Sessions

Lectures
Fabio

Creative Source, London, UK

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Fabio
Creative Source, London, UK

 
Session: Fabio - The Root To The Shoot Pt.3
Related Media:

Fabio charges out of Melbourne town in his final session: mastering at Music House, doing a residency, the songs that say it all and getting hit by jetlag.

RBMA: »Questions anyone?«

Participant: »Any tunes?«

Fabio: »Any tunes?. Yeah, yeah, yeah, I’ve got some tunes here, do you want to hear some tunes? Cool.«

RBMA: »While you’re looking for the tunes there’s a question there from our man.«

Participant: »Hey man, how you doing? You mentioned LTJ Bukem before who’s a massive influence of mine and I wanted to ask if you’ve done much stuff with the 4Hero guys like Mark Mac and Dego and the part they played in it back in the day?«

Fabio: »For sure. I mean, sometimes with stuff like this you forget names, but 4Hero, maybe more than anyone else, ‘Mr. Kirk’s Nightmare’, the worst thing about that I remember playing that in a cub when someone passed out, ecstasy, and kind of died in front of me when I played that tune. Which, if you don’t know it, it says: “Mr. Kirk your son is dead.” And I played that and someone was like: “Listen, take that record off, someone’s passed out man.” But that was a subversive tune. That tune came out and freaked the shit out of everybody. It was this chaotic rhythm with this “Mr. Kirk your son is dead” and everyone used to go crazy to it and I used to be a bit like: “This is weird.” Dancing to a tune about a dead person. 4Hero were very important in Goldie’s career as well. Goldie’s greatest moments came with Mark and them guys, ‘Internal Affairs’ and stuff like that with them engineering his stuff.«

RBMA: »There’s a bit of a love story of those guys hooking up at your night, right?«

Fabio: »Yeah, at ‘Speed’

RBMA: »Wasn’t it ‘Rage’

Fabio: »Yeah, Goldie met Bjork at ‘Speed’, he met Mark and them guys at ‘Rage’, Mark and Dego.«

Participant: »Before you were talking about everyone getting together and the whole West End thing, was there a real community flavour amongst producers as well? Like 4Hero and Goldie and stuff, did everyone kind of share stuff?«

Fabio: »I’ll tell you where everyone shared stuff, there used to be a cutting plant called Music House and that used to be the aim of the day, everyone used to go down there and cut dubs. Everybody. When I say everybody, everyone. Bukem, 4Hero, Goldie, Ed Rush, Dillinja, Photek, everyone used to meet up at this grimy little place in Holloway Road in North London and we used to cut dubs there, just a little shack. And the guy used to have a lathe and he used to cut Reggae stuff like Trojan and Greensleeves from back in the day and we all used to go there and meet up and a lot of the exchange of ideas came from Music House so there was that sense of family. Not family, its kind of like: “Oh, he’s made this bad tune, I’ve gotta make a better tune.” That’s kind of what’s happening now but it was more so back in the day because you used to go in and say Bukem, he brought in ‘Music’. I remember the day he came in with that tune he was like: “Fab…” And we were all in there and he put it on and for me it was the most important tune since I heard ‘It Is What It Is’, Rhythm is Rhythm. Because what that tune, ‘It Is What It Is’, done with Techno, it made me see that Techno could sound so beautiful, ‘Music’ did that. To me there wasn’t a beautiful Drum’n Bass record until that moment. ‘Music’ came along and I was just like: “Whoa, this music’s got a future in it, got timeless qualities, got everything you need.” So Bukem, he was amazingly important to what I do. What people don’t understand, when Bukem first started DJing, he had this reputation for people falling asleep when he was DJing. Seriously, people used to sit down on the floor and everyone used to be like: “Oh no, I can't get into this shit”, but he didn’t used to care. He never cared. He never, ever sold out. He’d never put on a tune for them. And I used to say: “Danny, sometimes you’ve got to compromise”, and he was like: “Listen, I‘m not going to play no music that I don’t like. I’m just not going to do it and if they don’t like it they don’t like it.” And I loved that about Danny and he’s still like that now, he doesn’t give a shit he just plays what he plays. That is a very difficult thing to do, especially in the Drum’n Bass scene when you get slagged off for doing certain things and you’ve got to have four, five rewinds and stuff like that, so respect to Bukem.«

RBMA: »When you talk about Music House as a social gathering point and peer pressure going on, its not only about the tracks and the musical developments, it’s also a really interesting social point because you’ve got this closed net of people and someone’s got this advance from this record company, someone’s got a new car, someone’s got this really ugly looking Nike trainers, but he still buys them because they’re 200 quid. As someone who has survived so many of these things and seen them come and go, what are the things you learn to stay above all that and cut away the crap?«

Fabio: »Just not to listen to it. Just not to listen to what anyone says really, because you go along with what people say and you end up getting totally wrong footed. It’s a bit like being at school sometimes. A lot of childishness going on, there’s a lot of hating. Through that closeness you get that, there’s a real competitiveness in Drum’n Bass, which is really good on one level, but on another level it’s a bit tiresome. Anyway, listen, I’m going to play a tune. Can I play ‘Music’? This is a tune that I, as I said to you, I heard this when Drum’n Bass was going through a really kind of glum phase and I needed something and Bukem was like: “Listen Fab, I’ve done this tune, I really don’t know if you’re going to like it”, and he played it to me and it just blew my mind.«

(music: LTJ Bukem 'Music').

»That’s a bad tune. (applause) Bad tune. The next tune I’m going to play is from an album that had so much ambition, and so much epic quality, which was an album that I heard in the 70’s. I remember my cousin bringing it ‘round, which was Stevie Wonder [lnk:‘Songs In The Key Of Life’. The reason why this album was so magical for me, it came at a time when I think in the 70’s people took more risks and were willing to do more things on an epic scale. Like ‘Apocalypse Now’, a film like that could never be made now, people just wouldn’t really spend that kind of money and have the ambition to do something on such a large scale. And this album, if you listen to Stevie Wonder’s use of electronic music as well, in ‘Village Ghettoland’ and ‘Pastime Paradise’ which Coolio used and stuff like that, you can hear how forward he was with the whole electronic sound. The track that I’ve chosen is ‘I Wish’ because it reminds me of me growing up in Brixton and the way things were and the things that your parents used to say to you. And it’s a quite corny song, the way its produced, but it’s got so much soul and so much feeling and as soon as you hear it, you just get that feeling of joy. Stevie Wonder also had this magical quality of making music that you think you’ve heard somewhere before. The Beatles had that as well, they make music that when you hear it you think you’ve heard it a million times before yet its so unique at the same time. So this is Stevie Wonder ‘I Wish’.«

(music: Stevie Wonder 'I Wish’)

»That’s Stevie Wonder ‘I Wish’. This next song I’m going to play for you, I’m going to play you something brand new, it’s a Drum’n Bass/Techno hybrid. It’s a bit Detroit-y but still running at 175 and it’s still got that real Drum’n Bass feel. It’s by a guy called Spirit who’s in New York and it’s called ‘Coming Home’ and this is what I’m talking about, about this new Techno hybrid that’s coming into Drum’n Bass.«

RBMA: »Don’t you think with your show on the BBC they would enjoy you doing something similar to this as well?«

Fabio: »Well, they’re getting a new slot where a lot of DJs are playing stuff they wouldn’t normally play and I’m looking forward to that. Hopefully I’ll get called in because I do really feel that I should be given an outlet and we’ve asked in the past if we could do stuff like this, but there’s a lot of red tape to go through and stuff like that. But they’ve started a new show where you do what you want to do and play stuff from your musical background so hopefully that’ll get going and I could do that because I’d love to do that.«

RBMA: » As you can see upstairs there’s a little outlet like that as well and there’s not a lot of red tape there, I guess about none, and we’d really welcome you to maybe later on, with an open door, do something similar up there in the radio slot. Since we’ve been sitting here for two hours and people are kind of getting ready for lunch I don’t want them to fade away with out giving you the applause and the props that you deserve for sharing your insight with us for the last two hours here. So, give the man a hand. (applause) But nevertheless, you’re going to be around and we still have to hear that tune.«

Fabio: »I am actually really jet lagged and at this time of the day I’m starting to get a bit fucked up and I’ve got this real allergy to caffeine and I drank a Red Bull earlier and now I’m really starting to talk too fast. Right, I’m going to put on this last tune but thanks a lot guys and I walked around seeing what’s going on here and respect to what you guys are doing. Music, it sounds like a cliché, but it’s the best game you can be in and as long as you’ve got the passion and the belief and you really want to do it and you’ve got the right feel for it and you get what fits for you. Those are the most important things, it doesn’t matter what genre it is, the most important thing is never let anyone tell you what to do because it’s all about doing what you believe in and people can sidetrack you and the more people tell you that you’re doing the wrong thing that means you’re doing the right thing. That’s happened to me so many times, people saying: ‘”You shouldn’t do this, you shouldn’t do tha”’, and the more they do it the more you know you’re on the right track. So as long as you keep doing that that’s the most important thing, and this last track ‘I’m going to play. As I said, is bang up to date, brand new, a guy called Spirit, it’s got a very Drum’n Bass opening but it’s got this lovely kind of techno breakdown. So this is the last tune, thanks for listening.«

(music: Spirit 'Coming Home’

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