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Tea Party folk target CSX-SunRail backers

Friday, December 11, 2009

Conservative "Tea Party" activists are targeting Republican lawmakers who supported the state's purchase of about 61 miles of rail in Central Florida for $432 million, according to News Service of Florida. Eight Republicans legislators — 61 representatives and 18 senators — lent their support to the deal that will allow SunRail to provide commuter service in the Orlando area. Tea Party chairman Fred O'Neal said his group is considering running Tea Party candidates against Republicans "who voted for the rail boondoggle and jeopardized the taxpayers of Florida." The deal still have to be approved by Gov. Charlie Crist. Republican supporters said the commuter rail system won't raise residents' fees or taxes, but O'Neal said taxpayer will eventually bear the financial brunt since the system has had troubles sustaining itself in the past. No word on how Tea Party activists feel about this other Orlando method of moving people. Home page - just like the "alerts" icon you have at my websites.

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TEA PARTY WILL TARGET GOP LEGISLATORS WHO VOTED FOR SUNRAIL BILL

(Orlando) – TEA Party Chairman Fred O’Neal announced today that the Florida Tea Party will target those Republican state legislators who cast votes for the SunRail legislation that passed the Florida Legislature this week.

"The SunRail Boondoggle may indeed amount to the largest tax increase in Florida history," stated O'Neal. "It could amount to tens of billions of dollars for failed rail systems and proposed rail systems that have no possibility of generating enough income to even pay operational costs."


"We are currently evaluating each individual race to determine the feasibility of running TEA PARTY candidates in races with a Republican incumbent who voted for the rail boondoggle and jeopardized the taxpayers of Florida," O'Neal stated. We have screened over a dozen candidates just in the last several weeks," O'Neal concluded.

The recently released Rasmussen poll indicates a strong viability for Tea Party candidates that obtain ballot placement showing that in a generic partisan race, the TEA PARTY candidate polls 33% to 12% for the Republican nominee.

The Florida Tea Party is recognized by the Secretary of State as an official minor party in Florida and may field a TEA PARTY candidate in any partisan general election race in Florida, including United States Senate and United States Congress. 

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Tea Party Is Local Voters’ New Bag

Wednesday, November 11, 2009 12:42:48 PM Local Voter for Florida Tea Party

ORLANDO — Florida’s newest third party has its first official voters.

The Florida Secretary of State certified the Tea Party as an official political party last week, and supporters have begun registering as members of the party.

Orlando lawyer Fred O’Neal, chairman of the newly established party, went to the Orange County Supervisor of Elections Office Wednesday to re-register and change his party affiliation from Democrat to the Tea Party.

"The Tea Party is conservative, a party based on traditional values, a party whose intention is to return the country back to principals in which it was founded," O’Neal told News 13. "It’s a rejection of what the Democratic Party and the Republican Party have both done to this country."

The Tea Party is now one of 32 minor political parties in the state of Florida. See All of Florida’s Political Parties.

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TEA PARTY REGISTERS AS FLORIDA POLITICAL PARTY

Contact: Frederic O’Neal (407) 719-6796

(Orlando) - Florida has a new political party joining the political fray – The Tea Party (TEA). 

The Florida Secretary of State has certified the TEA Party as an official political party, joining the Democrat and Republican Party’s in providing alternatives to Florida voters. 

Building on the incredible success of Conservative/Tea Party candidate Doug Hoffman in the recent New York 23rd Congressional race, the TEA Party will be offering similar quality candidates in various Florida contests. 

"Over the past year or more, we have seen a growing disenchantment with the existing two-party system.  The current system has become mired in the sludge of special interest money that seeks to control the leadership of both parties.  It’s time for real change," stated Orlando attorney Frederic O’Neal, founder and Chairman of the TEA Party. 

The TEA Party is currently interviewing potential candidates for various statewide positions, including the United States Congress; the Florida House and Senate as well as local positions. 

"So many people have cried out for a real choice in the political arena, The TEA Party will help provide taxpayers the opportunity to compare and contrast with candidates from other parties.

It’s no more ‘business as usual’ in Florida, now there will a choice,"  O’Neal concluded. 

The TEA Party will be launching its website www.FloridaTeaParty.us within the next several weeks.  

Individuals interested in joining the TEA Party or seeking the TEA Party nomination for the 2010 elections should contact Chairman O’Neal at (407) 719-6796.

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TEA PARTY CHAIRMAN TO RE-REGISTER FROM DEMOCRAT TO "TEA PARTY" TODAY AT ORANGE COUNTY SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONS OFFICE

(Orlando) – TEA Party Chairman Fred O’Neal will re-register from Democrat to TEA Party today at 10:00 a.m. at the office of Orange County Supervisor of Elections, 119 West Kaley Street, Orlando, FL. 

The Florida Secretary of State has certified the TEA Party as an official political party, joining the Democrat and Republican Party’s in providing alternatives to Florida voters. 

Individuals interested in joining the TEA Party or seeking the TEA Party nomination for the 2010 elections should contact Chairman O’Neal at (407) 719-6796. 

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Orlando attorney forms the Tea Party of Florida

By MICHAEL W. FREEMANTHE | REPORTER & EDITOR | Published: Thursday, November 12, 2009

ORLANDO – When attorney Fred O’Neal went to the Orange County Supervisor of Elections office on Nov. 11, he was doing more than just changing his party registration.

A self-described conservative or “Reagan” Democrat, O’Neal said he was abandoning his party to seek out a new one. But in this case, his move also involved the formation of an entirely new political party. The Orlando attorney is the chairman and founder of the new Tea Party of Florida, which recently got certified by the Florida Secretary of State as an official political party.

"The purpose of a political party is for like-minded people to gather," O’Neal said moments before changing his voter registration from Democrat to Tea Party. "I don’t feel like-minded with the Democrats or Republicans. So I have formed a Tea Party and hopefully, there will be like-minded people who will join us."

O’Neal said he’s also quite serious about building a serious third party movement in the state. The TEA Party is launching a website,www.FloridaTeaParty.us, and is now recruiting candidates to run for office next year on the TEA Party ticket. Anyone interested in joining the Tea Party movement can call O’Neal at to learn more.

"Hopefully," he said, "we’ll be able to get people elected. We plan to run a slate of candidates."

Most of all, O’Neal said he hopes to give the voters of Florida a clear alternative if they feel frustrated and let down by the dominant Democrat and Republican parties.

"So many people have cried out for a real choice in the political arena," he said. "The Tea Party will help provide taxpayers the opportunity to compare and contrast with candidates from other parties. It’s no more ‘business as usual’ in Florida. Now there will a choice."

So what exactly is the Tea Party? The name comes from the Tea Party rallies that have been held across the county, including in Orlando, to protest high budget deficits, rising government spending and bailouts for ailing industries. O’Neal said the core of the Tea Party’s message would be a return to traditional values, advocacy of a free market system, and limited government – in other words, a return to what the founding fathers originally intended of the federal government.

"We’ve got a document," he said. "It’s called the Declaration of Independence. It outlines the grievances we have. It outlines very specifically what we represent."

O’Neal said he envisions the party as being conservative on social issues, but one that "sees things from the little guy’s perspective, and not from the big business perspective."

That, he said, separates the Tea Party from the social liberalism of the Democrats, and from the pro-big business views of the Republicans.

"I think there are a lot of people with my views, who got fed up with both parties," he said. "We were basically told we’re not wanted. The Tea Party is conservative, a party based on traditional values. It’s a rejection of what the Democratic and Republican parties represent – bailouts, big deficits. We think the original founders had the best idea. We don’t think the current gang has the right idea."

While acknowledging that the Republicans are considered the conservative party in this country, O’Neal dismissed them, saying "We do not feel at home with the Republican Party, with their emphasis on big business."

O’Neal’s advocacy of traditional values and social conservatism is more libertarian, he said, than activist. He favors overturning Roe vs. Wade, the decision by the U.S. Supreme Court that granted women the right to have an abortion. But while he’s personally Pro-Life, he would let the states decide this issue, even if many of them legalized abortion.

"Every state is entitled to their own decision on abortion," he said, adding that he also favors letting states make their own decisions on other controversial issues like gay marriage and allowing marijuana for medicinal use.

"I am the attorney representing the People United for Medical Marijuana," he said.

O’Neal noted that there are already 30 or so minor political parties in Florida, "some of them with just one person." He hopes the Tea Party builds into a national movement, and doesn’t just fade as a tiny footnote in the history books.

"It’s up to the voters," he said. "It’s up to the electorate. Give them choices. What we’re hoping to do is give them another choice. What we’re doing is offering them a choice

"If you’re like-minded," he added, "come join us."

Copyright © 2009 TheLedger.com — All rights reserved. Restricted use only.

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The Telegraph.UK - US conservative activists  form Tea Party

By Toby Harnden in Washington

Grassroots conservative activists have registered themselves as the “Tea Party” ahead of the 2010 mid-term elections.

The Florida group, which models itself on the Boston tea party protesters who rebelled against British “taxation without representation“ in 1773, will run against Democrats and Republicans in national and state elections next November.

“The current system has become mired in the sludge of special interest money that seeks to control the leadership of both parties,” said Frederic O'Neal, the Tea Party party chairman, in a statement. “It's time for real change.” The move appears to have been triggered by the campaign of Doug Hoffman, a conservative Republican who ran as a Conservative Party candidate in New York's 23rd District last week. Although he was eventually narrowly defeated by his Democratic opponent, Mr Hoffman forced out Dede Scozzafava, the official Republican candidate he had branded as too liberal. There are 32 minor political parties certified in Florida, including the Florida Socialist Workers Party, the Prohibition Party and the Real Food Party of the United States of America. Any creation of a national third party that could attract significant numbers of conservatives could split opponents of President Barack Obama and therefore be bad news for the Republican party.
The Tea Party protests first sprung up across the United States in April, when they were timed to coincide with April 15th, the deadline for submitting tax returns. The protesters demonstrated against a number of Obama administration policies, most specifically the $787 billion stimulus package.

Since then, the movement has broadened to become an umbrella organisation of conservatives disgusted not just with Mr Obama but also with much of the Republican Party and the way politics is conducted. The tea party protests have been vocally supported by Fox News hosts, most prominently Glenn Beck, whose viewing figures have rocketed in recent months. Beck has formed a group called “the 912 project”, which takes its name from the day after the September 11th attacks and has become part of the broader tea party movement. Its website states that the group is “for you and other like-minded Americans looking for direction in taking back the control of our country” from the incumbents of the White House and Congress.
“We suggest that you start in your own homes. Talk to your family about the values and principles. Discuss the importance of what the founders designed for America. rdquo; “Hold or attend a weekly meeting in your neighbourhood or town. “Communication with your neighbours is vital to the process of protecting our country. Gather in living rooms, coffee houses or restaurants. Share your thoughts and ideas.”

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The Daily Commercial - Our Voice: Can you hear me now?

Sunday, November 15, 2009 - www.dailycommercial.com

The term “tea party” has come into vogue as a form of political expression.

Tea party participants have used the events to show their dismay over federal spending.

Now, a group has officially formed a Tea Party, as in a minor political party certified by the Florida Secretary of State.

“Over the past year or more, we have seen a growing disenchantment with the existing two-party system,” said Orlando attorney Frederic O'Neal, Tea Party Chairman, in a press release. “The current system has become mired in the sludge of special interest money that seeks to control the leadership of both parties. It's time for real change.”

Although some controversy has followed the party's formation, the idea behind it is key.

Voters are fed up. They hear candidates sing their political promises during campaigns, only to get the same old song-and-dance the day after the election.

Florida has 31 minor political parties certified by the state. There's the Reform Party, Green Party, Real Food Party of the United States of America, Prohibition Party, Veterans Party of America, The Christian Party and Florida Socialist Workers Party. A few years ago, there was even a Reform Silly Party.

But forming a political party to make a point is no laughing matter.

Politicians and prospective candidates need to pay attention.

Business as usual is no longer acceptable.

This country and this state are facing some serious financial issues. CNN reported that 10 states are in economic trouble; Florida is number seven on the list.

Although politicians must operate within the parameters of elected boards and are unable to enact sound fiscal policy individually, the clarion call has been made.

Voters want results. They want real change, not just slogans or stirring speeches.

There's no question people have become dissatisfied with the status quo.

Voters are becoming more vocal. The question is, will the political establishment get the message?

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CBS NEWS: The “Tea Party” Is Now Official in Florida

AP Photo/George Ruhe

The “Tea Party” is now an official political party in Florida.

An Orlando lawyer named Frederic O'Neal has registered the Tea Party with the office of the Florida Secretary of State, Politico reports,Florida Tea party now official and intends to run candidates against both Republicans and Democrats in state and national races.

“The current system has become mired in the sludge of special interest money that seeks to control the leadership of both parties. It's time for real change,” O'Neal reportedly said in a press release.

One of Florida's most prominent Republicans, Gov. Charlie Crist, already faces a conservative challenger in his bid to become the GOP's 2010 Senate nominee. Conservative Marco Rubio is gaining credibility among the state's conservatives, and has won the endorsement of the anti-tax, pro-limited government Club For Growth.

The split among conservatives and moderates in the Florida GOP is part of a larger debate within the party about the future of its identity.

O'Neal, the new chair of the Tea Party in Florida, reportedly compared his party to the Conservative Party in New York's 23rd District -- another example of the GOP's moderate-conservative fissure. In a special election to represent New York's 23rd congressional district, Conservative Party candidate Doug Hoffman drove out the local Republican Party candidate, Dede Scozzafava. The district is Republican-leaning, but the Democratic candidate ultimately prevailed over the Conservative in last Tuesday's election.

Even though the conservative lost in that race, “tea partiers” and other conservatives “remain convinced they're on the right side of history,” CBSNews.com's Charles Cooper wrote. “And in writing down their morning-after election analyses... they also delivered a hard-edged message to the Republican establishment: Get behind us or get out of the way.”

The Tea Party has been registered with the state since August and is one of 32 minor political parties certified in Florida, Politico reported.

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Miami New Times: 'Tea Party' Party Officially Established in Florida

By Kyle Munzenrieder in Politicks Mon., Nov. 9 2009 | Photo via Left Agenda

Well, the 'Tea Party' is an official political party in Florida now. Orlando lawyer Frederic O'Neal registered the new party with the Florida Secretary of State in August, and serves as its chairman.

“The current system has become mired in the sludge of special interest money that seeks to control the leadership of both parties. It's time for real change,” said O'Neal in a statement according to Politico.

Apparently he hopes the party becomes something like New York's Conservative Party that recently made headlines in that special congressional election. Though, unlike New York, Florida doesn't have fusion voting, where a third party is allowed to give their ballot line to a major party candidate. So what exactly the Tea Party plans to do isn't clear.

The party steams from the Conservative Tea Party protests that kept cable news busy all this summer by protesting big government.

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POLITICO: A Tea Party party registers in Florida

by Ben Smith November 09, 2009

A Florida conservative has registered an official “Tea Party” with the office of the Secretary of State, and is promising to run candidates against Republicans and Democrats in state and national races.

“The current system has become mired in the sludge of special interest money that seeks to control the leadership of both parties. It’s time for real change," says Orlando lawyer Frederic O’Neal, the new party's chairman, who couldn't be reached immediately by phone, in a press release.

A spokeswoman for the Florida Secretary of State, Jennifer Davis, said the party had registered in August, and that its qualified candidates will appear on the ballot in the state.

O'Neal compared his party's role to that of the Conservative Party in New York's 23rd District. Florida, however, lacks the “fusion” rules that has allowed third parties in New York to amass influence by offering their ballot line to acceptable major-party candidates.

It's unclear if O'Neal, who has represented high-profile tax protesters, has the wherewithal to organize a movement that prides itself on spontaneity and existing outside party structures.

The Tea Party will become one of 32 minor political parties certified by the state, including also the Real Food Party of the United States of America, the Prohibition Party, and the Florida Socialist Workers Party. Its website is not live.

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