1990/1992 SUBARU LEGACY WRC


DIMENSIONS
Overall length: 4,510 mm
(177.6 in)
Overall width: 1,705 mm
(67.1 in)
Overall height: 1,420 mm
(55.9 in)
Wheelbase: 2,580 mm
(101.6 in)
Curb weight (1990): 1,100 kg
(2,425 lbs)
Curb weight (1992): 1,150 kg
(2,535 lbs)

ENGINE
Power (1990): 286 hp
Power (1992): 296 hp
Torque (1990): 260 lb-ft
Torque (1992): 289 lb-ft

2004 SUBARU WORLD RALLY TEAM
THE IMPREZA WRC


DIMENSIONS
Overall length: 4,415 mm (173.8 in)
Overall width: 1,770 mm (69.7 in)
Overall height: 1,390 mm (54.7 in)
Wheelbase: 2,535 mm (99.8 in)
Curb weight: 1,230 kg (2,712 lbs)
(WRC regulation minimum)
ENGINE
Configuration: horizontally opposed 4-cylinder, 16-valve, turbocharged
Displacement: 1,994 cc, 2.0 liters (122 cu in)
Bore x stroke: 92.0 mm x 75.0 mm (3.62 in x 2.95 in)
Engine:
management:
Subaru programmable electronic engine management system
Power: 300 hp @ 5,500 rpm
Torque: 434 lb-ft @ 4,000 rpm
Exhaust system: ceramic-coated, fireproofed and covered with aluminum; two 3-way catalytic converters
Turbocharger: IHI, with WRC regulation 34 mm restrictor
Spark plugs: NGK
DRIVETRAIN
Configuration: all-wheel drive
Transmission: Prodrive 6-speed electro-hydraulic
Torque split: 50 percent front/
50 percent rear
Differentials: electro-hydraulically controlled
CHASSIS
Front suspension: MacPherson strut
Rear suspension: MacPherson strut with longitudinal and transverse link
Brakes: Alcon/Prodrive 305 mm ventilated discs and 4-piston calipers front/rear (asphalt: front brakes – 266 mm ventilated discs, 6-piston, water-cooled calipers)
Steering: power-assisted rack-and-pinion
Tires: Pirelli
Shock absorbers: Prodrive fully adjustable with remote reservoirs
Wheels: O·Z cast magnesium
ONBOARD SYSTEMS
Data system: one electronic control system for engine, transmission and data-logging
Driver display: LCD color monitor with eight selectable data screens
Radio equipment: Kenwood

Impreza WRC
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SUBARU IN INTERNATIONAL RALLYING
1990-1992 YEARS OF LEGACY

1990/1992 Subaru Legacy WRC

EVEN THOUGH THE LEGACY RS HAD SET A LONG-DISTANCE WORLD-SPEED RECORD, SUBARU KNEW THAT WRC TROPHIES WERE NOT WON BY SPEED ALONE.

arrows PERFORMANCE WAS THE HEART AND SOUL OF THE LEGACY RS, WHICH IT DEMONSTRATED BY BREAKING THE 100,000-KILOMETER WORLD-SPEED RECORD IN 1990 – AND THE RACE WAS ON.

Subaru had its share of successes in World Rally Championship events during the 1980s, but the Subaru World Rally Team didn’t emerge as a topflight WRC contender until the release of the Legacy model in 1989. Even though the Legacy RS had set a long-distance world-speed record, Subaru knew that WRC trophies were not won by speed alone.

For Subaru, organizing a team to develop rally cars was complicated by the logistics of establishing a European base of operations to be closer to WRC racing venues. In 1989, then-president of Subaru Tecnica International (STi), Ryuichiro Kuze, struck a partnership with the British motorsports company Prodrive that continues today as an essential part of the preeminence of Subaru in WRC competition.

Heading up the Subaru team of drivers was the legendary Finnish racer Markku Alen, winner of a record-breaking 19 WRC rallies.

1990-1992 Subaru Legacy WRC

arrows ROARING PAST THE PAPERWORK

Although the Legacy was ready to roll, snafus in sanctioning (the process of “homologation”) kept Subaru out of the running until the fourth round of the 1990 WRC season, the Safari Rally.

Results were mixed as only one of the five Legacy entries in Group A (highly modified WRC division) completed the course, finishing sixth. However, the Subaru Group N (production-based WRC division) entry scored a stunning victory in its class – and the Legacy became the first Group N vehicle ever to survive the rugged Kenyan countryside and reach the finish line of the notoriously brutal Safari Rally.

The Legacy held its own in its first year as a WRC rally car, remaining competitive while displaying flashes of brilliance that showed great promise for the future.

arrows THE FUTURE BEGINS

1991 was a transitional year for Subaru as it applied its growing WRC experience to improving the performance of the Legacy model. Although Alen took third place in the season’s first event, the Swedish Rally, he was dissatisfied with the Legacy’s performance. “No engine, no power,” he complained as the year’s initial success gave way to a series of disappointing defeats. Subaru went back to the drawing board, completing a redesign of the fuel injection system in time for the last event of the year, Great Britain’s RAC Rally. The three Subaru entries were driven by Alen, Ari Vatanen and the then up-and-coming rally superstar Colin McRae. That year, McRae had won his first of two straight championships in the British Open Rally driving a Legacy. But in the RAC, only Vatanen finished, placing fifth, while Alen and McRae scored DNFs.

Nevertheless, the redesigned fuel system greatly improved engine performance as the Legacy continued to evolve into a world-class rally machine.

arrows GETTING INTO GRAVEL

Subaru narrowed its WRC focus in 1992, entering only seven of 14 WRC rallies. Operating from a position of strength, the Legacy demonstrated its superior AWD handling capabilities on gravel courses.

While Alen moved on to drive for Toyota in 1992, the two-man team of Vanaten and McRae made major inroads for Subaru in the WRC. In particular, McRae wowed the crowds with spectacularly skillful driving as he started the season with a strong second-place finish in the Swedish Rally. Vatanen lent a certain symmetry to the year with a second-place finish in the season finale at the RAC Rally.

The Legacy models already had gained a reputation as the best-handling vehicles on the WRC circuit. As engineering added more power to the equation, Subaru rally cars began to take on a new image – that of a formidable frontrunner. The debut of the highly competitive Impreza was still a year away. But the stage had been set for Subaru to dominate WRC rallying for the next decade.

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