U.S. Aid from International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement, Entire Region, 2006-2011

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Grant military and police aid from International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement, Entire Region, 2006-2011
Country200620072008200920102011Country Total
Colombia350,248,000386,869,000223,124,500228,239,000199,950,000168,413,7081,556,844,208
Mexico28,340,00036,678,000292,298,000360,000,000416,325,000274,836,1501,408,477,150
Peru47,700,00056,000,00031,296,00045,731,26038,588,88935,694,722255,010,871
Bolivia37,206,00035,000,00025,423,00025,629,91019,710,09219,710,092162,679,094
Western Hemisphere Regional1,900,0002,200,00018,148,00043,531,67342,936,14040,556,624149,272,437
Haiti13,925,00014,850,00010,727,00017,500,00021,107,00019,420,00097,529,000
Ecuador7,315,0008,900,0006,112,0007,344,2244,402,8987,473,18541,547,307
Caribbean Basin Security Initiative37,463,00037,463,000
Guatemala1,060,00013,000,0002,472,0004,491,4296,640,62527,664,054
Brazil4,940,0004,000,000285,0001,000,0001,000,0001,000,00012,225,000
Panama3,125,0004,000,000592,0002,200,0009,917,000
Dominican Republic2,992,0003,650,0003,263,3339,905,333
Jamaica530,000900,000342,000589,1672,361,167
Central America Regional2,225,0002,225,000
Paraguay272,000300,000463,415926,8291,962,244
Venezuela1,000,000500,0001,500,000
Honduras650,000608,0001,258,000
Bahamas120,000500,000100,000500,0001,220,000
Argentina194,000275,000240,000320,0001,029,000
Trinidad and Tobago227,000400,000627,000
El Salvador478,000478,000
Eastern Caribbean383,333383,333
Eastern Caribbean Regional200,000200,000
Chile80,00080,000
TOTAL496,409,000566,772,000615,970,500742,264,996754,627,392605,814,3103,781,858,198

All amounts in U.S. dollars. Numbers in italics are estimates, usually based on the closest year for which data are available.

All Grant Aid from International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement, Entire Region, 2006-2011
200620072008200920102011TOTAL
TOTAL496,409,000566,772,000615,970,500742,264,996754,627,392605,814,3103,781,858,198
Military and police trainees from International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement, Entire Region, 2006-2011
Country20062007Country Total
Colombia555381936
Mexico13224156
Ecuador985103
Peru435699
Panama92698
Antigua and Barbuda1212
Bolivia66
Dominica44
St. Vincent and the Grenadines44
St. Lucia44
St. Kitts and Nevis33
TOTAL9474781,425
U.S. Training Institutions, International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement, Entire Region, 2006-2011 (Maximum 20 Shown)
Institution20062007Total
Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation130211341
Inter-American Air Forces Academy198198
12th Flying Training Wing7272
Inter-American Air Forces Academy6767
Army Aviation Logistics School212344
Army Aviation Center37744
Coast Guard Training Center2727
Naval Small Craft Instruction and Technical Training School111425
Defense Language Institute English Language Center11
TOTAL497322819

Official Descriptions of Aid from International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

Department of State, 2009

Document: International Narcotics Control Strategy Report

Country: Jamaica

U.S. Policy Initiatives and Programs

Policy Initiatives. The USG supports counternarcotics projects in Jamaica designed to increase the capacity of its law enforcement agencies to reduce the trafficking of illicit narcotics through Jamaica and sustain improvements in law enforcement capabilities through modernization and professionalization of the JCF, while maintaining a strong and corruption-free law enforcement institution. The pressures of narcotics trafficking, money laundering, corruption and crime undermine the rule of law and democratic governance. Supporting Jamaica's transformation into a more secure, democratic, prosperous and stable partner represents a major U.S. policy goal. This included enhancing the abilities of Jamaica's law enforcement agencies to detect and intercept shipments and detain traffickers.

Bilateral Cooperation. In 2009, the USG provided training and material support to elements of the JCF and JDF to strengthen their counternarcotics, and anticorruption capabilities and improve the investigation, arrest, and prosecution of organized crime, including assisting the GOJ with vetting of specialized units within the JCF. The Jamaica Fugitive Apprehension Team (JFAT) received specialized training, equipment, guidance and operational support from the U.S. Marshals permanently stationed in Kingston. The U.S. Marshals opened 71 new cases and closed 198 cases involving U.S. fugitives. Jamaican authorities made 14 arrests, 15 extraditions and eight deportations during the year.

The JDF Coast Guard participated in joint deployments with the USG in Jamaican waters during 2009 under the auspices of "Operation Riptide," which allow both nations to conduct law enforcement operations within each other's maritime zones and is authorized under the Joint Jamaica-United States Maritime Cooperation Agreement Concerning Cooperation in Suppressing Illicit Maritime Trafficking. In addition, the U.S. Coast Guard provided JDF Coast Guard resident, mobile and on �the-job training in maritime law enforcement, engineering and maintenance, search and rescue, port security, and leadership and management, while a three phase training exercise was conducted which covered land navigation, port security, and search and rescue boat maintenance and repair and leadership principles.

Multilateral Cooperation. While multi-nationals (United States, United Kingdom and Canada) continue to provide assistance to the GOJ for the implementation of 124 recommendations cited in the Police Strategic Review, a parallel strategy to enhance judicial operations has gained support from all partners The priority to assist the Anti-Corruption Branch with tackling corruption among senior police officers while, in tandem, strengthening the judiciary infrastructure so it can adequately process all forms of criminality remains high. Recognizing the abysmal five percent conviction rate for murders, the U.S. sponsored a comprehensive training which focused on defining the role of the prosecutor, developing broader analytical tools, and applying their skills via mock case studies in concert with the United Kingdom Crown Prosecution Service, the United Kingdom's High Commission and the GOJ . The Department of State's Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs' Narcotics Affairs Section in Kingston also brought the Governments of Jamaica, Haiti, and the Dominican Republic together to define, discuss, and formulate a multilateral strategy to reduce transnational crimes in the region organized crime activity between the three countries. As a result, the GOJ and Government of Haiti were in the final stages of drafting a security agreement covering a wide range of issues including joint operations, personnel exchanges, joint training, intelligence sharing, immigration, drugs and narcotics interdiction, transnational crime and gang reduction.

A two day meeting comprising of representatives from the Jamaican, American, British and Canadian law enforcement agencies, several major international airline companies, and the Montego Bay Airport Authority took place in Montego Bay December to discuss airport operations. The purpose of the meeting was to review current airport operations, identify airport assets and challenges, determine operational gaps, develop a measurable strategic response to combat previously defined roadblocks, and enhance cooperation between international law enforcement partners, the airlines and the airport authority. Over the course of the two day meeting all objectives were met including a short list of immediately actionable items for all players. Future meetings and task force groups have been established for the purpose of resource de-confliction, information sharing and strategic planning development.

Department of State, 2009

Document: International Narcotics Control Strategy Report

Country: Aruba

U.S. Policy Initiatives and Programs The Netherlands Antilles and Aruba have demonstrated their commitment to the counternarcotics effort by continued support for a USAF Forward Operating Location (FOL) at the Curacao Hato International Airport as well as a smaller FOL on at Reina Beatrix International Airport in Aruba. Under a ten-year use agreement signed in March 2000 and which entered into force in November 2001, U.S. military aircraft conduct counternarcotics detection and monitoring flights over both the source and transit zones from commercial ramp space. Aruba hosts the Department of Homeland Security?s (DHS) U.S. Customs and Border Protection pre- clearance personnel at Reina Beatrix airport. These officers occupy facilities financed and built by the GOA. DHS reports several seizures of cocaine in 2009. Chiefly through the DEA and DHS/U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the United States is able to provide assistance to enhance technical capabilities as well as some targeted training.

Department of State, 2009

Document: International Narcotics Control Strategy Report

Country: Venezuela

U.S. Policy Initiatives and Programs Bilateral Cooperation. Cooperation with the GOV is restricted to the interdiction of vessels on the high seas and informal exchanges of information between DEA and ONA. In 2007, the GOV said it would end the judicial sector's participation in several U.S.-funded United Nations Office of Drugs and Crime (UNODC) programs, and indicated to the UNODC that the GOV would not participate in any programs receiving U.S. funds. However, in 2009, the GOV attended a judicial sector training seminar on money laundering developed with the technical support of UNODC. No further cooperation with the GOV was reported during 2009. While the United States continues to reach out to traditional counternarcotics contacts in the GOV, increasing support has been given to non- traditional partners, including NGOs involved in demand reduction and regional and municipal government anticrime and counternarcotics programs. In November 2009, ONA informed U.S. officials of its intent to activate the U.S.-funded Container Inspection Facility (CIF) at Puerto Cabello. Completed in late 2006, the CIF was intended to provide a venue and equipment (forklifts, tools, and safety equipment) for Venezuelan authorities to unload and examine containers in a safe and protected environment. Embassy representatives attempted to assess the facility in April 2009 but were refused entry. However, they were alerted that USG-provided computers, forklift equipment, and other materials worth more than approximately $18,000 were missing from the locked facility. A number of private Venezuelan companies are still enrolled in a private sector antismuggling endeavor called the Business Alliance for Secure Commerce (BASC) program. This program seeks to deter smuggling, including narcotics, in commercial cargo shipments by enhancing private sector security programs. The GOV continues to cooperate with the United States to permit the boarding of Venezuelan-flagged vessels on the high seas that are suspected to be engaged in narcotics trafficking, although delays in response to requests for verification of nationality have sometimes resulted in lost opportunities. In cases of cooperation, the GOV asks to retain jurisdiction and does not share information on the final disposition of seizures made by the U.S. Coast Guard on Venezuelan-flagged vessels or the corresponding legal cases.

Department of State, 2009

Document: International Narcotics Control Strategy Report

Country: Uruguay

U.S. Policy Initiatives and Programs Bilateral Cooperation. U.S. strategy is to prevent Uruguay from becoming a major destination for narcotics transit or processing. Although DEA does not have an office in Uruguay, the regional DEA office has provided support and guidance to Uruguayan authorities in both general operations and specific investigations. The regional Department of Homeland Security (DHS) office also provided training and support to officials in border areas and ports. USG assistance to the GOU in 2009 included support for demand reduction programs and narcotics interdiction operations, including provision of equipment and assistance with police training. USG programs also provided training in maritime law enforcement leadership, port security including container inspection, and border security training to the Uruguayan Navy, Coast Guard, and Marines. As part of the State Partnership Program, the Connecticut Air National Guard is providing technical assistance to the Uruguayan Air Force on radar integration, maintenance, operations and training.

Department of State, 2009

Document: International Narcotics Control Strategy Report

Country: Trinidad and Tobago

U.S. Policy Initiatives Policy Initiatives. U.S. efforts focus on reducing the flow of illegal drugs through Trinidad and Tobago to the United States by strengthening the GOTT?s ability to detect and interdict drug shipments, bring traffickers and other criminals to trial, address money laundering, and counternarcotics-related corruption. The U.S. also seeks to strengthen the GOTT?s administration of justice by providing training and technical assistance to help streamline Trinidad and Tobago?s judicial process, reduce court backlogs, and protect witnesses from intimidation and murder. Bilateral Cooperation. In 2009, the USG provided training to policy makers and tactical law enforcement officials on crime scene investigation, command and control, witness protection, damage control, and combating terrorism. In 2009 the DEA and its local counterparts successfully closed 121 investigations, a significant increase from 42 investigations in 2008. The USCG provided resident training in the areas of engineering and maintenance, and leadership and management to the Trinidad and Tobago Coast Guard. The GOTT-funded U.S. Customs Advisory Team continues to provide technical assistance to Customs and Excise in tracking and intercepting marine vessels, including cargo container ships. The State Department?s Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs and the DEA also provided equipment to assist GOTT law enforcement related to drug interdiction and seizure. In 2009, the maritime agreement was used to board and seize one Trinidad and Tobago flagged vessel transporting over 2,000 lbs of marijuana, which included the detention of four suspected smugglers.

Department of State, 2009

Document: International Narcotics Control Strategy Report

Country: Peru

U.S. Policy Initiatives and Programs Policy Initiatives. U.S. assistance to Peru focuses on strengthening governance and creating opportunities for legal activities in isolated areas where drug traffickers and terrorists operate, using aggressive eradication, interdiction, and control of precursor chemicals; coupled with alternative development to reduce dependence on illicit coca cultivation. The USG also provides support for GOP efforts to improve its counter-terrorism efforts and publicize the links between drug production and common crime; so that Peruvians understand that drug trafficking degrades the quality of their lives, damages the environment, and threatens economic development. Bilateral Cooperation. In 2009, the USG continued to work with the GOP on counternarcotics operations in the major drug source zones of the UHV and the VRAE. The PNP received USG assistance to increase police presence and improve police operational capabilities in these areas by supporting and renewing existing police bases and enhancing police training. Other U.S. government-provided training included maritime law enforcement and container inspection. With U.S. support, DIRANDRO commanders and field personnel received specialized counternarcotics courses and refresher courses in advanced airport drug interdiction and chemical field testing. The USCG provided mobile training to Peruvian officials in the areas of port security and container inspection. Law enforcement officials from other Andean countries also participated in the training courses, which contributes to regional cooperation in drug investigations and interdiction. Peru's law enforcement organizations conducted joint operations with neighboring countries and Europe, and participated in drug enforcement strategy conferences to address drug trafficking along its borders, such as the former Operation Seis Fronteras?now renamed Operation Sin Fronteras to show that chemical and drug trafficking have no borders. This multilateral initiative is conducted at various stages during the year to combat the diversion of controlled chemicals to illicit markets where these chemicals are utilized. Peru hosted the Operation Sin Fronteras Phase XI evaluation conference in September 2009. The Cooperating Nation Information Exchange System (CNIES) Agreement signed in 2005 between the USG and the GOP enables the USG and other cooperating nations to share intelligence concerning trafficking of drugs by air. CNIES has been implemented at Peruvian Air Force (FAP) locations in Lima, Pucallpa, and Iquitos. Since 2005, the FAP Joint Anti-Drug C-26 Air Squadron has conducted counternarcotics reconnaissance and airlift east of the Andes. The C-26 Forward Looking INFRA-RED (FLIR) was used in 2009 to map suspected clandestine runways in Peru and update the status of known airstrips. The FAP C-26s provided critical overhead real time coverage for eradication workers, eradication police, and army personnel in the field. The planned 2010 installation in the C-26 of an electric optical camera will provide high quality imagery of coca fields to aid in planning eradication operations. The Military Assistance and Advisory Group (MAAG) coordinated and conducted CNIES training for FAP personnel and shifted radar assets in response to intelligence indicating potential trafficking by air. FAP conducted joint training exercises with Brazil and Colombia.

Department of State, 2009

Document: International Narcotics Control Strategy Report

Country: Paraguay

U.S. Policy Initiatives and Programs Bilateral Cooperation. The U.S. Mission in Paraguay works closely with the GOP to disrupt drug trafficking organizations and build stronger legal and regulatory measures to restrict drug trafficking, illegal contraband flows, and money laundering. The narcotics detection canine program continued to support seizure operations and was responsible for the direct seizure of 65 kilograms of cocaine. The USG funded the participation of SENAD, the Secretariat to Combat Money Laundering (SEPRELAD), and the Specialized Anti-Piracy Unit (UTE) agents at seminars on information sharing; illicit traffic of goods and trademark fraud; and money laundering. The USG has started a project to improve SENAD's physical headquarters in Asuncion. The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) continues to work with SENAD on improving its ability to develop criminal narcotics cases targeting major traffickers through technical assistance and training.

Department of State, 2009

Document: International Narcotics Control Strategy Report

Country: Panama

U.S. Policy Initiatives and Programs Policy Initiatives. USG-supported programs focus on improving Panama's ability to intercept, investigate, and prosecute illegal drug trafficking and other transnational crimes; strengthening Panama's judicial system; improving Panama's border security; and promoting strict enforcement of existing laws. In 2009, NAS, Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Office of Defense Cooperation (ODC), and USCG provided resources for modernization and upkeep of SENAN, SENAFRONT, and PNP vessels and bases, and assisted SENAN with training personnel and maintaining key aircraft for interdiction efforts. Over the past year, the USG provided training, operational equipment and support to the multi- agency Tocumen Airport Drug Interdiction Law Enforcement Team. NAS coordinated training for the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and U.S. Immigration Customs Enforcement (ICE) vetted units, as well as continued training for the quick response motorcycle team (?lynx? unit) in Tactical Law Enforcement procedures, internal affairs, Anti-Corruption investigations, and crowd control procedures. In 2009, NAS and CBP continued support for operational evaluation teams of U.S. Border Patrol Agents who work in the border areas with SENAFRONT. NAS also continued support for a major law enforcement modernization project with the PNP to develop its police leadership and implement community-based policing procedures. The program aims to improve community policing tactics, expand existing crime analysis technology, and promote managerial change to allow greater autonomy and accountability. In 2009, this program exposed the PNP leadership to the concepts of Community Policing. Due to the program's success, the PNP has incorporated the training concepts into the curriculum of its three training academies. NAS continues to provide material and training support to increase the effectiveness of the GOP's counternarcotics effort. Bilateral Cooperation. In 2009, the GOP continued to sustain joint counternarcotics efforts with U.S. entities, such as DEA and USCG, and worked to strengthen national law enforcement institutions with assistance from NAS. The DEA vetted unit continues to lead the region's vetted units in cocaine seizures. The NAS-funded ICE vetted unit doubled in size in 2009, and became a major asset for the PNP. This unit led several high-profile investigations and operations involving crimes with a nexus to the U.S. In 2009, Panama and the USG also coordinated to launch a Panamanian Trade Transparency Unit (TTU) in early 2010. The TTU will enhance information sharing for combating trade-based money laundering activities. Maritime cooperation improved in 2009. At U.S. urging, SENAN, SENFRONT, and the PNP formed a Joint Task Force (JTF) to increase the GOP's ability to leverage the entities' varied skills to combat drug trafficking when deployed to strategic locations in Panama. The JTF was created at the close of 2009, but plans are in process to establish a base of operations on Panama's Pacific Coast near the assistance from NAS. The DEA vetted unit continues to border with Colombia to work in conjunction with U.S. maritime assets to deny use of Panama's Pacific littorals waters to traffickers. In 2009, the USG and Panama cooperated to execute 18 cases under the provisions of the maritime counternarcotics bilateral agreement, which resulted in the removal of over 7.5 metric tons of cocaine, arrest of 76 smugglers, and seizure of 12 vessels.

Department of State, 2009

Document: International Narcotics Control Strategy Report

Country: Nicaragua

U.S. Policy Initiatives and Programs The USG policy focus in Nicaragua is to enhance GON law enforcement agencies' ability to detect and intercept shipments, detain traffickers, and stop the laundering of illegal profits from the drug industry as well as support preventative programs to protect youth from drugs and recruitment into gangs. Bilateral Cooperation. The U.S. continued to support Nicaragua's efforts in interdiction, and encouraged the GON to undertake more fundamental challenges to corruption and money laundering. During 2009, the United States provided counternarcotics assistance to the NNP and continued funding to expand the NNP Vetted Unit, a unit that investigates international drug trafficking, corruption (in drug trafficking and money laundering investigations) and money laundering. This unit worked closely with anticorruption units in the Attorney General's office and other vetted units in the region to coordinate cross-border counternarcotics operations. The USG also supported the NNP's Mobile Inspection Unit (MIU), a unit deployed to establish random checkpoints on strategic vehicular routes. The USG continued support to the Nicaraguan Navy by finishing the refurbishment of a large naval boat and provided 12 engines, spare parts, and maintenance for several go-fast patrol boats for maritime interdiction on both the Atlantic and Pacific coasts. The USCG provided mobile training to the Nicaraguan Navy in the areas of maritime law enforcement and engineering and maintenance, enhancing their ability to maintain operational readiness and to conduct counternarcotics patrols in their littorals. The USG also constructed barracks on Corn Island as well as a pier and maintenance facility in Bluefields to assist the GON counternarcotics efforts. The USG also provided training in maritime law enforcement, small boat operations, maintenance and logistics, engineering and leadership to the Nicaraguan Navy in 2009. In August 2009, the USG sponsored training in cybercrime issues for three officials to improve Nicaragua law enforcement capacity to track crimes using technology. Nicaraguan cooperation via the maritime bilateral agreement facilitated the removal of over 1,142 lbs of cocaine, the seizure of one vessel engaged in smuggling, and the detention of seven suspected smugglers by the U.S. Coast Guard. The USG also sponsored delegations of police officers, prosecutors and judges at several regional conferences to build capacity in anti-gang activity, maritime counternarcotics, and general police work in 2009. The USG supported the Nicaraguan Navy in maritime training exercises and continues to provide some budgetary assistance for NNP transportation and communication expenses. Under the Merida Initiative agreement, the NNP will participate in three projects; Central American Fingerprint Exchange (CAFE), the Central American Vetted and Sensitive Investigative Units (SIU), and Improved Policing and Police Equipment.

Department of State, 2009

Document: International Narcotics Control Strategy Report

Country: Mexico

U.S. Policy Initiatives and Programs Policy Initiatives. The United States shares many interests with Mexico?politically, economically, and with regard to our own national security. Mexico long ago became the principal transit route for cocaine and is an important producer in its own right of the heroin, marijuana, and methamphetamine consumed in the United States. The enormously corruptive influences of Mexico's narcotics cartels touch the communities on both sides of our shared border. The Calderon Administration has made progress in reforming Mexico's juridical system, diminishing its opaqueness in some instances, and increasing its efficiency, it is a priority for the United States to support Mexico's efforts to reform its justice system and improve security along our shared border and throughout the nation. Bilateral Cooperation. Historically, the governments of Mexico and the United States have cooperated on counternarcotics and security-related issues, and have had some success sharing information and coordinating law enforcement and military efforts. Additionally, the U.S. has aided in the fight against DTOs by providing Mexico with training, equipment, and information technology assistance. With the implementation of the Merida Initiative, 2009 represented a new era of cooperation between the two countries. The Initiative represents not only a historically significant increase in bilateral cooperation, but the inauguration of a new strategy in which the USG helps strengthen Mexico's institutional capacity to counter the shared threat posed by DTOs. The Merida Initiative focused on eight general areas: ! Judicial reform ! Combating financial crime ! Law enforcement professionalization ! Upgrading non-intrusive inspection equipment ! Improving aviation capability ! Demand reduction ! Fostering a culture of lawfulness ! Information management technology enhancement Although it is still early in its implementation, the Merida Initiative has moved forward in a number of areas. Some examples for 2009 include: ! A National Command and Control Center opened at the SSP to provide enhanced real- time communications and information flow to support law enforcement and disaster relief efforts. ! GOM received shipment of 15 x-ray vans and 30 ion scanners that will enhance its ability to interdict illegal weapons, drugs, and shipments of cash. ! Mexico accepted delivery of five Bell-412 helicopters to provide tactical support on a wide variety of counternarcotics and law enforcement missions. ! Over 3,000 Mexican university graduates received basic investigations training to form a cadre of Federal Police investigators; and over 300 mid- and senior-level federal law enforcement personnel received advanced training from U.S. trainers on topics ranging from enhanced investigations and drug interdiction to cyber-crime and counter- intelligence; as well as case management and leadership. ! A record 107 criminals were extradited from Mexico to the U.S. ! 318 polygraph machines are being delivered to key branches of the GOM including the Prosecutor General's Office (PGR), Secretary for Public Security (SSP), and Mexican Customs (SAT) in order to better detect and prevent potential corruption.

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International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement:

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International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement:

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Grant Aid Table Sources:

  • International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Bahamas 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Bolivia 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Brazil 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Colombia 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Ecuador 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Guatemala 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Haiti 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Jamaica 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Mexico 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Panama 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Peru 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Western Hemisphere Regional 2006; - United States, Department of State, Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs, FY 2008 Program and Budget Guide (Washington: U.S. Department of State, September 2007) (Link to source).
  • International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Bahamas 2007; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Bolivia 2007; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Brazil 2007; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Colombia 2007; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Ecuador 2007; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Haiti 2007; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Jamaica 2007; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Mexico 2007; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Panama 2007; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Peru 2007; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Venezuela 2007; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Western Hemisphere Regional 2007; - United States, Department of State, FY 2009 International Affairs (Function 150) Budget Request--Summary and Highlights (Washington: Department of State: February 4, 2008) (Link to source).
  • International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Guatemala 2007; - United States, Department of State, FY 2009 International Affairs (Function 150) Budget Request--Summary and Highlights (Washington: Department of State: February 4, 2008) (Link to source). United States, Department of State, Memorandum of Justification under Section 451 of the Foreign Assistance Act for the Use of Funds or Counterdrug and Law Enforcement Programs in Central America (Washington: Department of State, September 28, 2007) (Link to source).
  • International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Central America Regional 2007; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Honduras 2007; - United States, Department of State, Memorandum of Justification under Section 451 of the Foreign Assistance Act for the Use of Funds or Counterdrug and Law Enforcement Programs in Central America (Washington: Department of State, September 28, 2007) (Link to source).
  • International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Argentina 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Bahamas 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Bolivia 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Brazil 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Chile 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Colombia 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Dominican Republic 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Eastern Caribbean Regional 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Ecuador 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement El Salvador 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Guatemala 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Haiti 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Honduras 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Jamaica 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Mexico 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Panama 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Paraguay 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Peru 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Trinidad and Tobago 2008; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Western Hemisphere Regional 2008; - United States, Department of State, Bureau of International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Affairs, Program and Budget Guide 2010 (Washington: Department of State). (International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Colombia 2009; - United States, Department of State, Bureau of International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Affairs, Program and Budget Guide 2010 (Washington: Department of State) (Link to source).
  • International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Colombia 2010; - U.S. Congress, Conference Report 111-366 for H.R. 3288, Omnibus Appropriations Bill for Fiscal Year 2010, December 8, 2009 [See pages 1500 and 1501 of the PDF file] (Link to source).
  • International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Bahamas 2009; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Brazil 2009; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Dominican Republic 2009; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Haiti 2009; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Mexico 2009; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Panama 2009; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Paraguay 2009; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Trinidad and Tobago 2009; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Venezuela 2009; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Brazil 2010; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Haiti 2010; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Mexico 2010; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Brazil 2011; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Caribbean Basin Security Initiative 2011; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Haiti 2011; - United States, Department of State, Executive Budget Summary: Function 150 and Other International Programs, Fiscal Year 2011 (Washington: Department of State, February 1, 2010) (Link to source).
  • International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Argentina 2009; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Bolivia 2009; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Eastern Caribbean 2009; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Ecuador 2009; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Guatemala 2009; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Jamaica 2009; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Peru 2009; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Western Hemisphere Regional 2009; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Argentina 2010; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Bolivia 2010; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Dominican Republic 2010; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Ecuador 2010; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Guatemala 2010; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Paraguay 2010; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Peru 2010; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Western Hemisphere Regional 2010; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Argentina 2011; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Bolivia 2011; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Colombia 2011; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Ecuador 2011; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Mexico 2011; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Paraguay 2011; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Peru 2011; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Western Hemisphere Regional 2011; - United States, Department of State, Executive Budget Summary: Function 150 and Other International Programs, Fiscal Year 2011 (Washington: Department of State, February 1, 2010) (Link to source). Military aid estimate prorated by consulting INCLE economic to military aid ratio presented in United States, Department of State, Bureau of International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Affairs, Program and Budget Guide 2010 (Washington: Department of State) (Link to source).

Economic Aid Table Sources:

  • International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement ; -

Trainees Table Sources:

  • International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Antigua and Barbuda 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Colombia 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Dominica 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Ecuador 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Mexico 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Panama 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Peru 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement St. Kitts and Nevis 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement St. Lucia 2006; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement St. Vincent and the Grenadines 2006; - United States, Department of Defense, Department of State, Foreign Military Training and DoD Engagement Activities of Interest in Fiscal Years 2006 and 2007: A Report to Congress (Washington: August 2007) (Link to source).
  • International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Bolivia 2007; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Colombia 2007; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Ecuador 2007; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Mexico 2007; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Panama 2007; International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement Peru 2007; - United States, Department of Defense, Department of State, Foreign Military Training and DoD Engagement Activities of Interest in Fiscal Years 2007 and 2008 (Washington: January 2008) (Link to source).

Sales Table Sources:

  • International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement ; -

Deployments Table Sources:

  • International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement ; -