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Bibliographic data                                    
Alexander Everett and Complete Centering

     Author Vahle  Neal      
    Posted: 3/26/2001 7:22:17 PM  Type: Doc_article         
    Topic/Group:     

    Publication:
New Realities Vol.:    No.:  
   
Date: 5/1/1987 8:00:00 AM     Page(s):  

URL:  

Alexander Everett and Complete Centering

By Neal Vahle

New Realities, May/June 1987

The past two decades have seen the development of a wide variety of new approaches and techniques for facilitating personal and spiritual growth. �Complete Centering� is one of the new transformational techniques that are now available. Created in the early 1970s by Alexander Everett, an Englishman who came to the U.S. in 1960 and now resides outside Eugene, Oregon, Complete Centering facilitates the development of intuition and spiritual awareness. It is a technique, states Alexander (he prefers to be referred to by his first name), which �can take you to the center of your being.� Through its regular use (daily for 15 to 30 minutes), a person can �still the body, still the emotions, and still the mind,� and open up to intuition and spiritual inspiration.

�Complete Centering is not meditating,� states Alexander, �it is contemplating the inner self.� He sees it as a way of �gaining access to our deeper spiritual nature,� a way of getting inner direction. �I teach people practicing this technique to go to a level of awareness where they dont decide what to do, but get direction from the spiritual part of them.�

Alexander sees important benefits from gaining the ability to go within. When we reach the inner level, �the intuitive state,� we reach a place where nothing disturbs us. We no longer react to the outer circumstances of life. Here we are in touch with a powerful, inner, spiritual capacity that enables us not only to think clearly, feel well, and experience health and vitality, but to act appropriately. Alexander teaches Complete Centering in Inward Bound, a weekend experiential workshop he has taught throughout the U.S. since 1974.

Alexander introduces Complete Centering by asking the student to be willing to use the five senses subjectively to lead inward, to become more aware of the being within. Eyes are closed for peace and quiet, hands are open to receive, backs straight for energy flow. He then instructs the group to relax and let go of body, emotions, and mind.

Complete Centering begins with the visualization of the color red. The student is asked to picture a red flower or fruit, to see in his or her minds eye a beautiful, natural, bright red color. Red is the physical relaxation color. While the student visualizes a red geranium or a ripe red apple, he or she is asked to relax the body from head to foot. Alexander encourages the student to allow each body part to float off into space.

Alexander then moves to the color orange and asks the student to visualize an orange vegetable, flower, or fruit, or a bright orange sunset. Orange represents feelings, emotions and desires. The student is invited by Alexander to see, feel and sense the color orange, and to become a part of that color. The idea is to quiet the emotions and desires, to reach a state where internal emotions become calm and peaceful. Alexander suggests that the student release and let go of the emotions, and to desire only that which is good for others, thus directing desire away from themselves to help other people.

Alexander focuses on the color yellow and asks that the student choose a yellow fruit or flower, and see yellow in its natural state����

���..snip����..

Alexander was already over 50 when he began teaching Complete Centering. He developed the technique after a long spiritual search and after exploring a variety of approaches. His initial religious experiences were in the Church of England. Born in 1921 of Anglican, middleclass, English parents, Alexander received his education in private boarding schools where the Church of England was a part of the way of life. In this staid and structured religious environment he found little that was spiritually stimulating.

At age 12 an opportunity opened for Alexander when his mother began subscribing to The Daily Word, the pocket-sized monthly magazine of inspirational messages published to this day by the Unity School of Christianity in Lees Summit, Missouri. Alexander read it and found himself attracted to the ideas he found there. Soon afterward, he subscribed to Weekly Unity, the organizations magazine for youth. One of the Unity spiritual ideas that made a deep impression was the view that �the Power is within us.� This was in contrast to the notion that the Spirit operates from the outside, as taught by Anglican Christianity.

A second significant event, occurring also at about the age of 12, pointed him in the direction of spiritual teaching. He was listening to an African bishop give a sermon in an Anglican church when he had what he describes as �an incredible awakening.� He had a vision of himself as a spiritual teacher, and he experienced a strong urge to explore spiritual paths. Throughout his remaining school years he went to the various London churches to see what was offered. He even checked out the Jehovahs Witnesses.

John Moreton, the owner of the Metaphysical bookstore near the British Museum in London, was another significant influence during Alexanders youth. Moreton introduced him to Swedenborg, Egyptology, and Theosophy all of which Alexander would later draw upon in his teaching.

Alexander was still a teenager when World War II began. The war �interrupted life� for him. He served in the British Armed Forces and discontinued the spiritual search that characterized his youth. In the decade-and-a-half following the war, he occupied himself as a teacher of Latin, English, and mathematics, and put his creative energies into founding and becoming the headmaster of two English boarding schools. His early aspirations to be a spiritual teacher appeared to have been long forgotten. Not until the fourth decade of his life did these yearnings return.

In 1960, his fortieth year, he took a sabbatical from school work and spent a year traveling around the world Europe, India, the U.S., and Canada. He was searching. After the year was over he decided to leave England and come to the U.S. In an effort to find out whether he wanted to become a minister for Unity, he came to its church headquarters in Lees Summit. He spend one year there, in Silent Unity, working in the prayer room.

Deciding that the Unity ministry was not his calling, he left Missouri in 1963 and went to Fort Worth, Texas, where he had been invited to help establish a private boarding school. He remained in Texas for seven years. In Texas, he not only helped set up the Forth Worth Country Day School but, more importantly, completed the work that led to the founding in 1968 of Mind Dynamics, the experiential human potential training organization that was to become the for-runner of est, Lifespring, Actualizations, and several other human potential training organizations that flourished in the 1970s and continue to do so in the 80s.

Alexander states that Mind Dynamics grew out of the various paths of spiritual and personal growth that he had been exploring since leaving England. He lists, as the primary influences, Edgar Cayces work, Theosophy Rosicrucianism, Egyptology, Silva Mind Control, and, of course, Unity. He knew when he put the Mind Dynamics course together that, primarily, he wanted to develop a training that dealt with the workings of the mind, and secondly, since we live in the Aquarian Age, which is a mind sign, that he wanted to have the word �mind� in the organizations name.

The four-day trainings, which were largely experiential, caught on rapidly not in Texas, where they were first offered, but in California, where Alexander was soon being invited to present them. As a result the headquarters of Mind Dynamics was moved to San Francisco in 1970. Interest in the course, however, was not restricted to California. During the four remaining years of the organizations existence, the course was taught throughout the U.S. and in Europe and Australia.

Looking back upon it, Alexander feels that the organization expanded too quickly. It grew larger than he had originally intended, and was soon being controlled by the dynamic, young staff that he had recruited. Alexander brought in as trainers young men who were soon to become leaders in the human potential movement that spread throughout California in the 1970s and, later, across the country. Alexanders trainers in Mind Dynamics included: Werner Erhard, founder of est, Stewart Emery of Actualization, John Hanley of Lifespring, Howard Nease of Personal Dynamics, Randy Revell of Context Trainings, Jim Quinn of Lifestream, Thomas Willhite of PSI World Seminars, and Bob White if Life Dynamics in Tokyo.

Many of these men give credit to Alexander for having exerted a profound influence upon their lives. Werner Erhard writes, �Alexander is a pioneer. He is a dear friend and someone who had made an enormous difference in my work.� John Handley states that, �No doubt I would not be involved in the human potential movement today if it was not for Alexanders support.� Randy Revell writes that Alexander was �my mentor,� and that his teaching �contributed greatly to my success and fulfillment in life.� Thomas Willhite states that he took the Mind Dynamics course in 1971, and �I have never been the same since. I found myself and my full potential to better myself and others.� Even though Mind Dynamics had made an important contribution, and had a talented staff, Alexander decided in late 1973 that he was no longer interested in presenting the kind of trainings that he and his staff had developed. The trainings were more �confrontive� than he liked, and lacking in spiritual content. On these issues the staff disagreed with Alexander and preferred that the organization continue in its current direction.

Rather than go against the wishes of his associates, Alexander decided to leave the organization and set off in a new direction. It was at this time that he developed Inward Bound and began teaching Complete Centering. Inward Bound, as he teaches it today, is similar in many respects to the course he created in 1974 after leaving Mind Dynamics.

����

Bibliographic data                                    
Alexander Everett and Complete Centering

     Author Vahle  Neal      
    Posted: 6/28/2000 3:02:30 PM  Type: Doc_article         
    Topic/Group:    LGAT (Large Group Awareness Training),est,Landmark Education (Werner Erhard),Lifespring (John Hanley),Mind Dynamics (Alexander Everett),Alexander Everett/Complete Centering

    Publication:
New Realities Vol.:    No.:  
   
Date: 5/1/1987 8:00:00 AM     Page(s):  

URL:  

Alexander Everett and Complete Centering

New Realities, May/June 1987

By Neal Vahle

The past two decades have seen the development of a wide variety of new approaches and techniques for facilitating personal and spiritual growth. �Complete Centering� is one of the new transformational techniques that are now available. Created in the early 1970s by Alexander Everett, an Englishman who came to the U.S. in 1960 and now resides outside Eugene, Oregon, Complete Centering facilitates the development of intuition and spiritual awareness. It is a technique, states Alexander (he prefers to be referred to by his first name), which �can take you to the center of your being.� Through its regular use (daily for 15 to 30 minutes), a person can �still the body, still the emotions, and still the mind,� and open up to intuition and spiritual inspiration.

�Complete Centering is not meditating,� states Alexander, �it is contemplating the inner self.� He sees it as a way of �gaining access to our deeper spiritual nature,� a way of getting inner direction. �I teach peoplke practicing this technique to go to a level of awareness where they dont decide what to do, but get direction from the spiritual part of them.�

Alexander sees important benefits from gaining the ability to go within. When we reach the inner level, �the intuitive state,� we reach a place where nothing disturbs us. We no longer react to the outer circumstances of life. Here we are in touch with a powerful, inner, spiritual capacity that enables us not only to think clearly, feel well, and experience health and vitality, but to act appropriately. Alexander teaches Complete Centering in Inward Bound, a weekend experiential workshop he has taught throughout the U.S. since 1974.

Alexander introduces Complete Centering by asking the student to be willing to use the five senses subjectively to lead inward, to become more aware of the being within. Eyes are closed for peace and quiet, hands are open to receive, backs straight for energy flow. He then instructs the group to relax and let go of body, emotions, and mind.

Complete Centering begins with the visualization of the color red. The student is asked to picture a red flower or fruit, to see in his or her minds eye a beautiful, natural, bright red color. Red is the physical relaxation color. While the student visualizes a red geranium or a ripe red apple, he or she is asked to relax the body from head to foot. Alexander encourages the student to allow each body part to float off into space.

Alexander then moves to the color orange and asks the student to visualize an orange vegetable, flower, or fruit, or a bright orange sunset. Orange represents feelings, emotions and desires. The student is invited by Alexander to see, feel and sense the color orange, and to become a part of that color. The idea is to quiet the emotions and desires, to reach a state where internal emotions become calm and peaceful. Alexander suggests that the student release and let go of the emotions, and to desire only that which is good for others, thus directing desire away from themselves to help other people.

Alexander focuses on the color yellow and asks that the student choose a yellow fruit or flower, and see yellow in its natural state����

���..snip����..

Alexander was already over 50 when he began teaching Complete Centering. He developed the technique after a long spiritual search and after exploring a variety of approaches. His initial religious experiences were in the Church of England. Born in 1921 of Anglican, middleclass, English parents, Alexander received his education in private boarding schools where the Church of England was a part of the way of life. In this staid and structured religious environment he found little that was spiritually stimulating.

At age 12 an opportunity opened for Alexander when his mother began subscribing to The Daily Word, the pocket-sized monthly magazine of inspirational messages published to this day by the Unity School of Christianity in Lees Summit, Missouri. Alexander read it and found himself attracted to the ideas he found there. Soon afterward, he subscribed to Weekly Unity, the organizations magazine for youth. One of the Unity spiritual ideas that made a deep impression was the view that �the Power is within us.� This was in contrast to the notion that the Spirit operates from the outside, as taught by Anglican Christianity.

A second significant event, occurring also at about the age of 12, pointed him in the direction of spiritual teaching. He was listening to an African bishop give a sermon in an Anglican church when he had what he describes as �an incredible awakening.� He had a vision of himself as a spiritual teacher, and he experienced a strong urge to explore spiritual paths. Throughout his remaining school years he went to the various London churches to see what was offered. He even checked out the Jehovahs Witnesses.

John Moreton, the owner of the Metaphysical bookstore near the British Museum in London, was another significant influence during Alexanders youth. Moreton introduced him to Swedenborg, Egyptology, and Theosophy all of which Alexander would later draw upon in his teaching.

Alexander was still a teenager when World War II began. The war �interrupted life� for him. He served in the British Armed Forces and discontinued the spiritual search that characterized his youth. In the decade-and-a-half following the war, he occupied himself as a teacher of Latin, English, and mathematics, and put his creative energies into founding and becoming the headmaster of two English boarding schools. His early aspirations to be a spiritual teacher appeared to have been long forgotten. Not until the fourth decade of his life did these yearnings return.

In 1960, his fortieth year, he took a sabbatical from school work and spent a year traveling around the world Europe, India, the U.S., and Canada. He was searching. After the year was over he decided to leave England and come to the U.S. In an effort to find out whether he wanted to become a minister for Unity, he came to its church headquarters in Lees Summit. He spend one year there, in Silent Unity, working in the prayer room.

Deciding that the Unity ministry was not his calling, he left Missouri in 1963 and went to Fort Worth, Texas, where he had been invited to help establish a private boarding school. He remained in Texas for seven years. In Texas, he not only helped set up the Forth Worth Country Day School but, more importantly, completed the work that led to the founding in 1968 of Mind Dynamics, the experiential human potential training organization that was to become the for-runner of est, Lifespring, Actualizations, and several other human potential training organizations that flourished in the 1970s and continue to do so in the 80s.

Alexander states that Mind Dynamics grew out of the various paths of spiritual and personal growth that he had been exploring since leaving England. He lists, as the primary influences, Edgar Cayces work, Theosophy Rosicrucianism, Egyptology, Silva Mind Control, and, of course, Unity. He knew when he put the Mind Dynamics course together that, primarily, he wanted to develop a training that dealt with the workings of the mind, and secondly, since we live in the Aquarian Age, which is a mind sign, that he wanted to have the word �mind� in the organizations name.

The four-day trainings, which were largely experiential, caught on rapidly not in Texas, where they were first offered, but in California, where Alexander was soon being invited to present them. As a result the headquarters of Mind Dynamics was moved to San Francisco in 1970. Interest in the course, however, was not restricted to California. During the four remaining years of the organizations existence, the course was taught throughout the U.S. and in Europe and Australia.

Looking back upon it, Alexander feels that the organization expanded too quickly. It grew larger than he had originally intended, and was soon being controlled by the dynamic, young staff that he had recruited. Alexander brought in as trainers young men who were soon to become leaders in the human potential movement that spread throughout California in the 1970s and, later, across the country. Alexanders trainers in Mind Dynamics included: Werner Erhard, founder of est, Stewart Emery of Actualization, John Hanley of Lifespring, Howard Nease of Personal Dynamics, Randy Revell of Context Trainings, Jim Quinn of Lifestream, Thomas Willhite of PSI World Seminars, and Bob White if Life Dynamics in Tokyo.

Many of these men give credit to Alexander for having exerted a profound influence upon their lives. Werner Erhard writes, �Alexander is a pioneer. He is a dear friend and someone who had made an enormous difference in my work.� John Handley states that, �No doubt I would not be involved in the human potential movement today if it was not for Alexanders support.� Randy Revell writes that Alexander was �my mentor,� and that his teaching �contributed greatly to my success and fulfillment in life.� Thomas Willhite states that he took the Mind Dynamics course in 1971, and �I have never been the same since. I found myself and my full potential to better myself and others.� Even though Mind Dynamics had made an important contribution, and had a talented staff, Alexander decided in late 1973 that he was no longer interested in presenting the kind of trainings that he and his staff had developed. The trainings were more �confrontive� than he liked, and lacking in spiritual content. On these issues the staff disagreed with Alexander and preferred that the organization continue in its current direction.

Rather than go against the wishes of his associates, Alexander decided to leave the organization and set off in a new direction. It was at this time that he developed Inward Bound and began teaching Complete Centering. Inward Bound, as he teaches it today, is similar in many respects to the course he created in 1974 after leaving Mind Dynamics.

����

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