a small mirror….

ok.

[…] From innerbits.com:[QUOTE]The 1.80 SDK has been in developers’ hands for a few weeks, and we can now report on the latest progress of the Sony system utilities and their memory usage. On this front, the 1.80 release has been nothing but good news for developers (and indirectly, consumers). This release heralds both a slew of new features, and, as anticipated, improved memory consumption. […]

[…] Filed under: Hardware, News […]

[…] PS3 1.80 SDK […]

Thanks for the feedback guys, and thanks for reading.

Clinton, I think the longer the game has been released, the less likely it is they will patch in new features. Still, you can expect some developers to put out new patches to support some new features.

Mak, you’re correct. When you’re not using a utility, the memory is returned to developers. This is why you usually only see the friend’s list being used from within the front end UI. Only a few games can currently afford the memory cost of some of these utilities while they’re in-game, which is why it’s rare to be able to access the friend’s list then.

[…] few days ago, we brought you the latest feature list to be included in the PS3 firmware. Today, we offer insight and a bit of speculation as to what awaits PS3 consumers (and developers) […]

I think when posting articles about memory consumption, it should be made clear, the memory overheads you mention, are NOT permenant.

You know how it works, you come up with some numbers, and then XBots add all the numbers up, and then start spewing nonsense all over the net about how PS3 uses 90MB of memory all the time….

Are they going to have an option where you can invite friends within the game just like in the XB360. I know in Resistance you have can invit friends that are listed in resistance but not in the dashboard.

[…] I enjoyed writing the first few Sony firmware-related articles (pre-launch, post-launch, 1.60 and 1.80), as the public facts at the time were very muddled, and the constraints do impact consumers in one […]

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