ANBHF Albert Lasker Ad Samples
Home
Laureates
Fellows
Situational Role Models
Journal
Research Program
Education Program
Selection Program
Museum
About
Contact
Slide Shows
Board Members
Business Ethics and
Social Responsibility
Wall of Shame
Economic Literacy
Business Biographers
Sunkist

Sunkist
Sunkist 


At the time Lasker acquired the account for the California Fruit Growers Exchange, most people ate oranges. Lasker conceived the idea of advertising orange juice instead of the whole orange. In addition he emphasized the nutritional value of orange juice. These ideas quickly caught on around the country, as American per capita consumption of oranges more than doubled over the next twenty-six years.

Lucky Strike

American Tobacco Company's Lucky Strike became Lasker's biggest account. Lasker and his associates worked closely with George Hill of American Tobacco Co., to develop an innovative campaign that caused a boom in Lucky Strike sales.

Lucky Lucky

 

Van Camp's

VanCamp

VanCamp 

                          

Lord and Thomas acquired this account at a time when 94% of the American housewives made their own pork and beans. A classic feature of this campaign was the use of coupons in New York. In one day over 1,460,000 coupons were redeemed, and Van Camp's was established. Lasker's efforts partly contributed to the tremendous expansion in the use of canned foods in the United States. Van Camp's later began producing canned condensed milk, which Lord and Thomas designed the ad campaign for.

Kimberly Clark

Kleenex




One of the first new major accounts to be added, Kimberly Clark was in need of an advertising campaign for its disposable form of sanitary napkins. Lasker developed a masterful ad campaign and made "Kotex" a great success. In 1924, Kimberly Clark introduced a throw away substitute for handkerchiefs. With Lasker's advertising, "Kleenex" became a best seller.

Pepsodent

Pepsodent


Pepsodent became a Lord and Thomas client in 1916, but the toothpaste was not experiencing much market growth. Lasker developed an extensive advertising campaign which Pepsodent could not afford, so Lasker agreed to accept stock in the form of payment and over time Lasker became Pepsodent's second largest stockholder. Following Lasker's involvement in the advertising campaign, Pepsodent became the best selling toothpaste in the industry.