Garage Door Murphy Bed- Tiny Yellow House

This episode of Tiny Yellow House is filled with so much more than just a murphy bed made from garage door parts. It’s actually filled with as many features as Hal’s tiny guest house. Deek showcases the storage, the sneaky bathtub, the kitchen, and of course the garage door murphy bed. Any small home afficianado will find inspiration in this cleverly constructed tiny house.

Subscribe to the Tiny Yellow House podcast in iTunes, download the m4v version directly, or watch it on YouTube.

Make: Talk 015: Matthew Borgatti

Here’s the 15th episode of MAKE‘s podcast, Make: Talk!

Our maker this week is Matthew Borgatti. Matthew makes so many things it’s hard to even begin to describe it all: musical instruments, science fiction-themed jewelry, folded paper creations, realistic passports to hackerspaces, ceramic “brass knuckles,” and on and on. This was a really great interview, and I’m sure you are going to enjoy it. Here’s a terrific page of information Matthew created for listeners of this podcast.

In the show, I also talk a bit about the new issue of MAKE, Vol 30, which is available on newsstands now and by subscription. We’ve got a great line up of projects in this issue, including how-to’s on making indestructable LED Torches, an electronic Magic 8 Box Fortune Teller, all sorts of home automation projects, and our cover story — a very easy to make and fun to fly remote control stunt flyer.

Meet The Makers: Death Defying Pedal Car Figure 8 Races

The members of the Fun Bike Unicorn Club are bringing Death Defying Figure 8 Pedal Car Races to Maker Faire Bay Area 2012. Inspired by old-school pedal carts, the club started building and of course the desire to race followed. In the spirit of healthy, and perhaps reckless, competetion, The Unicorns will be shredding around the track racing not only eachother, but anyone else who has brought a car to race. The rules are simple, don’t spend too much money, build it yourself, and brakes are mandatory! Learn more about the races, FBUC, and how to enter here.

Subscribe to the Meet The Makers Podcast in iTunes, download the .m4v directly, or watch it on YouTube.

Check out more episodes of Meet The Makers.

Make: Talk 014 – “Programming Your Home” Author Mike Riley

Here’s the 14th episode of MAKE‘s podcast, Make: Talk!

Our maker this week is Mike Riley. He’s the author of a new book called Programming Your Home: Automate with Arduino, Android, and Your Computer.

In the show, I also talk a bit about the new issue of MAKE, Vol 30, which is available on newsstands now and by subscription. We’ve got a great line up of projects in this issue, including how-to’s on making indestructable LED Torches, an electronic Magic 8 Box Fortune Teller, all sorts of home automation projects, and our cover story — a very easy to make and fun to fly remote control stunt flyer.

MAKE Volume 30 Takes Flight

MAKE Volume 30 is on newsstands now, and we’ve put together a preview video highlighting some of its impressive content. Watch us crash the flying wing featured on the cover, drool over the delicious Yakatori grill, and take a peek at some home automation projects (the theme of this issue).

If you want to get your hands on Volume 30 and the three issues after that, you can subscribe here, or order a copy of this single issue in the Maker Shed.

Subscribe to the MAKE Magazine Extras Podcast in iTunes, download the .m4v directly, or watch this video on YouTube.

Make: Talk 013 – Arts Refoundry Bronze Casting Workshops

Here’s the 13th episode of MAKE‘s podcast, Make: Talk!

Our makers this week are Kate Mayfield and Gordon Bowen, owners of the biodiesel-fueled Arts Refoundry in Los Angeles. A couple of weeks ago my 9-year-old daughter Jane and I took a bronze casting workshop at Arts ReFoundry. Here’s what we made:

If you don’t live in LA but would like to create a bronze belt buckle, you can get a Metalcast Kit from Arts ReFoundry, which includes tools, instructions, and two wax buckle slabs that you can carve into a belt buckle. Once you are finished carving it, you just send it to ReFoundry and they will cast it in bronze and send it to you.

Also in this episode, I talk about a brand new Make event that’s taking place on May 15 and 16 this year, just a few days before Maker Faire. It’s called the Hardware Innovation Workshop and will be held at Xerox Parc in Palo Alto, California. There will be hands-on demos of compelling devices, products, and platforms that are shaping the future of manufacturing and the global economy. Our list of speakers includes Massimo Banzi, Co-Founder of Arduino, Ayah Bdeir, Founder of littleBits, and Carl Bass, President & CEO of Autodesk. The Hardware Innovation Workshop is being hosted by Dale Dougherty, founder and publisher of MAKE.

Make: Talk 012 – Ayah Bdeir of littleBits.cc

Here’s the 12th episode of MAKE‘s podcast, Make: Talk!

Our maker interview this week is with Ayah Bdeir, the founder and lead engineer of littleBits, an open source library of electronic modules that snap together with magnets, making it fun and easy to build interactive electronic projects.

I met Ayah at the TED2012 conference last month, where she was awarded a TED Fellowship for littleBits. You can watch my video interview with Ayah at TED here, and you can also watch Ayah’s TED presentation here.

And in this episode of Make: Talk, Ayah has a big announcement: littleBits has just launched its new littleBits Community, a website where people can share their creations. I’m looking forward to seeing the different projects people make with littleBits.

Ayah and littleBits will be at Maker Faire in San Mateo, California on May 19 and 20, and she’ll also be presenting at Make’s first Hardware Innovation Workshop in Palo Alto, California on May 15 and 16.

Make: Talk 011 – Yury Gitman, Toy Inventor

Here’s the 11th episode of MAKE‘s podcast, Make: Talk! In each episode, I interview one of the makers featured in the magazine.

Our maker this week is Yury Gitman. Yury’s a toy inventor and product designer who teaches physical computing and toy design at Parsons The New School for Design in New York. In the current issue of MAKE, Volume 29, Yury co-wrote an article about his Pulse Sensor, a wearable heart beat sensor that he created with his colleague Joel Murphy.

Before the interview with Andy, I mention a cool project on our Make: Projects site. It’s a guide on how to harvest and use squid ink, which you can use for cooking or printing. It was written by Instrucatables.com co-founder Christy Canida.

Make: Talk 010 – Andy Cavatorta, Bjork’s Musical Roboticist

Here’s the 10th episode of MAKE‘s podcast, Make: Talk! In each episode, I interview one of the makers featured in the magazine.

Our maker this week is Andy Cavatorta, a roboticist, artist, musician, and filmmaker. He was at MIT’s Media Lab from 2007 to 2010. In the current issue of MAKE, Volume 29, Andy wrote an article about his collaboration with the Icelandic musician Bjork to create robotic gravity harps for her touring performance. In my interview, we talk about this project and more.

Before the interview with Andy, I mention the latest deal in the Maker Shed: these fun-to-make Papertronics Lunar Modules with LEDs. They’re $10 for a set of 3.

Backpack Buddy – Sylvia’s Mini Maker Show

Subscribe to the Make: Podcast in iTunes, download the mobile version directly, or watch it on YouTube.

Looking for something crafty to make during a rainy weekend? Why not rev up an old stuffed animal into your very own Backpack Buddy!

For this sewable build, we’ll need:

  • Medium to large stuffed animal (make sure it’s got some room)
  • Some fabric scraps for the inside pocket
  • zipper/or other fastener (optional)
  • fabric glue or needle, thread and pins
  • Recycled backpack straps or Ribbon
  • Scissors

When picking out your stuffed animal, try and choose something a little bigger than you’d think: to keep it soft, we can’t make the pocket very big. Don’t pick too small, but not too big, either! Something just the right size to fit on your back, and that has room for both a useful pocket, and places to attach straps. Take a look at your stuffed animal. What we’ll be doing is making a single cut, sewing in a pocket of fabric, then adding straps. Good places for the opening would be on the back, or the front for a more concealed pocket. It all depends on what your plushie has going for it. Be creative!

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