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Encyclopedia > List of Jewish scientists and philosophers
This page is a list of Jews.
For more on who is considered Jewish, see Who is a Jew?.

This is a list of Jewish scientists and philosophers by country. For more detailed lists, see the links provided. This list includes people of Jewish faith or Jewish ancestry. Image File history File links Star_of_David. ... This page is a list of Jews. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This page is a list of Jews. ... For a List of scientists, see: List of anthropologists List of astronomers List of biologists List of chemists List of computer scientists List of economists List of engineers List of geologists List of inventors List of mathematicians List of meteorologists List of physicists Scientist pairs List of scientist pairs See... A philosopher is a person devoted to studying and producing results in philosophy. ...

Contents

Austria

See Austrian Jewish Scientists

This page is a list of Jews. ... Martin Buber pictured late in life. ... Erwin Chargaff (August 11, 1905 – June 20, 2002) was an Austrian biochemist who emigrated to the United States during the Nazi era. ... The structure of part of a DNA double helix Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is a nucleic acid that contains the genetic instructions for the development and function of living organisms. ... Sigmund Freud (born Sigismund Schlomo Freud) May 6, 1856 – September 23, 1939; (IPA pronunciation: [] in German, [] in English) was a Jewish-Austrian neurologist and psychiatrist who co-founded the psychoanalytic school of psychology. ... Psychoanalysis is a family of psychological theories and methods based on the work of Sigmund Freud. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Robert von Lieben (September 5, 1878 in Vienna – February 20, 1913 in Vienna) was a notable Austrian physicist. ... Lise Meitner ca. ... For the generation of electrical power by fission, see Nuclear power plant An induced nuclear fission event. ... Ludwig Heinrich Edler von Mises (September 29, 1881 – October 10, 1973) was a notable economist and a major influence on the modern libertarian movement. ... This article is about Austrian-Swiss physicist Wolfgang Pauli. ... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ) are awards in physics, chemistry, literature, peace, and physiology or medicine. ... 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday. ... Sir Karl Raimund Popper, CH, FRS, FBA, (July 28, 1902 – September 17, 1994), was an Austrian born naturalized British[1] philosopher and a professor at the London School of Economics. ... Otto Weininger (April 3, 1880 – October 4, 1903) was an Austrian philosopher. ... Ludwig Josef Johann Wittgenstein (IPA: ) (April 26, 1889 – April 29, 1951) was an Austrian philosopher who contributed several ground-breaking works to contemporary philosophy, primarily on the foundations of logic, the philosophy of mathematics, the philosophy of language, and the philosophy of mind. ...

France

See French Jewish Scientists

This page is a list of Jews. ... Henri-Louis Bergson (October 18, 1859–January 4, 1941) was a major French philosopher, influential in the first half of the 20th century. ... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ) are awards in physics, chemistry, literature, peace, and physiology or medicine. ... 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Claude Cohen-Tannoudji (born April 1, 1933) is a French physicist working at the École Normale Supérieure in Paris, France, where he has also studied physics. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Emile Durkheim. ... François Jacob (born June 17, 1920) is a French biologist, who together with Jacques Monod, originated the idea that control of enzyme levels in all cells happens through feedback on transcription. ... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ) are awards in physics, chemistry, literature, peace, and physiology or medicine. ... Claude Lévi-Strauss Claude Lévi-Strauss (IPA pronunciation ); born November 28, 1908) is a Jewish-French anthropologist who developed structuralism as a method of understanding human society and culture. ... Dr. Benoît B. Mandelbrot, Ph. ... The French chemist Henri Moissan (1852--1907) won the 1906 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work in isolating fluorine from its compounds. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Laurent Schwartz (5 March 1915 – 4 July 2002 in Paris) was a French mathematician. ... The Fields Medal is a prize awarded to two, three, or four mathematicians not over 40 years of age at each International Congress of the International Mathematical Union, a meeting that takes place every four years. ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... André Weil (May 6, 1906 - August 6, 1998) was one of the great mathematicians of the 20th century. ... The Wolf Prize has been awarded annually since 1978 to living scientists and artists for achievements in the interest of mankind and friendly relations among peoples . ... The Leroy P. Steele Prizes are awarded every year by the American Mathematical Society, for distinguished research work and writing in the field of mathematics. ... Jacques Derrida (July 15, 1930 – October 8, 2004) was an Algerian-born French philosopher, known as the founder of deconstruction. ... Emmanuel Levinas (January 12, 1906 - December 25, 1995) was a Jewish philosopher originally from Kaunas in Lithuania, who moved to France where he wrote most of his works in French. ...

Germany

See German Jewish Scientists

This page is a list of Jews. ... Hannah Arendt (October 14, 1906 – December 4, 1975) was a Jewish-German (later American) political theorist. ... Walter Benjamin (July 15, 1892 – September 27, 1940) was a German Marxist literary critic, essayist, translator, and philosopher. ... Hans Albrecht Bethe (pronounced bay-tuh; July 2, 1906 – March 6, 2005), was a German-American physicist who won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1967 for his work on the theory of stellar nucleosynthesis. ... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ) are awards in physics, chemistry, literature, peace, and physiology or medicine. ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... Max Born (December 11, 1882 in Breslau – January 5, 1970 in Göttingen) was a mathematician and physicist. ... Fig. ... 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Georg Cantor Georg Ferdinand Ludwig Philipp Cantor (March 3, 1845, St. ... Note: Albert Einstein is also the birth name of Albert Brooks. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for full calendar). ... Paul Ehrlich Paul Ehrlich in his workroom Paul Ehrlich (March 14, 1854 – August 20, 1915) was a German scientist who won the 1908 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Erich Fromm Erich Pinchas Fromm (March 23, 1900 – March 18, 1980) was an internationally renowned Jewish-German-American social psychologist, psychoanalyst, and humanistic philosopher. ... Alexander Grothendieck (Berlin, March 28, 1928) is one of the most important mathematicians of the 20th century. ... The Fields Medal is a prize awarded to two, three, or four mathematicians not over 40 years of age at each International Congress of the International Mathematical Union, a meeting that takes place every four years. ... 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... Heinrich Hertz Heinrich Rudolf Hertz (February 22, 1857 - January 1, 1894), was the German physicist for whom the hertz, the SI unit of frequency, is named. ... Electromagnetic radiation can be imagined as a self-propagating transverse oscillating wave of electric and magnetic fields. ... Max Horkheimer (front left), Theodor Adorno (front right), and Jürgen Habermas in the background, right, in 1965 at Heidelberg Max Horkheimer (February 14, 1895 – July 7, 1973) was a Jewish-German philosopher and sociologist, known especially as the founder and guiding thinker of the Frankfurt School of critical theory. ... Edmund Gustav Albrecht Husserl (April 8, 1859, ProstÄ›jov – April 26, 1938, Freiburg) was a German philosopher, known as the father of phenomenology. ... Edmund Georg Hermann Landau (February 14, 1877 - February 19, 1938) was a German mathematician and author of over 250 papers on number theory. ... Number theory is the branch of pure mathematics concerned with the properties of numbers in general, and integers in particular, as well as the wider classes of problems that arise from their study. ... Karl Heinrich Marx (May 5, 1818, Trier, Germany – March 14, 1883, London) was a German philosopher, political economist, and revolutionary. ... Albert Abraham Michelson. ... A line showing the speed of light on a scale model of Earth and the Moon The speed of light in a vacuum is an important physical constant denoted by the letter c for constant or the Latin word celeritas meaning swiftness. It is the speed of all electromagnetic radiation... 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Hermann Minkowski. ... People called Erich Neumann: Erich Neumann (politician) Erich Neumann (psychologist) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Franz Rosenzweig (1886 - 1929) was one of the most influential modern Jewish religious thinkers. ... Karl Schwarzschild (October 9, 1873 - May 11, 1916) was a noted German Jewish physicist and astronomer, father of astrophysicist Martin Schwarzschild. ... Otto Selz, (14 February 1881–27 August 1943) was a German psychologist who formulated the first nonassociationist theory of thinking, in 1913. ...

Great Britain

See List of British Jewish scientists

This page is a list of Jews. ... Ayer redirects here. ... Peter Bauer (born October 29, 1957) is perhaps best known as the Help Desk Director for the National Association of Photoshop Professionals (NAPP). ... Sir Isaiah Berlin, OM, (June 6, 1909 – November 5, 1997) was a political philosopher and historian of ideas, regarded as one of the leading liberal thinkers of the 20th century. ... Professor Sir Hermann Bondi, KCB , FRS (1 November 1919–10 September 2005) was a British (formerly Austrian) mathematician and cosmologist. ... For alternative meanings see steady state (disambiguation). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ) are awards in physics, chemistry, literature, peace, and physiology or medicine. ... Selig Brodetsky (10 February 1888, Olviopol, Russia-18 May 1954) was a British Professor of Mathematics. ... Sir Ernst Boris Chain (June 19, 1906 - August 12, 1979) was a German-born British biochemist, and a 1945 co-recipient of the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for his work on penicillin. ... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ) are awards in physics, chemistry, literature, peace, and physiology or medicine. ... Sir Michael Anthony Epstein (born 18 May 1921) was one of the discoverers of the Epstein-Barr virus. ... I do not think I could have written the book on nationalism which I did write, were I not capable of crying, with the help of a little alcohol, over folk songs . ... Rosalind Elsie Franklin (25 July 1920 – 16 April 1958) was an English-born physical chemist and crystallographer who made important contributions to the understanding of the fine structures of DNA, viruses, coal and graphite. ... H. L. A. Hart (Herbert Lionel Adolphus Hart) (1907-1992) is considered one of the most important legal philosophers of the twentieth century. ... Brian David Josephson (born Cardiff, Wales, UK, January 4, 1940) is a British physicist whose discovery of the Josephson effect as a 22-year-old graduate student won him the 1973 Nobel Prize for Physics, which he shared with Leo Esaki and Ivar Giaever. ... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ) are awards in physics, chemistry, literature, peace, and physiology or medicine. ... Richard Ferdinand Kahn was born in 1905, in Hampstead, England. ... Nicholas Kaldor, Baron Kaldor (Budapest, 12 May 1908 - Papworth Everard, Cambridgeshire, 30 September 1986) was one of the foremost Cambridge economists in the post-war period. ... Sir Hans Adolf Krebs (August 25, 1900 – November 22, 1981) was a German, later British medical doctor and biochemist. ... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ) are awards in physics, chemistry, literature, peace, and physiology or medicine. ... Harold Kroto Sir Harold Walter Kroto, FRS (born 7 October 1939) is an English chemist and one of the winners of the 1996 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. ... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ) are awards in physics, chemistry, literature, peace, and physiology or medicine. ... Maxwell Herman Alexander Newman (February 7, 1897 – February 22, 1984) was a British mathematician. ... A Colossus Mark II computer. ... Leslie Eleazer Orgel (born Jan 12, 1927 in London) is a chemist. ... Sir Rudolf Ernst Peierls, (June 5, 1907, Berlin – September 19, 1995, Oxford), was a German-born British physicist. ... The Enrico Fermi Award is a U.S. government Presidential award honoring scientists of international stature for their lifetime achievement in the development, use, or production of energy. ... Max Ferdinand Perutz, OM (May 19, 1914 – February 6, 2002) was an Austrian-British molecular biologist. ... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ) are awards in physics, chemistry, literature, peace, and physiology or medicine. ... Sir Karl Raimund Popper, CH, FRS, FBA, (July 28, 1902 – September 17, 1994), was an Austrian born naturalized British[1] philosopher and a professor at the London School of Economics. ... David Ricardo (April 18, 1772 – September 11, 1823), a political economist, is often credited with systematising economics, and was one of the most influential of the classical economists, along with Thomas Malthus, and Adam Smith. ... Adam Smith (baptized June 5, 1723 O.S. / June 16 N.S. – July 17, 1790) was a Scottish moral philosopher and a pioneering political economist. ... James Joseph Sylvester James Joseph Sylvester (September 3, 1814 London - March 15, 1897 Oxford) was an English mathematician. ...

Hungary

See Hungarian Jewish Scientists

This page is a list of Jews. ... Paul Erdős, also Pál Erdős, in English Paul Erdos or Paul Erdös (March 26, 1913 – September 20, 1996), was an immensely prolific (and famously eccentric) Hungarian mathematician who, with hundreds of collaborators, worked on problems in combinatorics, graph theory, number theory, classical analysis, approximation theory, set... Theodore von Kármán (Szőllőskislaki Kármán Tódor) (May 11, 1881 – May 6, 1963) was an engineer and physicist who was active primarily in the fields of aeronautics during the seminal era in the 1940s and 1950s. ... Georg Lukács (April 13, 1885 – June 4, 1971) was a Hungarian Marxist philosopher and literary critic in the tradition of Western Marxism. ... Marxism is the political practice and social theory based on the works of Karl Marx, a 19th century philosopher, economist, journalist, and revolutionary, along with Friedrich Engels. ... John von Neumann (Hungarian Margittai Neumann János Lajos) (born December 28, 1903 in Budapest, Austria-Hungary; died February 8, 1957 in Washington D.C., United States) was a Hungarian-born mathematician and polymath who made contributions to quantum physics, functional analysis, set theory, topology, economics, computer science, numerical analysis... Michael Polanyi (March 11, 1891 - February 22, 1976) was a Hungarian/ British polymath whose thought and work extended across physical chemistry, economics, and philosophy. ... Leó Szilárd (February 11, 1898 – May 30, 1964 Originally Szilárd Leó) was a Jewish Hungarian-American physicist who conceived the nuclear chain reaction and worked on the Manhattan Project. ... Edward Teller (original Hungarian name Teller Ede) (January 15, 1908 – September 9, 2003) was a Hungarian-born American theoretical physicist, known colloquially as the father of the hydrogen bomb. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, in 1945 lifted nuclear fallout some 18 km (60,000 feet) above the epicenter. ... Eugene Wigner Eugene Paul Wigner (Hungarian Wigner Pál Jenő) (November 17, 1902 – January 1, 1995) was a Hungarian physicist and mathematician who received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1963 for his contributions to the theory of the atomic nucleus and the elementary particles, particularly through the discovery and... 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1963 calendar). ...

Israel

See Israeli Scientists

This is a list of prominent Israelis (including Arab citizens of Israel). ... Israel Aharoni was an Israeli zoologist best known for locating and collecting a litter of Syrian hamsters, thus allowing them to be bred and turned into common laboratory animals, and subsequently pets. ... Dorit Aharonov (born 1970) is an Israeli computer scientist specializing in quantum computing. ... Professor Yakir Aharonov BSc PhD is a physicist specialising in Quantum Physics and holds a joint professorship at Tel Aviv University, Israel and the University of South Carolina, America. ... Noga Alon is a Israeli mathematician noted for his prolific contributions to combinatorics and theoretical computer science, having authored hundreds of papers. ... Ruth Arnon is an Israeli biochemsit and codeveloper of the multiple schlerosis drug Copaxone. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean [1]. // Coated in ice, power and telephone lines sag and often break, resulting in power outages. ... Israel Robert John Aumann (ישראל אומן) (born June 8, 1930) is an Israeli mathematician and a member of the United States National Academy of Sciences. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jacob David Bekenstein (born May 1, 1947) is a physicist who has contributed to the foundation of black hole thermodynamics and to other aspects of the connections between information and gravitation. ... Eli Biham is an Israeli cryptographer and cryptanalyst, currently a professor at the Technion Israeli Institute of Technology Computer Science department. ... Aaron Ciechanover (אהרון צחנובר) (born October 1, 1947) is an Israeli biologist. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Professor Irun Cohen (b. ... Shlomi Dolev is a computer scientist best known for his contributions to the foundation of self-stabilization. ... Shimon Even (June 15, 1935 - May 1, 2004) was an Israeli computer science researcher. ... Professor Oded Goldreich Oded Goldreich is a professor of Computer Science at the Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science of Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel. ... Avram Hershko (born December 31, 1937) is an Israeli biologist. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ephraim Katzir (born May 16, 1916) is an Israeli biophysicist and Israeli Labour Party politician. ... Abraham Lempel is a computer scientist and one of the fathers of the LZ family of lossless data compression algorithms. ... Yuval Neeman (May 14, 1925 – April 26, 2006), was an Israeli physicist and politician. ... Amos Ori is a professor of Physics at the Technion Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa, Israel. ... Asher Peres (born 1934 and died January 1, 2005) was an Israeli physicist, considered a pioneer in quantum information theory. ... Amir Pnueli (born April 22, 1941) is an Israeli computer scientist who received the Turing Award in 1996 for seminal work introducing temporal logic into computing science and for outstanding contributions to program and systems verification. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... Eliyahu Rips is an Israeli mathematician known for his research in algebra and the controversial Bible codes. ... Nathan Rosen (March 22, 1909 – December 18, 1995) was a physicist. ... The Technion - Israel Institute of Technology (הטכניון - מכון טכנולוגי לישראל) is a university in Haifa, Israel. ... Leo Sachs (born 1924) is a German-born Israeli molecular biologist and cancer researcher. ... Adi Shamir at the CRYPTO 2003 conference. ... In cryptology, RSA is an algorithm for public-key encryption. ... Ehud Shapiro (born 1955) is a Jewish scientist in Israel who is developing a DNA computer. ... Yair Sprinzak (8 November 1911– 6 September 1999 was an Israeli scientist and politician, who served in the Twelfth Knesset for the Moledet party. ... Reshef Tenne (1944-) is an Israeli scientist. ... Lev Vaidman is an Israeli physicist working at Tel Aviv University, Israel. ... Chaim Weizmann and Harry S. Truman, May 25, 1948 Chaim Azriel Weizmann (Hebrew: חיים ויצמן) (also: Chaijim W., Haim W.) (November 27, 1874 – November 9, 1952) chemist, statesman, President of the World Zionist Organization, first President of Israel (elected May 16, 1948, served 1949 - 1952) and founder of a research institute in... Jacob Ziv, along with Abraham Lempel, developed the lossless LZ77 compression algorithm. ...

Poland

See Polish Jewish Scientists

This page is a list of Jews. ... Solomon E. Asch (September 14, 1907 - February 20, 1996) was a world-renowned American Gestalt psychologist and pioneer in social psychology. ... Gestalt is a German word whose meaning is only roughly approximated by the English words shape or form. ... Dr. Benoît B. Mandelbrot, Ph. ... A fractal is a geometric object which can be divided into parts, each of which is similar to the original object. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... // Alfred Tarski (January 14, 1902, Warsaw, Russian-ruled Poland – October 26, 1983, Berkeley, California) was a logician and mathematician who spent four decades as a professor of mathematics at the University of California, Berkeley. ... Stanisław Ulam in the 1950s. ... The Manhattan Project resulted in the development of the first nuclear weapons, and the first-ever nuclear detonation, at the Trinity test of July 16, 1945. ...

Russia/Ukraine

See Russian Jewish Scientists

This page is a list of Jews. ... Vladimir Gershonovich Drinfeld (Владимир Гершонович Дринфельд) is a mathematician born February 14, 1954 in Ukraine. ... The Fields Medal is a prize awarded to two, three, or four mathematicians not over 40 years of age at each International Congress of the International Mathematical Union, a meeting that takes place every four years. ... MCMXC redirects here; for the Enigma album, see MCMXC a. ... Israel Moiseevich Gelfand (Russian: ) (born in 1913) is a prolific mathematician in the field of functional analysis, which he interprets in a broad sense as the mathematics of quantum mechanics. ... The Wolf Prize has been awarded annually since 1978 to living scientists and artists for achievements in the interest of mankind and friendly relations among peoples . ... The Kyoto Prize (京都賞) has been awarded annually since 1984 by the Inamori Foundation, founded by Kazuo Inamori (fortune from ceramics). ... The Leroy P. Steele Prizes are awarded every year by the American Mathematical Society, for distinguished research work and writing in the field of mathematics. ... Vitaly Lazarevich Ginzburg (Russian: ; born October 4, 1916 in Moscow) is a Soviet/Russian theoretical physicist and astrophysicist, a member of the Academy of Sciences of the former Soviet Union, and the successor to Igor Tamm as head of the Academys physics institute (FIAN). ... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ) are awards in physics, chemistry, literature, peace, and physiology or medicine. ... Indian postage stamp dedicated to W.M. Haffkine Waldemar Mordecai Wolff Haffkine (March 15, 1860, Odessa, Russia - October 20, 1930, Lausanne, Switzerland) was a Russian bacteriologist of Jewish ancestry. ... A bottle and a syringe containing the influenza vaccine. ... Cholera (frequently called Asiatic cholera or epidemic cholera) is a severe diarrheal disease caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. ... Bubonic plague is the best-known variant of the deadly infectious disease plague, which is caused by the enterobacteria Yersinia pestis. ... Lev Davidovich Landau Lev Davidovich Landau (Russian language: Ле́в Дави́дович Ланда́у) (January 22, 1908 – April 1, 1968) was a prominent Soviet physicist, who made fundamental contributions to many areas of theoretical physics. ... Theoretical physics employs mathematical models and abstractions of physics, as opposed to experimental processes, in an attempt to understand nature. ... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ) are awards in physics, chemistry, literature, peace, and physiology or medicine. ... 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar). ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Wassily Leontief (August 5, 1905, Munich, Germany – February 5, 1999, New York)[1], was an economist notable for his research on how changes in one economic sector may have an effect on other sectors. ... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ) are awards in physics, chemistry, literature, peace, and physiology or medicine. ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... Grigori Yakovlevich Perelman (Russian: ), born 13 June 1966 in Leningrad, USSR (now St. ... The Fields Medal is a prize awarded to two, three, or four mathematicians not over 40 years of age at each International Congress of the International Mathematical Union, a meeting that takes place every four years. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Ilya Prigogine (January 25, 1917 – May 28, 2003) was a Belgian physicist and chemist noted for his work on dissipative structures, complex systems, and irreversibility. ... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ) are awards in physics, chemistry, literature, peace, and physiology or medicine. ... For the song by The Smashing Pumpkins, see 1979 (song). ... Chemistry - the study of atoms, made of nuclei (center particles) and electrons (outer particles), and the structures they form. ... Selman Abraham Waksman (22 July 1888 – 16 August 1973) was an Ukrainian-American biochemist and microbiologist whose research into organic substances—largely into organisms that live in soil—and their decomposition lead to the discovery of Streptomycin, and several other antibiotics. ... Streptomycin is an antibiotic drug, the first of a class of drugs called aminoglycosides to be discovered, and was the first antibiotic remedy for tuberculosis. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Iakov Borisovich Zeldovich (Я́ков Бори́сович Зельдо́вич, March 8, 1914 – December 2, 1987) was a Soviet physicist working in the fields of shock waves, cosmology, and general relativity. ... Efim Isaakovich Zelmanov (Ефим Исаакович Зельманов: born September 7, 1955) is a mathematician, known for his work on combinatorial problems in nonassociative algebra and group theory, including his solution of the restricted Burnside problem. ... The Fields Medal is a prize awarded to two, three, or four mathematicians not over 40 years of age at each International Congress of the International Mathematical Union, a meeting that takes place every four years. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ...

Scandinavia/Benelux

See Dutch Jewish Academics

This page is a list of Jews. ... Niels (Henrik David) Bohr (October 7, 1885 – November 18, 1962) was a Danish physicist who made fundamental contributions to understanding atomic structure and quantum mechanics, for which he received the Nobel Prize in 1922. ... Benedictus de Spinoza or Baruch de Spinoza (Hebrew: ברוך שפינוזה) (lived November 24, 1632 – February 21, 1677) was a Dutch philosopher of Jewish origin, considered one of the great rationalists of 17th-century philosophy and, by virtue of his magnum opus the posthumous Ethics, one of the definitive ethicists. ...

Australia/Canada

See Canadian Jewish Academics
See Australian Jewish Academics

This page is a list of Jews. ... This page is a list of Jews. ... Sir Gustav Joseph Victor Nossal Kt, AC, CBE, FRS, FAA (born June 4, 1931 in Vienna, Austria) is a distinguished Australian research biologist. ... Steven Pinker Steven Arthur Pinker (born September 18, 1954) is a prominent American experimental psychologist, cognitive scientist, and popular science writer known for his spirited and wide-ranging advocacy of evolutionary psychology and the computational theory of mind. ... Evolutionary psychology (abbreviated ev-psych or EP) is a theoretical approach to psychology that attempts to explain certain mental and psychological traits—such as memory, perception, or language—as evolved adaptations, i. ... John Charles Polanyi (born January 23, 1929) is a German/Canadian chemist. ... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ) are awards in physics, chemistry, literature, peace, and physiology or medicine. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other persons named Peter Singer, see Peter Singer (disambiguation). ...

United States

See Jewish-American Academics
See Jewish-American Scientists

This page is a list of Jews. ... Morris Aaron Benjaminson (b. ... A Microbiologist is a biologist that studies the field of microbiology. ... The structure of insulin Biotechnology is technology based on biology, especially when used in agriculture, food science, and medicine. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Emile Berliner with disc record gramophone. ... Edison cylinder phonograph from about 1899 The phonograph, or gramophone, was the most common device for playing recorded sound from the 1870s through the 1980s. ... Franz Boas Franz Boas (July 9, 1858 – December 21, 1942[1]) was one of the pioneers of modern anthropology and is often called the Father of American Anthropology. Born in Germany, Boas worked for most of his life in North America. ... Anthropology is the study of the anatomical and mental composition of humanity through the examination of historical and present geographical distribution, cultural history, acculturation, cultural relationships, and racial classifications. ... David Bohm. ... Fig. ... Theoretical physics attempts to understand the world by making a model of reality, used for rationalizing, explaining, predicting physical phenomena through a physical theory. There are three types of theories in physics; mainstream theories, proposed theories and fringe theories. ... Avram Noam Chomsky, Ph. ... The following is a list of linguists, those who study linguistics. ... Jesse Douglas (July 3, 1897 - October 7, 1965) was an American mathematician. ... The Fields Medal is a prize awarded to two, three, or four mathematicians not over 40 years of age at each International Congress of the International Mathematical Union, a meeting that takes place every four years. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Richard Epstein Richard A. Epstein, born in 1943, is currently the James Parker Hall Distinguished Service Professor of Law at the University of Chicago Law School. ... Liberalism is a political current embracing several historical and present-day ideologies that claim defense of individual liberty as the purpose of government. ... The University of Chicago is a private university located principally in the Hyde Park neighborhood of Chicago. ... Richard Phillips Feynman (May 11, 1918 – February 15, 1988; surname pronounced ) was an American physicist known for expanding the theory of quantum electrodynamics, the physics of the superfluidity of supercooled liquid helium, and particle theory. ... Quantum electrodynamics (QED) is a relativistic quantum field theory of electromagnetism. ... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ) are awards in physics, chemistry, literature, peace, and physiology or medicine. ... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... Milton Friedman (July 31, 1912 – November 16, 2006) was an American economist and public intellectual who made major contributions to the fields of macroeconomics, microeconomics, economic history and statistics while advocating laissez-faire capitalism. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Murray Gell-Mann (born September 15, 1929 in Manhattan, New York City, USA) is an American physicist who received the 1969 Nobel Prize in physics for his work on the theory of elementary particles. ... For other uses of this term, see: Quark (disambiguation) 1974 discovery photograph of a possible charmed baryon, now identified as the Σc++ In particle physics, the quarks are subatomic particles thought to be elemental and indivisible. ... John George Kemeny (Kemény János) (May 31, 1926–December 26, 1992), U.S. computer scientist and educator best known for co-developing the BASIC programming language in 1964 with Thomas Eugene Kurtz. ... Screenshot of Atari BASIC, an early BASIC language for small computers. ... Edwin Herbert Land (May 7, 1909 – March 1, 1991) was an American scientist and inventor. ... Polaroid is the name of a type of synthetic plastic sheet which is used to polarise light. ... John McCarthy (born September 4, 1927, in Boston, Massachusetts, sometimes known affectionately as Uncle John McCarthy), is a prominent computer scientist who received the Turing Award in 1971 for his major contributions to the field of Artificial Intelligence. ... Hondas humanoid robot AI redirects here. ... Theodore Maiman. ... For other uses, see Laser (disambiguation). ... Daniel Nathans (October 30, 1928 - November 16, 1999) was a U.S. microbiologist. ... A restriction enzyme (or restriction endonuclease) is an enzyme that cuts double-stranded DNA. The enzyme makes two incisions, one through each of the phosphate backbones of the double helix without damaging the bases. ... Robert Nozick (November 16, 1938 – January 23, 2002) was an American philosopher and Pellegrino University Professor at Harvard University. ... In English-speaking countries, libertarianism usually refers to a political philosophy maintaining that every person is the absolute owner of their own life and should be free to do whatever they wish with their person or property, as long as they respect the liberty of others. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) , is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. One of the eight Ivies, it was founded in 1636. ... J. Robert Oppenheimer, the father of the atomic bomb served as the first director of Los Alamos National Laboratory, beginning in 1943. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, in 1945 lifted nuclear fallout some 18 km (60,000 feet) above the epicenter. ... The Manhattan Project resulted in the development of the first nuclear weapons, and the first-ever nuclear detonation, at the Trinity test of July 16, 1945. ... Gregory Goodwin Pincus (April 9, 1903 - August 22, 1967), American physician, biologist, and researcher, was co-inventor of the contraceptive pill. ... Oral contraceptives are contraceptives which are taken orally and inhibit the bodys fertility by chemical means. ... It has been suggested that The Ayn Rand Collective be merged into this article or section. ... Objectivism is a philosophy[1] developed by Ayn Rand that encompasses positions on metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, politics, and aesthetics. ... Murray Newton Rothbard (March 2, 1926 – January 7, 1995) was a highly influential American economist, historian and natural law theorist belonging to the Austrian School of Economics who helped define modern libertarianism and anarcho-capitalism. ... Insert non-formatted text here Carl Edward Sagan (November 9, 1934 – December 20, 1996) was an American astronomer and astrobiologist and a highly successful popularizer of astronomy, astrophysics, and other natural sciences. ... Cosmos: A Personal Voyage was the name of a thirteen part television series produced by Carl Sagan and Ann Druyan which was first broadcast by the Public Broadcasting Service in 1980. ... Jonas Edward Salk (October 28, 1914 – June 23, 1995) was an American physician and researcher, best known for the development of the first polio vaccine (the eponymous Salk vaccine). ... Two polio vaccines are used throughout the world to combat polio. ... Leo Strauss (September 20, 1899 – October 18, 1973), was a German-born American political philosopher who specialized in the study of classical philosophy. ... Norbert Wiener Norbert Wiener (November 26, 1894 - March 18, 1964) was a U.S. mathematician and applied mathematician, especially in the field of electronics engineering. ... Cybernetics is the study of communication and control, typically involving regulatory feedback in living organisms, machines and organisations, as well as their combinations. ... Edward Witten (born August 26, 1951) is an American mathematical physicist, Fields Medalist, and professor at the Institute for Advanced Study. ... M-theory is a solution proposed for the unknown theory of everything which would combine all five superstring theories and 11-dimensional supergravity together. ... MCMXC redirects here; for the Enigma album, see MCMXC a. ... Dr. Isaac Asimov (January 1, 1920 – April 6, 1992, IPA: , originally Исаак Озимов but now transcribed into Russian as Айзек Азимов) was a Russian-born American author and professor of biochemistry, a highly successful and exceptionally prolific writer best known for his works of science fiction and for his popular science books. ...

See also

This page is a list of Jews. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This page is a list of Jews. ... This is a List of Jews who were or are Members of Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities Shraga Abramson, Talmud Shaul Adler, Parasitology Shmuel Agmon, Mathematics Yakir Aharonov, Physics Hanokh Albeck, Talmud Shlomo Alexander, Physics Noga Alon, Mathematics Shimshon Amitsur, Mathematics Ruth Arnon, Immunology David Asheri, Classical Studies Robert...

References

  1. ^ Jewish Year Book 1995 p193; "Who's Who in World Jewry" (1955 and 1965 editions).

The Jewish Year Book is an almanac targetted at the Jewish community in the United Kingdom. ...

External links

  • JInfo.org, a comprehensive set of lists of Jewish contributions to world civilization. Fuller (copyrighted) lists can be found there.

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