WordPress News

Live from South by Southwest 2011

Posted March 14, 2011 by Jane Wells. Filed under Community.

If you’ve ever heard Matt Mullenweg talk about the early days of WordPress, the South by Southwest (SxSW) Interactive festival that takes place each spring in Austin, TX usually crops up in the story. South by Southwest is in full swing right now, and WordPress has been all over the place.

On Friday the 11th, Matt was interviewed by John Battelle of Federated Media in front of a packed ballroom, talking about the future of WordPress. That night, the annual SxSW WordPress BBQ party played host to hundreds of WordPress users, developers, and businesspeople, and attendees got an extra treat this year in the form of a t-shirt made especially to commemorate WordPress and its Texas roots.

On Saturday the 12th, a second party co-hosted by the Austin WordPress Meetup Group and GeekAustin (and co-sponsored by the WordPress Foundation and WPEngine) brought together a similar crowd but with the addition of local WordPress community members who were not registered for the SxSW conference.

Starting today, the South by Southwest trade show opens, and this year for the first time it will feature an official WordPress Genius Bar. Staffed by professional WordPress support staff, developers, advanced users, theme designers, and even some of the core contributors and project leaders, the booth will be open from 11am-6pm each day to answer questions and help people with any WordPress problems they might have. If you are at South by Southwest this year, consider stopping by to say hello and pick up a WordPress button or sticker. We’ll also have a limited supply of the special WordPress/Texas shirts that we’ll be giving away at the booth, so if you’re at SxSW between now and Thursday, stop by.  Hope to see you there!

Location: The WordPress booth will be in trade show stand numbers 829, 831, 928, and 930 (it’s an endcap booth that combines those four spaces). You can find us in those spaces by following the numbered banners hanging from the ceiling.

WordPress 3.1, lots of fun

Posted February 23, 2011 by Matt Mullenweg. Filed under Releases.

The long-awaited fourteenth release of WordPress is now available. WordPress 3.1 “Reinhardt” is named in honor of the jazz guitarist Django Reinhardt. Version 3.1 is available for download, or you can update from within your dashboard.

This release features a lightning fast redesigned linking workflow which makes it easy to link to your existing posts and pages, an admin bar so you’re never more than a click away from your most-used dashboard pages, a streamlined writing interface that hides many of the seldom-used panels by default to create a simpler and less intimidating writing experience for new bloggers (visit Screen Options in the top right to get old panels back), and a refreshed blue admin scheme available for selection under your personal options.

There’s a bucket of candy for developers as well, including our new Post Formats support which makes it easy for themes to create portable tumblelogs with different styling for different types of posts, new CMS capabilities like archive pages for custom content types, a new Network Admin, an overhaul of the import and export system, and the ability to perform advanced taxonomy and custom fields queries.

With the 3.1 release, WordPress is more of a CMS than ever before. The only limit to what you can build is your imagination.

(No video yet for 3.1, we’re going to add it later.)

By the Numbers

There were over two thousand commits to the codebase in the 3.1 cycle! For a more comprehensive look at everything that has improved in 3.1, check out 3.1’s Codex page or the more than 820 closed issues in Trac.

Now is the time to drop by our development channels if you are interested in being involved with 3.2, as the agenda will be under discussion shortly. We’re hoping to get the 3.2 release out in a shorter development cycle (3.1 took too long) and include some fun improvements around plugins and the speed of the admin. (Don’t worry, we’re still planning on using PHP.)

We’re All in This Together

WordPress is the result of the combined effort of people from all over the world united with a common goal: to make the best darn web software for publishing your story on the web and sharing it with the world. Here is a list of the more than 180 people who helped out with development during the 3.1 cycle:

Aaron Campbell (aaroncampbell), Adam Backstrom (adambackstrom), John Ford (aldenta), Alex Dunae (alexdunae), Alex King (alexkingorg), Amanda French (amandafrench), Will Anderson (anderswc), Andrea Rennick (andrea_r), Andrew Ozz (azaozz), Andy Skelton (andy/skeltoac), Andy Blackwell (andyblackwell), André Renaut (arena), Andrei Vereha (avereha), Azizur Rahman (azizur), Barry Abrahamson (barry), Mohammad Jangda (batmoo), Beau Lebens (beaulebens), Ben Ward (benward), Matthew G. Richmond (bigdawggi), Rowan Rodrik van der Molen (bigsmoke), Glenn Ansley (blepoxp), blt4, bobbyblade, Boone B. Gorges (boonebgorges), Brian Colinger (briancolinger), Brian Layman (brianlayman), Caesar Schinas (caesarsgrunt), Ben Casey (casben79), Chip Bennett (chipbennett), Chris Sfanos, Chris Jean (chrisbliss18), Marco Cimmino (cimmo), Scott Reilly (coffee2code), Dylan Kuhn (cyberhobo), Darren Meehan (darrenmeehan), Dion Hulse (dd32), Dean Robinson (deanjrobinson), Demetris Kikizas, Δημήτρης Κίκιζας (demetris), Denis-de-Bernardy, djzone, Доктор Бро (doktorbro), Donal MacArthur (donalmacarthur), Dougal Campbell (dougal), Dre Armeda (dremeda), Jon Cave (duck_), Doug Provencio (dougwrites), Edward Hevlund (edward mindreantre), Einar Egilsson (einare), Eric Mann (ericmann), Austin Matzko (filosofo), Gil Rutkowski (flashingcursor), foofy, Francesco Laffi (francescolaffi), Gary Cao (garyc40), Justin Tadlock (greenshady), Reuben Gunday (greuben), hakre, Hui Chen (huichen), Ben Huson (husobj), Matt Thomas (iammattthomas), Ian Stewart (iandstewart), indie-ulf, Jacob Santos (jacobsantos), Jakub Míšek (jakub.misek), James Collins (jamescollins), Jane Wells (jane/janeforshort), jayjdk, Jason Penney (jczorkmid), Jeff Farthing (jfarthing84), Josh Kearney (jk0), joelhardi, John Blackbourn (johnbillion), John James Jacoby (johnjamesjacoby/jjj), John O’Nolan (johnonolan), John Bloch (JohnPBloch), Joost de Valk (joostdevalk/yoast), Aaron Jorbin (jorbin), Joseph Scott (josephscott), Justin Rainbow, Kapeel Sable (kapeels), Adam Harley (kawauso), Jorge Bernal (koke), Daryl Koopersmith (koopersmith), Lance Willett (lancewillett), Lutz Schroeer (latz), Lew Ayotte (layotte), linguasite, Lloyd Budd (lloydbudd), loushou, mailnew2ster, mako09, Mark Jaquith (markjaquith), Mark McWilliams (markmcwilliams), MattyRob, Mauro Gentile, Michael Adams (mdawaffe), Chris Meller (mellertime), Michael Fields (mfields), MichaelH, Mike Schinkel (mikeschinkel), Robert Chapin (miqrogroove), Michael “Mitcho” Erlewine (mitchoyoshitaka), David McFarlane (mrmist), mrwok, John Havlik (mtekk), Martin Widmann (mwidmann), Andrew Nacin (nacin), Nikolay Bachiyski (nbachiyski), Nathan Rice (nathanrice), Niall Kennedy (niallkennedy), Bernhard Riedl (neoxx), Nick Momrik (nickmomrik), Nils Juenemannn, Nicolas Kuttler (nkuttler), nootron, norbertm, Dominik Schilling (ocean90), ohanesian, Samuel Wood (Otto42), Ozh Richard (ozh), Pádraic Brady, Franklin Tse (peaceablewhale), Pete Mall (PeteMall), Phill Brown (phill_brown), Phill Kenoyer (PhillKenoyer), phrostypoison, Michael Pretty (prettyboymp), Simon Prosser (pross), Ptah Dunbar (ptahdunbar), Harsh J. Chouraria (qwertymaniac), Ran Yaniv Hartstein (RanYanivHartstein), Rasheed Bydousi (rasheed), Daniel Jalkut (redsweater), rfw, Rasmus Lerdorf (rlerdorf), Ryan McCue (rmccue), Roger Theriault (rogertheriault), ronbme, rovo89, Ryan Boren (ryan), Sara Cannon (saracannon), Scott Bressler (sbressler), Scott Kingsley Clark (sc0ttkclark), ScottMac, Silviu Cristian Burca (scribu), Sergey Biryukov, Сергей Бирюков (SergeyBiryukov), Alex Petrescu (SeyelentEco), Shawn Parker (shawnparker), shidouhikari, Simon Wheatley (simonwheatley), Matt Martz (sivel), Samir Shah (solarissmoke), sorich87, Mitch Canter (studionashvegas), t31os_, Tracy Cannon (TECannon), tech163, Aaron Brazell (technosailor), TheDeadMedic, Tim Moore (tmoorewp), Tobias Bäthge (TobiasBg), Tom Lany (tomthewebmaster), tonyf12, Utkarsh Kukreti (Utkarsh), Zé Fontainhas (vanillalounge), John Hawkins (vegasgeek), Michael Stewart (vericgar), Alex Mills (Viper007Bond), Vladimir Kolesnikov (vladimir_kolesnikov), wahgnube, wedsxcrfv, Peter Westwood (westi), whoismanu, Will Norris (wnorris), Wojtek Szkutnik (wojtek.szkutnik), wpcanyon, William P. Davis (wpdavis), Ron Rennick (wpmuguru), Kenneth Newman (WraithKenny), Yoav Farhi (yoavf), and Safirul Alfreda (zeo).

Bonus: Don’t forget to check out the latest on WordPress.tv to see all the cool WordCamp sessions you may have missed.

WordPress 3.0.5 (and 3.1 Release Candidate 4)

Posted February 7, 2011 by Andrew Nacin. Filed under Releases,Security,Testing.

WordPress 3.0.5 is now available and is a security hardening update for all previous WordPress versions.

This security release is required if you have any untrusted user accounts, but it also comes with important security enhancements and hardening. All WordPress users are strongly encouraged to update.

Three point oh point five
Enhances security
Three point one comes soon

The release addresses a number of issues and provides two additional enhancements:

Two moderate security issues were fixed that could have allowed a Contributor- or Author-level user to gain further access to the site.

One information disclosure issue was addressed that could have allowed an Author-level user to view contents of posts they should not be able to see, such as draft or private posts.

Two security enhancements were added. One improved the security of any plugins which were not properly leveraging our security API. The other offers additional defense in depth against a vulnerability that was fixed in previous release.

Thanks to Nils Jueneman and Saddy for their private and responsible disclosures to security@wordpress.org for two of the issues. The others were reported or repaired by our security team.

Download 3.0.5 or update automatically from the Dashboard > Updates menu in your site’s admin area. Please update immediately.


WordPress 3.1 Release Candidate 4 is also now available.

The Release Candidate 4 build includes the security fixes and enhancements included in 3.0.5 and addresses about two dozen additional bugs. This includes fixes for:

  • Deleting a user and reassigning their posts to another user.
  • Marking multiple users or sites as spam in multisite.
  • PHP4 compatibility.

As outlined in previous RC posts, if you are testing the release candidate and think you’ve found a bug, there are a few ways to let us know:

To test WordPress 3.1, try the WordPress Beta Tester plugin (you’ll want “bleeding edge nightlies”). Or you can download the release candidate here (zip). If any new issues become known, you’ll be able to find them here.

After nearly five months of development and testing, we think we’re very close to a final release. Users and developers, please test your themes and plugins.

Download WordPress 3.1 RC4 or WordPress 3.0.5 now.

The Annual WordPress Conference: WordCamp SF 2011

Posted January 24, 2011 by Jane Wells. Filed under WordCamp.

Mark your calendars: WordCamp San Francisco, the official annual WordPress conference, will be August 12-14, 2011. This year will mark the 5th anniversary of WordCamp, and as always will feature Matt Mullenweg’s “State of the Word” address as well as a variety of amazing speakers that you’d normally only get to see at expensive industry conferences. This year the program will be expanded to three days, with programming for publishers, bloggers, and developers. There will also be related activities, like core team summits, workshops  for contributors, designers, and local organizers, and various professional and networking events. The planning is just beginning, so save the date on your calendar and keep an eye on the WordCamp SF 2011 site (and/or follow the @wordcampsf twitter account) for updates as details become available.

*For people who attended WordCamp SF last year who thought the annual event this year would be called WordCon, with WordCamp SF becoming a more locally-oriented event, you can read my long-winded explanation of why we didn’t go that route over the on the WordCamp Central blog.

WordPress 3.1 Release Candidate 3

Posted January 22, 2011 by Andrew Nacin. Filed under Releases,Testing.

WordPress 3.1 Release Candidate 3 is now available. After careful evaluation of the 3.1 features in RC2, we recognized the need to make some adjustments. There are some significant differences from previous versions of 3.1, so please review the changes if you have been developing against a beta or RC version.

The biggest change is the removal of AJAX list tables, which had been an effort to move all of our list-style screens to full AJAX for pagination, searches, and column sorts, and to consolidate the list-style screens into a single API that plugins could leverage. Unfortunately, with more testing came realizations that there were too many major bugs and usability issues with how the functionality was implemented, so we’ve spent the last week rolling back the most important portions of the feature.

  • For users: AJAX has been entirely disabled for the list tables. We hope to bring this back again, in a form that is properly and fully implemented, in a future release. Column sorting remains, but everything else has returned to its 3.0 state.
  • For developers: The entire list table API is now marked private. If you attempt to leverage new components of the API, you are pretty much guaranteeing that your plugins will break in a future release, so please don’t do that. :-) We hope to enable all the fun new goodies for public use in a future release.

This is the only way we could prevent any regressions in functionality and usability from WordPress 3.0 to 3.1. That’s right, users and plugin authors can still do everything you used to be able to do (and a little bit more).

Because of the code churn between RC2 and RC3, this release candidate needs a lot of testing. Every list screen needs testing. In particular, the comment moderation screen needs testing, especially with keyboard shortcuts (if you didn’t know about those, now’s your chance to try them out).

Other fixes in RC3 include:

  • Properly display the author dropdown in Quick Edit
  • Various important fixes to numerous taxonomy query variables
  • Fixes to the theme deletion process
  • Fixes to pages used for posts
  • IIS and Multisite: Avoid resetting web.config on permalink save
  • Properly validate post formats and their rewrite rules

I’m assembling a group of friends in Washington, D.C., this weekend to test WordPress 3.1 and provide feedback. We’d love to see this idea catch on among friends at coffee shops around the world. (We’ll blog our results, and we’re thinking about using the hashtag #wptest on Twitter.) If you are testing the release candidate and think you’ve found a bug, there are a few ways to let us know:

To test WordPress 3.1, try the WordPress Beta Tester plugin (you’ll want “bleeding edge nightlies”). Or you can download the release candidate here (zip).

We’re going to study this release carefully to see where we can improve on our internal processes in the future. With that, our requisite haiku, authored by Jane:

Pulling the AJAX –
sometimes you need to step back
and show some restraint.

Happy testing!

WordPress 3.1 Release Candidate 2

Posted January 1, 2011 by Andrew Nacin. Filed under Releases,Testing.

The second release candidate for WordPress 3.1 is now available. The requisite haiku:

Rounding up stragglers
Last few bugs for 3.1
Go test RC2

As I outlined in the announcement post for RC1, release candidates are the last stop before the final release. It means we think we’re done, and we again have no bugs to squash. But with tens of millions of users, many server configurations and setups, and thousands of plugins and themes, it’s still possible we’ve missed something.

Beta 1 came on Thanksgiving, RC1 on Christmas, and RC2 on New Year’s Day. We won’t be waiting for another holiday for the final release, though, so if you haven’t tested WordPress 3.1 yet, now is the time!

Select changes since RC1:

  • The security fixes included in WordPress 3.0.4
  • Fix issues related to handling a static front page
  • Fixes and enhancements for the pagination buttons
  • Fix searching for partial usernames
  • Properly reactivate plugins after editing them
  • Always show the current author in the author dropdown when editing a post
  • Fixes for attachment taxonomies
  • Fix node removal for the admin bar
  • Fix the custom post type show_in_menu argument
  • Various fixes for right-to-left languages
  • and a few dozen more changes

If you are testing the release candidate and think you’ve found a bug, there are a few ways to let us know:

To test WordPress 3.1, try the WordPress Beta Tester plugin (you’ll want “bleeding edge nightlies”). Or you can download the release candidate here (zip).

If any known issues crop up, you’ll be able to find them here. If you’d like to know which levers to pull in your testing, check out a list of features in our Beta 1 post.

Download WordPress 3.1 RC 2

3.0.4 Important Security Update

Posted December 29, 2010 by Matt Mullenweg. Filed under Releases,Security.

Version 3.0.4 of WordPress, available immediately through the update page in your dashboard or for download here, is a very important update to apply to your sites as soon as possible because it fixes a core security bug in our HTML sanitation library, called KSES. I would rate this release as “critical.”

This issue affects all versions of WordPress prior to 3.0.4, so if you are still on a 2.X release you need to update as well.

I realize an update during the holidays is no fun, but this one is worth putting down the eggnog for. In the spirit of the holidays, consider helping your friends as well.

If you are a security researcher, we’d appreciate you taking a look over this changeset as well to review our update. We’ve given it a lot of thought and review but since this is so core we want as many brains on it as possible. Thanks to Mauro Gentile and Jon Cave (duck_) who discovered and alerted us to these XSS vulnerabilities first.

Coming Up: Meet the Makers

Posted December 27, 2010 by Jane Wells. Filed under Community.

I am often asked how decisions are made for WordPress, who’s involved in decision-making, and how the open source project is structured in general. WordPress is a meritocracy, meaning that anyone can get involved, and a combination of the quality of someone’s contributions and their level of interest/time commitment will determine how much influence they have over decisions. Because these factors vary, we have several levels of contributors to the core WordPress application, ranging from full-time lead developers to casual one-patch contributors.

I loved it when that Intel commercial in 2009 gave Ajay Bhatt, co-inventor of the USB, some recognition as a rock star of geekland (though I hated it that it wasn’t actually Ajay Bhatt, but an actor — way to kill the message, Intel).1 In WordPress-land, most people know who Matt Mullenweg is, but most of the other leaders and contributors are much less visible. Moving forward, I’m going to be posting profiles here of some of our more dedicated contributors.

Why now? We’re coming up on the second annual WordPress core leadership meetup in January 2011, and we’re thinking we’ll hold a video town hall at some point during our time together. Between now and then the profiles I post will be of the core developers who will be at the meetup. After that, I’ll be branching out and posting about other contributors, including developers, designers, forum moderators, etc.

I’ll post here in January when we have dates/times set for the video town hall. In the meantime, you can submit questions for us to answer then in the forum thread What Should 2011 Hold for WordPress?

To get a sense of how all these people fit together and how decisions are made, you can check out the presentation I did at WordCamp Portland in October on How WordPress Decisions Get Made.

1 – And how lame is it that Conan O’Brien’s interview with the real Ajay Bhatt is no longer available on the The Tonight Show’s website, and everyone’s embedded videos are blank? I found a copy of it here. And here’s the original Intel commercial if you were living under a rock and never saw it. :)

WordPress 3.1 Release Candidate

Posted December 25, 2010 by Andrew Nacin. Filed under Releases,Testing.

The first release candidate (RC1) for WordPress 3.1 is now available.

An RC comes after the beta period and before final release. That means we think we’re done. We currently have no known issues or bugs to squash. But with tens of millions of users, a variety of configurations, and thousands of plugins, it’s possible we’ve missed something. So if you haven’t tested WordPress 3.1 yet, now is the time! Please though, not on your live site unless you’re extra adventurous.

Things to keep in mind:

  • With nearly 700 tickets closed, there are tons of changes. Plugin and theme authors, please test your plugins and themes now, so that if there is a compatibility issue, we can figure it out before the final release.
  • Users are also encouraged to test things out. If you find problems, let your plugin/theme authors know so they can figure out the cause.
  • If any known issues crop up, you’ll be able to find them here.

If you are testing the release candidate and think you’ve found a bug, there are a few ways to let us know:

To test WordPress 3.1, try the WordPress Beta Tester plugin (you’ll want “bleeding edge nightlies”). Or you can download the release candidate here (zip).

We released WordPress 3.1 Beta 1 on Thanksgiving, so it’s only fitting that the release candidate comes as a Christmas present. Happy holidays and happy testing!

Download WordPress 3.1 RC 1

If you’d like to know which levers to pull in your testing, check out a list of features in our Beta 1 post.

WordPress 3.1 Beta 2

Posted December 15, 2010 by Andrew Nacin. Filed under Releases,Testing.

Haikus from Jane on her 39th birthday:

Practice makes perfect
is what they say about things,
but sometimes it’s not.

In this case it is
not practice but refinement,
and then more testing.

You can help WordPress!
Now: 3.1, beta 2
is here; needs testing.

But! Remember this:
Only install on test sites,
as YMMV.

The second beta of WordPress 3.1 is now available!

For things to test, please review our Beta 1 release announcement. A list of known issues can be found on our bug tracker.

Already have a test install that you want to switch over to the beta? Try the beta tester plugin. Please test 3.1 on a test site, not on your live site, as interactions with plugins that haven’t been updated may be unpredictable, and we can’t predict (see how that works?) whether something will break or not… that’s why we’re asking people to help us test everything! :)

Testers, don’t forget to use the wp-testers mailing list to discuss bugs you encounter. Plugin and theme authors, please test your plugins for compatibility.

Download the WordPress 3.1 Beta 2 now.

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See Also:

For more WordPress news, check out the WordPress Planet.

There’s also a development P2 blog.

To see how active the project is check out our Trac timeline, it often has 20–30 updates per day.

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