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Ideas and Opinions from Donald Trump and The Trump Entrepreneur Initiative Instructors.

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The Trump Entrepreneur Initiative Blog

For the first blog for The Trump Entrepreneur Initiative, I'd like to start with some basics that will help anyone who wants to be an entrepreneur. My father, Fred C. Trump, who was a real estate developer, gave me some great advice, great because the advice was not only solid, but it worked. In fact, it still works. He always told me to "know everything you can about what you're doing." In other words, be thorough. I watched him and he definitely practiced what he preached. He knew everything about construction and could show carpenters shortcuts. He was very focused as well more...
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Sign Your Own Checks

 I like signing my own checks and not pressing a computer button. I have many friends who press computer buttons and often times they end up going out of business. I had one job that for some reason the pricing seemed very high and I was very unhappy with costs. I was not signing the checks at that job. I got very angry at the people running the job and ultimately said to them, “Dammit, I want to personally sign every single check.” The minute I suggested this, my costs went down automatically, without negotiating, by 15%. I guess they knew I more...
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The Brain Game

It’s a well known fact that I not only develop golf courses, but that I am passionate about the game as a player. In fact, if someone had told me thirty years or so ago that I’d become a golf course developer, I wouldn’t have believed it. Today, my portfolio of golf courses stretches from California to the Caribbean to Scotland.  Golf has been an important component in my success even before I became a golf course developer. I found solutions to problems, ideas for new ventures, formed partnerships, and learned new business skills. I learned how to maneuver, how to negotiate more...
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A Great Example!

Nearly twenty years ago, a young man started working for the Trump Organization as a driver and a security guard. He had a terrific work ethic, natural smarts, wit and an engaging personality that matched his unmistakable Queens accent. His name was Vinny Stellio. Over the years, he became a high ranking executive who was not only effective, but greatly admired personally and professionally. He was a terrific example of a Trump success story, and I was proud of his accomplishments and his dedication and loyalty to the Trump Organization and to the Trump family. In fact, my sons Don Jr more...
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Do YOU Have What it Takes to be the Next Apprentice?

I am very excited to return to the original premise of The Apprentice. We’ve got to do something about the economy and this is a terrific way to provide jobs as well as business lessons along the way. NBC, Mark Burnett and I hope this economic downturn can begin a turnaround, and we’ll do our best with The Apprentice to see that it starts happening. I’m proud to be putting people back to work, and to positively changing the psychology of America. Therefore, we are proud to report that casting for The Apprentice Season 10 is now in full swing! Click here more...
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Rosie O

I can’t believe that Rosie O’Donnell, after all her failures, is about to be given another shot. She’s crude, arrogant, and not very smart. She’s a bully at the highest level and sadly, other than me, very few people have hit her--figuratively--hard between the eyes--which is what you must do with a bully. Elisabeth Hasselbeck did and came out great. Ultimately, Barbara Walters did, but very light handedly, and nevertheless, remained the Barbara we all know and love.   People forget that Rosie’s talk show was ultimately thrown off the air just as she quit The View after being beaten up by Elisabeth more...
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Trump Hotel Nominations

I am very pleased to inform you that  The World Travel Awards (www.worldtravelawards.com/vote) just announced their 2010 selections and the Trump Hotel Collection has been nominated for the following awards:   Trump International Hotel & Tower New York - “North America’s Leading Hotel” Trump Hotel & Tower Chicago  - “North America’s Leading Luxury Hotel” Trump SoHo - “North America’s Leading New Hotel” Trump International Hotel & Tower Chicago - “Leading Business Hotel.” If any of you have had the opportunity to visit any of the above properties, I would greatly appreciate you voting in support of them. Winning once again (among others, Chicago won the #1 New more...
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Amanda Knox Prosecutor Convicted of Abuse of Office

I had mentioned a couple of weeks ago that the prosecutor in the trial of Amanda Knox should be thrown into jail, not Amanda Knox. Just recently, the prosecutor, Giuliano Mignini, was convicted of abuse of office in an earlier murder case. He was sentenced to serve one year and four months in prison for his role in the investigation of the case known as the “Monster of Florence” murders. These murders took place between 1968 and 1985 in the Tuscan countryside. Mignini is appealing the verdict and is being allowed to continue working during the appeals process. He reportedly said, “I more...
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Trump to Boycott Italy

I have just been informed that Amanda Knox's family has hired a new law firm to help her turn around the injustice that was done in Italy by recently convicting her of murder.  I followed the trial closely and Amanda Knox is not guilty.  I hope the new law firm, led by a very talented guy named Theodore Simon, from Philadelphia, can turn around this injustice and turn it around quickly.  At the same time, I hope somebody in Italy goes after the "wild man" prosecutor who, as I understand, is already being looked at for abuse of power in an more...
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The New Year

Since we have a New Year to challenge us, it’s a good thing to keep our resolution to be bigger than our problems. Problems come with the territory called life, and we are fortunate in more ways than we realize. We need to move forward with optimism. Change can be unsettling for everyone but it’s a necessary component for growth. Growth is an indication of life, for one thing. Life isn’t static, just as business shouldn’t be static either. Sometimes we have blips, sometimes we have catastrophes. I’m a strong believer in keeping things in perspective--it’s also a way to keep your more...
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A Million Dollar Investment

The following question was submitted to "Ask Donald Trump" by a The Trump Entrepreneur Initiative member. Question: On what would you spend a million dollars with today’s economy? My Response: As I understand real estate, that’s what I would invest in. I have recently bought two golf courses, one in Washington, D.C. on the Potomac River and one in Colts Neck, New Jersey. They are beautiful sites and worth the investment. As a developer, there is great satisfaction in making something spectacular. Every moment is exciting, even with the problems. It’s a challenging economy we’re dealing with today but there are ways around it. If you more...
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How To Define Success

The following question was submitted to "Ask Donald Trump" by a The Trump Entrepreneur Initiative member. Question: In life there is more to being successful than success financially, in business, or in your career. What do you think is the best way to define what success really means in order to feel that a person has lived a complete and satisfied life? My Response: Happiness is a good barometer. I have a full life because I not only love what I’m doing, but I have a wonderful family. It’s very well balanced. I work a lot but that includes my family in many ways. My three more...
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Free Amanda Knox

There is a disturbing injustice surrounding the Amanda Knox case and I think we should boycott Italy until they do the right thing and free Amanda. Knox was interrogated for over 50 hours in a five day period, and Italian law states that a suspect cannot be interrogated without a lawyer. During part of this interrogation, Amanda Knox did not have a lawyer. When she returned to prison after her conviction, her fellow prisoners cried in disbelief because they knew she was innocent. They should put the prosecutor in jail, not Amanda Knox. I have little doubt, based on what I saw, that more...
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Waving the Wand

I spoke with Neal Cavuto on Thursday, once again about the state of the economy. Not much has changed, because we are still in a situation where we need the banks to loan money. There’s a credit freeze going on, and there will be very little happening regarding economic development--and jobs--if the banks don’t start lending. We’ve loaned billions of dollars to the banks. People can’t buy apartments because they can’t get loans. Lines of credit have been terminated. If we could wave the wand, I’d say we have to demand that the banks loan money. Related Posts Update On What's Happening With The more...
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Getting Started In Real Estate Investing

The following question was submitted to "Ask Donald Trump" by a The Trump Entrepreneur Initiative member. Question: I would love to be a real estate investor, however, I hear it takes a huge capital to venture. I have so little but I want to start now. How do I do it? My Response: You will need to build up your capital, but at the same time, start looking around for smaller real estate investments. It’s a good way to lay the groundwork for when you will be able to invest. You have to set realistic goals--it’s the think big philosophy combined with pragmatic thinking. I didn’t build more...
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Retire?

I am often asked when I am going to retire. My answer is “Why?” I love what I’m doing and every day is great because of that. My father always told me that “to retire is to expire” and I agree. There’s a lot of concern these days with retirement plans that have had to be altered. There can be a silver lining there. Maybe your work isn’t done yet, and there’s another plan waiting for you. I’ve heard stories where people found fulfilling careers after they had ‘retired’ and were happier than ever. The important thing is to keep your mind more...
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Two Important Qualities

There are a lot of similarities between business and baseball, and in ways they are interchangeable. I played baseball in high school and became captain of the team. I learned a lot about how teams can excel with the right leadership and with regard to the specific talents of each player. It was a great education. I remember talking to George Steinbrenner about the ingredients for success and two things we agreed upon were loyalty and talent. Loyalty is a must and if you are job seeking, always ask yourself this question: would you want someone like you on your team? You know more...
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Shaking Hands, Turning Pages

I’ve always been against shaking hands as it’s a great way to pass along millions of germs. The other offense is when people lick their fingers before turning pages--that’s a fingerprint full of germs just waiting for the next person who picks up the paper. In this day and age, people should think about that. It’s not only unnecessary, it’s unhealthy and disrespectful of other people. People are surprised when I shake their hands, and it’s only because it’s a custom (a bad one) that I do it, but I will always wash my hands afterwards. That’s not an offense to anyone more...
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Thanksgiving Time

We should all get together and make a country in which everybody can eat turkey whenever he pleases.  --Harry S. Truman When the Thanksgiving season comes around, it makes me think about how we should always be in a season of thanksgiving. There’s always a reason to be grateful. We’ve had some challenges the past couple of years and we’ve seen some improvement, and things will continue to improve. There are silver linings to situations that may appear less than positive. The important thing is to approach each day with a sense of victory. Are you big enough for what the day will bring? When more...
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The Real Estate Market

The following question was submitted to "Ask Donald Trump" by a The Trump Entrepreneur Initiative member. Question: Will the real estate market turn around? My Response: It will take awhile, it really took a hit, but it will turn around. Real estate is cyclical, as are many things, and it needs time to even out. There are still real estate investment opportunities out there. Related Posts My Biggest Accomplishment in Real Estate Investing Choosing the Right Real Estate Market Focus On The Opportunities Related Training: Learn How to Invest in Real Estate  Work with a real estate coach to find the right market more...
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Staying on Top

One way I stay on top of things is to realize there’s a flip side to everything. It keeps me circumspect in both good and bad times. This produces a learning curve, which is a smart way to look at problems or the curveballs that come your way. There are highs and lows in everyone’s life. Whether you’ve reached your goals or not, staying on top of things requires momentum on a daily basis. If you’re riding high or having tough times, it applies to both situations. It’s a sound base from which to operate. There is the saying “courage is grace more...
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Trump International - Scotland

I am pleased to announce that work on site on my golf course in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, will begin this week, ahead of schedule. We plan to build the greatest golf course in the world. There are hundreds of acres of magnificent sand dunes and the seaside landscape includes three miles of spectacular oceanfront. 2000 acres in all, and the location couldn’t be better. I spent five years reviewing sites and turned down over 200 possibilities for development throughout Europe. When I saw the links land at Menie Estate, which is in northeast Scotland’s Grampian region, I knew it was the right place. I more...
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Business is an Art Form

In my last blog, I spoke about delivering the goods and how consumers, whether past, present or future, want the best for their money. That will never change. Another thing that will never change is that art forms will always draw from the past, reflect on the present, and look to the future. That applies to everything from art and architecture to business. In my first book, The Art of the Deal, which came out in 1987, I start out by saying “I don’t do it for the money. I’ve got enough, much more than I’ll ever need. Deals are my art form more...
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Deliver the Goods

Not too long ago someone was asking me what I thought the secrets to my success in business might be. That’s a broad topic so I decided to apply it to my success over the years, especially pertaining to the brand I have built. But the answers can be helpful to you whether you are a student or if you already run a business. First of all, you need to be able to deliver the goods. People want the best for their money, and that’s a quality common to consumers whether past, present or future. It can also simplify your life--all you more...
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The Best Advice From Fred Trump

The following question was submitted to "Ask Donald Trump" by a The Trump Entrepreneur Initiative member. Question: What is the best thing your father Fred C. Trump ever taught you in your lifetime? My Response: He always told me to “know everything you can about what you’re doing” and that was simple but wise. I’ve followed his advice and it has proved effective. He also gave me his 4-step formula for success: Get in Get it done Get it done right Get out This is also very good advice and I’ve followed this formula. It works. Side point: My first book, The Art of the Deal, gives background information on my father and how more...
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Pursue Your Passion

The following question was submitted to "Ask Donald Trump" by a The Trump Entrepreneur Initiative member. Question: I am a first year diploma student specializing in Engineering. I prefer Entrepreneurship, business management and currently I am educating myself with those subjects more than my current formal education. Would you advise me to stay focused on my formal education for a diploma or for me to pursue my passion? My Response: If it’s possible, you should do both. It seems you are doing both now if you are reading my books. But if you clearly aren’t interested in engineering, it’s best to switch majors. I’m a firm believer more...
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New Creativity

One reason entrepreneurs are important is because they find ways to create jobs. How ideas are generated is sometimes a mysterious process, but one way to look at it is to envision giving the world what you wish had been given to you. That opens the door to the philanthropic side of great endeavors, and can greatly increase your mind power when touching on the imaginative side of business. Walt Disney, for example, created an enormous business largely from using and believing in his imagination. Steven Spielberg followed his passion, as did Bill Gates, and they’ve wound up being great givers in more...
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Architectural Critics

Over the years I have dealt with many architectural critics, some of them bad, some good, some excellent. I do not rate excellence just on what they’ve said about me, but rather on their level of taste and expertise. One of the best I’ve ever known is the late great Herbert Muschamp of The New York Times. His reviews were not only interesting, in the terms of the building, but also literarily superb. Generally speaking I have done well with architectural critics. I have found though, somewhat sadly, the choice of the architect is usually more important than the building itself. Certain trophy architects, more...
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Problems or Opportunities?

People become creative when faced with an emergency. Amazing events have happened when people have a crisis or crises to deal with. Unusual strengths can surface, as can courage in the face of disaster. Courage is the ability to go beyond fear. I’m not one to urge anyone to wish for a crisis, but they happen and sometimes it turns out that your problem becomes your opportunity. That’s also a wise way to view any situation you might be in that wasn’t in your game plan--and a lot of things have happened that weren’t in anyone’s game plan or vision of the more...
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Manage Difficult Times

The following question was submitted to "Ask Donald Trump" by a The Trump Entrepreneur Initiative member. Question: What was your mentality when you encounter difficult times? How did you manage negativity and come through successfully? My Response: I refused to give in or to give up. I knew I wasn’t finished, and in fact I came back to be more successful than I was before. I refused to become negative and saw the situation as a ‘blip’ and not a catastrophe. I focused on the solution, not the problems. Being positive can give you tremendous resiliency. I regained my focus and was very tenacious. The best mentality more...
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Consider This

If a baseball player hits .333 he’s had a great season--but it also means he failed to get a hit close to 70% of the time. I played baseball in college and I learned a lot about the game and about the importance of team work. I also learned that patience and timing are crucial. That translated into business skills later on. I’m a firm believer that every experience has value if we choose to notice and take the lesson away with us. Not everything we do will be a hit, a home run or a grand slam. It just doesn’t work more...
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Update On What's Happening With The Economy

I was on Neil Cavuto’s show yesterday for an update of what’s happening with the economy. On the whole I’m feeling much better than a year ago. They did the right thing with the banks or we’d be in a major depression now. One problem is that the banks won’t lend any money. Fortunately I’m using my own money. But the banks need to lend to fix unemployment. In that sense, the situation is worse now than a few months ago. The banks are probably building up their balance sheets, but it isn’t doing the economy or the people any good. Regarding the stimulus, more...
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Success and A Happy Family Life

The following question was submitted to "Ask Donald Trump" by a The Trump Entrepreneur Initiative member. Question: How has your family life and marriages influenced, either positively or negatively, in your way of achieving things? How is this aspect of your life tied to your success? My Response: Having a happy family life definitely provides an equilibrium that is very helpful for finding success. It is a firm foundation, just as education can be. A family unit is stronger than an individual. For example, I am the Chairman of a large organization, and I know how effective it is, and how important it is, to have a more...
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My Daughter Ivanka

My daughter Ivanka’s first book, The Trump Card, is a collection of personal memoirs and business advice. It will be released on October 13th by Simon and Schuster. She’s done a terrific job and I’m very proud of her. The Trump Card: Playing to Win in Work and Life Ivanka Trump. A child of privilege with one of the most familiar surnames in America, Trump has managed to avoid many of the pitfalls that routinely plague children of the rich and famous (reckless partying, drug abuse and other mindless self-indulgences) to become a focused, successful woman in her own right-a model, entrepreneur and vice more...
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Tenacity

Henry Ford said “Don’t find a fault. Find a remedy.” That statement can cover a lot of territory in our business lives as well as personal lives. I have often said that one way out of a problem is to focus on the solution, which is a similar take. The next step is tenacity. People who know me know that I don’t give up. I’m someone who stays the course and sometimes it can take decades. Trump Place on the Hudson River took many years to come into being, as it was in 1974 that I first secured the option to buy more...
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Serena Williams

I hated to see Serena Williams apologize so much for her actions in her recent loss to Kim Clijsters. I have always liked Serena and respected her tenacity. She got angry at a line judge, as have many other great players like John McEnroe and Jimmy Connors, because the line judge made a mistake--there was no foot fault! The line judge made a very evident mistake, and she is the one who should be apologizing. She had a smirk on her face and was being a wise guy. Serena was right to be upset, as would be any other player. The backlash against more...
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A Lesson In Resilience

With so much being said about how bad things are, I’ve decided we need to accentuate the positive. There are always positives, and one reason I’ve remained resilient is because I choose to see the bright side of situations. People who know me and work with me know that my persona of optimism isn’t a faade--it’s for real. I want to emphasize how valuable that approach is if you intend to be successful. Your attitude is also your altitude--and the higher your frequency, the greater your results will be. That doesn’t mean it will happen overnight. As you might know by now, I more...
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Top Ten Tips For Success

One of the requests I receive the most is for a list of the top ten tips for success. Here’s a list that addresses students as well as professionals: Be focused. Put everything you’ve got into what you do every day. Believe in yourself. If you don’t, no one else will. Be tenacious. Trust your instincts. Maintain your momentum and keep everyone moving forward See yourself as victorious and leading a winning team. Be passionate about what you do. Live on the edge. Do not become complacent. Leadership is not a group effort. If you’re in charge, then be in charge. Never give up! more...
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Being Well Informed

I remember hearing someone say “I am not an intellectual, but I’m well informed” when they were talking about their interests, and I thought that statement was well put. People are surprised when they discover the variety of subjects I am interested in, but that comes with paying attention to newspapers, magazines, television coverage and the Internet. If you stop to consider how much information is given out on a daily basis, there’s very little reason not to be well informed. Give yourself opportunities by refusing to limit yourself. I may be a businessman, but I attend concerts, read history books and more...
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Getting Motivated

The following question was submitted to "Ask Donald Trump" by a The Trump Entrepreneur Initiative member. Question: What is it that motivates you every day in the morning besides your family, love and passion for your business?  My Response: I have remained a curious person and that’s a motivation in itself. There’s always something to discover, and every day provides another opportunity. Remain alert and curious and you’ll be motivated every morning too. Related Post Inspiration Taking Control Focus On The Opportunities Related Training: Learn real estate investing  Work With a Coach Join The Trump Entrepreneur Initiative's Network more...
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Inspiration

There are many stories of inspiration that we can draw on from history, such as Abraham Lincoln and his triumph over many years of adversity, and there are people who are living and working today who have had success despite many setbacks and tragedies. I recently came across a book by a man who survived five concentration camps as a teenaged boy who became a real estate developer in Los Angeles and encountered great success. His story is an inspiring one. A Holocaust Survivor: In The Footsteps Of His Past is by Naftali Deutsch. After his parents and brothers were murdered more...
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The Death Penalty

When I read about Phillip Garrido and what he has done, it made me believe in the death penalty as never before. He is a monster who ruined a young girl's life and may have killed other women as well. His horrendous treatment of another human being shouldn't be taken lightly. I don't understand people who don't condone the death penalty. There are people who obviously have no conscience and if they do, knowingly continue to commit crimes. They are obviously not capable of censoring themselves and any behavior is 'okay' as long as they get away with it. What Garrido has more...
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The Great Thing

The great thing in the world is not so much where we stand as in what direction we are moving. --Oliver Wendell Holmes This quote brings home a powerful thought, and it has to do with circumstances. Many people are dealing with difficult circumstances now and it’s important to remember that it can be a temporary situation. As long as we keep moving forward, things are certain to change. Keeping things in perspective is helpful. I have mentioned before that a fear should be labeled a concern, as that allows for more objectivity. I also ask myself, “is this a blip or is it more...
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My Biggest Accomplishment in Real Estate Investing

The following question was submitted to "Ask Donald Trump" by a The Trump Entrepreneur Initiative member. Question: What was your biggest accomplishment in real estate? And where was it? My Response: Trump Tower opened in the early 1980’s and was the first building I had built that had my name on it. Getting it done--and in the way I wanted to do it--was a huge accomplishment. I’m still proud of it, and it has become a major tourist attraction in New York City. Trump Tower is on Fifth Avenue in New York, between 56th and 57th Street. Related Posts Choosing the Right Real Estate Market more...
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Moving Your Ideas

We briefly discussed creative capital last week, and it’s a topic that deserves a bit more exploration. In essence, one way to become rich is to be able to move an idea into your asset column. Those people who have had an innovative idea and put it into production, whether it was for an automobile or for Post-Its, have been able to move that idea from “idea” to “asset” in a very big way. A lot of great ideas get discarded before they are developed, and a lot of ‘great’ ideas deserve to be discarded before they take up too much time more...
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You Can Be in Charge

That’s an empowering thought. It’s also a real possibility. If it seems you are being thrown curveballs every day, that means it’s time for some strategy. In short, you need to be bigger than your problems in order to handle what’s being delivered. Here are a few things to think about. What is your creative capital? Many of us have hobbies, knowledge and experiences that can be turned into something useful in the marketplace. Give this some comprehensive thought. You probably have talents that could be further developed to create a career.   Are you lucky? Some people seem to be naturally lucky. Another definition more...
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Choosing the Right Real Estate Market

The following question was submitted to "Ask Donald Trump" by a The Trump Entrepreneur Initiative member. Question: There are many markets in real estate, what is your opinion about choosing the right type of market and how do you do that? My Response: The most important thing is to know your territory. I am successful in real estate but I still do my homework, particularly if it’s an area I’m not familiar with. When I decided to develop in Manhattan, I spent a great deal of time walking around, to familiarize myself with the neighborhoods because I was new to the city. Do not take anything for more...
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An Incomplete Education

There’s an interesting book that first appeared in 1987 that became a bestseller. It was updated in 1995 and it contains a full gamut of information that will keep you interested in reading more no matter what your interests might be.  An Incomplete Education,by Judy Jones and William Wilson, covers a variety of subjects in a succinct CliffsNotes way that can save you a lot of study time while keeping you entertained. For example, their chapter called Opera for Philistines describes the ‘most bankable composer ever’ (Puccini) as “The Steven Spielberg of opera.” Their chapter on Shakespeare, Bellying up to the Bard, more...
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Something New Every Day

I have often said that I learn something new every day, and recently I learned where the term “caddie” came from, which, as a golfer, I found to be of special interest. Golf originated in Scotland and Mary, who was later to become known as Queen of Scots, loved and played the game. Louis, King of France, knew that Mary loved the game and so when she went to France as young girl he had a golf course built for her enjoyment, which was the first golf course outside of Scotland. As he was concerned for her safety, King Louis had cadets more...
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Taking Control

The way things are these days it seems a lot of people feel they’ve lost control. There are many things we can’t control, but I’ve learned that taking a positive outlook is a form of control that is available to everyone. It’s a way of keeping your fate in your own hands. One effective technique is to make sure you define yourself versus allowing others to define you. They will limit you when instead you should see yourself as limitless when it comes to possibilities. I can remember when people and newspapers were saying I was done, finished and in total financial more...
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Synergy

Coming together is a beginning, keeping together is progress, working together is success.  --Henry Ford Synergy is a word that implies that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. It’s a coming together of energies that is made clear by the Greek roots of the word: syn + ergos = ‘together working’ which is what Henry Ford was saying in his quote. It has a scientific application but is a great word for business aptitude, as in, combining forces to create a greater momentum, a greater whole. We all know about the great teams that have worked together to make history more...
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Focus On The Opportunities

The following question was submitted to "Ask Donald Trump" by a The Trump Entrepreneur Initiative member. Question: You have faced some really big challenges and some very difficult circumstances in your life. What activities, words of wisdom and other tools do you use to get yourself back up to remain positive? What advice would you offer to anyone struggling today? My Response: Your focus is very important--so be sure to focus on the opportunities, because they are always there. For example, if 90% of companies aren’t hiring, then focus on the 10% that are. I learned to focus less on the problem and more on the solution, more...
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Curiosity

One thing I’ve learned over the years is that curiosity is a good way to stay stimulated and informed as well as young. Ever notice that children are curious about everything? That’s how they learn and the same thing should apply to adults. People have often commented that I ask a lot of questions, which is true, and it’s one way I’ve learned a lot. I can remember when I was deciding on what type of bathroom sink to install in a new property, so I kept three samples on a sofa in my front offices. I would ask everyone who came more...
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Confidence

I can remember when someone asked me where my confidence came from. I thought for a moment and realized that a lot of it comes from discipline, and from having a firm foundation. My father always told me “Know everything you can about what you’re doing”-- in  other words, cover your bases, be thorough. This sounds very simple but it was very good advice, and I have followed it. It has obviously worked, and I remain grateful to my father to this day. His advice and mentorship gave led to my entrepreneurship success. Another thing about being thorough is that it can more...
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Managing Real Estate Investment Property

The following question was submitted to "Ask Donald Trump" by a The Trump Entrepreneur Initiative member. Question: I have never studied management but am interested in learning real estate property management so I can manage my own real estate investing properties. Where do I start and what are the basics I need to know about property management?  Study everything you can about it. In The Art of the Deal,  I talk about how I learned from my father and had my own experiences with property management. It’s worth reading about. You’ll see that it takes a lot of insight into human nature, so all your experiences more...
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Additional Reading: The Thinker

We’re not going to be discussing Rodin and his famous statue today, but Edward de Bono. For those of you who aren’t familiar with him, de Bono is worth knowing about. He is an author, a physician, an inventor, an entrepreneur and a consultant. He has degrees in medicine, psychology, physiology, and design and holds many professorships throughout the world. He has written 62 books and he invented the term ‘lateral thinking’ with subsequent work on parallel thinking. In using lateral thinking, you can provide a possible solution to problems through a creative and indirect approach. Trying harder and in the same more...
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Signs Of Improvement

On Wednesday I was interviewed by Neil Cavuto and we discussed issues pertaining to the economy. I said that things seemed to be looking better, and that very importantly, people seemed to be confident that the economy is improving. Considering the situation awhile back, there are indications that the market is coming back and along with that we see confidence returning. That’s a very good sign in itself. Neil asked me what I thought about the idea of raising taxes. I think that’s a dangerous thing to do. This is a fragile time, we have a delicate economy and it wouldn’t take more...
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Donald Trump's Summer Reading List for Business Success - Part 2

I learned a great deal about business and life from my father, Fred C. Trump. I learned from watching him and working with him. He was unable to attend college himself, so it meant even more to him for his children to be well educated and well read. I will always be grateful to him for emphasizing the importance of education, and reading is still an integral part of my daily life. To make sure it’s part of yours,  here’s a list that has the variety that life presents to us. Being good at business means having a broad base of more...
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Strengths vs. Weaknesses: A Citizen's Duty

The New York Post ran an article on Monday about a letter I wrote to Governor David Paterson about his choice of a lieutenant governor. As a citizen, I felt it was my duty to point out a few things that I knew about the man he appointed, which included his strengths and weaknesses. I decided this would be a good lesson in objective assessment for my readers at The Trump Entrepreneur Initiative. It’s always important to be circumspect when it comes to business, politics, and just about everything. I had carefully thought about the pros and cons before writing my letter, and realized more...
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Fred Trump

The following question was submitted to "Ask Donald Trump" by a The Trump Entrepreneur Initiative member. On several occasions you pay tribute to your father Fred C. Trump. We only see a small glimpse of him as a family man and as a business person. Anything in the works to do an inside biography of your father and his early years? My first book, The Art of the Deal, gives background information on my father and how he started out in business, and about our family life. It’s a good source. Related Posts  Focus On Business Donald Trump's Biggest Challenge Real Estate Investing more...
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Donald Trump Books for Summer Reading

Recently, I was asked to recommend a summer reading list from my own books. Over the years I’ve written a lot of business books and even one on golf. Why do I write? I’m a bit of a teacher by nature and I feel writing allows me to organize my thoughts and experiences in a way that I can provide lessons of wealth building wisdom in an easily accessible format. It is my sincere desire to help you by sharing my own experiences and life lessons and I hope you’ll take some time this summer to catch up on your reading. What are your favorite more...
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OPEC

Last week I spoke with Greta Van Susteren on Fox News, and we covered topics that included the economy, President Obama, the banks, health care, and OPEC. OPEC deserves our attention because it’s a situation that is too often overlooked, and it has had serious impact on our country and our economy. OPEC openly laughs at the stupidity of our country as they raise oil prices. They are draining and sucking the life blood out of this country. They like to blame it on speculators. The speculators are peanuts compared to the power of OPEC. OPEC hires lobbyists in Washington and they more...
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Michael Jackson

There’s been a lot of coverage on Michael Jackson, and rightly so. He was the most amazing performer I have ever seen, and I have seen most of the greats. I knew him personally as well, as he lived at Trump Tower and stayed at my Mar-a-Lago Club in Palm Beach. He stayed there when he and Lisa Marie Presley were married, and they were obviously a romantic item. They had a great time and we loved having them as guests. Michael Jackson was a shy person which made his gift as a performer even more astonishing. I remember thinking, “This quiet more...
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Wrestling, Ratings and Guerrilla Marketing

Guerilla marketing is a term that was coined by Jay Conrad Levinson in his book of 1984, Guerilla Marketing. This is a form of advertising and promotions that depends on the unconventional. Imagination is key, and a big budget isn’t always necessary. Entrepreneurs use this technique, and it’s considered to be non-traditional--just what entrepreneurs are known for being. A very good example of this would be the June 22nd WWE (World Wrestling Entertainment) event that drew 6.8 million viewers. That’s a 25% increase in viewers from an earlier broadcast in June. Some of you may have heard of Vince McMahon, who owns more...
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Focus On Business

The following question was submitted to "Ask Donald Trump" by a The Trump Entrepreneur Initiative member. What methods do you use to help you focus on the many projects and businesses that you have? In the morning, I review the newspapers, national and international, and watch the morning news. I pay attention to anything that might have a positive or negative effect on wealth creation and make mental notes about that. It gets my mind going for what I need to address that day, and gives insight into developing situations that might also affect my businesses in the future. This provides an immediate focus.  Related Posts  Donald more...
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Donald Trump's Biggest Challenge

The following question was submitted to "Ask Donald Trump" by a The Trump Entrepreneur Initiative member. What was your biggest challenge as one of the top entrepreneur’s in the world? Entrepreneurship takes patents, skill and a lot of hard work. In the early 1990’s I was many millions of dollars in debt, the markets weren’t doing well, and newspapers had reported my demise, that I was finished. But I didn’t believe it for a second. I focused on the solution, not my problems, and refused to give up. I became more successful than I had been before. Related Posts  Real Estate Investing and The Global more...
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Father's Day

To this day, I think of my father every single day. He was a tremendous presence in my life and the example he set for me remains intact. His integrity was beyond reproach, and the legacy he left behind was as important to him as it is to me. In that sense we are still very much together. Our goals may have been different--he didn’t see why I wanted to build glass skyscrapers, for example, when bricks worked for him as a developer--but the means were the same: hard work, focus, integrity, and a standard that would not be diminished by more...
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Real Estate Investing and The Global Economic Crisis

The following question was submitted to "Ask Donald Trump" by a The Trump Entrepreneur Initiative member. What do you think about the importance of buying real estate in this world crisis? There are always real estate investing opportunities, but one must research and be careful. Of course it helps if you have cash and know how to buy in this kind of market, but it’s important to realize that there are opportunities no matter what the market is doing. One of my first deals was done when the real estate market was in bad shape in New York City, in fact the city itself was more...
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Hand Carts and Airplanes

After learning that Air France is replacing the airspeed sensors on its Airbus A330 jets following the air disaster--even though there is no confirmed link between the crash and the airspeed sensors--I spoke to a friend of mine who has a hand-cart company. For many years his carts were made of steel, and now they are made of a carbon fiber composite that is stronger and lighter than steel, but has moments of weakness. The carts are made of the same composite material as the Airbus 330 vertical stabilizer/rudders. He also explained that out of many thousands of carts made a year, more...
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D-Day

June 6th marked the 65th anniversary of an epic day in history, which was the Allied invasion of Normandy. This was the turning point in World War II and is an event that warrants the great tributes it has received. President Obama, President Sarkozy, Prince Charles, British Prime Minister Gordon Brown, and Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper were among those who were present, along with veterans, at the American cemetery in Normandy on Saturday. Maybe some of you saw Stephen Spielberg’s film, Saving Private Ryan, which chronicles this day in a realistic and therefore devastating way. One veteran said this film is more...
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Entrepreneurialism

Last week in the Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal there was an article on James Gutierrez. Gutierrez is the co-founder of Progreso Financiero, which he started in 2005. His company has brought in $26 million in venture funding, has partnered with Sears and has made 20,000 loans from 24 locations throughout California. He mentions that his success had early beginnings when he would look through business books while in grade school. He came across one of my books, and that’s the first time he had seen the word ‘entrepreneur’--and he decided that’s what he wanted to be. His first venture was selling pens more...
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Education vs. Experience

Here’s a topic that can be argued positively from both sides. My father, Fred C. Trump, didn’t have the advantage of a college education yet he became very successful. He was smart, focused and he worked hard every day. But he knew the advantages of having a good education. He put his younger brother through college, and my uncle went on to get his Ph.D. from M.I.T. and became a professor of physics. Education was stressed when I was growing up, and my father made sure we had the best education possible. While I had the great advantage of attending Wharton, one of more...
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The Trump Entrepreneur Initiative's 4th Anniversary

It was four years ago this week that The Trump Entrepreneur Initiative was launched. In these four years, we’ve seen excellent growth as well as excellent results from those who have taken our courses and read our books. Our aim is to help people to succeed, and we have succeeded. Education was very much stressed when I was growing up. My father didn’t have the opportunity to get a college education, and so it mattered to him that his children would have that opportunity. I am well aware that college is not easily affordable and one of the great advantages of The Trump Entrepreneur Initiative is more...
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Personal Finance Advice For All Ages

The following question was submitted to "Ask Donald Trump" by memeber #1958969. I'm a high school teacher working with 11th and 12th graders. I read your blog entry regarding the need to prep students for the business world at the high school level rather than waiting until college. I was wondering if you could list 5-10 general areas you think would be vital for students to have exposure to at this level? Students need to know more about how the financial sector works, both nationally and internationally. Emerging markets, equities, stocks, bonds, mutual funds, asset management, fixed income, commodities, and so on should be more...
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Why We Want You To Be Rich: Winners Take Control

The first part of the title of this blog is also the name of a book Robert Kiyosaki and I wrote back in 2006. We were trying to warn people of the necessity for financial literacy. We could see there were problems on the horizon in the government as well as in the financial markets, nationally and globally. Unfortunately, we were very right about that. The seismic shock we experienced doesn’t just even itself out right away, and we experienced--and are still experiencing--aftershocks. It’s a good idea to be prepared to ride this out for awhile longer. My theory has always been more...
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Sales and Marketing is 24/7

Last week there was an article on Forbes.com titled Genuine Business Lessons from Donald Trump by Shaun Rein, who is the founder and managing director of the China Market Research Group. He writes for Forbes on strategy, leadership and marketing, and I found his insights to be right on. All of them are helpful to anyone interested in success, and here are a few for your review:  Trump has mastered the art of defining the core values of his brand and leveraging his brand equity to appeal to a wide customer base. In a time when consumers are seeking to stretch their shopping more...
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Celebrity Apprentice Finale and Lessons Learned Along the Way

I hope all of you will tune in to the live finale of this season’s Celebrity Apprentice, which will be this Sunday night at 8 p.m. We will be live from the Museum of Natural History in New York City, and that’s a fitting environment for this season of historic proportions. If you’ve followed the season, you will know that it’s down to Joan Rivers and Annie Duke, and considering their record thus far, I think it’s safe to say we might be in for an explosive evening. But one thing I hoped you noticed during this season is that it’s important more...
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Is It Easy To Say You're Fired?

The following question was submitted to "Ask Donald Trump" by Ray C. Q: Do you think because of employers seeing how you handle things on The Apprentice it has become easier for individuals in business who watch to say “You’re Fired!” to under performing employees? A: I don’t think anyone really likes to fire another person. I know I don’t. I’d rather keep people around, but sometimes it’s necessary. I’ve had employees who have been with me for decades, and that’s my preference. I think employers understand the premise of the show and what is going on, and as professionals, it wouldn’t alter their course more...
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Obama's First 100 Days: A Strong B+

On Wednesday morning I was on CNN to talk about President Obama’s first 100 days in office. I was quoted from my new book, Think Like a Champion, where I mention that Obama “will need to be a great president because we’re in serious trouble as a country. It hasn’t been this way since 1929. So he doesn’t have much choice--he will simply have to be great, which he has a very good chance of being.” I was asked if he had lived up to the challenge. I said that he is working very very hard on many many fronts--it would be more...
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Champion Challenge from Donald J. Trump

I’ve decided that I would like to give you a challenge. My latest book is called Think Like a Champion, and if you haven’t read it yet, I would recommend that you do so as soon as possible. These are challenging times and all of us need to have as much training as possible to get through the race that lies ahead. I signed some of my books for the purpose of sending a few to those of you who can tell me why you think you’re a champion-- how do you write a business plan for success? No doubt a lot more...
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Larry King Live and Direct

I visited Larry King Live on Wednesday night and we had a great visit, covering many topics. We talked about my new book Think Like a Champion, which also covers a wide variety of topics, from Obama, to Madoff, to pirates and prescience. To be a champion, as I told Larry, knowledge is important, and this book provides a solid step in that direction. Here are a few highlights from our interview: On real estate: I mentioned that this is a great time to buy real estate. However, banks are not doing their job. They’re not providing financing for deals. If the more...
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Advice For New Real Estate Agents

The following question was submitted to "Ask Donald Trump" by Helen G.: I am really feeling at a loss as new agent in real estate. I have not been able to land one deal and am not sure if it’s me or what it is, for the most part. I don’t have the right people around, everyone claims they have already bought. Am I that late in the game? This is a tough time for real estate, even for seasoned agents. Instead of becoming discouraged, use this time to learn as much as you can about what you’re doing and about the industry more...
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Some Good News on April 15th

Today, which is April 15th, the New York Daily News has an article called Donald, yer hired!  in their paper. The subtitle is Trump tops nationwide Web poll on whom we’d like to prepare our tax returns. I didn’t know about the poll so this came as a surprise. The article, written by Sarah Kaufman and Bill Hutchinson, says: What do Donald Trump and CNN newsman Anderson Cooper have in common? They’re the celebrities Americans feel most comfortable doing their taxes. In a nationwide survey by WalletPop.com, The Donald edged out The Coop, 32% to 27%, as the most trusted tax preparer. Apparently over more...
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Champions Rise to the Challenge

I was recently interviewed for the New York Times by Deborah Solomon for their March 29th magazine. One of her questions was: Your latest book of business advice is called “Think Like a Champion,” but isn’t it the American infatuation with thinking like a champion that got us into the financial mess? My answer was: I would say no. I think it was the greed of a fairly small group of people that got us into this mess. The vast majority of people did not get us into trouble. Last weekend, the Times had an article on Bob Newburger, who began his career on more...
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Tough Love About DUI

There’s been a lot of commotion about alcohol lately. On The Celebrity Apprentice, two of our celebrities have admitted problems with it. One had a DUI conviction. People wonder why I take a strong position on this situation. My experience with alcohol is limited, as I don’t drink. Maybe that allows me to have a clearer view of what it can do to people who do not handle it responsibly. Many people can drink and live healthy and productive lives. Others cannot. I saw what happened to my elder brother when he couldn’t handle alcohol well. It destroyed him. His loss left more...
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The Think Big Approach

The following question was submitted to "Ask Donald Trump" by Luke Yaugo:  You take a big kick ass approach to everything you do. How did you develop that mindset? From your father or on your own? Would you say the 90’s were the starting point of your philosophy? Will your children carry on this way of thinking? What is your vision? Where do you see the Trump Organization headed when you’re no longer able? I learned a great deal from my father about many things, he was definitely a mentor and a terrific example, but my think big philosophy was more of my own more...
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The Think Link

My new book, Think Like a Champion: An Informal Education in Business and Life will be coming out soon--on April 14th, to be exact. I’m excited about this book because as Robert Kiyosaki says, “it’s the perfect book at the perfect time.” I tend to agree, because one thing we all need now is some inspiration as well as motivation, and this book serves that purpose. I start each topic covered with a quote, which has proven to be a popular approach. Some people who have skimmed the book  mention that they love the quotes because they are diverse and cover the more...
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Who's Happier at What Age: Men or Women?

How happy are you? How old are you? Researchers say there’s a correlation. Apparently, the happiness “tipping point” is right around age “40.” Before that, according to University of Southern California economist Richard Easterlin, women are generally happier than men. In their 20s and 30s, they’re generally pleased with their personal lives and their careers and life overall. Men, however, allegedly experience the saddest period of their lives in their 20s. They still haven’t hit the peak of their careers, most are still single, and they’re still trying to figure out life. But once they hit the big 4-0, men and women switch more...
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Hostages, Revolutions and Critics

Most uprisings and revolutions find their beginnings in injustice. The French and American revolutions are two examples, and we can trace this back to Greek history. Democracy started there. The people had a justified outrage and managed to change things. Just recently in Paris, the French protested layoffs by barricading the director of a large company in his office and another similar incident happened at Sony in the South of France a couple of weeks ago. It seemed to work--after the ‘bossnapping’ occurred, Sony agreed to talk about severance packages. So far this is a revolt without violence, but it’s a barometer more...
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Pigeons and Hedge Fund Managers

Recently I heard a good one that pertains to a lot more than the luxury car market: Q: What’s the difference between a pigeon and a hedge fund manager? A: A pigeon can leave a deposit on a Ferrari. That’s a vivid visual but fortunately it’s not as bad as it might seem out there. I’ve pointed out before that there are always opportunities. I’m working on my new golf course on the Potomac River and I visited Puerto Rico last week, where the Trump International Golf Club has 1250 acres of Atlantic Ocean Waterfront in Rio Grande. We hosted the second Puerto Rico Open, and more...
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Why I Selected Tionne Watkins for The Celebrity Apprentice

Tionne runs the success gamut from musician to producer to philanthropist and more. She’s tireless and gifted--a great combination. Tionne Watkins, www.chasescloset.com, is best known as "T-Boz," the lead singer of TLC. During the 1990s TLC blended pop, hip-hop, and urban soul to create iconic songs like "Creep" and "Waterfalls." They are still the best-selling female group of all time with over 45 million records sold worldwide. In addition to her successful musical career, Tionne is a skilled actress, producer and a tireless fundraiser for many important charities. Twice, People Magazine named Tionne one of its "50 most beautiful people" she appears as more...
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Business Has No Conscience. Yet.

Covering the issues last night with Larry King brought up some interesting points, which is one reason Larry is so good at what he does. At this time in history, it’s not that hard to find an outrage or two to talk about, but Larry is always spot-on about what’s going on and knows what to ask. He asked me about the public anger over the AIG bonuses and if it is justified. I said the anger has been unbelievable, but what AIG did is very bad politics. In fact, to me it sounds absolutely insane and I think AIG has the more...
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Why I Selected Herschel Walker for The Celebrity Apprentice

Herschel’s legacy is such that he is considered by many to be the greatest college football player of all time. When I bought the New Jersey Generals, I was pleased to have Herschel on our roster, and it’s good to see him again--and in fine form. Herschel Walker,www.herschelwalker.net , is another example of a successful athlete who transformed discipline on the field into business success. Herschel was a football great and today he is the President and Chief Executive Officer of Renaissance Man Food Service, a successful company that produces Herschel's Famous 34, a popular line of flavorful entrees and appetizers. Of course more...
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Why I Selected Dennis Rodman for The Celebrity Apprentice

Dennis has a personality that matches the diversity of his credentials. He’s a little bit crazy, but he’s also very smart, and that’s a good mix. Dennis Rodman, www.drodman.com, is as flamboyant as he was a great basketball star. Over 14 years of NBA play Dennis amassed one of the most enviable basketball records ever. He is a five-time NBA Champion, seven-time All-Defensive First Team pick and two-time Defensive Player of the Year. Dennis brought amazing energy to the game and equally thrilled fans with his play and his ever-changing hair color, his tattoos and his body piercings. During his career, Dennis played for five more...
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Celebrity Apprentice: Why I Selected Brian McKnight

Brian was terrific on Broadway in Chicago, and his stage charisma will hopefully transfer to the television screen--and to the boardroom. Brian McKnight, defines the meaning of American soul man. A Grammy nominee, Brian's musical accomplishments include singing, songwriting, arranging and producing. He has sold over 16 million albums and will soon host BET's "Soul Sessions." His latest record "Ten" can be found in stores now. He truly knows how to write a business plan for success. Always looking for new challenges, in 2007 Brian made his Broadway debut by performing the role of Billy Flynn, the slick hustler lawyer in the revival of the musical more...
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Why I selected Brande Roderick to Play The Celebrity Apprentice

As an actress and businesswoman, Brande brings a solid background as well as landscape to the boardroom. A Playmate with smarts. Brande Roderick, www.financiallyhung.com, is best known as being the 2001 Playboy Playmate of the Year and a Baywatch babe, she is an equally astute businessperson. Brande is the CEO and majority owner of Financially Hung, a web site that combines business development, social networking and celebrity events to create an ultimate experience for members. In fact, one of Brande's celebrity members is Celebrity Apprentice challenger Annie Duke. Brande also manages two other companies including She-Ra Productions, a film and television production company more...
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Why I Selected Melissa Rivers for The Celebrity Apprentice

Melissa is an accomplished producer and she knows the television industry well. Let’s see how she handles the boardroom--and her mother. While Melissa Rivers, www.melissarivers.com, may be best known for interviewing celebrities on the red carpet with her mother Joan Rivers, she is an accomplished television producer, an Ivy League graduate, an equestrian and a mother. A graduate of The University of Pennsylvania, Melissa teamed up with Joan Rivers to create a whole new red carpet experience for television audiences around the world. We have all seen Melissa interview celebrities and critique gowns in front of the camera. Behind the lens, however, it more...
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Donald Trump's Economic Survival Tips

What’s happened to the economy has been likened to a tsunami as well as an implosion. When the undersea earthquake and subsequent tsunami hit in Indonesia in 2004, the world was stunned by the devastation that took place. It triggered earthquakes around the globe as far away as Alaska. It happened in a very short amount of time. This kind of event takes shape over a period of time and then erupts with incredible force. What happened this past year is similar in that respect--it’d been brewing for some time. When it hit, it was like a tsunami which caused other economies more...
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Celebrity Apprentice: Why I Selected Khloe Kardashian

Khloe is a dynamo and very pleasant on the eyes. As a veteran of reality television, we’re looking forward to seeing how she fares with this assortment of personalities. Fans of Khloe Kardashian, know that she is the youngest of the Kardashian sisters, made famous by the "Keeping Up with the Kardashians" TV show. The E! series rocketed Khloe into the spotlight end to embark of a busy series of projects. A consummate entrepreneur, Khloe manages DASH, the Kardashian sisters' high-end women’s boutique in Calabasas, California, she writes a popular blog and hosts behind-the-scenes and red carpet events for Celebuzz. Khloe also contributes more...
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Why I Selected Joan Rivers for The Celebrity Apprentice

Joan’s a powerhouse--and that’s an understatement. An amazing woman! I know few people who are as industrious as Joan Rivers, www.joanrivers.com. She is always fresh, funny and insightful. Joan is a comedienne, Tony-nominated actress, best-selling author, Emmy Award-winning television talk-show host, playwright, screenwriter, motion picture director, columnist, lecturer, syndicated radio host, jewelry designer and cosmetic company entrepreneur, red-carpet fashion laureate, businesswoman and, most importantly to her, a mother and a grandmother. (Whew!) Joan caught the eyes of America back in 1968 when she appeared on "The Tonight Show" with Johnny Carson. Less than three years later she had her own daytime TV show more...
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Why I Selected Claudia Jordan for The Celebrity Apprentice

From beauty pageants to real estate to television shows? Claudia is beautiful, interesting and smart. No one will ever blame model, actor and reporter Claudia Jordan, (www.claudiajordan.net), of sitting still. Aside from The Celebrity Apprentice, she is best known for holding the #1 case on the hit game show “Deal or No Deal.” Last month Claudia did NFL Super Bowl Media Day coverage for "Entertainment Tonight" and was previously a correspondent for "The Best Damn Sports Show" and "5.4.3.2.1." Claudia will soon appear in the new feature film, “Middlemen" with Luke Wilson. Early in her career, Claudia earned both the Miss Teen Rhode more...
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Why I Selected Jesse James for The Celebrity Apprentice

Jesse is a bit of a Renaissance man with his variety of interests and accomplishments. From motorcycles to a clothing line, he has the drive and diversity we’re looking for. But let’s see if he lives up to his name of legend. Jesse James, www.westcoastchoppers.com, may be best known as a gruff looking custom motorcycle genius, but that's only the tip of the iceberg. Jesse's title at work is CEO, and for good reason. He oversees the chopper shop, a television production company, one of the hottest lines of clothing in America, a restaurant and more. Jesse may not wear French cuffs more...
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Why I Selected Scott Hamilton for The Celebrity Apprentice

As an Olympic gold medalist, most people know about Scott’s many accomplishments, but he’s also had an equal amount of challenges along the way. He’s a champion on and off the ice. As an ice skater, a television commentator and as an entertainer, Scott Hamilton is an instantly recognizable figure. He has won 70 different titles and awards, including a gold medal at the 1984 Winter Olympics, but whenever I see Scott, I always think of him as a classy gentleman who always sports a smile. In 1980, the year he finished third in the US Figure Skating Championships, he made millions more...
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Why I selected Annie Duke for Celebrity Apprentice

A worldwide poker champion who is also philanthropic in her efforts, Annie has an unusual flair and combination of talents that make her ideal for The Celebrity Apprentice. Playing professional poker requires cunning, skill, knowledge, patience and daring. Annie Duke, (www.annieduke.com), is one of the world's best. In 2004, Annie won her first World Series of Poker bracelet by beating 234 players in the WSOP $2000 buy-in Omaha Hi/Lo Split. That same year she won $2 million by eliminating 8 of the world's greatest poker legends in the No-Limit Texas Hold'em winner-take-all WSOP Tournament of Champions. Professional poker is a business, one that more...
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Why I selected Andrew Dice Clay for Celebrity Apprentice

I selected Andrew Dice Clay to appear on Celebrity Apprentice because he is edgy, smart and successful--and definitely a heavyweight of comedy.  Andrew, (www.andrewdiceclay.com), will tell you that he is proud to be America's most controversial and outrageous comic. Long before shows like South Park and comedians like Dave Chappelle came onto the scene, Andrew shocked his audiences and broke the rules with his never-before-seen brand of no apologies hardcore comedy. Clay doesn't mince words or make excuses. When he released his debut album "DICE" the parental advisory label simply read "Warning: This album is offensive." Clay’s rise to fame was spectacular; he more...
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Why I Selected Professional Golfer Natalie Gulbis for Celebrity Apprentice

Natalie won the Evian Masters in 2007 and her calendar caused some waves but the only thing on her agenda is excellence--easy when you’re as talented, beautiful and intelligent as she is. Natalie Gulbis, (www.nataliegulbis.com) is one of America's most recognizable professional golfers, both on and off the course. Back on 2001 she attended the University of Arizona where she won three tournaments and became and All-American First Team honoree. The next year Natalie joined the LPGA and broke out in 2005 when she finished third at the Michelob ULTRA Open at Kingsmill and at the State Farm Classic. That year she more...
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Why I Selected Tom Green for Celebrity Apprentice

I am truly excited to have Tom Green join Celebrity Apprentice. Tom is a Talk show host, writer, director, producer, comedian, survivor-Tom has had a go at many things, and very often wins. Tom Green made a name for himself with a public access television talk show that he nurtured and grew into his very own MTV hit show, "The Tom Green Show." After MTV, he returned to his talk-show roots, and to his living room, where he broadcasts "Tom Green's House Tonight." His web-based show is free of FCC regulations and television executives and has become an Internet phenomenon. Hollywood's most more...
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Why I Selected Clint Black for Celebrity Apprentice

I selected Clint Black to appear on Celebrity Apprentice because Clint is not only a gifted musician and songwriter, but he’s a good businessman. He has his own record company and has sold over 20 million albums worldwide. He’s bringing a lot of talent to the boardroom. Becoming a star recording artist requires determination, talent, hard work and, yes, luck. As any successful musician can tell you, it's a lot easier to fall out of the spotlight than it is to climb into it, which is why Clint Black was especially smart to secure his future with the establishment of Equity Music more...
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Making the Right Call

I was on Neal Cavuto’s show yesterday and we were discussing economic conditions and Atlantic City. I stepped down as chairman of the Trump Entertainment Resorts after my offer to buy the company was turned down by the bondholders. I was hoping that I might be able to reverse its fortunes. My holdings there represent substantially less than 1% of my net worth, and I am not involved in management. It has been tough going for awhile and brings to light the timing that is necessary in business to make the right decisions at the right time. These are very tough times more...
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Obama Is Absolutely Right

Last night I was on the air with Larry King who always has incisive questions. He asked me if Obama was right or wrong to go after these executives with salary caps--and I said he’s absolutely right. Billions of dollars are being given to banks, and once you start using taxpayer money, it’s a whole new ball game. It’s not a game I’m enjoying watching. The banks are trying to shore up their balance sheets. They’re supposed to be loaning out that money and they’re using it for other purposes, so it is a real mess. Everyone wants to blame the United States, more...
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The 3 D's of Real Estate

The real estate market is such these days that one thing has become apparent: If someone is selling in this market it’s usually because of the 3 D’s: Death, Divorce Debt When the value of property is low, it is common sense not to sell it. You hold onto it until the realty market changes. Therefore it’s common sense to notice that those who are selling are encountering one of the 3 D’s just mentioned. Otherwise, their actions would be nonsensical. It doesn’t take a sixth sense to figure out what is going on. Maybe it’s clearer to me because I’m experienced in real estate and more...
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Listen to the Greeks

The sea gets sick but never dies. This is a well known Greek motto that I think is pertinent to today’s economic situation. The Greeks have been around for a long time and they’ve watched the ebb and flow of history for many centuries. Their saying is based on observation, and we’d do well to give it some thought. If someone or something is sick, it means it has to be allowed to get better. That can take some time. It also takes care and a proactive commitment to a return to health. Here we are in 2009 and we need to more...
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Where Are Nixon's Children?

After watching the movie Frost/Nixon I was thinking about Nixon's children. Where are they?Whether you liked Nixon or not, family is family and I find it incredible that no one has surfaced to defend him. Did they just disappear? Why haven't they defended him? I would hope my children would fight for me more than his kids fight for him. I have a feeling they would. I also think Nixon would go to bat for his children, just as I would for mine. Their silence is a mystery to me and while I know it was a humiliating time in their more...
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A New Year's Observation

It takes all kinds. That’s something we’ve noticed in the past year in the news, with Bernard Madoff topping it off.  We have a saying in construction when the structure of a building is completed--a ‘topping off party’ to signify the top floor has been put in place. Somehow, the past year got its own topping off party but not in the best sense.   My opinion is that we should all try to be grateful. There’s a lot to be thankful for and being positive is certainly more productive than being negative. But I have to say I got another surprise more...
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Loyalty and Kelly Preston

I have always respected people who were loyal and faithful--which brings to mind Kelly Preston. A long time ago, before I was married, I met Kelly Preston at a club and worked like hell to try and pick her up. She was beautiful, personable, and definitely had allure. At the time I had no idea she was married to John Travolta.   In any event, my track record on this subject has always been outstanding, but Kelly wouldn’t give me the time of day. She was very nice, very elegant, but I didn’t have a chance with her, and that was that. When I more...
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Guidelines

The Trump Entrepreneur Initiative came out with a book last year called Entrepreneurship 101: How to Turn Your Idea into a Money Machine. I wrote the foreword and first chapter, and entrusted the very knowledgeable Michael E. Gordon, PhD, with writing the rest. I was reviewing it again recently and realized how valuable a guide it is for today. There’s not a specific college degree for being a great entrepreneur, but this book will set you up and on your way in a very comprehensive way. In my introduction, I mention that entrepreneurship starts with vision. Without a vision, nothing of consequence will happen more...
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Painfully Blunt or Just Honest?

I was interviewed by Neil Cavuto of Fox News and he announced that it was the most ticked off he’d seen me in the twenty years he’s been interviewing me. I’d say I was being blunt, which is typical for me, and Neil said I was painfully blunt. Well, these are painful times, and I’m not running for any political office so I can afford to be honest.   We covered the situation in New York, and the 137 proposed tax hikes by Governor Paterson. These tax hikes include non-diet soda and massages. Meantime, we’ve spent a trillion dollars in Iraq. And now more...
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Americans and Religion

I know it’s never safe to talk about religion and politics, but it certainly hasn’t stopped me before. Are you religious? There’s a good chance you don’t practice the same faith you were raised in. Perhaps you’ve either switched allegiances or abandoned religion altogether. When it comes to faith, nearly half of Americans have changed faiths or given up. It’s no surprise since we’re a society that’s used to change - whether in careers or where we live or in our personal lives. Religion is just one more thing we alter. Some people are saying the religious economy is like a competitive marketplace. There more...
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Madoff Teaches Lessons in Due Diligence

I can remember when Bernard Madoff would approach me in Palm Beach, Florida, about investing some money with him. He’d say “Why don’t you invest in my fund?” I didn’t know much about him and I’m not a fund guy so I said no. I had enough going on in my own businesses that I didn’t need to be associated or involved with his. Madoff was a frequent visitor at my Mar-a-Lago Club and he was a respected guy. I know several people who have been victims of his unscrupulous scheme and what’s happened to them is dreadful. He is without a more...
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Somali Pirates to Acquire Citigroup: A Cliff Notes Summary of Our Times

My friend Tom Barrack of Colony Capital sent me a recent article of his with the headline Today’s Debt is Equity plus A Few Suggestions to Help President-Elect Obama Ease the Pain. He bullet pointed the latest events pertaining to the economy--twenty two of them--and I realized that at any other time, just a few of these would be huge topics in themselves. It’s a good indication of how alert we need to be right now. His Cliff Notes summary: Real estate is experiencing a seismic liquidity shock as a result of a complete closure of the credit and capital markets for more...
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Cheating with the Checkbook

We always hear so much about spouses cheating, it just becomes commonplace. But in today’s economic times, more and more couples are guilty of financial infidelity where they hide their spending from each other. A Harris Interactive survey of nearly 2,000 people in a committed relationship found that 29 percent of them admitted to lying to their partner about their spending habits. Women were a little more apt to lie than men, but it was close. That’s obviously very dangerous for the health of a relationship. Keeping secrets of any kind is damaging, of course, but financial cheating is like writing a business more...
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The First Apprentice: Great Managers Work For the Team

It's been almost five years since that first season of The Apprentice appeared on television. The first winner was a young man named Bill Rancic, who has gone on to be a best-selling author, a guest advisor on The Apprentice, a public speaker and the host of his own reality show on the A&E Network. Bill has done terrifically well since he became a celebrity after winning The Apprentice in 2004. I chose him above the other candidates because I knew he had the intelligence as well as the ability to be a combination of two things: a team player and a more...
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Inside City Hall Part 2

The second half of my interview with Dominic Carter brought up some interesting points. Being a New York based television show, he asked me what I thought of Governor Patterson, the Governor of New York.  As I’ve gotten to know him, I can say he’s smart, sharp and street-wise, and I expect that he will handle the problems that this state has for him and very well. Dominic did a word-association test on me with some well-known names in New York (and nationwide for that matter), and here were some of my comments: Michael Bloomberg, Mayor of New York City:  Michael Bloomberg more...
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Golden Goggles

Last week I had the privilege of presenting Michael Phelps with the Male Athlete of the Year award.  Along with former Olympian Don Schollander, I enjoyed reviewing some of the great moments of the Beijing Olympics. Of course, Phelps and his eight gold epic is one of the greatest achievements in the history of sport. There were four candidates for this award, which Don and I covered for the ceremony. For those of you who may not know who Don Schollander is, he was the nation’s most celebrated athlete in 1964. He was on the cover of Life Magazine as the more...
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Case In Point: Global Facts

Since I often emphasize the importance of being aware on a global level, I was reminded by a chapter in my book with Robert Kiyosaki, Why We Want You To Be Rich, which came out in 2006. In this chapter I gave some facts about China and India that illustrate why I stress knowing something about other countries should be a priority. These two facts alone about China were a clear indication of how that country is doing: The first Starbucks opened in China in 2004. There are now more Starbucks in China than in the United States. In the 1970’s, Shanghai had exactly more...
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I Know It's Not Easy Out There

A few months ago, a citizen in Canada sent me a copy of her local newspaper from Kamloops, British Columbia. There was a photograph of a homeless man who was surrounded by his belongings, and he was reading a copy of my first book, The Art of the Deal, which came out in 1987. The reporter who saw him spoke to him, and a photograph was taken. I was very taken with the story and photo and decided to send the man a check for $1,000.00 via the reporter from the Kamloops newspaper.  I was impressed that, despite his situation, he more...
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Guess? Success Teaches Lessons in Leadership

Once again my very smart friend Tom Barrack of Colony Capital sent me one of his essays that was based on his pondering over a way “to chart a path to lead our team and our investors out of this jungle” in reference to what’s been going on with the economy. He found the answer while talking with one of his friends, Paul Marciano, the CEO of Guess?, Inc. Paul and his brothers are self-made and have built Guess into one of the most well-known fashion brands in the world. He asked Paul what his insights were on the economy, and because more...
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Barack Obama Election Ushers in A Different World

This week I was interviewed by Dominic Carter of New York 1, on his program called Inside City Hall.  New York 1 is an all-news program that is popular in New York City, and Dominic Carter is someone I have a great deal of respect for. He should have a national show, but then New York would miss out on his full time and dynamic presence here. He describes me as “a man not known for keeping his opinions to himself” and the interview spanned two consecutive nights. On Tuesday night we covered some interesting topics. Dominic asked about the election more...
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A Great Coach

It was a few years ago, probably in 2005, that I received a phone call from Coach Mike Leach, calling to say how much he liked my books because they were inspirational. As I follow college football, I knew that he was the coach for Texas Tech, and a great one at that. We had a conversation and I realized we shared a few things in common as far as motivation and focus go, and we’ve stayed in touch. Just last week I appeared on ESPN for his weekend game against the University of Texas (currently #1). Coach Leach invited me more...
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Scotland: You're Hired!

This story started over five years ago, and as of this week, it has a happy ending. I had spent five years reviewing sites throughout Europe, and turned down over 200 possibilities for development.  Then I saw the links land at Menie Estate, which is in northeast Scotland’s Grampian Region. I had never seen such a dramatic unspoiled seaside landscape--it had three miles of spectacular oceanfront and sand dunes of immense proportions. To put it mildly, I was excited. I knew this was the right place for my golf course, and I had two additional reasons for that: My mother was more...
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A Case For Tenacity

Jones Beach on Long Island has been an important part of many New Yorker’s lives since childhood, including mine. When my venture, to be called Trump on the Ocean, was announced in the spring of 2007, it was met with opposition as well as support. Some people saw it as historic preservation, other people saw it as a blight on the landscape. Whenever I do anything, the scrutiny can border on the ridiculous, but I refuse to give up. Just last Friday it was announced that I’d won a big victory, and here’s the press release: DONALD TRUMP WINS HUGE VICTORY AGAINST NEW more...
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Rudeness at Work

How important is it to you that people be polite at work? A professor of psychology at West Chester University in Pennsylvania conducted a study all about rudeness in the workplace. Jennifer Bunk found that about 75 percent of workers say they’re treated rudely at least once a year. That can mean anything from being ignored by the boss or hearing snide remarks from coworkers. So, you say, rudeness in the office just makes for an unpleasant work environment. But, according to this study, it also harms productivity. This professor goes so far as to say that the “silent treatment” and other more...
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Political Literacy

I’ve talked about financial education before, but another concern for this country is political literacy. I was astounded when I read an article recently about a survey that asked U.S. citizens three questions dealing with political knowledge. In their survey of adult Americans, only 18 percent of those questioned answered all three questions correctly. That’s not a huge number. I was thinking to myself that those questions must have been of a very complex nature to have received such a low score of correct answers. I was wrong. They were simple, and here’s what they were:  What is the controlling party of the more...
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Record-breaking voter registration and voter turnout expected

Because of all the excitement and interest surrounding this year’s presidential primaries, voter registration figures are way up. Numbers are up for women, young people, and nearly every ethnic group. They’re up in rural and urban areas, in the North and in the South. Record-breaking turnouts are expected at the polls on November 4. The boards of elections all over the country are recruiting and hiring plenty of extra workers to handle the expected long lines as people show up to cast their votes. Even before the final presidential contenders were decided, nearly one in 65 adult Americans signed up to vote in more...
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Bottom Line: This is Not the Bottom of the Financial Crisis

Thomas Barrack Jr. is a friend of mine who happens to be a brilliant guy. We’ve partnered on ventures and he’s the CEO of Colony Capital. He’s been following the financial crisis and occasionally sends me his thoughts about what is going on. He makes such good sense that I’d like to quote a few paragraphs from what he sent me a few days ago: Why Can’t Anybody Find the Bottom? It all boils down to trust! The mantra of the country is “In God We Trust--but not counterparties.” No buyer trusts any seller, banker, insurer or intermediary. No investor trusts any depository, more...
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Real Estate Investing Looms but OPEC Controls Economic Recovery

On a recent interview on CNBC, I was asked a few questions about the current situation with the banks and the market. Here are the questions (summarized) and my answers: Q: What do you think about the economy after we get through this credit mess. A: The economy is really driven by oil, and every time something good happens, oil goes up. Oil is the thing that killed the economies of many nations in the first place. OPEC is probably sitting down right now to raise the hell out of oil, and it’s going to take all of the good out of the more...
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Critics

I’ve had my fill of naysayers and critics. To me it’s a negative approach that doesn’t serve any purpose. Here’s a quote by Theodore Roosevelt that I keep handy because it’s so right on: It is not the critic who counts, not the man who points out how the strong man stumbled, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena: whose face is marred by the dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again... who knows the great enthusiasms, the more...
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Asking Questions

People who are around me will often comment that I ask a lot of questions--all the time. One reason is that I want to know as much as I can about everything, Another reason is sometimes I need to know how much or how little someone else knows. But mostly it’s because I’m curious. A few years ago I received a letter from my kindergarten teacher. I can remember her, and she obviously remembered me. She told me in her letter that I asked more questions than any student she’d ever had in her entire career as a teacher, which spanned several decades more...
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An Early Thanksgiving

On the day before the Rosh Hashanah holiday each year for the past eighteen years, I receive a message from a Rabbi in Los Angeles. I am not Jewish but have many observant Jews who work for me, so I am well aware of the holiday schedule and that Rosh Hashanah is their New Year, a time for celebration. I find his message of thanks to be especially resonant because he and his wife lost their son years ago, yet they call to remind themselves (and me) of the many blessings they’ve had in life. The reason the Rabbi calls me every more...
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Give People a Chance

Just yesterday I was reading about George Clooney, who apparently doesn’t want to say ‘yes’ to a return appearance on “ER”--the show that made him famous. “ER” was one of the most successful of television series, with a big fan base as well as critical acclaim. From there, Clooney went on to great success in films, and has shown himself to be a remarkable and diversified talent. The gist of the article seemed to be that George Clooney isn’t grateful--to either the show that launched him or his former boss, or to his loyal fans. I can understand that any action--or non-action--can more...
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Laid Off? Try Cosmetic Surgery

With today’s economy, unfortunately more and more people are finding themselves without jobs. Different people, of course, handle the situation in different ways. Some jump headfirst back into the job hunt, polishing their resumes and interviewing skills. Others take some time off to regroup and maybe consider a career change. But there’s a newer, growing trend. Some people are turning toward plastic surgery. Apparently, a lot of people figure that they need an edge in order to appeal to prospective employers so they go under the knife or at least settle for some Botox. They think that no matter how experienced or more...
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Management Tips: Trusting Telecommuters

It takes a good manager - and a great employee - for telecommuting to work. With gasoline prices still uncomfortably high, more companies are allowing their employees to work from home at least occasionally. While that sounds great for the worker, it’s often frustrating for the boss. It requires an unbelievable amount of trust as they hope their charges are actually accomplishing work-related missions and not watching TV, doing the laundry or working on the kids’ science project. In the end, it should be easy to tell if telecommuting employees are getting the job done. Their work output should speak for itself. But more...
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Office Etiquette: No Jerks Office Policy

Despite what some people might think, being an attorney and being a jerk don’t go hand-in-hand. At least not at one Atlanta law firm, where office etiquette matters. Morris, Manning, & Martin has a “no jerks” policy that everyone - from interns and support staff to the highest-ranking partners - is expected to follow. Employees are hired and later evaluated based on how well they get along with other people. Those who don’t play nice don’t stick around very long. Some actually get fired. “Law firms can be quite high-pressured,” managing partner Bob Saudek told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. “We have so much external more...
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Presidential List

I read an article recently that made a lot of sense to me. Doris Kearns Goodwin is a Pulitzer Prize winner for her books on history, and she made a list of ten points that are important for a President to consider and to emulate if they hoped to be great. She has written books about Abraham Lincoln and Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, and she believes leadership strengths should be considered carefully before voting. Here are some of the attributes that she feels make for a great leader--and I agree! 1. The courage to stay strong. This means a President needs to be able more...
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Real Estate Investing And The Shock Market

What transpired yesterday on Wall Street is one day for the history books. I had predicted this would happen about a year and a half ago, and again about eight months ago when I appeared on Neal Cavuto’s show. That the landscape of Wall Street could be altered this rapidly is something we should think about. Yesterday was the worst day on Wall Street since right after the 9/11 attacks, with a fallout of some financial giants that we thought were untouchable. Here’s my view of this situation. We survived and prospered after 9/11, and we will do the same this time more...
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Back to School

September always seems like the start of a new year. It’s back to school time and the energy is great. Now that I have my three eldest children working at The Trump Organization and doing so well professionally and personally, I am often asked what the secret is to raising good kids. I’m not sure if any of these things are a secret, but there are some guidelines that I think are effective. After seeing me on television on The Apprentice, people might think I’m a tough guy. That’s true in some ways, but most people will admit that I’m fair. When more...
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Tennis Lesson

A big part of being successful is performance. We all know about preparation, doing your homework or groundwork, covering our bases and so on, but it all boils down to the bottom line. Sometimes there is only one winner. I’ve been lucky enough to watch quite a bit of the U.S. Open this year. I love to watch these champions go at it. I was there to watch the match between Serena and Venus Williams, and when I left I was thinking about what fighters they are. Both of them are great athletes, and to see them battle it out left quite more...
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Too Much Oil

There’s too much oil in the world to justify the current high market prices. I’ve heard there are tankers all over the world that are loaded up to the gills with oil. They have so much oil they don’t know what to do with it. It’s ridiculous what’s going on with OPEC and all of that. I blame the major oil producing countries for the current recession and I think the large oil companies are doing a major number on everyone.  The price of oil has dropped recently, but it should drop a lot more. The price of oil should be no more...
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What American Parents Think About Public Education

Every time you turn around, another expert has an opinion about what’s wrong with our schools. Sometimes it makes more sense to ask the parents. After all, they see what their children are learning - or not learning - so they see where the schools are succeeding and failing. Recently, a major survey of adults and parents found that a large majority of Americans think schools are placing too much emphasis on the wrong subjects. More than half of those polled think that educators are doing just a fair job in preparing children for the eventual work force or giving them the more...
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Work Dress Code

In the summer, many offices have problems with how employees dress. When the temperature soars, it’s as if common sense disappears. People stop wearing appropriate clothes and out come the flip-flops and the skimpy attire that’s certainly at home on the beach or on the weekends, but not in most businesses. I hear from employers that this is particularly true of young people who are working at their first jobs. They just have no idea how to dress for work, so it’s an employer’s place to either tell them or to put a dress code in writing. I’ve always been fairly outspoken about more...
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John Edwards: Another Politician, Another Scandal

Another politician, another scandal. Former presidential candidate John Edwards admitted he had an affair several years ago - a relationship he vehemently denied when he was campaigning. There are, of course, all sorts of issues here. Some people question whether a candidate’s personal life really matters. They think what he does in his personal life doesn’t affect his ability to lead. Still others question whether the media pursued this story as diligently as they should have. But you can also look at it from a business viewpoint. What happens when one of an organization’s most visible members is caught up in a situation more...
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Ed McMahon

I grew up watching Ed McMahon on the Johnny Carson show and I watched him every night while I was at Wharton. I always thought he was terrific and that he brought a warm and very memorable quality to the Tonight Show.  When I heard what was happening to him and his house, I couldn’t believe it because I didn’t want to believe it. That shouldn’t be happening to him--but it was--so my first instinct was just to help him out. My primary motivation in this situation is not a real estate deal--it’s a way to help a great American icon and a more...
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Gas Prices Finally Falling

So much of the nation is so dependent on gas that there’s certainly been a collective sigh of relief over the past few weeks as the price at the pump has slowly started slipping. The last I read, the national average price for a gallon of gas was around $3.80. Less than a dozen states had prices hovering at more than $4 a gallon. A year ago, those figures would’ve seemed astronomical, but today, we’re hopeful that this is a sign of good things. Reports are that worldwide demand for petroleum products is finally slowing down so, as you learned in economics more...
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Times Are Good

You’re probably wondering what I’m talking about when you see that headline. But I’m talking about what’s happening today, now, in the U.S. I say that times are good because there are still plenty of opportunities out there. In fact I’m a little tired of the negative cloud we seem to be under these days. Difficult doesn’t necessarily mean negative. Challenging doesn’t have to be negative either. There are ups and downs in every aspect of life and business, and as someone who has survived some major financial upheavals and losses, I think I have some insights to share with you about more...
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The World's Happiest Nations

How happy are you? Not as happy as if you were living in Denmark, apparently. Denmark is the world’s most content nation, according to a recent study on global well-being. Surprisingly, I think, the United States is way down the happiness list at the Number 16 spot. Researchers at the University of Michigan said Denmark earned the top spot thanks to economic prosperity, stability and democracy. "I strongly suspect there is a strong correlation between peace and happiness," said Ronald Inglehart, a political scientist at the University of Michigan's Institute for Social Research. "There is also a correlation between democracy and peace. Democracies more...
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A Challenging Olympics

I love the Olympics. It’s amazing to watch the world’s greatest athletes all take the same playing field together. Like so many time before, these Beijing Olympics have been wrought with controversy. Many people feel that President Bush should not have agreed to attend the opening ceremonies. They think that boycotting the event would’ve shown his concern about China’s horrid human rights’ record. But he said not attending would’ve been an affront to the Chinese people and he felt no need to connect the athletic event and politics. Both Barack Obama and John McCain have echoed the calls of human rights groups, saying more...
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Smiling can hurt your health

What do you do when you’re on the job and someone insults you - whether it’s your boss or a coworker or even a client? Most people just grin and bear it, even though it can eat them up inside. It’s no surprise, but a German scientist has proven that people forced to smile and take on-the-job insults suffer long-lasting stress that may harm their health. In the study of 4,000 people, half were allowed to respond to abuse while the other half had to suck it up. Those people who weren’t allowed to answer back had terrible stress as compared to those more...
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Manimony

When married couples split up and one person makes more money than the other, often somebody ends up paying alimony...and it’s usually the man. But legally, under state laws, both women and men are entitled to financial support if there’s a large discrepancy in spousal income. In the past, not many men had the need...or the nerve...to ask their wives for alimony. However, recently there’s been a move toward gender equality. A lot more men are asking for alimony or, as some people call it, "manimony." But the numbers are far from equal. In marriages right now, one-third of the higher-earning spouses are more...
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County: Smokers Need Not Apply

If you smoke, don’t even think about applying for a government job in Sarasota County. Blaming the cost of buying health insurance for smokers, officials in the Florida county recently announced that they will no longer hire employees who light up. Officials say it costs them $3,400 per year per smoker in lost productivity and medical expenses and they want to save taxpayers that money. Although this policy has some people crying “discrimination,” in Florida, the right not to hire employees who smoke was upheld nearly a decade ago by the state Supreme Court. So the county is utterly within its rights. In fact, more...
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Bearded Police Officers in Houston

Apparently, facial hair is serious business when it comes to the Houston police department. City officials have authorized spending as much as $150,000 to defend the city in a lawsuit challenging a policy that forbids beards and goatees. The City Council says they want to hire new police officers, but they don’t want new police officers who happen to have a lot of facial hair. Four police officers filed a federal civil rights lawsuit in November claiming the no-beards policy is discriminatory. The officers say the ban on beards and goatees is unfair for men who suffer skin conditions and can’t shave. The policy more...
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A Fine if You're Fat

Tired of a nation that just keeps getting less and less fit, lawmakers in Japan are beginning to fine companies that employ overweight workers. They hope to take a proactive approach to good health, preventing diseases such as diabetes and heart diseases. The country has established waist measurements set by the International Diabetes Federation in Belgium - 33.5 inches for men and 35.4 inches for women. (Personally, these guidelines seem odd to me because women tend to have smaller waists than men. But I digress.) If people exceed those guidelines and then don’t manage to lose their extra inches, their employers could more...
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The Importance of a Good Handshake

For the first time ever, researchers have studied the importance of a good handshake. A huge study at the University of Iowa found that those people who start job interviews with a firm, strong handshake are always perceived in a more favorable light than those who shake hands like a limp fish. Good handshakers are seen as being more extroverted and, eventually, more hirable. And women with strong handshakes have an advantage over men because their grips are more memorable. I think that the only thing better than a good handshake is no handshake at all. I’ve long said that handshakes are a bad more...
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Are Economic Stimulus Checks Impacting Housing Foreclosures?

I have to admit I wasn’t so sure the government’s economic stimulus plan was going to be the perfect solution to all our nation’s woes. I still don’t think it’s much more than a temporary Band-Aid, but at least it seems to be helping. The Commerce Department reports that the millions of economic stimulus payments sent out in the first wave gave a huge boost to household finances in May, boosting consumer spending by the largest amount in six months and sending after-tax incomes up by the largest amount in more than three decades. The Bush administration hopes that the $106.7 billion in more...
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Seattle Teacher Says Tests Kill Learning

A sixth-grade teacher in Seattle was suspended for refusing to give his students a federally-mandated standardized test. Science teacher Carl Chew said for years he watched his students suffer with test anxiety. Some, he said, got physically sick and others actually cried. He said the test created an atmosphere he called “rife with fear,” so he just decided not to give it. This didn’t sit well with his principal who suspended him for nine days without pay for insubordination. The teacher’s actions made him a hero for a lot of parents who sent him letters from as far away as Hawaii and Canada. A more...
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Single parenting costs billions

I’m all for divorce if a marriage becomes unbearable. But I also believe that a couple should at least try to see if their relationship is salvageable instead of immediately heading to court at the first sign of trouble. Apparently it’s not just a personal thing; it’s a financial burden on the entire country. According to a new study, divorce and out-of-wedlock childbearing cost U.S. taxpayers more than $112 billion each year. That’s based on the assumption that households headed by single women unfortunately have high poverty rates which mean higher spending on welfare, health care, criminal justice, and eventually education for children more...
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Perks of a Good, Demanding Job

Does your job make you think too much? Even though sometimes it may not seem like it, that’s a good thing. Mentally demanding jobs come with an extra big perk: they keep you mentally sharp even as you age. Day-to-day work that requires negotiation, analysis, and decision-making builds up something called your “cognitive reserve” which is a level of mental function that helps you avoid mental decline. So while you’re solving problems and planning, organizing and strategizing with tough clients, you might feel like your brain is going to explode. In reality, however, you’re warding off dementia. That’s not to say that all complex, more...
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Italy Posts Salaries Online

Would you like to know how much money your co-workers make? If you could sneak a look at their paychecks, I bet you would.  There was a lot of outrage in Italy recently after the government published every citizen’s income on the Internet. The tax authority’s website was swamped with people snooping to see how much their neighbors and co-workers and celebrities earned. Within hours of the site going up, it was so overwhelmed that it was nearly impossible to access. But the site stayed up for nearly 24 hours until it was suspended after a formal complaint was filed. Although critics complained more...
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Father's Day Advice from My Father

Sunday is Father’s Day which, of course, always makes me think of my dad, Fred C. Trump. I learned a lot from my father, especially about business. Probably the best advice I ever had came from him. He had a four-step formula for getting things done:  Get in. Get it done. Get it done right. And Get out. Simple, concise, and it works. The other thing my father told me was to “know everything you can about what you’re doing.” I’ve followed that advice too, and I think it’s apparent that it works. I’m very thorough, as he was, and it can save you more...
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Advice for College Graduates

With today’s terrible economy, job news is miserable everywhere. It’s no surprise that over the past few years, college graduates each June haven’t been very lucky once they’ve picked up their diplomas and headed out into the real world. They’ve been faced with a tough job market, low salaries and lots of frustration. Surprisingly, however, the Class of 2008 is stepping out into a great job situation. This is the healthiest job market in three years, with employers planning to hire 16 percent more new college graduates this year than they did last year. Hiring projections for new graduates are strong across the more...
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Should We Start Stockpiling Food?

Sure, the economy is bad and I definitely believe we’re in a recession, but I’m convinced we shouldn’t really start panicking. That’s why I was a little surprised to read a recent column in the Wall Street Journal by Brett Arends. He suggested that maybe it’s time for Americans to start stockpiling food. His reason is that food prices are rising much faster than the returns you are likely to get by keeping your money in a bank or money-market fund. He said that if you keep standby cash in a money-market fund, you’ll be lucky to get a 2.5 percent interest rate more...
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Tax Rebate Checks

Did you receive a tax rebate check yet? The U.S. Treasury began mailing out the checks earlier than expected. Many people had them by late April, but everyone should have them by the end of June. The purpose of the rebates is to pump more than $100 billion dollars into the U.S. economy. That is, if people spend the money when they get it. So, if you’re eligible for a check and receive that unexpected windfall of anywhere from $600 to $1,200 or more, what will you do with it. Spend it or save it? For the economic stimulus plan to work, people must spend more...
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Higher Gas Prices = Lower Worker Productivity

As gas prices climb higher and higher, the costs hurt people in more places than just their wallets. The more people pay at the pump, the more employees get stressed - even on the job - which results in lower productivity. People who are concerned about high gas prices let that stress carry over into their work lives. Researchers say they are significantly less attentive when they’re on the job. They’re less excited about going to work, less passionate and conscientious and more tense. All that combined equals overall lower productivity. Of course, higher gas prices have all kinds of other trickle-down effects. For more...
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High Self-Esteem Isn't Always Healthy?

Personally, I’ve never had a problem with self-esteem. I always say that you have to believe in yourself or no one else will. Now a new study has come out suggesting that high self-esteem isn’t necessarily healthy. The researchers, who of course are psychologists, say that sometimes people who are overly confident and proud of themselves can lash out at other people and believe that everyone else is wrong except them. They concluded that there was “good” high self-esteem and “bad” high self-esteem. With the good people well-grounded and the bad ones too aggressive and defensive. That doesn’t make a whole lot of sense more...
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Babies in the Office

Could you get much work done if there were babies in the cubicles all around you? Apparently, that’s not as odd as it sounds. I read a story in USA Today that said at least 80 companies across the nation right now allow babies in the workplace. It’s an extreme - and somewhat controversial - example of how employers are trying to help their workers strike a balance between home and office. Many of the companies allow parents to bring their babies to work until the children are old enough to crawl. They don’t leave the infants in office daycare centers, however. They more...
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Afraid to Buy

It’s hardly a surprise but in the midst of today’s terrible economy and the nation’s housing crisis, the majority of Americans say they don’t plan to buy a home anytime soon. In fact, more than a quarter of homeowners worry that their home will lose value over the next couple of years, and one in seven mortgage holders are afraid that they won’t be able to make their monthly payments in time over the next six months. People are worried that housing prices will continue to fall which is good news if you want to buy but obviously terrible if you have a more...
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Another Reason to Get a Good Education

I’m always talking about how important it is to get a good education. I’m a big believer in going to a great college and getting a good degree because of all that it will do for your career. Well here’s another reason to get a good education. Researchers at Harvard University found a stunning correlation between how long people live and how long they go to school. Over the past decade, people with at least one year of college increased their lifespan by at least a year and a half. But those with a high school diploma or less gained only six months. It more...
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More People Moonlighting

Whether or not you believe we’re in a recession, a lot of people are taking a hit to their wallets and bank accounts and have to deal with it in some relatively old-fashioned ways. For one, moonlighting seems to be back in style. But it certainly isn’t because people are testing the waters of new careers or trying to expand their horizons beyond their boring day jobs. Now, when people work two jobs, it’s almost always motivated solely by financial need - either they really need the funds now or they’re afraid they’ll lose their primary source of income. According to the Department more...
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If You Were Laid Off...

Of course no one likes to think about it, but if you were laid-off from your job tomorrow how would you fare financially? With today’s volatile economy and job market, unfortunately it’s something you have to consider. I saw a recent online poll on CNN.com and was shocked at the results. Nearly 100,000 people had logged in their comments and about half said that if they were laid-off now, their savings wouldn’t last more than a couple of weeks. That’s unbelievable to me. It’s hard for me to imagine that people are that unprepared for financial hardship today, especially knowing how unstable everything more...
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AT&T; says hard to find skilled U.S. workers

Not that long ago, the leaders of AT&T announced that they were going to return 5,000 customer service jobs to the United States that they had outsourced to India. But now, two years later, the head of that top U.S. phone company says it’s having trouble finding enough skilled American workers to fill those positions. So far, not even one-third of the jobs have been returned to the United States out of the 5,000. The company still hopes to fill all those jobs here but it hasn’t been easy. In some U.S. communities, for example, the high school dropout rates is as high as more...
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Energy Fix or Cancer Cure?

What do you think is more important: investing money in technology to solve the country’s energy problems or investing money in research to cure cancer and other diseases? That’s a tough one, isn’t it? If you’re like the majority of Americans, you think it’s more important to raise energy efficiency than it is to cure cancer. I’m not sure I agree with them. Of course, the results of this nationwide survey come as gas prices are well over $3 a gallon and continue to rocket to new highs, so it makes sense that breakthroughs in the development of alternative fuels would be high more...
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If You're Fired...

Have you ever been fired? No one likes to think about it but, unfortunately, with today’s economy and faltering job market, it certainly can be a strong possibility for anyone in any field. I’m not sure why - I guess it’s because they always see me firing people on “The Apprentice” - but people often ask my advice about what they should do if they lose their job. I say look at it as an opportunity. When you lose a job, it’s a great time to reevaluate your career and decide if you really were doing what you loved in the first place. If more...
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Is Your Job Recession-Proof?

Even with the bad economy and weak job growth, there are still several fields that will survive - and possibly even thrive - during hard times. The analysts at CareerBuilder.com say that at least five industries keep expanding their hiring so if you’re looking for a job, here are some that are relatively recession-proof. First is education. No matter what happens to the economy, schools will always need great skilled teachers and administrators. The energy industry will also continue to grow. There will be plenty of jobs related to alternative and renewable energy, as well as oil, gas, and even nuclear energy. With so many more...
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The Hunt for Super-Efficient Cars

So many people complain about what we’re doing to the environment. Well, here’s at least one chance where people - specifically car manufacturers -- can get paid to do something about it. The Automotive X Prize is a $10 million contest aimed at promoting the creation of cars that get somewhere around 100 miles per gallon while also meeting good standards for low greenhouse-gas emissions, safety, and affordability. In other words, these cars have to be super-efficient and people have to be able to afford them. The contest organizers point out that years and years ago the Ford Model T got 25 miles more...
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Weathering the Market

With the current state of the market, everyone keeps asking me what to do with their money. My biggest advice is to do nothing if you can. If you don’t need money from your investments over the next couple of years, then don’t sell anything right now. Sit tight and wait it out. If you leave every time things get bad, you miss the point of owning stocks in the first place. The market goes up and it goes down. Right now it’s not looking very pretty, but it’ll get better. The point is to ride out the bad times so you more...
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Company Ban on Friday E-mails

I know way too many people who spend way too much time with email. And I know that too many businesses lose money when employees waste time sending and responding to email. In addition, when people spend so much time and energy communicating via email, they lose the personal connection of face-to-face communication. That’s why a company in metro Atlanta has introduced “no e-mail Fridays.” The CEO of PBD Worldwide Fulfillment Services wrote this business plan because he thought that an overdependence on email was hurting productivity and even sales. Some employees receive at least 250 emails each day. There was a lot of more...
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Too Competitive = Bad News for Democrats

Competition is almost always a good thing. It usually brings out the best in a person or a business if they know they are battling for a job or a client. They know they can’t win by being complacent. But in the Democratic primary, the competition between Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama may be hurting both candidates as well as their own party. Because the fight between the two of them is, at times, getting so dirty, voters are getting turned off. Their supporters are so firmly camped in their own candidate’s court that many of them wouldn’t switch loyalties to the other more...
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Banning Gossip in the Office

Nearly everybody gossips at work. I guess it’s human nature, but people just like to talk about each other, and rarely does it do anything but add negativity to the workplace. Well, at least one employer in Chicago decided to do something about it by banning gossip at his firm. Each of the employees at Empower Public Relations not only agreed not to gossip, but they also agreed that when an employee says something negative behind a co-worker’s back, he or she will be required to repeat that gossip to the person’s face. The policy gives the employees a chance to diffuse the more...
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Trusting the Press

Personally, I have a love/hate relationship with the press. Over the years, they’ve written some pretty great stories about me. And, over the years, there have been a lot of lies printed too. I’ve talked to some pretty incredible reporters and some who are just horrible and seem to make up whatever they want to write. If it’s that way about me, I know it’s that way about almost everything I read. So how do you know when to believe what you read in print or what you hear on the news? If you’re skeptical, you’re not alone. Right now, more than half more...
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What You Owe Your Kids

It wasn’t that long ago that parents pushed their kids out of the nest and watched them live their lives on their own. But today’s tough job market has changed everything. These days, nine out of ten parents give money to their grown kids for major expenses such as credit card balances, car insurance, and student loans. Plus, there’s been a huge increase in the number of adult children who move back in with their parents when the real world gets too tough. Have today’s parents raised a generation of spoiled young people who don’t know how to live within their means? Or more...
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A Hug is Just A Hug

We wonder why there are so many education problems in our country. Well, maybe it’s because administrators spend way too much time with issues that have nothing to do with actual education. Recently, a school policy at Shepherd Junior High School in Mesa, Arizona, made national headlines...and not for good reasons. The school has banned hugs between students that last longer than two seconds. Students who are caught hugging for any longer than that are punished with detention. So many students - and even parents - were upset by the policy that they staged a public protest across the street from the school more...
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The Race for Vice-President

With the Democratic presidential nomination far from decided, the candidates were jockeying a little bit recently, talking about a “dream ticket.” Hillary Clinton said she’d consider naming Barack Obama as her vice-president when she gets the nomination, but she’s nowhere near a shoo-in. For his part, Obama said he’s just focused on winning the nomination, although at least one member of his team said Clinton would make a good vice-president. (I know Hillary and I think she’d make a great president or vice-president.) It’s interesting to see what the candidates are doing. They’re playing the same kind of power games that you see more...
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Attractive People Inspire More Teamwork

If you are running a business or even conducting a meeting, here’s the business plan for success. Have a lot of attractive people around. New research proves that people naturally work harder when they’re around a good-looking person. There’s an inherent desire to be near beautiful people and to please them. So when an attractive person asks for help, most people will jump at the opportunity. Apparently that’s why football teams with handsome quarterbacks tend to be so successful. And, in office environments, that’s why bosses are smart when they put a great-looking man or woman in charge of leading an important project. We more...
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Homeowners in denial

It’s obviously a really tough time right now for homeowners who are trying to sell. The housing market is in a bad place, and all over the nation home values are showing incredible declines. But don’t tell that to homeowners. According to a recent survey, more than three out of four homeowners still believe their own home has not lost value in the past year. More than one-third believe their home has actually increased in value. Many industry analysts estimate that home values declined 5% on average last year, with many parts of the country showing much steeper drops. So are homeowners not paying more...
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America's Most Wanted Workers

Many companies are cutting jobs, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t a lot of jobs out there. As more workers from the Baby Boomer generation retire, millions of jobs are becoming available in a variety of industries and managers are having trouble filling those positions. Many times, it’s because today’s young professionals are more focused on careers that require critical thinking and computer skills rather than jobs that require working with their hands. Often, it’s just a lack of qualified candidates. In any case, according to Manpower Inc.’s Talent Shortage Survey, some of the jobs most in need of qualified workers right now include more...
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Are Men Smarter Than Women?

Are men smarter than women? A huge new report says they’re not, but they certainly think they are.  An analysis of 30 different studies shows that men and women are fairly equal in terms of overall IQ, but women tend to underplay their own intelligence while men overestimate theirs. The studies show that on average, women underestimate their IQ scores by about five points while men overestimate their own IQs by at least that much. Because the studies were international, the results were the same whether the people were from the United States or Japan, Argentina or Zimbabwe. But not only do men think more...
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Fixing Your Mortgage Mess

In today’s volatile home market, so many people are in serious trouble with their mortgages. They have problems because they made a bad deal or their interest rates are too high or they just don’t have the funds to pay.  I have some answers. I give lots of speeches on this and the speech today is: Don’t leave your house. Work with your bank. If you have to, fight the bank. Figure out a way to make a deal. The banks don’t profit from foreclosure. They would rather have you physically in your house paying them some money. So, if you’re in default, call more...
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Women with Big Salaries Can Depress Their Husbands

Men, do you make more money than your wife? If you don’t, does it bother you? Believe it or not, recent research shows that a man actually can become psychologically damaged when his wife earns a larger percentage of the household income than he does. He can get migraines, feel less satisfied with his overall life, and even get clinically depressed. Researchers say that it’s worse if the wife brags about her larger salary and tries to make a power play by getting more of the decision-making in the household or trying to get the husband to do more of the household duties more...
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Honestly, All of Us Are Liars

Admit it. At some point it your life, you’ve lied. Maybe you tell white lies on a daily basis. Maybe you tell some all-out doozies. Whatever the case, don’t worry about it too much. You’re normal. Experts say there are two kinds of lies - the lies that you tell to help yourself and the lies you tell to protect other people’s feelings, like when you tell someone they look good in that terrible pink-and-green tie. Serious lies are most often told to protect relationships. That’s when people lie about cheating, for example. Obviously, they don’t want to get caught and they want more...
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Paying Kids to Study (An Early Business Lesson)

In a pilot program in metro Atlanta called “Learn and Earn,” several schools are paying kids to study. In Fulton County, specially chosen middle school and high school students who aren’t performing well in math and science are paid $8 an hour to attend study hall after school. If their grades actually improve, they can earn an extra $125 each semester. That ends up being as much as $600, which is a pretty decent amount of money when you’re a kid. Although some people are critical of the plan, saying that we shouldn’t being paying kids to do what they’re supposed to be more...
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Japanese Firm Offers Heartache Leave

I don’t think a broken heart can really kill you, but in Japan it can at least get you some time off work. Management at a marketing company in Tokyo is offering employees paid time-off after a bad break-up with a partner. The older the employees are, the more “heartache leave” they can get. Staff aged 24 or younger can take one day off per year, while those between 25 and 29 can take two days off, and those older than 30 can take three days off. The CEO says that not everyone needs to take maternity leave for example, but lots of more...
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What Not To Say To Your Boss

If you’re smart, you’ve learned what not to say in a romantic relationship. You’d never tell a woman she looked fat in a dress or tell a man he was losing his hair. But have you learned what not to say in a business relationship? Recently, CareerBuilder.com put together a list of some of most inappropriate things you could say in the workplace. Listen to my advice, and you’ll write a business plan for success. You’d think a lot of this was common sense, but I admit I’ve heard so many of these lines before.  For example, if you say "That's not my job," There’s more...
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To Tip or Not to Tip?

 Recently I read a question in Money Magazine where a reader wrote in asking what to do about terrible service in a restaurant. She said that the food was good but the waiter got the orders wrong, ignored the diners for long stretches of time, and was horribly rude every time he did appear. The person who wrote the letter wanted to leave the waiter next to nothing, but her friend insisted on tipping close to 15 percent. She wanted to know who was right. The magazine editors sided with the letter writer, saying she should’ve left the waiter a dollar, just enough to more...
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Woman Fired for Moonlighting At Work

 I’ve heard of plenty of people getting caught goofing off on the job, but here’s a great story. A woman in Iowa was fired from her job at an industrial equipment manufacturing company for working on a romance novel on company time. The woman, who had a desk job, began her job in August. After a few weeks, her supervisor noticed that she was typing almost constantly. A computer technician examined the woman’s computer and found what appeared to be a romance novel. It focused on the activities and desires of a teenage temptress. The company fired the woman, who challenged the decision and more...
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Financial Infidelity

Sure, you’ve heard about normal infidelity, but what about financial infidelity? That’s when women hide their spending from their spouses. According to several recent stories I’ve read, women are likely to buy expensive designer items with cash. That way, it’s easier to hide their spending from their husband or boyfriend. In fact, it gets so serious sometimes that more than 80 percent of American women go so far as to actually hide department store shopping bags from their men so they don’t even suspect they were out buying things. Some people say it’s only fair. Lots of guys cheat in the bedroom, so what more...
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Young Women Choosing Careers over Love

For a long time, it never used to be much of an option for young men. When it came to choosing between careers and love, it was a no-brainer. Most men opted for their jobs first. Women, on the other hand, often looked to marriage and babies and relationships. But not anymore. According to a new scientific study, these days men are more willing than women to sacrifice their careers for romance. Only about half of women prioritized relationships over professional goals while more than 60 percent of men put love first. Women are much less likely to disrupt their careers now in order more...
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Most Americans Are Satisfied with Life

It’s only January, but so far, so good. According to a recent Gallup Poll, most Americans are “very satisfied” with their personal lives. More than 8 in 10 Americans are pleased with the way things are going with things on the home front. Just six percent say they aren’t happy. Although Americans are generally satisfied at home, that’s in sharp contrast to their feelings about the way things are going with our country. Only a little over one-quarter of Americans are content with the state of the United States right now. And I’m right there with them when it comes to the state more...
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Live a Life of Discovery

"What lies behind us, and what lies before us, are tiny matters compared to what lies within us." - Ralph Waldo Emerson I receive a lot of mail every day -- piles of it. Not too long ago I received a letter from my kindergarten teacher. It was a big surprise for me to come across that in one of those piles of letters. She mentioned that what she remembered most clearly about me is that I never stopped asking questions. I was the most inquisitive student she had ever had. I wrote back to her that some things never change - more...
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Teleworking

Among the business trends for 2008 is an even greater increase in teleworking. Last year, 12.4 million Americans worked from home at least one day a month. But by 2010, an estimated 100 million Americans will do some work from home. Of course, most employees love the idea. They don’t have to waste time commuting and fighting traffic. They get to work from the comforts of home without the hassles of meetings and office politics. As for employers, they save money, conserve resources, and ideally boost productivity and morale. Some managers, however, have been reluctant to allow employees to work from home, afraid they’ll goof more...
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Good News about Education

It seems like we only hear bad news when it comes to education. We read about poor schools and low test scores and how we struggle to compete with other countries academically. But now there’s some good news for a change. According to a recent study released by the Educational Testing Service, over the past decade, teacher qualifications have risen rapidly, improving significantly over their predecessors. This news suggests that more qualified candidates have been lured into teaching. It also means that teachers’ colleges have strengthened and toughened their classes. This new generation of teachers is stronger and more academic than they were more...
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Worst Employees of 2007

"A man in Alaska strangled his boss by putting him in a neck-hold after an argument . . ." What was the worst thing you did on the job last year? Took an extra-long lunch? Called in sick so you could golf? Raided the supply closet for some staples and sticky notes? As you start a new year on the job with a clean slate, here’s a look at some of the worst employees of last year, courtesy of CareerBuilder.com. (Read more here.) An ambulance driver in West Virginia went to jail on a charge of DUI after running two red lights with a patient more...
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Donald J. Trump's 20 Top Success Tips

The Trump Entrepreneur Initiative is giving you a holiday present today. It’s a list of 20 success top tips we distilled from Donald J. Trump’s previous posts on this blog. They’re all you need to make 2008 your most successful year ever.  Think big Be positive Follow your passion Learn something new every day Listen to your gut Be patient Put a great team behind you Put beauty in everything you do Learn to negotiate, because everything you want demands it Always go for the biggest win possible Real estate investing is the best investment there is Take risks Be audacious and get into the public eye Be your own brand Enjoy doing some work seven days a week and more...
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The Secret of Your Success in 2008 . . .

To make 2008 your most successful year ever . . . Think big! When you were a child, would you have liked to keep crawling, when everyone else was walking? I don’t think so. We all have to start with small steps, but the point is: Get to the biggest steps you’re capable of taking. Thinking small will limit your potential. Thinking big will take you places. Thinking big can get you to the top, and I can tell you, it’s not lonely up here. Successful people like challenges. It’s our nature. Keep in sync with this basic premise, and you’ll begin moving forward with the momentum more...
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Working the Graveyard Shift

Do you work nights? It may be harmful to your health. Like UV rays and diesel exhaust fumes, working the graveyard shift will soon be listed as a "probable" cause of cancer. Scientists suspect that overnight work is dangerous because it disrupts the body’s biological clock. In addition, a hormone which can suppress tumor development is normally produced at night. People who work nights also tend to sleep less. Not getting enough sleep makes your immune system vulnerable to attack, and less able to fight off cancerous cells. If this theory is correct, millions of people worldwide could be affected. Experts estimate that more...
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Emails

I never send emails. If I need to communicate with someone, I ask them to come to my office or I just pick up the phone. But there are people I know who are always sending emails. They’re always on their computers or their Blackberrys or their iPhones. They send and receive hundreds of messages a day. Thirty-five million emails are sent daily. White-collar workers spend more than two hours of their paid time each day at a total loss for all employers of 28 billion hours a year and $650 billion dollars! So they waste time and productivity as well as lots more...
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Internet Addiction in China

While many experts in the United States are still trying to decide whether Internet addiction is a real illness, China is taking this disorder very seriously. They’ve opened several Internet addiction clinics and camps to treat hundreds of children and teenagers who spend hours and hours each day online. They have them eating, playing and socializing with other kids in the real world instead of sitting in front of a computer living in a virtual world. In extreme cases, the patients receive drugs and some even get shock therapy to try to fix their problems. About 70 percent of the kids who more...
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Put the Power of the 90/10 Rule behind Your Potential for Wealth Creation

In their new book Why We Want You to Be Rich, Donald J. Trump and Robert T. Kiyosaki discuss the 90/10 Rule, a simple principle that can get you started on the road to riches today. What is the 90/10 Rule? Here’s your chance to find out now from two incredibly successful men. Robert T. Kiyosaki’s Advice on the 90/10 Rule . . . The 90/10 Rule of Money is something that my rich dad taught me about. I have written about it in Rich Dad, Poor Dad and my other books. Simply put, in the game of money and the game of life too, more...
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One Secret of Being a Great Public Speaker

If you want to learn how to talk on your feet, know your subject inside out so that you will never have to hesitate or bluff because questions will not surprise or stump you. You'll know every answer, and each question will give you a great opportunity to show how good you are and how much you know. Master your subject and know it cold. Work at it, read about it and discuss it with others. Dedicate yourself to working at it every day. Anticipate the questions you will be asked and practice your answers to them. Follow the example of great athletes more...
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Always Have a Fallback Plan

“A leader has the right to be beaten, but never the right to be surprised.” --Napoleon The Apprentice teaches candidates to think quickly on their feet. Since they're placed under tight time constraints, they have to think, act, and express themselves without hesitation or they lose and are fired by me. Since their ideas don't always work, they also need backup plans that they can employ when Plan A fails. If they're ready and move promptly and decisively on Plan B, they can recover without losing much time. You have probably noticed that the candidates who have no fallback plans are often the more...
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Companies Ban Smoking at Home

It’s one thing for a company to forbid its employees to smoke at work, but what about businesses that tell their employees not to smoke at all? A growing number of companies are prohibiting their workers from smoking not only at work, but also in their private lives. If they find out their employees are lighting up - even in the privacy of their own homes - they’re firing them. One boss even said, “If you’re too stupid to understand that smoking will kill you, then we’re going to tell you that if you want to work for our company, you will not more...
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College Students Say Vote Has a Price

Most college students admit that their vote has a price. A professor who taught an NYU journalism class asked more than 3,000 undergraduates how much their vote was worth to them. They were also asked what they’d be willing to take in exchange for their vote in the next presidential election. Two-thirds said they’d trade their vote for free tuition. Twenty percent said they’d exchange their vote for something as little as an iPod Touch. Half said they’d forfeit their vote forever for $1 million. But the students overwhelmingly agreed on the importance of voting. Nearly three-quarters of them felt that one vote really more...
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Know Your Audience

"Whether you're involved in negotiations, war, public speaking, or merely socializing, learn about the person across from you and find out what he or she wants so that you can build a better relationship." - Donald J. Trump I've heard stories about people who landed terrific jobs, not just because of their qualifications, but also because of common interests they had with the people hiring them. Granted, the applicant had to have the credentials to begin with, but lots of people do. I once heard about a top law firm that hired a young lawyer because, in addition to excelling in law school, more...
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The Benefits of Cursing

If you want to improve morale around the office, start cursing. According to a study by British researchers, regular swearing at work can help boost team spirit among staff members. It’ll help them express their feelings and it’ll help develop better social relationships. The key is knowing when such language is appropriate and when to watch what you say. For example, you probably shouldn’t let loose with profanity in front of senior executives or customers. But a few choice four-letter words can help foster solidarity among employees, especially when you’re expressing frustration or stress. The study also found that swearing is becoming more common as more...
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American Execs Think they Deserve to be Paid Less

This is hard to believe, but according to a new study, most American executives say they believe they are overpaid. Four out of six top U.S. CEOs or company presidents polled said that the compensation of top executives was too high in relation to their very own performance. Only about two percent said their salaries were too low and about a third said their compensation was “just about right.” Outside directors thoroughly agreed with them. More than 80 percent of them said that chief executives were definitely overpaid. I think this is a big problem. Sure, there are plenty of people who are paid more...
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Americans Very Stressed

How worried are you about work and money? According to a new survey from the American Psychological Association, worries about work and money are causing one-third of Americans to suffer from extreme stress, driving them to overeat, drink and smoke. Nearly half of Americans say their stress levels have shot up in the past five years, taking a toll on their personal relationships, their productivity at work, and on their health. People say they have difficulty balancing family and work responsibility and stress causes friction in their relationships with family and friends. We’ve all been there. Many deal with it in unhealthy ways, turning more...
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Cardinal Virtues: Temperance

Recently, I wrote several blogs about the Seven Deadly Workplace Sins. Now I’m taking a look at the four Cardinal Virtues: justice, fortitude, prudence and temperance. These are great qualities to have in your personal life and they can carry over to help you thrive in the business world. Last time I looked at prudence; now it’s time for a little temperance. This is a difficult one for me to advocate in some regards because I don’t do many things in moderation when it comes to business. I believe in always having the biggest and the best. But sometimes if you’re so more...
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Cardinal Virtues: Prudence

Recently, I wrote several blogs about the Seven Deadly Workplace Sins. Now I’m taking a look at the four Cardinal Virtues: justice, fortitude, prudence and temperance. These are great qualities to have in your personal life and they can carry over to help you thrive in the business world. Last time I looked at fortitude; now it’s time for a little prudence. After extolling the virtues of courage and people who are willing to take risks, now I’m praising people who have foresight and wisdom. These are the people who are smart enough to actually weigh the possible consequences before they take more...
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Cardinal Virtues: Fortitude

Recently, I wrote several blogs about the Seven Deadly Workplace Sins. Now I’m taking a look at the four Cardinal Virtues: justice, fortitude, prudence and temperance. These are great qualities to have in your personal life and they can carry over to help you thrive in the business world. Last time I looked at justice; now it’s time for a little fortitude. For me, bravery is one of the most important characteristics to have professionally. If you don’t have the courage to make bold decisions and to take chances, then there’s no way you’ll distinguish yourself from everyone else in the workplace. It more...
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Cardinal Virtues: Justice

Recently, I wrote several blogs about the Seven Deadly Workplace Sins. I took a look at each of them and how they can get you in trouble in the workplace. They’re great transgressions to avoid if you want to succeed professionally. So now I thought I’d take a closer look at the four Cardinal Virtues: justice, fortitude, prudence and temperance. These are great qualities to have in your personal life and they can carry over to help you thrive in the business world. Justice is an admirable characteristic. When you take an evenhanded approach to your professional dealings, you act fair and square more...
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Young Boss, Older Worker

In today’s multi-generational workplace, it’s not unusual for an older worker to have a younger boss. In order for that relationship to survive, both partners have to capitalize on each other’s experiences and strengths. According to a study by the staffing company Randstad, one-fifth of employed adults are older than their bosses. And that number keeps increasing as more and more older people stay in the workforce even after they hit retirement age. Unfortunately, only about half of employees say they relate well to older workers. And more than three-quarters of employees say that younger workers don’t seek advice from their older, more more...
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The Seventh Deadly Workplace Sin: Lust

Recently, I read an article from Careerbuilder.com about the Seven Deadly Workplace Sins. Last time, I gave you my take on Gluttony. Finally, it’s all about Lust. First of all, it’s not what you’re thinking. Get your mind out of the gutter. When I’m discussing lust in the office, I mean an intense longing for other people’s success or other people’s work instead of your own. (Not an intense longing for the attractive person in the next cubicle.) Here, they liken the sin of lust in the office to the “grass is always greener” theory. If you are obsessed with what your co-workers more...
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The Sixth Deadly Workplace Sin: Gluttony

Recently, I read an article from Careerbuilder.com about the Seven Deadly Workplace Sins. Last time, I gave you my take on Sloth. Today, it’s all about Gluttony. When it comes to success, it’s hard not to want it all. And, to be honest, I’m not so sure that’s a bad thing. This, to me, is a lot like greed. If you have high aspirations and yearnings for big things, then you work hard and long and fast to get it. But the caution here is that if you gorge yourself on just one thing - like someone sitting down at an incredibly prepared more...
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The Fifth Deadly Workplace Sin: Sloth

Recently, I read an article from Careerbuilder.com about the Seven Deadly Workplace Sins. Last time, I gave you my take on Greed. This morning, it’s all about Sloth. There are few things I hate more than laziness. I work very, very hard and I expect the people who work for me to do the same. So if you’re lazy at work, you will get absolutely nowhere. While you’re sitting back twiddling your thumbs, you will watch everyone else whiz right by you on the fast tracks of their careers. If you want to succeed, you cannot relax. You can’t do just the minimum, more...
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The Fourth Deadly Workplace Sin: Greed

Recently, I read an article from Careerbuilder.com about the Seven Deadly Workplace Sins. Last time, I gave you my take on Anger. Today, it’s all about Greed. One of my often-quoted sayings is “Greed is good,” so I have mixed feelings about greed being a workplace sin. I believe that you have to be motivated by some sort of insatiability for success. I guess that’s greed in a way. If you’re not driven, you won’t succeed. Where greed can hurt you is if you want too much too soon and you only consider the short term, forgetting that some time you have to more...
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The Third Deadly Workplace Sin: Anger

Recently, I read an article from Careerbuilder.com about the Seven Deadly Workplace Sins. Last time, I gave you my take on Envy. Today, it’s all about Anger. This is a tough one. In general, I’d have to agree that anger doesn’t belong in the workplace. It can create a hostile environment and people who are prone to angry outbursts are often seen as unprofessional by their employers. However, I think that leaders occasionally may have to use their anger in the workplace. I don’t mean that they should run around yelling at their employees, slamming doors and punching walls. But often people who are more...
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The Second Deadly Workplace Sin: Envy

Recently, I read an article from Careerbuilder.com about the Seven Deadly Workplace Sins. Two days ago, I gave you my take on Pride. This morning, it’s all about Envy. Jealousy is stupid. It is a waste of time and it’s destructive. Nothing good can ever come of it, so there’s definitely no room for it in the workplace. If a co-worker gets a project or a promotion that you wanted, then don’t spend time stewing over it or lamenting that it should’ve been yours. Instead, turn the opportunity around. Use the situation to motivate yourself to work harder, to achieve more so that more...
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Seven Deadly Workplace Sins. First Up: Pride

Recently, I read an article from Careerbuilder.com about the Seven Deadly Workplace Sins. I’d have to agree that they did a pretty good job pinpointing the vices that can surely get you in trouble at work. Missing only the stone tablets and Moses, they’re some pretty good sins to avoid if you want to succeed professionally. Here’s the full list. 1.      Pride 2.      Envy 3.      Anger 4.      Greed 5.      Sloth 6.      Gluttony 7.      Lust Taken without explanation, it sounds highly biblical. And I’d even argue that you need a lot of these traits, at least in small doses. Over the next few weeks, I’ll break it down and give you more...
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Keep Your Tempo

"Running a business is like being an orchestra conductor. How well your people perform is your responsibility. " - Donald J. Trump Effective leaders develop individual tempos and utilize them. Your tempo is like an inner metronome that constantly keeps time. It should never stop -- even when the world is exploding around you. The people you work with will feel your tempo and plug into it. When they do, everyone will work better together and enjoy it more. We each have our own internal tempos that govern how quickly we move. It's an integral, distinguishing part of us. Some people are deliberate, more...
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Woman Fired for Talking Back to Her Boss

I recently read about a woman in China who is suing her former employer because she was fired. Apparently, the company sacked her because she talked back to her boss three times. She was fined for her insubordination but refused to pay the fines so she was fired. She was told that according to company rules no matter whether management is right or wrong, employees are not allowed to contradict them and must obey. They obviously have some pretty tough rules. But even here, I know a lot of managers who run their businesses like that. They figure the boss is the boss and more...
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Americans Work Hard

When it comes to work, Americans sure know how to do it. According to a recently released report by the United Nations, the United States leads the world in labor productivity. Somehow, that news surprised me. But according to the report, American workers stay longer in the office, at the factory, or on the farm than workers in Europe and most other wealthy nations. And American workers produce more per person annually than everybody else. The average American worker produces $63,885 of wealth per year, more than workers in all other countries. They also get more work done per hour than everyone but the more...
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Take the Hit

Take the responsibility. Take the hit. If you do that, you will have no need to blame others or continually find fault with them. A guy I once knew used to constantly call me to complain about everybody and their brother. To listen to him, you would think that the entire world was against him and that he never made a mistake in his life. From day one, nothing was ever his fault. Everyone else was to blame. In truth, he was his own biggest blind spot and sad to say, he eventually became a total loser because he never remedied his biggest more...
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Stay-At-Home Dads

It’s not a job that I could do, but more and more fathers are taking on the role of “Mr. Mom” and deciding to become stay-at-home dads. More than 150,000 men in the United States are full-time fathers which is triple the number from just 10 years ago. They come from all walks of life professionally, ranging from businessmen and computer technicians to bartenders and soldiers. They have one thing in common: wives who make enough money to support the family, so the dads can stay home and take care of the kids full-time. I’m impressed with these men and with their patience and dedication more...
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Sue Your Boss

Sometimes I just can’t believe the stuff I read. According to The Los Angeles Times, legislatures across the country are considering laws that would allow workers to sue their bosses for being, basically, jerks. The newspaper says that the number of bullying bosses may be on the rise because companies are relying on lower-paid managers with less experience and poor people skills. And those managers just don’t know how to treat their employees well. In New Jersey, a proposed bill would allow workers to claim as much as $25,000 in damages if their superior creates “an abusive work environment.” Similar laws are being considered more...
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Will History Repeat Itself?

In the 1930s, the German government had printed so much currency that its money nearly lost its value. One story tells of a woman who pulled a wheelbarrow full of money to buy some bread. When she came out of the baker's to get her money to pay for the bread, someone had stolen her wheelbarrow and left the money. Hyperinflation devalues money. And while the social, political and financial environments that enabled Adolf Hitler to be elected German Chancellor in 1933 were complex, his rise to power was in no small part due to the middle class having their savings wiped more...
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Women Angry At Work

I know it doesn’t seem fair, but getting angry at work can be good if you’re a man and bad if you’re a woman. A man who gets angry at work may be admired for it. Yet a woman who shows anger in the office is often seen as “out of control” and “incompetent.” That’s according to a new study from Yale University. As part of the research, people watched videos of job interviews and rated the status of the candidates based on how they reacted in various situations. When men got angry on the tapes, people assumed they made a lot of money more...
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Most Prestigious Occupations

What do you want to be when you grow up? When it comes to prestigious occupations, firefighters, scientists and teachers top the list in the eyes of adults. They’re closely followed by doctors, military officers and nurses, as well as police officers, priests/ministers and clergy, and farmers. Bankers, actors and real estate agents, however, are at the bottom of the list. (Poor real estate agents!) Not far above them are accountants, entertainers, and stockbrokers; union leaders, journalists, business executives and athletes. Perceptions for many occupations have changed a lot over the years. Over the past three decades, for example, the prestige for what teachers more...
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Mind Your P's and Q's

 Some people might think billionaires don't have to impress anyone, but most of us still live by these rules. 1.      Be honest. Most people can smell a lie and will appreciate honesty, even if it's not exactly what they want to be hearing. 2.      Be on time. Punctuality is essential. You should never tolerate late arrivals and missed deadlines for yourself or from anyone else. 3.      Be self-deprecating and disarming. Don't be a bulldozer in business; save your hardest edge for when you need it most. 4.      Do your homework. Wasting other people's time due to poor planning and thoughtlessness will only leave a bad more...
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How to Correct and Criticize

I'm a New Yorker, so I tell it like it is. Be up front and direct with people, and they will return the favor. But sometimes, in more sensitive social situations, you have to consider the source and let it slide. In business and in life, I've heard people say things that are so outrageously incorrect that I don't feel it's worth my energy to say anything. Sometimes it's easy to just say, "You might want to check into that. I heard differently," and leave it at that. If you can avoid an altercation, do so, since most of them aren't worth your more...
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How to Motivate Yourself Financially and Create Wealth

I once knew a guy who had terrific ideas, would talk them up at hurricane force, and then go off and putter away at something else. He would lose his momentum before he even got going. What's the point? I've met some brilliant businesspeople in my time, but some of them will never be billionaires because they never act on those brilliant ideas. Twenty percent of your priorities will give you eighty percent of your productivity. You should always focus your time, energy, and efforts on the top 20 percent of your priorities; that's a four-to-one return on your investment. So if you have more...
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Not Taking Vacations

Many Americans are giving up traditional vacations. The reasons range from having too little time off work to not having enough money to travel. But in many cases, people just aren’t in the habit of getting away from their jobs. All this has some experts worried. They’re afraid that workers aren’t getting away from their jobs long enough to relax - both physically and mentally. And, because of that, they’ll suffer from some kind of work overload. It used to be that many people took two- and three-week vacations. Now, according to a recent online survey, one-third of people say they took five or more...
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Does Height Equal Power?

The taller you are, the more powerful you are. At least that’s how it appears. A professor at the Stanford University Graduate School of Business has studied executives and how they achieve status. One of the things she found is that they use their height - or the appearance of height - to their advantage. Taller people are perceived to be more powerful than shorter people. They really increase their edge by doing things like speaking loudly in a deep voice, putting their hands on the shoulders of shorter adversaries, and - for women, wearing heels. Several studies have found that taller men are more...
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How to Say No

Learning how to say no is crucial. We are faced with a barrage of requests each and every day - for time, for money, and for favors. We have to learn to say no most of the time, occasionally to some worthy causes and some great opportunities. When it comes to saying no in the context of a deal, I learned a valuable lesson from one of my lawyers: Distill the information presented to you. Lawyers are pros at distilling complex information, and it’s a skill worth cultivating. As you read over the terms of a deal or a contract, translate the more...
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Too Many Complaints

So much for the belief that the customer is always right. Sprint-Nextel has cut more than one thousand customers for being too high-maintenance. Apparently, these clients call customer service too often and make what the company says are “unreasonable requests.” While the average subscriber calls customer service less than once a month, these 1,200 subscribers getting released by the company call 40 to 50 times more frequently. All the excessive complaining has frustrated management to the point that the business just isn’t worth it anymore. Sprint says they’ve done what they can to try to resolve the issue but, because the complaints keep coming more...
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Job Outlook Looking Good

 When it comes to the job outlook these days, it always seems like business forecasters are preaching doom and gloom. But it appears as if things are looking good for employees and job hunters this summer and early this fall. According to a new online job survey, the vast majority of American companies don’t expect to fire any of their employees. In fact, more than one-third of managers said they actually planned to do some hiring. More than half even expect to give raises to their loyal employees later this year. They say that a tight labor market makes it difficult for them to more...
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Americans and Bank Accounts

Recently, I read some very surprising money news. As many as 28 million Americans don’t have bank accounts. It’s because they don’t trust banks, or because of language and cultural barriers, or simply because they just don’t think they make enough money to use a bank. When these people need to cash checks or pay bills, they use retailers and check-cashing businesses and often end up paying huge fees. In addition, they carry around lots of cash, making them a target for crime. About one in 12 American families doesn’t have a bank account. And these families are estimated to earn hundreds of billions more...
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Adult Kids Returning Home

Sorry, parents. Just when you thought the kids were out of the nest, a lot of them are coming home. With the rise of housing costs and with jobs harder to find, more than half of all college graduates are returning home to Mom and Dad, moving back into their childhood bedrooms. Just last year, more than one million families had young adults back at home. That’s an increase of more than 28% from just two years earlier. Sure, letting the kids move back in for awhile will help them get on their feet financially, but make sure it’s not a long-term solution. My more...
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Build Your Reputation

I’ve been building the Trump brand for several decades. But from time to time, landmarks do come along. Several months ago my son Eric joined us. So my three eldest children are now with the Trump Organization, helping to expand our brand. Don Jr, Ivanka and Eric are all here now. They are my real Apprentices, and they’re doing a great job. They know that I’m demanding, but they are disciplined and very hard workers, so they are a good fit with the Trump Organization.  Having a quality brand is very much like having a good reputation. It’s important to consider that fact, even when you more...
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Teens and Summer Jobs

Most teenagers apparently aren’t working very hard this summer. For the first time since 1948 when the U.S. Labor Department started keeping records, fewer teens are working or looking for work. They’re foregoing the traditional summer jobs as lifeguards or camp counselors or working at fast food restaurants. This year, only about 48 percent of teens ages 16 to 19 were working or looking for jobs, which is a steady decline over the past several years. But the drop in summer employment doesn’t mean teenagers are slacking. Some companies are only hiring adults. With household income on the rise, some parents are giving their more...
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Working on Vacation

I don’t go on vacation very often and, when I do, it’s always a working vacation. So the results of a new survey really don’t surprise me. It reports that one in five people brought laptops with them on their most recent vacations. At least 80 percent brought their cell phones. That’s because when people go on vacation, they don’t want to miss what’s going on at the office. About one in five said they did some work while vacationing. About the same number called in to the office to see how things were going. Twice as many checked e-mail and even more more...
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Be Thorough

There’s really no such thing as knowing too much about what you’re doing.  When I was in college, I spent my spare time reading about real estate and foreclosures. I didn’t feel it was a sacrifice of my time, because I was interested in real estate; I wasn’t studying just to pass a test. The knowledge I gained on my own led to my first successful investment. I couldn’t have achieved that if I hadn’t spent the time studying on my own. In college, I also read something that Rudyard Kipling said, which I’ve never forgotten: “I keep six honest serving men, they more...
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Boomers Can't Retire

It doesn’t seem that long ago that people looked at age 65 as the golden age of retirement. That’s when workers dreamed of a little condo on the beach, maybe spending their days golfing or fishing or hanging out with the grandkids. Not anymore. As baby boomers are hitting their 60s, most expect to delay retirement longer than their parents and their grandparents. And that’s smart because according to a couple of new reports, many of them can’t afford to stop working anytime soon. And that’s sad. Blame everything from higher divorce rates to longer life expectancies for greater financial hardships that mean people more...
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The Art of Negotiation

Negotiating is an art. There are nuances and finely honed techniques and rules to be aware of. Here are a few of them: Know what you’re doing. Sounds simple, but I’ve seen a lot of instances where I couldn’t believe how much the other side didn’t know. I immediately knew I could have a grand slam and fast, just based on their apparent lack of preparation. My father used to tell me, “Know everything you can about what you’re doing.” He was absolutely right, and I’m giving you the same advice. Follow it. Remember, it takes a lot of smarts to play dumb more...
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Loving the Liberal Arts

I’ve always been very outspoken about a college education. If you’ve got the brains and the financial assets to go to college, then there’s no reason not to go. It’ll give you an amazing leg-up on the rest of your life. The question is, when you go to college, which major should you choose? I’ve always leaned heavily towards business, but there are plenty of other fields that obviously offer great opportunities. However, recent studies show that liberal arts degrees, surprisingly, can be very useful in today’s world. Liberal arts majors are in high demand across all fields because in today’s working environment it’s more...
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The Road to Wisdom

There are many roads to wisdom, and many wonderful books to educate us on our way. One book that I would suggest to you, because it is valuable for business and management strategies, is The Art of War by Sun Tzu. It was apparently written in the 6th century BC, and is a study of military strategy. It has been influential to leaders for many centuries. Throughout history, General Douglas MacArthur and other famed military strategists have studied it. It’s a valuable book and worth your time. By comparison, another famed book is Machiavelli’s The Prince, which is more about political conflict than more...
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Making Less than Dad Did

I’ve always thought it was part of the American dream that each generation would grow up and make more than their parents did. But a new report shows that American men in their 30s earn significantly less than their fathers. After adjusting for inflation, it found that men in their 30s now have a median income of about $35,000 per year. That’s a 12 percent drop for men in the same age group 30 years ago who made $40,000 a year. As recently as 10 years ago, men in their 30s earned 5 percent more than their fathers did when they were the same more...
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Interviewing 101

With graduation time here, college graduates are heading out into the workforce hoping to land great jobs. But it all starts with a really good interview. I’ve conducted so many interviews and I’m often amazed at how poorly so many of them go. I’m surprised at how quickly talented candidates can blow a potential job by what they say or don’t say when they sit across the desk from a potential boss. Some of the dumbest mistakes are when an interviewee doesn’t ask questions because it shows he or she just isn’t interested in the company. Show interest. Show that you care about more...
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Find the Greatness within Yourself

You cannot teach a man anything; you can only help him find it within himself.  - Galileo I am a competitive person and to me, that’s a good thing. Staying competitive is the opposite of being complacent. Complacency is the ultimate enemy of success. In fact, when people ask me how to achieve great success, I usually explain that the most important first step is to get out of their comfort zone, which is a bad place to be. If you are happy in your comfort zone, you need to move out of it. How else can you find the greatness that lies within you? more...
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Blueprint for Success

It’s not just business acumen, but integrity, that carries you forward in the business world. It’s as simple as keeping your word, or, in some cases, remembering what your words were. It seems that “simple” isn’t always easy for some people. I came from the world of construction and real estate development, which is known for being demanding and difficult, but it also requires precision. There can’t be anything haphazard in construction, or people can be injured. “Happenstance” is not acceptable. I’ve applied that approach to everything I do. There’s an integrity to building that cannot be compromised. We’ve all seen the results more...
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Connect the Dots

We’ve all heard the saying “connect the dots.” I see it as having enough knowledge to be able to connect the dots in a reasonable and informed way. In a conversation I was having a few years ago, one guy mentioned that the Trump name had become a famous brand around the world. Then he added, “What’s in a name?” and sort of laughed and then said to me, “In your case, a lot!” I noticed that another man seemed out of the loop about the quip. So I said “That’s Shakespeare. ‘What’s in a name’ is a famous line from Shakespeare.” more...
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Prescience

Years ago, when reality shows first hit the television industry, I had been approached many times to appear in one. I refused all the offers, although a few were tempting. I just didn’t feel it was the right time or right venue for me. Then, after I’d refused all the offers, Mark Burnett approached me with his idea for The Apprentice and I just knew it was right. It had an educational subtext, the concept was solid, and sure enough, we had a solid hit on our hands. Did I know it was going to be a hit show? No. In more...
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Equal Pay for Women?

Even though women have made great strides, so many of them still hit a glass ceiling on payday. According to some surprising research from the American Association of University Women, women earn just 80 percent of what men earn one year after they graduate from college. And that pay gap widens, falling to as little as 69 percent of what men make 10 years later. According to the study, one factor that plays a significant role in the salary disparity is that women tend to study areas with lower salaries such as education, health and psychology whereas men dominate higher-paying fields like engineering, more...
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Misery Clubs

I’ve heard misery loves company but this is ridiculous. Supposedly, there’s a new fad in London called “misery” clubs. Visitors grab a bowl of chopped onions to help them start crying about whatever’s bothering them in life. This is no joke. The trend started in Japan where businessmen rent rooms by the hour to watch sad movies or pay money to attend group cry-athons and “tear therapy” meetings. It’s all part of the belief that crying is somehow therapeutic. But I think it’s pretty stupid. If you have a problem - whether it’s in business or in your personal life -- then solve it more...
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Dress for Success

With summer just around the corner, a lot of employees in a lot of businesses start dressing like it’s Casual Friday every day of the week. They utterly forget about professionalism and start dressing totally inappropriately for work. In fact, Monster, an online job and recruiting site, conducted a poll about the biggest fashion faux pas in the office. Employers complained the most about employees who came in to work wearing tank tops and visible underwear. They also had a problem with employees who wear flip-flop sandals, Hawaiian print shirts, and shorts. Of course...because none of that belongs in a professional environment. If more...
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Americans and Work

Here’s one of the silliest ideas I’ve heard in a long time. A guy in Atlanta is spearheading a movement called “Friends of the Five-Day Weekend.” He wants to shorten the nation’s workweek to two days, saying Americans already work way too hard. This man argues that Americans already have one of the shortest vacation times in the world and they give up nearly 570 million days of unused vacation a year. But I’d like to point out that the reason they don’t take their vacation days is because they have a lot of work to do. Shortening the work week obviously isn’t more...
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Moms Not Working

For years, career women have heard that it’s fine for them to quit their jobs in order to become stay-at-home moms. They’re told that it’s the best thing for their children and eventually they can make their way back into the workforce when their kids get old enough. But a new book - called The Feminine Mistake - disagrees with all that. The author, Leslie Bennetts, says that women should not quit their jobs when they have children. The theory is that if women depend on their spouses, it could have serious economic consequences. What if the husband gets sick or, worse, more...
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Office Romances

This seas