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Kay Nielsen’s Little Mermaid

kaynielsen19414

Development on Disney’s The Little Mermaid stretches back to 1941 soon after Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs was released. Livejournal user Snufkin has posted several pieces of early production artwork by Kay Nielsen.

For more of Nielsen’s work, check out the ASIFA-Hollywood Animation Archive.

  • http://www.willymj.com/ willymj

    Wow this is such a beautiful series. I would have loved to have seen the Little Mermaid done like this. Kay Nielson is one of the greats such a shame to have not used her work. Thanks so much for blogging them. :)

  • http://www.willymj.com/ willymj

    Wow this is such a beautiful series. I would have loved to have seen the Little Mermaid done like this. Kay Nielson is one of the greats such a shame to have not used her work. Thanks so much for blogging them. :)

  • http://www.timothyhodge.com/ Tim Hodge

    The film did draw upon Kay’s inspiration for the film, and he is listed in the film credits (posthumously, of course) for visual development. The shot of the ship riding the crest of the hugs wave during a lightning flash is taken directly from one of his illustrations. And yes, Kay (pronounced ‘Kie’ – rhymes with ‘die’) is a him, not a her. I’m sure it’s a common misperception.

  • http://www.timothyhodge.com Tim Hodge

    The film did draw upon Kay’s inspiration for the film, and he is listed in the film credits (posthumously, of course) for visual development. The shot of the ship riding the crest of the hugs wave during a lightning flash is taken directly from one of his illustrations. And yes, Kay (pronounced ‘Kie’ – rhymes with ‘die’) is a him, not a her. I’m sure it’s a common misperception.

  • Powerslave214

    His work. Kay was a man. ;-)

  • Powerslave214

    His work. Kay was a man. ;-)

  • Denny Sullivan

    Actually, Kay Nielsen was a man. His first name sounds female, but it's actually pronounced as “kigh”.