13th FINA World Championships 2009 - Rome (ITA)
Swimming Rome 2009
Wednesday, 08 July 2009 13:30

Dates of competition: July 26-August 2
Venue: Stadio del Nuoto
Capacity: 13,000 seats
Medal favourites: Men – Michael Phelps (USA) and all the team from USA, Oussama Mellouli (TUN), Tae-Hwan Park (KOR), Alain Bernard (FRA) and all the team from France, César Cielo (BRA), the team of Australia, Milorad Cavic (SRB), the team of Japan, Laszlo Cseh (HUN), the team of Italy; Women – Stephanie Rice (AUS) and all the team from Australia, Marleen Veldhuis (NED) and all the team from the Netherlands, Britta Steffen (GER), Federica Pellegrini (ITA) and all the team from Italy, Rebecca Adlington (GBR), Kirsty Coventry (ZIM), Katie Hoff (USA) and all the team from USA

FACTS & FIGURES
•    The men’s 4x100m freestyle relay has been almost exclusively dominated by American teams. Only in 2001 (when the medals went to Australia, Netherlands, and Germany respectively), and in 2003 (when Russia took gold, USA silver and France bronze) was USA denied gold. The case of the men’s 4x200m freestyle has been different, as several nations have won that event, including Sweden and Germany;

•    In the men’s 4x100m medley meanwhile, the USA has been world champion nine times, and the only other team to take gold was Australia (winner in 1998, 2001 and 2007);

•    Micheal Phelps (USA), now the greatest Olympian ever, is also the best performer in the history of the World Championships. Before Rome 2009, Phelps already has 18 World medals (15 gold & three silver) since the 2001 edition. The next best Championship performers are Grant Hackett (AUS), who earned 18 medals (10 gold, five silver & three bronze) over five editions from 1998-2007, and Ian Thorpe (AUS), who has 13 medals from three editions (11 gold, one silver and one bronze);

•    The number of swimming events on the programme of the World Championships has gradually expanded since the event began in 1973, when just 14 races took place among women, and 15 among men. That number increased to 16 for both women and men in 1986, and reached 20 events (the present number) – again for both women and men – in 2001;

•    An encouraging figure about the evolution of the Championships is the number of National Federations climbing the swimming competition’s podium. In 1973, swimmers from 13 different Federations earned medals, while in 2007 that number had increased to 24;

•    Spectator numbers for the Championships also continue to rise. In 1991 approximately 60,000 fans followed the competition, while the Championships of Melbourne in 2007 drew the attention of about 215,000!


•    Despite being dominated by American, Australian and European swimmers since its foundation, several male stars from alternative continents have shined at the World Championships over the years. These include breaststroker Kosuke Kitajima (JPN), who has seven World Championship medals (three gold, two silver and two bronze), distance-ace Oussama Mellouli (TUN), who has three bronze medals, breaststroke sprinter Oleg Lisogor (UKR) with three medals (two gold, one silver), Roland Schoeman (RSA) with four medals (three gold and one bronze), Tae-Hwan Park (KOR) with a gold from 2007 in the 400m freestyle, and Anthony Nesty (SUR), who won gold in 1991 in the 100m butterfly;

•    Among women there can be found a variety of World Champions from Central and Eastern Europe, including Alena Popchanka (BLR), who won 200m freestyle gold in 2003, triple gold medal winner Yana Klochkova (UKR), Krisztina Egerszegi (HUN) - gold in the 100m and 200m backstroke in 1991, Otylia Jedrzejczak (POL), who had back-to-back titles in the 200m butterfly (2003 & 2005), Agnes Kovacs (HUN), who won the 200m breaststroke in 1998 and 2001, not to mention the champions from Romania (Tamara Costache in 1986; Diana Mocanu in 2001) and the German Democratic Republic, such as Kornelia Ender with 10 World medals and Kristin Otto, with nine;

•    It is worthwhile to check the host country’s history at these Championships, as the Italian swimmers will want to make an impact at home. Among men, Italy’s track record is not bad regarding number of medals overall (21), although that number includes just five gold (from Alessio Boggiatto in 2001 for 400m medley, Giorgio Lamberti in 1991 for 200m freestyle, Filippo Magnini in 2005 & 2007 for the 100m freestyle, and Massimiliano Rosolino for 200m medley in 2001). Italian women however, have won only three medals, of which just one is gold (from Novella Calligaris in 1973 for the 800m);

•    An unusually high number of swimmers in the women’s field retained their World titles after winning back-to-back at the Montreal 2005 and Melbourne 2007 editions. These are: Lisbeth Lenton (AUS) in the 50m freestyle, Laure Manaudou (FRA) in the 400m freestyle, Kate Ziegler (USA) in the 800m and 1500m freestyle, Leisel Jones in both the 100m and 200m breaststroke, and Katie Hoff in the 200m and 400m medley events. Other back-to-back titles holders in history include freestylers Inge De Bruijn (NED), Janet Evans (USA), Hannah Stockbauer (GER), and breaststroker Xuejuan Luo (CHN);


•    Among men however, there are many more with consecutive World Championship titles. Just from the USA there was: Tom Jagger, 50m freestyle champion in 1986 & 1991, Matt Biondi in 100m freestyle (1986 & 1991), Brendan Hansen (100m breaststroke, 2005 & 2007), Ian Crocker in 100m butterfly (2003 & 2005), and Tom Dolan over 400m medley (1994 & 1998). Hungary claims Tamas Darnyi in the 200m & 400m medley (1986 & 1991), Andras Hargitay (also for 400m medley, 1973 & 1975) and Norbert Rozsa in the 100m breaststroke (1991 & 1994). Others include David Wilkie (GBR) in 200m breaststroke (1973 & 1975), Roland Matthes (GDR, 100m backstroke in 1973 & 1975), Vladimir Salnikov (URS, 400m & 1500m freestyle in 1978 & 1982), Michael Gross (FRG, 1982 & 1986 for the 200m freestyle and butterfly events), and Alexander Popov (100m freestyle, 1994 & 1998);


•    Interestingly, the greatest World Championship men’s performers from Australia fall into a different category: those who have retained their crown triple more times in a row. Ian Thorpe retained his 400m freestyle title for three editions (1998, 2001 & 2003), as well as his back-to-back 200m freestyle crowns (2001 & 2003). Grant Hackett, in addition to the 800m freestyle title he retained in 2003 & 2005, held his 1500m freestyle title for four-straight editions (1998, 2001, 2003 & 2005)!

•    Also falling in this category are American swimmers Aaron Peirsol, who won three consecutive times in both the 100m (2003, 2005 & 2007) and 200m backstroke (2001, 2003 & 2005), and of course, Michael Phelps, who won the 200m freestyle in 2005 & 2007, the 200m butterfly in 2001 & 2003, and the 200m medley in 2003, 2005 & 2007!

•    Out of the top-10 best performers ever at the World Championships among women, five are from the USA. Topping the list is none other than the most-medalled woman at the Beijing Olympics – Natalie Coughlin. Coughlin is the owner of 15 World medals (five of each colour). Just behind her with 14 medals is Jenny Thompson (USA), who owns seven gold, five silver and two bronze, which she picked up from the 1991, 1994, 1998 and 2003 editions;


•    The first time all medallists of the men’s 1500m free all clocked under the 15-minute mark was at the 1991 FINA World Championships in Perth (AUS). After that, this situation only happened in 2005 (Montreal) and Melbourne (AUS);

•    The first edition of the FINA World Championships (Belgrade 1973) is the one with the highest number of World Records established in the swimming events – 18. In 1998, in Perth (AUS), not a single WR was beaten. The number of WR by edition was: 1973 (18), 1975 (5), 1978 (13), 1982 (7), 1986 (6), 1991 (7), 1994 (10), 1998 (0), 2001 (8), 2003 (14), 2005 (9), 2007 (15);

•    Only on one occasion in the history of these championships did two swimmers have to share the gold: it was two years ago, in Melbourne (AUS), in the men’s 100m free. Filippo Magnini (ITA) and Brent Hayden (CAN) both touched the wall in 48.43;

•    Both in the men’s and women’s competition, only two swimmers managed to win - in the same edition - the 400m, 800m and 1500m free: in 2003, Hannah Stockbauer (GER) managed to get the triple gold among women, while in 2005 Grant Hackett (AUS) would do the same in the men’s events;

•    One of the WR with the shortest “life” in the history of the FINA World Championships was established in the first semi-final of the men’s 100m butterfly on July 25, 2003 in Barcelona (ESP). Ukraine’s Andriy Serdinov won the race in 51.76, but not more than five minutes later, Michael Phelps (USA) triumphed in the second semi-final in 51.47. Curiously, the following day, neither of these two swimmers got the gold in the decisive race: this victory went to Ian Crocker (USA), who smashed both times, with a new World Record of 50.98;

•    All Championships records date from the 21st century. The oldest ones (three) of this list were established in 2001 at the FINA World Championships in Fukuoka (JPN): among men, the 400m free by Ian Thorpe (AUS) and the 1500m free by Grant Hackett (AUS), and in the women’s competition the 50m free by Inge de Bruijn (NED).
TOP-3 MEDALS*

 G S
BTotal
 USA
 143
 120 75 338
 AUS 58 41 33 132
 GBR 50 40 25 115

*By number of gold medals first

WORLD CHAMPIONS 1973-2007

Men

50m free
1986 – Tom Jagger (USA); 1991 – Tom Jagger (USA); 1994 – Alexander Popov (RUS); 1998 – Bill Pilczuk (USA); 2001 – Anthony Ervin (USA); 2003 – Alexander Popov (RUS); 2005 – Roland Schoeman (RSA); 2007 – Ben Wildman-Tobriner (USA)

100m free
1973 – Jim Montgomery (USA); 1975 – Andrew Coan (USA); 1978 – David McCagg (USA); 1982 – Jörg Woither (GDR); 1986 – Matt Biondi (USA); 1991 – Matt Biondi (USA); 1994 – Alexander Popov (RUS); 1998 – Alexander Popov (RUS); 2001 – Anthony Ervin (USA); 2003 – Alexander Popov (RUS); 2005 – Filippo Magnini (ITA); 2007 – Filippo Magnini (ITA) & Brent Hayden (CAN)

200m free
1973 – Jim Montgomery (USA); 1975 – Tim Shaw (USA); 1978 – William Forrester (USA); 1982 – Michael Gross (FRG); 1986 – Michael Gross (FRG); 1991 – Giorgio Lamberti (ITA); 1994 – Antti Kasvio (FIN); 1998 – Michael Klim (AUS); 2001 – Ian Thorpe (AUS); 2003 – Ian Thorpe (AUS); 2005 – Michael Phelps (USA); 2007 – Michael Phelps (USA)

400m free
1973 – Rick DeMont (USA); 1975 – Tim Shaw (USA); 1978 – Vladimir Salnikov (URS); 1982 – Vladimir Salnikov (URS); 1986 – Rainer Henkel (FRG); 1991 – Jörg Hoffmann (GER); 1994 – Kieren Perkins (AUS); 1998 – Ian Thorpe (AUS); 2001 – Ian Thorpe (AUS); 2003 – Ian Thorpe (AUS); 2005 – Grant Hackett (AUS); 2007 – Tae-Hwan Park (KOR)

800m free
2001 – Ian Thorpe (AUS); 2003 – Grant Hackett (AUS); 2005 – Grant Hackett (AUS); 2007 – Przemyslaw Stanczyk (POL)

1500m free
1973 – Stephen Holland (AUS); 1975 – Tim Shaw (USA); 1978 – Vladimir Salnikov (URS); 1982 – Vladimir Salnikov (URS); 1986 – Rainer Henkel (FRG); 1991 – Jörg Hoffmann (GER); 1994 – Kieren Perkins (AUS); 1998 – Grant Hackett (AUS); 2001 – Grant Hackett (AUS); 2003 – Grant Hackett (AUS); 2005 – Grant Hackett (AUS); 2007 – Mateusz Sawrymowicz (POL)

50m backstroke
2001 – Randall Bal (USA); 2003 – Thomas Rupprath (GER); 2005 – Aristeidis Grigoriadis (GRE); 2007 – Gerhard Zandberg (RSA)

100m backstroke
1973 – Roland Matthes (GDR); 1975 – Roland Matthes (GDR); 1978 – Robert Jackson (USA); 1982 – Dirk Richter (GDR); 1986 – Igor Polianski (URS); 1991 – Jeff Rouse (USA); 1994 – Martin Lopez-Zubero (ESP); 1998 – Lenny Krayzelburg (USA); 2001 – Matt Welsh (AUS); 2003 – Aaron Peirsol (USA); 2005 – Aaron Peirsol (USA); 2007 – Aaron Peirsol (USA)

200m backstroke
1973 – Roland Matthes (GDR); 1975 – Zoltan Verraszto (HUN); 1978 – Jesse Vassallo (USA); 1982 – Rick Carey (USA); 1986 – Igor Polianski (URS); 1991 – Martin Lopez-Zubero (ESP); 1994 – Vladimir Selkov (RUS); 1998 – Lenny Krayzelburg (USA); 2001 – Aaron Peirsol (USA); 2003 – Aaron Peirsol (USA); 2005 – Aaron Peirsol (USA); 2007 – Ryan Lochte (USA)

50m breaststroke
2001 – Oleg Lisogor (UKR); 2003 – James Gibson (GBR); 2005 – Mark Warnecke (GER); 2007 – Oleg Lisogor (UKR)

100m breaststroke
1973 – John Hencken (USA); 1975 – David Wilkie (GBR); 1978 – Walter Kusch (FRG); 1982 – Stephen Lundquist (USA); 1986 – Victor Davis (CAN); 1991 – Norbert Rozsa (HUN); 1994 - Norbert Rozsa (HUN); 1998 – Fred Deburghgraeve (BEL); 2001 – Roman Sloudnov (RUS); 2003 – Kosuke Kitajima (JPN); 2005 – Brendan Hansen (USA); 2007 – Brendan Hansen (USA)

200m breaststroke
1973 – David Wilkie (GBR); 1975 – David Wilkie (GBR); 1978 – Nicholas Nevid (USA); 1982 – Victor Davis (CAN); 1986 – Jozsef Szabo (HUN); 1991 – Mike Barrowman (USA); 1994 – Norbert Rozsa (HUN); 1998 – Kurt Grote (USA); 2001 – Brendan Hansen (USA); 2003 – Kosuke Kitajima (JPN); 2005 – Brendan Hansen (USA); 2007 – Kosuke Kitajima (JPN)

50m butterfly
2001 – Geoff Huegill (AUS); 2003 – Matt Welsh (AUS); 2005 – Roland Schoeman (RSA); 2007 – Roland Schoeman (RSA)

100m butterfly
1973 – Bruce Robertson (CAN); 1975 – Greg Jagenburg (USA); 1978 – Joseph Bottom (USA); 1982 – Matthew Gribble (USA); 1986 – Pablo Morales (USA); 1991 – Anthony Nesty (SUR); 1994 – Rafal Szukala (POL); 1998 – Michael Klim (AUS); 2001 – Lars Frolander (SWE); 2003 – Ian Crocker (USA); 2005 – Ian Crocker (USA); 2007 – Michael Phelps (USA)

200m butterfly
1973 – Robin Backhaus (USA); 1975 – William Forrester (USA); 1978 – Michael Bruner (USA); 1982 – Michael Gross (FRG); 1986 – Michael Gross (FRG); 1991 – Melvin Stewart (USA); 1994 – Denis Pankratov (RUS); 1998 – Denys Sylantiev (UKR); 2001 – Michael Phelps (USA); 2003 – Michael Phelps (USA); 2005 – Pawel Korzeniowski (POL); 2007 – Michael Phelps (USA)

200m individual medley
1973 – Gunnar Larsson (SWE); 1975 – Andras Hargitay (HUN); 1978 – Graham Smith (CAN); 1982 – Alexander Sidorenko (URS); 1986 – Tamas Darnyi (HUN); 1991 – Tamas Darnyi (HUN); 1994 – Jani Sievinen (FIN); 1998 – Marcel Wouda (NED); 2001 – Massimiliano Rosolino (ITA); 2003 - Michael Phelps (USA); 2005 - Michael Phelps (USA); 2007 - Michael Phelps (USA)

400m individual medley
1973 – Andras Hargitay (HUN); 1975 – Andras Hargitay (HUN); 1978 – Jesse Vassallo (USA); 1982 – Ricardo Prado (BRA); 1986 – Tamas Darnyi (HUN); 1991 – Tamas Darnyi (HUN); 1994 – Tom Dolan (USA); 1998 – Tom Dolan (USA); 2001 – Alessio Boggiatto (ITA); 2003 - Michael Phelps (USA); 2005 – Laszlo Cseh (HUN); 2007 - Michael Phelps (USA)

4x100m free relay
1973 – USA; 1975 – USA; 1978 – USA; 1982 – USA; 1986 – USA; 1991 – USA; 1994 – USA; 1998 – USA; 2001 – AUS; 2003 – RUS; 2005 – USA; 2007 – USA

4x200m free relay
1973 – USA; 1975 – FRG; 1978 – USA; 1982 – USA; 1986 – GDR; 1991 – GER; 1994 – SWE; 1998 – AUS; 2001 – AUS; 2003 – AUS; 2005 – USA; 2007 – USA

4x100m medley relay
1973 – USA; 1975 – USA; 1978 – USA; 1982 – USA; 1986 – USA; 1991 – USA; 1994 – USA; 1998 – AUS; 2001 – AUS; 2003 – USA; 2005 – USA; 2007 – AUS

Women
50m free

1986 – Tamara Costache (ROM); 1991 – Yong Zhuang (CHN); 1994 – Jingyi Le (CHN); 1998 – Amy Van Dyken (USA); 2001 – Inge de Bruijn (NED); 2003 – Inge de Bruijn (NED); 2005 – Lisbeth Lenton (AUS); 2007 – Lisbeth Lenton (AUS)

100m free
1973 – Kornelia Ender (GDR); 1975 – Kornelia Ender (GDR); 1978 – Barbara Krause (GDR); 1982 – Birgit Meineke (GDR); 1986 – Kristin Otto (GDR); 1991 – Nicole Haislett (USA); 1994 – Jingyi Le (CHN); 1998 – Jenny Thompson (USA); 2001 – Inge de Bruijn (NED); 2003 – Hanna-Maria Seppala (FIN); 2005 – Jodie Henry (AUS); 2007 – Lisbeth Lenton (AUS)

200m free
1973 – Keena Rothhammer (USA); 1975 – Shirley Babashoff (USA); 1978 – Cynthia Woodhead (USA); 1982 – Annemarie Verstappen (NED); 1986 – Heike Friedrich (GDR); 1991 – Hayley Davis (AUS); 1994 – Franziska van Almsick (GER); 1998 – Claudia Poll (CRC); 2001 – Giaan Rooney (AUS); 2003 – Alena Popchanka (BLR); 2005 – Solenne Figues (FRA); 2007 – Laure Manaudou (FRA)

400m free
1973 – Heather Greenwood (USA); 1975 – Shirley Babashoff (USA); 1978 – Tracey Wickham (AUS); 1982 – Carmela Schmidt (GDR); 1986 – Heike Friedrich (GDR); 1991 – Janet Evans (USA); 1994 – Aihua Yang (CHN); 1998 – Yan Chen (CHN); 2001 – Yana Klochkova (UKR); 2003 – Hannah Stockbauer (GER); 2005 – Laure Manaudou (FRA); 2007 – Laure Manaudou (FRA)

800m free
1973 – Novella Calligaris (ITA); 1975 – Jennifer Turrall (AUS); 1978 – Tracey Wickham (AUS); 1982 – Kimberley Linehan (USA); 1986 – Astrid Strauss (GDR); 1991 – Janet Evans (USA); 1994 – Janet Evans (USA); 1998 – Brooke Bennett (USA); 2001 – Hannah Stockbauer (GER); 2003 – Hannah Stockbauer (GER); 2005 – Kate Ziegler (USA); 2007 – Kate Ziegler (USA)

1500m free
2001 – Hannah Stockbauer (GER); 2003 – Hannah Stockbauer (GER); 2005 – Kate Ziegler (USA); 2007 – Kate Ziegler (USA)

50m backstroke
2001 – Haley Cope (USA); 2003 – Nina Zhivanevskaya (ESP); 2005 – Giaan Rooney (AUS); 2007 – Leila Vaziri (USA)

100m backstroke
1973 – Ulrike Richter (GDR); 1975 – Ulrike Richter (GDR); 1978 – Linda Jezek (USA); 1982 – Kristin Otto (GDR); 1986 – Betsy Mitchell (USA); 1991 – Krisztina Egerszegi (HUN); 1994 – Cihong He (CHN); 1998 – Lea Maurer (USA); 2001 – Natalie Coughlin (USA); 2003 – Antje Buschschulte (GER); 2005 – Kirsty Coventry (ZIM); 2007 – Natalie Coughlin (USA)

200m backstroke
1973 – Melissa Belote (USA); 1975 – Birgit Treiber (GDR); 1978 – Linda Jezek (USA); 1982 – Kornelia Sirch (GDR); 1986 – Kornelia Sirch (GDR); 1991 – Krisztina Egerszegi (HUN); 1994 – Cihong He (CHN); 1998 – Roxanna Maracineanu (FRA); 2001 – Diana Mocanu (ROM); 2003 – Katy Sexton (GBR); 2005 – Kirsty Coventry (ZIM); 2007 – Margaret Hoelzer (USA)

50m breaststroke
2001 – Xuejuan Luo (CHN); 2003 – Xuejuan Luo (CHN); 2005 – Jade Edmistone (AUS); 2007 – Jessica Hardy (USA)

100m breaststroke
1973 – Renate Vogel (GDR); 1975 – Hannelore Anke (GDR); 1978 – Yulia Bogdanova (URS); 1982 – Ute Geweniger (GDR); 1986 – Sylvia Gerasch (GDR); 1991 – Linley Frame (AUS); 1994 – Samantha Riley (AUS); 1998 – Kristy Kowal (USA); 2001 – Xuejuan Luo (CHN); 2003 – Xuejuan Luo (CHN); 2005 – Leisel Jones (AUS); 2007 – Leisel Jones (AUS)

200m breaststroke
1973 – Renate Vogel (GDR); 1975 – Hannelore Anke (GDR); 1978 – Lina Kachushite (URS); 1982 – Svetlana Varganova (URS); 1986 – Silke Hoerner (GDR); 1991 – Elena Volkova (URS); 1994 – Samantha Riley (AUS); 1998 – Agnes Kovacs (HUN); 2001 – Agnes Kovacs (HUN); 2003 – Amanda Beard (USA); 2005 – Leisel Jones (AUS); 2007 – Leisel Jones (AUS)

50m butterfly
2001 – Inge de Bruijn (NED); 2003 – Inge de Bruijn (NED); 2005 – Danni Miatke (AUS); 2007 – Therese Alshammar (SWE)

100m butterfly
1973 – Kornelia Ender (GDR); 1975 – Kornelia Ender (GDR); 1978 – Mary-Joan Pennington (USA); 1982 – Mary T. Meagher (USA); 1986 – Kornelia Gressler (GDR); 1991 – Hong Qiang (CHN); 1994 – Limin Liu (CHN); 1998 – Jenny Thompson (USA); 2001 – Petria Thomas (AUS); 2003 – Jenny Thompson (USA); 2005 – Jessicah Schipper (AUS); 2007 – Lisbeth Lenton (AUS)

200m butterfly
1973 – Rosemarie Kother (GDR); 1975 – Rosemarie Kother (GDR); 1978 – Tracy Caulkins (USA); 1982 – Ines Geissler (GDR); 1986 – Mary T. Meagher (USA); 1991 – Summer Sanders (USA); 1994 – Limin Liu (CHN); 1998 – Susie O’Neill (AUS); 2001 – Petria Thomas (AUS); 2003 – Otylia Jedrzejczak (POL); 2005 – Otylia Jedrzejczak (POL); 2007 – Jessicah Schipper (AUS)

200m individual medley
1973 – Andrea Hubner (GDR); 1975 – Katherine Heddy (USA); 1978 – Tracy Caulkins (USA); 1982 – Petra Schneider (GDR); 1986 – Kristin Otto (GDR); 1991 – Lin Li (CHN); 1994 – Lu Bin (CHN); 1998 – Yanyan Wu (CHN); 2001 – Maggie Bowen (USA); 2003 – Yana Klochkova (UKR); 2005 – Katie Hoff (USA); 2007 – Katie Hoff (USA)

400m individual medley
1973 – Gudrun Wegner (GDR); 1975 – Ulrike Tauber (GDR); 1978 – Tracy Caulkins (USA); 1982 – Petra Schneider (GDR); 1986 – Kathleen Nord (GDR); 1991 – Lin Li (CHN); 1994 – Guohong Dai (CHN); 1998 – Yan Chen (CHN); 2001 – Yana Klochkova (UKR); 2003 – Yana Klochkova (UKR); 2005 – Katie Hoff (USA); 2007 – Katie Hoff (USA)

4x100m free relay
1973 – GDR; 1975 – GDR; 1978 – USA; 1982 – GDR; 1986 – GDR; 1991 – USA; 1994 – CHN; 1998 – USA; 2001 – GER; 2003 – USA; 2005 – AUS; 2007 – AUS

4x200m free relay
1986 – GDR; 1991 – GER; 1994 – CHN; 1998 – GER; 2001 – GBR; 2003 – USA; 2005 – USA; 2007 – USA

4x100m medley relay
1973 – GDR; 1975 – GDR; 1978 – USA; 1982 – GDR; 1986 – GDR; 1991 – USA; 1994 – CHN; 1998 – USA; 2001 – AUS; 2003 – CHN; 2005 – AUS; 2007 – AUS

 
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