REVISED: 4/20/09

Bell, Bell-Boeing

1935: (Lawrence Dale) Bell Aircraft Corp, 2050 Elmwood Ave, Buffalo NY. 1941: Bell Helicopter Co, Buffalo; Ft Worth TX. 1960: Bell Aerospace-Textron.

1914 = 2pOB modified from a Martin exhibition tractor as a scout-bomber for Pancho Villa by 19-year-old Larry Bell during his spare time while employed by Martin Aircraft Co.


2 - Consolidated XA-11A (A-11 repowered with Allison liquid-cooled engine) never went into production.
3 - Single-engined fighter with supercharged engine; forerunner of XP-39 project. Only mock-ups made.
27 - This appears to have been applied to XP-59A, not necessarily the production version.
  Bell 30 #1 roll-out [NX41867] (Bell)
  Bell 30 #1A [NX41867] (Bell)
  Bell 30 #2 [NX41868] (Bell)
  Bell 30 #3 frame [NX41860] (Bell)

30 1942 = 1pOH; 150hp Franklin 6V4; ff: 12/29/42 (p: Floyd Carlson). First successful twin-blade system; third helicopter to fly in USA. Arthur Young. POP: 3 prototypes [NX41860, NX41867/41868], tested by Army as XR-12. First ship, #1 [NX41867], crashed in Sep 1943, was rebuilt with modified landing gear and tail rotor as #1A. #2 appeared in May 1944 inside the Buffalo (NY) Natl Guard Armory for its first public flight. Reworked #3 became the basis for 47.

I could nowhere find a mention that one of these prototypes was tested as the XR-12. Indeed, this designation applied to the first Model 48.
NOTE:  Bell helicopters license-built in foreign countries are not included in the production figures below.

  Bell 42 (Bell)

42 1946 = 5pCH; 450hp P&W; R-985; rotor: 47'6" load: 1445#; v: 125/100/0 range: 300. POP: 3 [prototype NX33540, NX42063, x].


47 (TC H-1 H-5, H7SW, 2H1, 2H3) - 2pCH. Arthur Young. The world's first commercially-licensed helicopter, familiar by its fishbowl canopy, open-grid tail boom. Remained in continuous production until 1974; licensed construction also in Japan and Italy. Larger version became model 48. Military versions H-13 and HTL. Sioux AH-1 and HT-2 were built by Westland Ltd for the British Army.
  Bell 47A (Bell)

47A 1945 = USAF with bubble canopy, covered fuselage and tail boom; 175hp Franklin O-35-1. POP: 18 to Army as YR-13, 10 to USN as HTL-1.

  Bell 47B Prototype [NC41967] (Bell)
  Bell 47B Experimental bubble canopy [NX92845] (Bell)
  Bell 47B #3 [NX131B] (Bell)

47B 1946 (TC H-1) = Commercial version with "sedan" fuselage. 2pCH; 175hp Franklin 6V4-B32; rotor: 41'10" v: 100/80/0; ff [NC1H]: 12/8/45. POP: 80. [NC1H] s/n 1 crashed during a training flight on 4/3/46 after about 75 hours, was damaged beyond economical repair, and its registration was transferred to s/n 11 on 5/15/46.

47D, H-13 1948 = 2pCH; 200hp Lycoming O-435; rotor: 35'2" length: 41'3" load: 603# v: 100/85/0 range: 238. 24v electrical. POP: ??; 65 to USAF as H-13, 12 to USN as HTL-2.

47G 19?? = 3pCH with derated 200hp Lycoming VO-435-A1A or 200hp Franklin 6V4-C32AB; rotor: 35'2" length: 27'4" load: 915# v: 86/70/0 range: 212. $35,750; POP: ??.

47G-2 1955 = License-built by Augusta and Kawasaki; 260hp Lycoming VO-435. $38,750; POP: ??.

  Bell 47G-2A-1 [N6723D] (Bell via Johan Visschedijk coll)

47G-2A-1 1963 = 2pCH, nicknamed "Wing Ding." Developed as an aircraft which would lift very large payloads in excess of its hover capability, taking advantage of running take-offs and landings. In addition to the wing the rotor's mast angle could be varied in flight. POP: 1 [N6723D].

47G-3 1959 = 3pCH; 225hp Franklin 6VS. POP: 389 all G-3 variants.

47G-3B-1 1963 = 3pCH; 270hp Lycoming supercharged TVO-435; length: 31'7" load: 1156# v: 105/86/0 range: 273 ceiling: 17,200' (hover) 16,100'.

47G-3B-2 1968 = 280hp Lycoming TVO-435; rotor: 37'2" length: 32'6" load: 1090# v: 105/83/0 range: 250. POP total -3B-1 and -3B-2: 389.

47G-4A 1966 = 280hp derated Lycoming VO-540; length: 31'7" load: 1173# v: 105/84/0 range: 295 ceiling: 11,200' (hover) 7,700'. POP: 269.

  Bell 47G-5 (Bell-Textron)

47G-5, -5A 1966 = Low-cost variant. 260hp Lycoming VO-435; load: 1200# v: 105/85/0 range: 256. POP: 336.

  Bell 47H-1 (Bell)

47H-1 Bellairus 19?? = Deluxe appointments, hydraulic boost controls. 2-3pCH; 200hp Franklin; load: 1235# v: 100/91/0 range: 213 ceiling: 13,100' (hover: 5,500'). $40,750-42,700; POP: ??.

47J Ranger 1957 = Widened cabin, new tail rotor system. 4pCH; derated 250hp Lycoming VO-435; rotor: 37'2" length: 32'4" load: 950# v: 105/99/0 range: 222 (300 with optional fuel tanks). $63,750; POP: ??, of which ?? to USAF as H-13J, ?? to USN/USCG as HUL-1/HTL-7.


48 SEE R-12.
50 Convert-O-Plane - Bell's very first convertible project. None built.
54 SEE H-15.
61 SEE HSL.
  Bell 65ATV [N1105V] (Bell)

65 ATV 1954 = 1pOhwM VTOL "Air Test Vehicle." Two 1000# Fairchild J44 turbojets, tiltable 90° for lift and propulsion + one Turbomèca Palouste turbo-generator delivering compressed air to the attitude control system; span: 26'0" length: 21'0" v: 125/x/0. Built from wings from a Cessna 170, fuselage from a Schweizer glider, and landing gear from a Bell 47. Hovering and conventional flights were made on 11/16/54 and 12/18/58 respectively (p: David Howe), but no transitions. The test program was terminated in 1955. POP: 2 [N1105V, x], with the second one destroyed in an engine fire on the ground.
68 SEE X-14.
204B 1963 (TC H1SW, H4SW) = 10pCH; 1100hp Lycoming T-53-09A; rotor: 48'0". Commercial and military export version of HU-1. POP: 70+.
205A-1 1963 (TC H1SW, H4SW, H6SW) = 15pCH, commercial variant of HU-1; 1250hp Lycoming T-53. POP: 302.
206 Jet Ranger 1965 (TC H2SW) = 5pCH; rotor: 33'4" length: 31'2" load: 1590#. POP: By Jan 1988 Bell and its licensees had built over 7,000 206s, including military versions. SEE H-57, H-67, and OH-58.
206A 1965 = 317hp Allison 250-C18 turboshaft; v: 138/121/0 range 380. POP: 4170 206A/B.

  Bell 206B [N206BH] (Bell-Textron)

206B 1971 = 420hp Allison 250-C20; v: 140/134/0 range: 419.

  Bell 206L (Bell-Textron)

206L Long Ranger, Texas Ranger 1974 = New transmission, longer rotor mast, modified engine cowling; 420-650hp Allison 250; rotor: 37'0" length: 42'9" load: 2000# v: (420hp) 150/x/0 (650hp) 153/x/0 ceiling: 14,400'. $250,000; POP: 1,150 by 1987.

206LM = Developmental 206 with a four-blade rotor.

  Bell 206LT (Bell-Textron)

206LT = Two 450hp Allison 250-C20R turboshafts. New production 206L with Tridair Gemini ST engine installation.


  Bell 207 [N73927] (clip via Les McCrae)

207 Sioux Scout 1963 = 2pCH armed scout with two high-mounted stub wings; 260hp Lycoming TVO-435; ff: 6/27/63 (p: Al Averill). Test-bed built from commercial 47J-2 parts. POP: 1 [N73927] to Fort Benning for Army testing.
208 1965 = Repowered UH-1D with 1400hp Continental XT67T-1 coupled twin-turboshaft.
209, 249 SEE AH-1.
211 Huey Tug 1968 = Considered for the Army's prime Artillery Mover. Uprated dynamic system rated at 2000hp and a larger 48'0" rotor with a wide chord and swept tips.
  Bell 412 [N3893S] (Bell-Textron)

212, 412 1970 (TC H4SW) = Repowered 205, originally developed for Canadian armed forces. 15pCH; 1290hp P&W; PT6T-3 Turbo Twin-Pac coupled turboshaft; rotor: 46'0" length: 56'2" load: 5101# v: 143/x/0 range: 356 ceiling: 16,300' (data for 412). 412 had a four-blade rotor. Also license-built by Agusta in Italy as AB-412.
214 (TC H10SW) - 16pCH, developed as an improved version of UH-1H, aka Huey Plus.
214 1970 = 2000hp Avco Lycoming T-53-L-702. POP: 4.

214A 1974 = 2930hp Avco Lycoming LTC4B-8D; rotor: 50'0" length: 49'3" load: 4020# v: x/161/0 range: 215. Gross wt: 11,480#. POP: 295.

214B Big Lifter 1975 = 2930hp Avco Lycoming LTC4B-8D. POP: 70.

214C 1977 = SAR version. POP: 39.

214ST aka Super Transport 1980 = Stretched twin. Two 1625hp GE CT7-2A (civil version of GE T700), rotor: 52'0" length: 49'4" v: x/161/0. Gross wt: 17,500#. Developed with funds provided by Imperial Iranian Army, but none delivered due to 1979 revolution in Iran. Approximately 40 later sold to Iraq and used in Iran-Iraq war, as well as Gulf War. POP: 98.


222 (TC H9SW) - 10pCH business and utility helicopter.
222, 222A 1976 = Two 592hp Avco Lycoming LTS101; rotor: 42'0" length: 39'9" load: 3075# v: 150/146/0 range: 450. POP: 90.

222B 19?? = Two 684hp Textron Lycoming LTS101-650C; length: 42'2" load: 3350 v: 172/161/0 range: 330. POP: 26.

  Bell 222SP [D-HHSH] (Johan Visschedijk coll)

222SP 1981 = 222A conversion, originally registered [N2220P], then [N82NR] as a shuttle for Rockwell Intl. Went to Germany in 1991 for medivac duties [D-HHSH], returned to USA in 2000 and reregistered [N29WW].

222U, UT 1983 = Two 684hp LTS101-650C; range: 380. POP: 75.


  Bell 230 Special-Mission (Bell-Textron)

230 1991 (H9SW) = 10pCH; two 700hp Allison 250; rotor: 43'0" length: 43'4" load: 3350# v: 162/x/0 range: 485.
249 19?? = AH-1W with four-blade main rotor.
255 SEE D-262.
301 SEE V-15.
  Bell 309 (Johan Visschedijk coll)

309 Kingcobra 197? = Development of AH-1J. POP: 2; one powered by P&W; T400-CP-400 Turbo Twin-Pac coupled turboshaft, the second by Avco Lycoming T55-L-7C turboshaft. Both featured a modified nose which housed a stabilized multi-sensor sight and enlarged ammunition bay, larger span stub wings, a ventral fin for improved longitudinal stability, and extended tail boom to compensate for the larger, wide-chord main rotor unit. Forerunner of AH-1T
  Bell 407 [N407PH] (Bell-Textron)

407 1994 (TC H2SW) = 7pCH; 814hp Allison 250-C47; rotor: 35'0" length: 42'0" load: 2402# v: 161/139/0 range: 328 ceiling: 17,900'.
409 SEE AH-63.
412 SEE 212.
  Bell 427 (Bell-Textron)

427 1999 = No data.
  Bell 430 [N43011] Bell-Textron)

430 (TC H9SW) 1994 = 10pCH; 808hp Allison 250-C40; rotor: 48'0" length: 57'3" load: 3815# v: 173/160/0 range: 434 ceiling: 14,600'. Set helicopter around-the-world speed record in Sep 1996 [N43011]. $4.5 million; POP: ??.
533 1962 = UH-1B with two 920lb Continental J69-T-9 turbojets added and a swept wing. Flown with both two- and three-blade rotors. Reached speeds of 250mph in level flight.
A-7 Airacobra 1941 = P-39 as aerial target.
AH-1 Cobra (Model 209, 249) - USMC/Army 2p close-support attack helicopter, unofficially nicknamed "Huey" after HU designation. The 2 prototype YAH-1Gs had retractable skid landing gear [66-15246/15247].
AH-1E, -1S(ECAS) 1975 = load: 3400# v: 141/x/0 range: 315. POP: 205; included 7 exports.

AH-1F, -1S(MC) 1979 = load: 3400# v: 141/x/0 range: 315. POP: 225 conversions from AH-1G; included 41 TAH-1F dual-control trainers and 74 exports.

  Bell AH-1G [69-16430] (Larry DiRicco)

AH-1G, TH-1G Snake 1966 = First production. 1100hp Lycoming &53-L-13; rotor: 44' length: 44'7" load: 3400# v: 172/130/0 range: 362-357 ceiling: 11,400'. POP: 1,127 (?>1,119); included a number of TH-1G dual-control crew trainers and 9 exports. For US Customs Dept, weapons were replaced by Nitesun searchlight.

JAH-1G 1972 = Army engineering testbed. POP: 1 [71-20985].
  Bell AH-1J [159228] (Larry DiRicco)

AH-1J SeaCobra 1970 = Two 1800hp T400 Turbo "TwinPac." Anti-tank TOW-equipped for USMC. POP: 269 [157757/157805, 159210/159229], included 210 exports. All were ultimately converted to AH-1Q.

AH-1P, -1S(PROD) 1976 = POP: 100.

AH-1Q 1973 = Conversion of AH-1G, with added TOW equipment, and AH-1J. POP: 290 (?>93).

AH-1R 1974 = Experimental Lycoming 1800hp T-53-L-703. POP: 2; ultimated converted to AH-1S.

AH-1S 1976 = Increased armament, redesigned cockpit, electronics upgrade. POP: 297 production, plus Army conversions of 197 AH-1Gs and 93 AH-1Qs, and USMC conversions of 9 AH-1Fs. Trainer modification was TH-1S and TAH-1S.

AH-1T SeaCobra 1976 = USMC. 1970hp T400 TwinPac; ff: 5/20/74. POP: 54 [160105/160119, 160742/160748, 160797/160826, 161015/161022].

AH-1T+ 19?? = AH-1T repowered with two GE T700-GE-401 turboshafts as prototype of AH-1W. POP: 1.
  Bell AH-1W (Bell-Textron)

AH-1W SuperCobra 1986 = USMC AH-1T with better weapons load, two 3250hp General Electric T700; rotor: 48'0" length: 58'0" load: 4550# v: 175/173/0 range: 395. Almost an entirely new aircraft and not just an upgrade. POP: 196 [162532/162575, 163921/163954, 164572/164578, 164586/164596, 164913/164938, 165037/165056, 165097, 165271/165292, 165317/165341, 165358/165377, 165392/165396, 165445/165450].

AH-1Z 2000 = USMC attack helo. Upgraded AH-1W and UH-1N with new engine, avionics, and four-blade rotor. POP (contract): 180 AH-1W, 100 UH-1N.


AH-58 Warrior 1988 = Army modified and armed OH-58D.
AH-58D 19?? =

  Bell YAH-63 [73-22246] (Bell)

AH-63 (Model 409) 1975 = Based on King Cobra. 2pCH; two 1500hp GE T700-GE-700 turboshafts; rotor: 51'0" length: 52'5" v: 202/167/0 range: 515 ceiling: 29,000'. Bell's entry in US Army Advanced Attack Helicopter competition, lost out to Hughes AH-64. POP: 2 as YAH-63 [73-22246/22247].
ATV SEE 65.
Coaxial Rotor Helicopter 1945 = Little-known research machine with counterrotating blades on a common shaft flew briefly but was reportedly scrapped before any potential could be realized.

This could be Model 31 or 46, the only two missing Bell model numbers in that time sequence, or the undocumented Model 36 project. (— Stéphane Beaumort 7/7/07)
Design studies of relative importance, not bearing a factory Model number and, except for D-292, none was built:

CTR-22A/B/C/D - Tilt-rotor project (1983).

CTR-750 - Tilt-rotor project.

CTR-800 - Tilt-rotor project.

CTR-1900 - Tilt-rotor project.

D-182C - Trailrotor T-37 COIN conversion project in 1956.

D-188A - The designation XF-109 was requested, but never allocated officially—three times reserved but never allocated in the end.

  Bell D-190B (Bell)
D-190B - USAF V/STOL concept for SAR, cargo, liaison, ground support (1957). Two tilting ducted props and turboshafe engines. Got only as far as a mock-up for wind tunnel testing, but some technology went into X-22A program.

D-223 - Tilt-rotor project (1956).

D-230 Flying Jeep - VTOL project with four foldable ducted fans.

D-246 - Tilt-rotor project (1959).

D-252 - Tilt-rotor project (1961).

  Bell D-255 (Bell)

D-255 Iroquois Warrior - Full-size mock-up of a tandem 2p combat helicopter (1962).

D-262 - Smaller version of D-255 (1964)

D-266 - Composite prop-rotor VTOL research aircraft pre-design study proposal in response to Army's Composite Aircraft Program (1965).

D-267 - Tilt-rotor project (1968).

D-292 ACAP 1985 = 2-4pCH; two 680hp Avco-Lycoming LTS101-750C turboshafts; rotor: 42'0" length: 40'5"; ff: 8/x/85. Designation was factory model number. ACAP = Advanced Composite Airframe Program; constructed of Kevlar, plastic/epoxy, and graphite. POP: 2.

D-303 - Tilt-rotor project (1980).

D-321 - Tilt-rotor project (1980).

D-326 Clipper - Commercial tilt-rotor passenger transport (1980).

D-327 - Tilt-rotor project (1980).

D-329 BAT - Research VTOL developed as a proposal for the Army's 1984 LHX light helicopter program.

D-340 Pointer - Design proposal for tilit-rotor UAV.

D-2149-1 Carabao - Design proposal for ground-effect machine.

  Bell F-109 (D-188A) Mock-up (Bell via Paul Matt coll)

F-109 1959 = Joint VTOL supersonic bomber project with Convair, based on Bell D-188A design, only made it to the mock-up stage. Eight turbojets, two rotating on the wingtips, two fixed horizontally in the tail, and two vertically through the fuselage aft of the cockpit. F- designation was assigned by USAF, but s/n on the tail was Bell's "blue-sky" number.
F2L Airabonita 1944 = Unarmed P-39Q to USN with conventional landing gear and tailhook, used first in carrier evaluations, finally as target drone. POP: 2 as F2L-1K [91102/91103].
Feederliner - Commercial helicopter design project, development of Model 48.
  Bell XFL-1 [1588] (USN)

FL Airabonita 1940 = USN carrier version of P-39 with 1150hp Allison V-1710; conventional gear and tail hook; ff as taildragger: 5/13/40 (p: Homer Barry, who suddenly became airborne during a high-speed taxi test, and as he circled to land, flotation bags in the wings deployed and inflated, cutting lift to almost zero and doubling the drag, but he somehow still managed a credible landing without further incidents). POP: 1 as XFL-1 [1588]; lost out to Vought F4U.
FM Airacuda - AAC escort fighter-bomber; designation of FM was for "Fighter, Multi-place." 5pClwM rg; two 1150hp Allison V-1710-13 pushers. Robert Woods. Two pilots sat in tandem, each engine nacelle held a gunner firing his choice of a 37mm Madsen cannon or a .30 machinegun (two .30s in YFM-1a and -1B), and the radio operator manned .50 machineguns in each side blister. Battlewise it was a busy affair, but the blisters caused attritional drag and were replaced with sliding flat panels. However, its small bomb load (600#), low speed, and general lack of maneuverability kept it from performing any of its roles to satisfaction, so the planes were used briefly as flight trainers, finally grounded as training aids before the start of WW2.
  Bell XFM-1 [36-351] (Bell)

XFM-1 (Model 1) 1937 = Conventional landing gear; span: 70'0" length: 46'0" v: 277/244/77 range: 2600 ceiling: 30.500' ff: 9/1/37 (Lt Ben Kelsey). POP: 1 [36-351].

  Bell YFM-1 in color (Bell)

YFM-1 (Model 7) 1939 = Service tests; bomb racks installed; 1150hp V-1710-23; ff: 9/28/39. POP: 10 [38-486/495]. [38-492] crashed before delivery and was not on the rolls.

  Bell YFM-1A (1940 Air News)
  Bell YFM-1A (Bell)

YFM-1A (Model 8) 1940 = Tricycle gear. POP: 3 [38-496/498].

  Bell YFM-1B [38-489] (Bell)

YFM-1B 1940 = Conventional gear; 1090hp V-1710-41. POP: 2 converted from YFM-1s [38-489/490].

YFM-1C (Model 17) 194? = no data.


H-1 Iroquois, H-40, HU-1, UH-1 (Model 204, 205) (TC H1RM, H1SW, H2NM, H2SW, H3NM, H3SO, H4SW, H5SO, H9SW, H13WE, H15NM, N5NM) - 6-12pCH; 770hp derated Lycoming T53; rotor: 44'0" length: 42'8" load: 4130# v: 142/115/0 range: 210. Originally designated H-40.
  Bell XH-40 [55-4461] (Bell)

XH-40 1956 = 825hp Lycoming XT53 turboshaft; ff: 10/22/56 (p: Floyd Carlson). POP: 3 [55-4459/4461].

YH-40 1958 = POP: 6.

HH-1H 19?? = Base rescue version for USAF. POP: 30.

  Bell UH-1A (Bell)

UH-1A 195? = no data.

  Bell UH-1C with nose grenade launcher (Bell)

UH-1C 1965 = 1100hp T53; load: 4430# range: 382. POP: 749.

  Bell UH-1D (Bell)

UH-1D (205) 1963 = 1100hp T53; rotor: 48'0" length: 41'11" load: 4560# v: 148/130/0 range: 260. POP: 2,015.

UH-1E, TH-1E 1963 = USMC. Similar to HU-/UH-1B. POP: 212, included 20 TH-1E trainers [154730/154749].

UH-1F, TH-1F 1964 = USAF. 1272hp GE T58; rotor: 48'0" length: 41'5" load: 4570# v: 138/123/0 range: 347; ff: 2/20/64. Prototype designated XH-48A. POP: 146; included 27 TH-1F trainers.

UH-1H (205) 1967 = 1400hp T53; load: 4560# v: 148/130/0 range: 260. POP: 4,955; included 1,382 exports; modified as UH-1V for Medevac.

EH-1H 1980 = UH-1H modified for Project Quick Fix with additional electronic equipment, including AN/APR-39V2 radar warning receiver, XM130 chaff/flare dispenser, and AN/ALQ-144 infra-red jammer. POP: 10 conversions.

JUH-1H 19?? = At least 4 UH-1H were converted as advanced developmental research models to demonstrate the operational feasibility of using the Stand-Off Target Acquisition System (SOTAS) in Europe. The aircraft had a high skid that retracted in flight permitting full rotation of the large antenna pod. Inside the pod was a Moving Target Indicator. Project was replaced by EH-60B SOTAS Black Hawk.

HH-1K 19?? = USN. 27 POP: [157177/157203].

  Bell TH-1L [157827] (Larry DiRicco)

TH-1L 1969 = USN. Similar to UH-1E but with a 1400hp T53 engine. POP: 90 [157806/157850, 157859/157903].

UH-1L 1968 = USN utility version of TH-1L. POP: 8.

UH-1M 19?? = 1400hp T53. Modified UH-1Cs for Vietnam. POP: a small number.

  Bell UH-1N [158234] (USN)

UH-1N 19?? = USN utility. POP: 200 [158230/158291, 158548/158550, 158555, 158558/158562, 158762/158785, 159186/159209, 159565, 159680/159703, 159774/159777, 160165/160179, 160438/160461, 160619/160624, 160827/160838].

VH-1N 19?? = POP: 6 [158551/158554, 158556/158557].
UH-1P 19?? = UH-1F converted for a classified psychological warfare role. Operated exclusively by USAF 20th SOS Green Hornets in Vietnam, had rockets and hand-held minigun armament. POP: 20.

UH-1V 19?? = Medical evacuation conversion. Fitted with a radar altimeter, distance measuring equipment, glideslope, and rescue hoist. POP: 220.

AH-1W SuperCobra 19?? = No data.

EH-1X 19?? = EH-1H, modified as part of Phase Two of Project Quick Fix IIA, differed from earlier -1Hs in that it incorporated Direction Finding Capability. The major external difference was four dipole antennas affixed to the tailboom of the -1X model.

UH-1Y 2001 = USMC. Modified UH-1N with two GE-T700 and four-blade rotors; ff: 12/12/01 (p: Monte Nelson, Maj William Randall).

HU-1, UH-1 1959 = POP: 9.

HU-1A, TH-1A, UH-1A 1960 = POP: 173. 14 modified as TH-1A trainers.

YHU-1B (Model 533) 1962 = 1100hp T53; ff: 8/10/62. Set unofficial helicopter world speed record in 1964 of 222mph. POP: 4.

HU-1B, UH-1B 1961 = 960-1100hp T53-L; load: 4130# v: 147/126/0 range: 260. POP: 1,010.

HU-1D 196? = 12p with 1100hp T53. POP: 9.


H-2 - Redesignation from R-12 in 1948.
H-4 Kiowa 1969 = 2pCH redesignated as OH-58A.
H-13, R-13 Sioux - Army 2-4pCH utility from civil Model 47, redesignated from initial R-13. Wheel undercarriage replaced by skids from -13C on. H classification redesignated OH in 1953. USN version HUL.
XR-13, YR-13 1946 = 2p with 175hp Franklin O-335; rotor: 35'1" length: 27'4" v: 78/62/0 load: 540# range: 150 ceiling: 13,000'. POP: 1 prototype XR-13 [46-227], 27 production as YR-13 [46-228/254], of which 10 transferred to USN as HUL [122452/122461].

YR-13A, YH-13A 1947 = YR-13 winterized for Alaskan operations. POP: 3 modifications [46-228/230].

H-13B 1948 = 200hp Franklin O-335; v: 82/66/0 range: 175. POP: 65 [48-796/860].

H-13C, YH-13C 1950 = POP: 1 YH-13C ambulance prototype, 13 H-13C production models.

H-13D, OH-13D 1951 = Ambulance with external litter-platforms; 220hp Franklin O-335; v: 85/70/0 load: 670# range: 200. POP: 87 [51-2446/2531, -16642].

H-13E, OH-13E 1951 = 3p with dual controls. POP: 490 [51-13742/14231].

XH-13F (201) 1955 = H-13D repowered with 240hp Continental-Turbomèca XT51-T; v: 95/88/0 ceiling: 17,500'. POP: 1 as Model 201.

H-13G, OH-13G 1953 = 3p with tail-boom elevator, larger fuel tanks, dual controls; v: 85/70/0 load: 870# range: 238. POP: 256 [51-14232/14241, 52-7790/7793, 53-3654/3674, -3785/3814].

H-13H, OH-13H 1951 = USAF ambulance with 250hp VO-435, all-metal rotors. POP: 453 [55-3355/3356, -4613/4633, 56-2161/2244, 57-1792/1875, -6203/6244,. 58-1497/1552, -5304/5395, -6984/6998].

H-13J 1957 = Special model for Presidential use. 4p with 240hp Lycoming VO-435; rotor: 37'2 length: 32'5" load: 950# v: 105/99/0 range: 222-300. POP: 2 [57-2728/2729], redesignated UH-13J in 1962.

H-13K, OH-13K 1960 = 225hp Franklin 6VS-335; rotor: 38'4" v: 95/80/0 load: 735# range: 235 ceiling: 21,250'. POP: 2.

OH-13S 1963 = Observation. 3-4p stretched version with 260hp turbocharged Lycoming TVO-435; length: 28'6" v: 113/105/0 load: 919# range: 324 ceiling: 18,000'. POP: 265 (?>150).

TH-13L, -13M, -13N 196? = Trainers redesignated as HTL-4, -6, and -7 respectively.

  Bell TH-13T [64-17885] (Larry DiRicco)

TH-13T 1963 = 2p instrument trainer with 270hp TVO-435D; specs similar to OH-13S, but v: 110/97/0 load: 970#. POP: 411.


  Bell XH-15 [46-530] (Bell)

H-15, R-15 (Model 54) 1946 = 4pCH; 275hp Continental XO-47; rotor: 37'4" length: 29'4" v: 105 range 200. POP: 3 XR-15 [46-530/532], re-designated XH-15.
H-33 SEE V-3.
H-40 - Original designation for H-1/HU-1.
H-57 Sea Ranger 1968 = 5pCH Army/Navy basic training version of 206 Jet Ranger. POP: 40 TH-57A [157177/157203], 51 -57B [161695/161701, 162803/162810, 163312/163347], and 89 -57C [162013/162067, 162666/162686, 162811/162823].
H-58 Kiowa SEE OH-58.
  Bell TH-67A [N67409] (Bell-Textron)

H-67 Creek (Canada) 19?? = US Army trainer version of 206B-3 with similar specs; Allison 250-C20J; r: 33'4" length: 31'2" v: 140. POP: 154 as TH-67A; prototypes as YTH-67A. All operated with their civil N-registrations. SEE TH-67A registrations.
H-70, ARH-70, RAH-70, RH-70 2007 = Armed Recon Helicopter (ARH) derived from Bell 407. ff: 2/x/2007, but crashed on an Arlington TX golf course after loss of power.
HO-4, OH-4, H-4 1962 = 4pCH; Allison T63-A turboshaft; rotor: 33'4" length: 30'1" load: 1000#; ff: 12/8/62. Served as prototype for 206 Jet Ranger (Model 206) series. POP: 5 as YHO-4, redesignated YOH-4A, then H-4.
HSL (Model 61) 1953 = 4pCH tandem-rotor anti-sub helicopter for USN; 2400hp P&W; R-2800-50; rotor: 51'6" length: 36'3" (?>40'0") v: 115/96/0 range: 350. Gross wt: 26,500#. POP: 3 XHSL-1 and 50 HSL-1 [129133/129136, 129154/129168, 129843/12977].
HTL - USN instrument trainer version of civil 47. 2pCH; 220hp Lycoming VO-435; rotor: 37'2" length: 31'8" load: 534# v: 103/90/0 range: 198.
  Bell HTL-1 (Bell)

HTL-1 (47A) 1958 = 175hp Franklin O-335. YR-13 transferred from Army. POP: 15 [22453/22454, 22456/22458, 122452/122461], the last two of which were transferred to USCG.

HTL-2 (47D) 1949 = POP: 12 [122952/122963].

HTL-3 (47E) 1950 = POP: 12 [124561/124569, 144693/144695], included 3 for Brazilian Navy.

HTL-4, TH-13L (47D-1) 1950 = POP: 46 [128621/128636, 128887/128916]. Redesignated TH-13L in 1962.

HTL-5 1951 = As HTL-4, but 200hp Franklin O-335. POP: 36 [129942/129977].

  Bell HTL-6 (Bell)

HTL-6, TH-13M (47G) 1955 = POP: 48 [142373/142396, 143148/143171].

HTL-7, TH-13N (47J) 1958 = 220hp Lycoming VO-435; rotor 37'2" length: 31'8" load: 1180# v: 105/100/0. POP: 18 [145837/145854].


HU-1 SEE H-1.
HUL, UH-13 - USN version of USAF H-13J (civil 47J and 47L). 4pCH; 260hp Lycoming VO-435. Redesignated UH-13 in 1962.
HUL-1, UH-13P 1956 = Stock 47J for USN. POP: 28 [142364/142372, 143134/143147, 147578/147581, 148277].

HUL-1M, UH-13R 19?? = Experimental 47L powered by 250hp Allison YT63-A-3 shaft-turbine. POP: 2 [149838/148839].

HUL-2 - Projected turboshaft-powered version of HUL-1.


  Bell L-39 with test swept wing (USN)

L-39 1944 = Swept-wing modification of P-63C for USN/NACA stall and low-speed tests. POP: 2 [90061/90062]. The "L" was a NACA designation, unrelated to the military Liaison prefix.
OH-58 Kiowa (TC H22NM, R00006DE) - Light Observation version of 206. 5pCH redesignated from H-4.
OH-58A 1969 = 317hp Allison T63; rotor: 35'4" load: 1415# v: 150/117/0 range: 300. POP: 2,383; included 318 exports.

OH-58B 197? = Similar to -58A. POP: 12 exports to Austria.

OH-58C 1976 = Improved Army version with 420hp T63. POP: 438 converted from OH-58A.

  Bell OH-58D (Bell-Textron)

OH-58D (Model 406) 1985 = 650hp Allison 250; rotor: 35'0" load: 1675# v: 147/127/0 range: 345. POP: ??.


P-39 Airacobra (P-45, P-400) - AAF and export fighter. 1pClwM rg; 1150hp Allison V-1710 amidships; span: 35'0" length: 28'8" load: 1555# v: 390/255/80 range: 1150 (data for XP-39). First ordered as P-45. 25mm or 37mm nose cannon in propshaft. British designation originally was Caribou, then Airacobra I and II. While unpopular with US pilots, it was used by USSR and France with notable success. Export totals were 4,773 to USSR, with small lots to Great Britain and Portugal. USN versions FL for carrier tests, and F2L Airabonita, modified from P-39Q.
 The P-400 and P-39 in combat

  Bell XP-39 and -39B [38-326] (USAAC and 1940 Air News)

XP-39, -39B (Model 11) 1939 = POP: 1 [38-326], modified by NACA after initial testing as XP-39B without turbo-supercharger; ff: 4/6/39 (p: James Taylor).

  Bell YP-39 (USAAF)

YP-39 1940 = 1100hp V-1710; span: 34'0" length: 30'2" load: 1958# v: 368/257/x range: 1100. POP: 12 [40-027/039].

  Bell TP-39 (Dan Shumaker coll)

TP-39 1942 = 2p trainer.

YP-39A (Model 12) 1940 = Service trials. POP: 1 without turbosupercharger.

  Bell P-39C (1940 Air News)

P-39C, RP-39C (Model 13) 1941 = POP: 20 from P-45 contract [40-2971/2990]. No combat duties; redesignated in Restricted category as RP-39C.

  Bell P-39D-1 (USAAF)

P-39D, -39D-1, -39D-2 (Model 15) 1941 = 1150 V-1710-35; span: 34'0" length: 30'2" load: 1858# v: 368/213/85 range (with ferry tanks): 1100 ceiling: 32,100'. POP: 369 [40-2991/3050, 41-6722/7052, -7057/7058, -7080/7115], plus 336 P-39D-1 as first Lend-Lease model [41-28257/28406, -38220/38404, 38563], and 158 P39D-2 with extra 145-gallon fuel tank for ferrying flight [41-38405/38562]. 494 destined for RAF as Airacobra I (Model 14), of which 179 were redesignated P-400 when impressed by USAAF.

  Bell XP-39E (Bell Co)

XP-39E (Model 23) 1942 = An experiment with a 35'10" laminar-flow wing, redesigned tail. Planned as P-76, elements went into P-63 instead; length: 31'11"; ff: Feb 1942. POP: 3 prototypes [41-19501/19502, 42-71464].

  Bell P-39F (USAAF)

P-39F, -39F-1, -39F-2 1942 = Propeller change. POP: 229 [41-7116/7344], of which 2 modified as F-1 photo-recon; F-2 designated planes were field-modified with belly armor.

TP-39F = Unarmed 2p trainer conversion by field kits from various models.
P-39G - Contract for 1,800 transferred to P-39K, -39L, -39M, and -39N.

P-39H - Designation not used.

P-39J 1942 = Engine modification. POP: 25 [41-7053/7056, -7059/7079].

P-39K 1942 = 1325hp V-1710-63 and Aeroproducts prop. POP: 210 [42-4244/4453].

P-39L 1943 = Curtiss prop, modified nose wheel. POP: 250 [42-4454/4703].

P-39M 1943= 1200hp V-1710-83; load: 2790# v: 386/200/x range: 650 ceiling: 36,000'. POP: 240 [42-4704/4943].

  Bell P-39N (NACA)

P-39N, -39N-5 (Model 26) 1943 = Smaller fuel tanks; v: 399/x/85 range: 750 ceiling: 38,500'. POP: 1,400 [42-4944/5053, -8727/9726, -18246/18545], plus 695 as P-39N-5 with armor-plate seat-back [42-18546/19240].

  Bell P-39Q [42-20098] (USAAF)

P-39Q, F2L-1 Airabonita 1943 = Largest production batch, with suffixes -1, -5, -10, -20, and -30, with a four-blade prop on the last two models; length: 30'2" load: 2055# v: 385/200/88 range: 1250. POP: 4,905 [42-19446/21250, 44-2001/4000, -32167/32666, -70905/71504], of which 2 early models to USN as F2L-1K [42-19976=91102, 42-20807=91103].

RP-39Q 1945 = Target drone conversion.
  Bell P-400(magazine clip)

P-400 1941 = Impressed and redesignated from RAF Airacobra I exports and assigned by USAAF at start of war for duty in the Pacific theater. POP: 179.

P-45 SEE P-39C.
P-52 (Model 16) 1941 - Projected twin-boom fighter with 1250hp Continental XIV-1430-5 pusher. None was built.
P-59 Airacomet - 1pCmwM rg; two 2000# GE J-31 turbojet; span: 45'6" length: 38'10" load: 5535# v: 413/375/85 range: 525 ceiling: 46,200' (data for P-59B). First US operational jet-propelled aircraft. For security reasons, the plane was assigned this designation, originally intended for a twin-boom, piston-engine fighter design XP-59 (which was later cancelled). Stability problems led to service rejection, and most all ended up as 2p target drone directors. SEE The Ape and the Airacomet
  Bell XP-59A

XP-59A 1942 = 1600# GE I-16 (original J-31, aka GE 1-A); ff: 10/1 (?>2)/42 (p: Robert M Stanley). POP: 3 prototypes [42-108784/108786]. Also flown by Laurence C Craigie that year as the first US military pilot to fly a jet aircraft.

  Bell XP-59A Open cockpit! [42-10786] (Edwards FTC)

Such was the novelty of our nation's first jet fighter that a crude open cockpit was cut out in the forward fuselage of one XP-59A [42-10786] to accommodate a lucky VIP passenger (first was Bell's project engineer Harland Poyer) on a makeshift seat, little more than a stool, whose only protection from the elements was a small windshield and helmet and goggles. One USAAF model was also similarly modified to take an unnamed general for a ride, during which he reportedly became airsick.

  Bell YP-59A [42-108] (USAF)

YP-59A 1943 = First service batch, also with I-16. POP: 13 [42-108771/108783], of which 2 evaluated by USN [63960/63961], and 1 traded to RAF for a Gloster Meteor.

  Bell P-59A (USAF)
  Bell P-59A [44-22612] (Bell)

P-59A (Model 27) 1944 = Production model. POP: 20 [44-22609/22628].

XP-59B 1944 - Single-engine variant; transferred to Lockheed as a base of study for P-80.

  Bell P-59B-1 [44-22650] (USAF Museum)

P-59B (Model 29) 1945 = Increased fuel tanks. POP: 30 [44-22629/22658], of which 3 allocated to USN for service trials [64100, 64108/64109].

XP-59B - Low-wing design project was sent to Lockheed to use as a basis in their P-80 program.

  Bell P-63 Civil two-seater mod [NX41954] (clip)

P-63 Kingcobra - 1pClwM rg; 1325hp Allison V-1710-93 amidships; span: 38'4" length: 32'8" load: 4125# v: 408/378/100 range: 450 ceiling: 43,000' (data for P-63A). Harlan M Poyer (design patent #141,292). Evolution of P-39 with 37mm nose cannon. Unarmed and unarmored, but recovered with tougher metal skin, RP (later QF) was used as flying targets for frangible bullets, a "flying pinball machine" that registered hits with a red light. Total production was 3,303, of which 2,421 went to USSR. Only a few were in USAAF service, and none were in combat.
  Bell XP-63 [41-19512] (Bell Co)

XP-63 (Model 33) 1942 = ff: 12/7/42 (p: Robert M Stanley). POP: 2 [41-19511/19512], both lost in testing.

XP-63A 1943 = Third prototype, with V-1710-93. POP: 1 [42-78015].

  Bell P-63A [42-69431]

P-63A 1943 = POP: 1,725 [42-68861/69879, -69975/70685], with most going to USSR; a few modified as flying target RP-63A. Subtypes of A-1, -5, -8, -9, and -10 indicated various armament configurations and modifications.

  Bell RP-63A "Pin-Ball" [42-69654] (USAAF via AETC)

RP-63A 1944 = Flying target. POP: 95 [42-69880/69974].

TP-63A (Model 38) 1945 = 2p trainers with dual controls. POP: 24 modifications.

P-63B (Model 34) - Planned for Packard-Merlin V-1650, but cancelled.

  Bell P-63C racer [NX62995]
  Bell L-39 (Bell via NACA)

P-63C 1944 = Ventral fin; v: 410/356/115 range: 420 ceiling: 38,600'. POP: 1,227 [42-70686/70860, 43-10893/11717, 44-4001/4427], most of which to USSR and France, but 2 to USN as L-39 (qv) for NACA experiments using sweptback wings. [43-10933/11132] were "flying target" versions.

  Bell RP-63C [43-10959] (USAF)
  Bell RP-63C V-tail (USAF Museum)

RP-63C 1944 = Flying target. POP: 200 [43-10933/11132].
P-63D (Model 37) 1945 = Modified wing, bubble canopy. POP: 1 [42-11718].

  Bell P-63E [43-11720] (USAF via Peter Bowers)

P-63E (Model 41) 1945 = 1425hp V-1710-109; span: 39'2" v: 410/188/117. POP: 13 [43-11720/11721, -11725/11735].

  Bell P-63F [43-11719] (Larry DiRicco)

P-63F (Model 43) 1945 = Taller fin with small dorsal extension. POP: [43-11719/11722]. The first one was civil registered post-war as a racer in the 1947 NARs [NX1719].

  Bell RP-63G [45-57300] (Bell Co)

RP-63G, QF-63G 1946 = Flying target; 1425hp V-1710-135. Despite QF designation for unmanned radio-controlled drones, Bell QFs were flown by pilots. POP: 32 [43-11723/11724, 45-57283/57312] included 1 with experimental V-tail [45-57300].

XP-63H (Model 45) - Proposed test-bed for Allison V-1710-127 turbo-compound engine, not produced.


P-76 1942 - Proposed production of modified XP-39E; order for 4,000 was cancelled.
  Bell XP-77 [43-34915] (Bell)

P-77 (Model 32 aka D-6) 1944 = 1pClwM rg; 520hp Ranger XV-770; span: 27'6" length: 22'11" load: 823# v: 330/270/92 range: 550; ff: 4/1/44 (p: Jack Woollams). Robert J Woods. An experiment in metal conservation when a shortage of aluminum seemed imminent. Laminated wood construction, cantilever wing, manual retracting tri-gear; two .50 wing guns plus a 20mm cannon in the propshaft. POP: 2 as XP-77 [43-34915/34916], the latter destroyed in testing. Metal shortage never developed, nor did the fighter. Projected P-77A (Model 35) not built.
  Bell XP-83 (Bell)

P-83 (Model 40) 1945 = Enlarged P-59 with two J33-GE-5; ff: 2/25 (?>27)/45 (p: Jack Woollams). Unofficial name was "Airarattler." POP: 2 as XP-83 [44-84990/84991].
P-400 SEE P-39.
  Bell XR-12 [46-215] (Bell)
  Bell YR-12B [46-217] (Bell)

R-12, H-2 (Model 48) 1946 = 5pCH; 550hp P&W; R-1340; rotor: 47'6" length: 39'7" (?>41'7") v: 105/90/0 range 300. Gross wt: 6285#. POP: 2 XR-12 [46-214/215], 1 10p XR-12B [46-216], and 10 YR-12B [46-217/226]. Redesignated as H-2 in 1948.
R-13 Sioux - Initial designation for H-13 (qv).
R-15 SEE H-15.

TH-1 SEE H-1.


UH-1 SEE HU-1, HUL.
  Bell XV-3 [54-147] (magazine clip)
  Bell XV-3 [54-148] (NASA Ames)
V-3, H-33 Convertiplane 1955 = 2-5pCmwH, factory model 200, with three-blade tilt rotors at the wingtips. 450hp P&W; R-985 mounted amidships driving rotors via geared shafts; span: 25'0" rotors: 33'0" length: 30'4" v: 178/130/0 range: 140 ceiling: 15,000'; ff (hover): 8/11/55 (p: Floyd Carlson). Developed under a contract jointly funded by the Army and USAF in their Convertible Aircraft Program to investigate vertical-to- forward flight technologies, it was the first aircraft to fully tilt its rotors while in flight, although it was initially so underpowered as to be unable to lift more than its test pilot. POP: 2 prototypes as XV-3, originally as XH-33 [54-147/148]. The first was destroyed in a test flight on 10/25/56. The second was modified with two-blade 23' rotors and other modifications, and made the first conversion to airplane mode on 12/18/58. It was destroyed in 1968 wind-tunnel testing, but is being restored for display at the Army museum at Ft Rucker AL. Acquired technology went into XV-15.

Thanks to Marty Maisel for intensive research and editing on the Bell VTOLs.
  Bell XV-15 [N703NA] (NASA Ames Research Center)
  Bell XV-15 [N703NA] (AIAA)

V-15 (Model 301) 1977 = Tilt-rotor proof-of-concept aircraft developed under a contract jointly funded by NASA and the Army. Two 1550hp (maximum 1160hp because of transmission limitations) Avco-Lycoming LTC1K-4K turboshafts with three-blade 25' "proprotors" mounted in tiltable wingtip nacelles; span: 35'2" length: 41'0" load: 5430# v: 382/230/0 range: 512 ceiling: 29,000'; ff (hover): 5/3/77 (p: Dorman Cannon, Ron G Erhart). A helicopter with the proprotor shafts near vertical, it could operate steady-state at any shaft angle down to the airplane mode, with shafts horizontal and proprotors acting as propellers. Design gross weight was 13,000#, normal VTOL take-off weight about 14,000#. Exceeded 300mph in 1980. Shipboard tests on USS Tripoli in Aug 1982. POP: 2 as XV-15 [N702NA/703NA]. Elements and experience went into Bell-Boeing V-22.
X-1 - Transonic (X-1) and supersonic (X-1A, -1B, -1D) research aircraft with Reaction Motors four-barrel XLR11 rocket engine. Original designation XS-1.
  Bell XS-1 [46-062] (NASA Dryden via John K Lewis)

X-1, XS-1 (Model 44) 1946 = POP: 3. [46-062]; ff (glide): 1/25/46, (p: Jack Woollams); ff (powered): 7/11/47 (p: Chalmers "Slick" Goodlin). On 10/14/47, Capt Charles E "Chuck" Yeager in Glamorous Glennis was the first man to exceed Mach 1. Subsequent 82 powered flights and at least 14 unpowered until it was retired in 1950 and transferred to NASM for permanent museum display. [46-063] had 74 powered and at least 5 glide flights; ff (glide): 10/11/46 (p: Goodlin); ff (powered): 12/9/46 (p: Goodlin); modified to X-1E. [46-064] had its only flight, as a glider, 7/20/51 (p: Joseph Cannon), before being destroyed in a ground accident.

  Bell X-1A [48-1384] (Bell)

X-1A (Model 58A) 1953 = POP: 1 [48-1384]; ff (powered): 2/2/53 (p: Jean "Skip" Ziegler). Subsequently about 25 powered and 2 unpowered flights before it was jettisoned from its carrier on 8/8/55 after an in-flight explosion and was destroyed.

  Bell X-1B [48-1385] (NASA Dryden)

X-1B (Model 58B) 1954 = POP: 1 [48-1385]; ff (powered): 9/24 (?>Oct 8)/54 (p: LtCol Jack Ridley), with 27 powered and 4 unpowered flights until transfer to USAF Museum for permanent display in 1959.

X-1C (Model 58C) - High-speed armament test project cancelled [48-1387].

X-1D (Model 58D) 1951 = POP: 1 [48-1386]; ff (glide): 7/24/51 (p: Ziegler). On 8/22/51, a small explosion occurred in the X-1D while attached, but test pilot Capt Frank Everest was able to scramble into the mother ship before his plane was jettisoned to crash on the desert floor.

  Bell X-1E [46-064] (NASA Dryden)

X-1E 1955 = POP: 1 converted from X-1 [46-064]; ff (powered): 12/12 (?>15)/55 (p: Joseph Walker). 26 powered and 3 unpowered flights until retirement in 1958.


  Bell X-2 [46-0674] (Edwards FTC)

X-2, XS-2 (Model 52) 1952 = Supersonic swept-wing research aircraft with Curtiss-Wright rocket engine, originally designated XS-2-BE. POP: 2. [46-0674]; ff (glide): 8/8/55, ff (powered): 11/11/55 (p: Capt Frank Everest); crashed 9/27/56 due to inertia coupling after 17 flights; [46-0675]; ff: (glide): 6/27/52 (p: Jean "Skip" Ziegler). Only had three unpowered flights before being destroyed in an in-flight explosion 11/10/52 that killed Ziegler, who was in the bomb bay, and observer Frank Wolko, who bailed out but his 'chute failed. The blast also damaged the EB-50A carrier to a considerable extent, but pilots William Leyshon and David Howe were able to get it back safely to the Bell factory field at Wheatfield NY. Unofficial name: "Starbuster."
  Bell X-5 [50-1838] (NASA Dryden)

X-5, XS-5 (Model 60) 1951 = Rocket with variable-sweep wings; two J34-WE-17 (?>J35-A-17) turbojets; ff (X-5): 6/20/51 (p: Jean "Skip" Ziegler), ff (XS-5): 10/20/51 (p: Maj Raymond Popson). Robert Woods. POP: 2 [50-1838/1839]. NACA High-Speed Flight Station operated Bell X-5 #1 [50-1838] from 1952 to late 1955. Following the conclusion of the contractors program in Oct 1951, the ship was grounded for installation of a NACA instrument package. In Dec 1951 USAF completed a brief evaluation program involving six flights — because data were taken, these were considered part of the overall NACA effort and were logged as joint USAF-NACA flights. The first all-NACA flight was flight 7. The second X-5 [50-1839] was operated only by USAF and was lost in a spin accident in 1953. Unofficial name: "Interceptor."
X-9 Shrike (Models 59, 59A) - Design proposals.
  Bell X-14 [56-4022] (USAF Museum)

X-14 (Model 68) 1957 = Deflected-thrust VTOL research aircraft. Two 2680# J85-GE-5 (originals were 1750# Armstrong-Siddeley Vipers); span: 34'0" length: 25'0" v: 180/x/0; ff (hover): 2/19/57 (p: David Howe), (transitional): 5/24/58 (p: Howe). Flew in test programs for more than 20 years before being retired in May 1981. Wings from Beechraft Bonanza, tail from Beech T-34. POP: 1 [56-4022=N234NA=N704NA], transferred from Bell to USAF, then to NASA as X-14A in Oct 1959; modified with J85-GE-19s as -14B and reregistered in 1971.
X-16 - 1955 - High-altitude reconnaissance project canceled in favor of Lockheed U-2. Only a mock-up completed.
  Bell X-22A-1 [151521] (Bell)

X-22 1966 = Tandem ducted-propeller VTOL research aircraft from design D-2127. Four YT58-GE-8D turboshafts; span (across rear ducts): 39'3" length: 39'6" v: 255/x/0 range: 445; ff (hover): 3/17/66 (p: Stanley Kakol, Paul Miller); ff (STOL): 6/30/66 (p: Kakol); ff (transitional): 3/1/67 (p: Kakol). 501 flights to 1971. POP: 2 as X-22A-1, -22A-2 [151520/151521], the first of which was converted as a ground simulator; after USAF use. the second went to Cornell Univ for research experiments.
  Bell-Boeing 609 (Boeing)

-Boeing 609 20?? = Tilt-rotor experiments of a 6-9p civil version of Osprey. In the ground testing stage at the end of 2002.
  Bell-Boeing XV-22 (Bell)
  Bell-Boeing XV-22 (Boeing)
  Bell-Boeing CV-22 (SSgt Mark Woodbury, Edwards FTC)

-Boeing V-22 Osprey 1989 = Multi-service tilt-rotor VSTOL. 3-27pChwM; two 6000hp Allison T406-AD-400; span: 84'6" rotors: 38'0" length: 57'4" v: 362/276/0; ff: 3/19/89. Constructed of composite materials, there was only about 1000# of metal in the aircraft, excluding power train. Cross-connected shaft between wingtip motors allowed one-engine emergency operation. Scheduled to replace USMC CH-46E and CH-53D. POP: 5 prototypes as XV-22, of which two crashed in testing. A sixth, planned for USMC testing as MV-22A, was never built. An Army contract for 231 was cancelled, as was a USN contract for 50 as HV-22A.
SOURCES:

-- Bell Aircraft Since 1935 A J Pelletier [Naval Institute Press 1992]
-- John K Lewis