Call of Cthulhu: Dark Corners of the Earth Q&A;

By Staff

We talk to Andrew Brazier, artist and designer at Headfirst Productions, to get a development update on this first-person action-adventure game.

Over the past several months, Headfirst Productions has been steadily making progress on its first-person adventure game, Call of Cthulhu: Dark Corners of the Earth, which is loosely based on H.P. Lovecraft's series of novels as well as the pen-and-paper role-playing game. However, Headfirst is taking a decidedly different approach to the adventure game genre by incorporating a number of elements that you'd normally find in a first-person shooter, and in fact, the development team even has plans to incorporate multiplayer deathmatch and cooperative modes. The cooperative mode in particular will play into the game's sanity system, in which you lose your sanity as you progress through the game, mistaking shadows and even partners for enemies. We had the chance to speak with Andrew Brazier, artist and designer at Headfirst Productions, to learn more about the sanity system, multiplayer modes, the lack of a HUD, and other aspects of the game.

GameSpot: Designing the game so that it doesn't make use of a heads-up display must be difficult. How has the team been able to handle the problem of adapting traditional HUD features into the game itself?

Andrew Brazier: Our game differs from many FPS-type games in that it's not as action orientated as some others--subsequently the pace is slightly slower. This means that there's not so much of the frantic gun swapping like Wolfenstein or Quake 3. The onus is on the player to prepare for the action sequences by making sure their gun is fully loaded and they have the right one ready--just like real life. You wouldn't barge into a room of monsters, then pull out your gun and find you had no bullets left.

GS: How will players know how much ammunition or health they have left?

AB: They are given feedback through the control system and also visually, so you can actually see how many bullets you have left by looking in the chamber. Alternatively, you can access a separate screen where all that sort of information is available like Resident Evil.

GS: One of the more notable features of Call of Cthulhu seems to be the level of interactivity with the environment. How difficult has it been to determine which objects players can interact with and which ones they can't? Or is it simply a matter of only using objects that are relevant to the quest at hand?

AB: It'll be a few years before you'll be able to interact with everything in the environment, so there'll still be an element of "I can move that chair but why can't I move that desk?" We are trying to equalize this as much as possible by letting the player move objects that you would expect them to be able to in real life. It is tricky designing levels in this situation though to make sure that the player doesn't trap themselves in an area.

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Game Info

  • PC Release Info

    • Release Date: Apr 26, 2006
    • ESRB: M
      Titles rated M (Mature) have content that may be suitable for persons ages 17 and older.
  • PS2 Release Info

    • Release Date: Canceled
    • ESRB: M
      Titles rated M (Mature) have content that may be suitable for persons ages 17 and older.
  • Xbox Release Info

    • Release Date: Oct 24, 2005
    • ESRB: M
      Titles rated M (Mature) have content that may be suitable for persons ages 17 and older.

Call of Cthulhu: Dark Corners of the Earth

Call of Cthulhu: Dark Corners of the Earth Boxshot
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