The facts on electricity consumption and Daylight Saving

Release Date: 31 October 2007

Western Power today announced it recently completed research into the impact of last summer's daylight saving. The research found daylight saving contributed only a 0.6% increase in electricity consumption in WA's main grid.

Western Power's General Manager System Management, Mr Ken Brown said daylight saving produced a  negligible impact on electricity consumption and said the increasing use of air conditioners was far more significant in the electricity network.

"Air-conditioners and high energy use appliances, had a far greater impact on the network, particularly because they contribute to short but high peaks in electricity use and drive the need for more and more infrastructure to be built," he said.

"The impact that these devices have on the network should be much more of a concern to Western Australians, than the impact of daylight saving.

"Western Australia has the highest rate in Australia of air conditioners installed, and the rate of increase has been very rapid", he said.

Air-conditioners are installed in 82% of homes in WA, up from 45% in 1999.

"The impact of daylight saving was a negligible part of a 10% increase in overall electricity demand across the network from the previous year.

The daylight saving research showed slightly less power was used on days when the temperature went below 30 degrees, and slightly more power when the temperatures went above 30 degrees.

Energy consumption is significantly influenced by a number of variables including the number of very hot days and nights experienced in a summer, the number of days with high humidity levels, the frequency of strong afternoon sea breezes as well as economic growth which influences the number of new connections made to the network.

Contact us

If you have any questions regarding this media release please email us: media@westernpower.com.au