J. Galen Buckwalter, Ph.D.

J. Galen Buckwalter, Ph.D.

Former Chief Scientist, eHarmony

Dr. Buckwalter is the primary contributor to eHarmony’s current position as a world leader in research on the foundations of relationship success. Although Dr. Buckwalter retired from eHarmony in 2008, he continues to serve as a trusted advisor and key member of the Research Advisory Board. With over 20 years of experience in the field, Dr. Buckwalter has become an acclaimed research psychologist and an internationally-recognized expert in the effects of hormones on brain functioning. Prior to joining eHarmony, Dr. Buckwalter served as a director of research at Kaiser Permanente, a leading HMO. He has served on a Scientific Review Panel for the National Institutes of Mental Health since 1999. Dr. Buckwalter has authored more than 100 papers in the field of psychology and holds a Ph.D. from Fuller Graduate School of Psychology, where he currently serves as adjunct professor. He is also a former research professor at the University of Southern California.

Thomas Bradbury, Ph.D.

Thomas Bradbury, Ph.D.

University of California, Los Angeles

Thomas Bradbury, Ph.D, is a Professor of Psychology at the University of California, Los Angeles. He received his Ph.D. in 1990 from the University of Illinois and completed his clinical internship at the UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute. Dr. Bradbury is the editor of The Psychology of Marriage (with Frank Fincham,1990) and The Developmental Course of Marital Dysfunction (1998). He is a member of the Risk Prevention and Health Behavior Review Committee at the National Institute of Mental Health, and he is an editorial board member for several journals, including the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, the Journal of Family Psychology, and the Journal of Marriage and the Family. Dr. Bradbury is the recipient of the 1997 Distinguished Scientific Award for Early Career Contributions from the American Psychological Association and has twice received the Reuben Hill Award for Research and Theory on Marriage from the National Council on Family Relations. Dr. Bradbury currently conducts basic research on the longitudinal course of marriage, with particular emphasis on laboratory observation and interview methods. A central goal of this work is to understand how newlywed couples negotiate the first several years of marriage (which constitute the period of highest risk for marital disruption) and to clarify the factors that increase or decrease the likelihood of couples having stable, satisfying relationships. Findings from this research are being used to develop an intervention program for couples planning marriage, and an experimental version of this program is now being tested to examine its effects on marital disruption over a 3-year period.

Click here for more information on the UCLA Marriage Lab.

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John T. Cacioppo, Ph.D.

John T. Cacioppo, Ph.D.

University of Chicago

John T. Cacioppo, Ph.D., is the Tiffany and Margaret Blake Distinguished Service Professor at The University of Chicago and the Director of the University of Chicago’s Center for Cognitive and Social Neuroscience. He currently is the President-Elect of the Association for Psychological Science (APS) and a member of the National Advisory Council on Aging of the US Department of Health and Human Services. In addition, he is a Fellow of numerous scientific societies including the Society of Experimental Psychologists, Association for Psychological Science, American Psychological Association, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Academy of Behavioral Medicine, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Among his awards are the American Psychological Association Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award, National Academy of Sciences Troland Research Award, Society for Psychophysiological Research Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions to Psychophysiology, and Donald Campbell Award from the Society for Personality and Social Psychology. He has published more than a dozen books and 300 scientific articles and chapters. Dr. Cacioppo is currently investigating the social and neural mechanisms underlying complex human behavior through an approach termed social neuroscience. Current research on this topic focuses on individual differences in affective processing, and the neural substrates of affective and socioemotional processing.

Click here for more information about Dr. Cacioppo.