The History of Sega Fighting Games
Page 5 of 19
 
The Early Failures

Early 1992  Sega releases Holosseum, a laserdisc arcade fighting game using mirrors and a television to create a "floating" holographic image on top of a waist-level base
March 1993  Sega releases its first 3-D fighting game, Dark Edge
Mid 1993  Sega releases Cyborg Justice for the Genesis, a hybrid SFII/beat-em-up game with robots

Capcom shows SFII: Champion Edition for the Genesis





Predictably, Sega's first efforts eschewed the 2-D design that Capcom had honed in favor of different sorts of "3-D" solutions, each different in approach and none successful in the marketplace. In American and Japanese arcades,


"Holosseum... displayed a hovering image on the top of a small white plastic cabinet roughly the size and height of two side-by-side trash cans. Like trash cans, the external appearance concealed a stinking core..."

Sega released a laserdisc-based holographic fighting game called Holosseum, which displayed a hovering image on the top of a small white plastic cabinet roughly the size and height of two side-by-side trash cans. Like trash cans, the external appearance concealed a stinking core: Holosseum's characters were all filmed human actors spooled off a laserdisc, and as primitive LD technology had horrendous access times, the game was doing little more than playing back movies for the player to react to. The tiny "holographic" image was just a reflected image from a hidden color television in the base of the machine, and it had no more "depth" than a swimming pool made for kids. Holosseum was a novelty and didn't really take off with arcade owners or players, and the other Sega holographic game Time Traveler was similarly received.

Dark Edge, Sega's first true 3-D fighting game, was released in March 1993 in Japan.

Spider-Man: The Arcade Game
The company's System 32 arcade hardware, which had been used in the racing game Rad Mobile and the beat-em-ups Spider-Man: The Arcade Game and Golden Axe: The Return of Death Adder, improved significantly on the arcade boards used to power the company's earlier hit games, allowing for plentiful 3-D scaling of characters and zooming of backgrounds, transparency effects, superior audio, and a huge number of characters on screen at once.

Dark Edge was the first non-simulation game to use the scaling technology for something other than spot special effects - the System 32 was used to create a simplistic sprite- and background-based 3-D arena and two characters who scaled in and out of the screen as you moved. A futuristic theme and exciting music made the game worth checking out.

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