1066 Country

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Pevensey Bay
Spend Easter in 1066 Country
A Beach Ball
Sunshine and sand in 1066 Country
Black cat
Ghosts and Gunpowder in 1066 Country
Buildings with snow covered rooftops
Seasons Greetings from 1066 Country

The Sussex Carol

The Sussex carol was first written down by Cecil Sharp and Ralph Vaghan Williams, who heard Harriet Verrell of Monk’s Gate in Sussex singing it, and hence its name ‘Sussex Carol’.

Now a popular Christmas hymn, the Sussex Carol is not only sung in churches in Sussex around Christmas time, but across the UK.

On Christmas night all Christians sing
To hear the news the angels bring.
On Christmas night all Christians sing
To hear the news the angels bring.
News of great joy, news of great mirth,
News of our merciful King's birth.
Then why should men on earth be so sad,
Since our Redeemer made us glad?
Then why should men on earth be so sad,
Since our Redeemer made us glad,
When from our sin he set us free,
All for to gain our liberty?
When sin departs before His grace,
Then life and health come in its place.
When sin departs before His grace,
Then life and health come in its place.
Angels and men with joy may sing
All for to see the new-born King.
All out of darkness we have light,
Which made the angels sing this night.
All out of darkness we have light,
Which made the angels sing this night:
"Glory to God and peace to men,
Now and for evermore, Amen!"

The words were first published by an Irish bishop, Luke Wadding, in a work called Small Garland of Pious and Godly Songs. It is not clear whether Wadding wrote the song or was recording an earlier composition, but the version we know today came from the song sung and written down in Sussex in 1919.


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Christmas in 1066 country
this page was last updated: 03 November 2008