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Contribute to Our 2014 Calendar!

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PCC streetcar No. 1078, honoring San Diego, at Powell and Market. Adolfo Echeverry photo. Click to enlarge.

If you’re serious about your photography and you love San Francisco’s historic transit vehicles, we invite you to contribute to our 2014 calendar. That great shot above is by Adolfo Echeverry, a contributor to our 2013 calendar. We love shots like this that show off distinctive architecture or street scenes in addition to the streetcar or cable car.

You can learn all about submitting photos to our calendar on our Flickr group. Look forward to seeing new photographers join us for 2014!

Contribute to Our 2014 Calendar!

January 25, 2013 • PCC streetcar No. 1078, honoring San Diego, at Powell and Market. Adolfo Echeverry photo. Click to enlarge. If you’re serious about your photography and you love San Francisco’s historic transit vehicles, we invite you to contribute to our 2014... (more)

Muni's First Schedule, From Our Archives

One important aspect of Market Street Railway is the preservation of important documents that illuminate San Francisco’s transit history.

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Muni’s first schedule, from the Market Street Railway Archives. Gift of Galen Sarno. Click to enlarge.

The leader of our archival activity, Alison Cant, has sent along this wonderful document, bequeathed to us by the late Galen Sarno (a very generous supporter of our San Francisco Railway Museum, by the way). It’s Muni’s very first schedule, for inbound streetcars on the A-Geary, beginning December 28,1912. If you click to enlarge the photo, you’ll see that eight cars were scheduled (Muni only had ten on hand at the time). It took 28 minutes to go from Tenth Avenue and Fulton Street (Golden Gate Park) to Geary, then all the way downtown to Kearny and Market Streets. Today, the schedule for the 38-Geary is about the same to run from Park Presidio (near 14th Avenue) and Geary to the same point downtown, about the same distance.

The first car of the morning left Tenth and Fulton at 5:30 a.m. The last car of the evening left Kearny and Geary at 1:37 a.m., headed for the barn at Geary and Presidio Avenue (home to Muni trolley buses today).

The more things change…

Muni's First Schedule, From Our Archives

January 21, 2013 • One important aspect of Market Street Railway is the preservation of important documents that illuminate San Francisco’s transit history. Muni’s first schedule, from the Market Street Railway Archives. Gift of Galen Sarno. Click to enlarge. The leader of our archival... (more)

"Gliding Beauty" Rejoins Muni's Streetcar Fleet

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PCC No. 1009, honoring Dallas, near the San Francisco Railway Museum on the F-line, January 17, 2013. Brian Leadingham photo.

Dallas didn’t operate PCC streetcars very long — just 11 years. When they did, just after World War II, they called them “Gliding Beauties” for their streamlined grace.

Today, Muni pays tribute to the streetcars of “Big D” with the first day of passenger service for PCC No. 1009, painted in the original Dallas livery.

Dallas is one of the few cities to ever operate double-end PCC streetcars. (Only the handful of the 5,000 PCCs built in the U.S. between 1936 and 1952 were designed to operate in passenger service from either end.) After Dallas ended streetcar service in 1956, it sold its PCCs to Boston, where railrans referred to them as “Texas Rangers.” Today, Dallas has a vibrant historic streetcar operation on McKinney Avenue and recently acquired one of the original Dallas PCCs for future restoration.

Dallas is also about to start construction of a modern streetcar line serving Oak Cliff (a neighborhood served by its PCCs back when) and has already decided to extend that new line.

Streetcar No. 1009, now wearing the Dallas Terminal & Railway tribute livery, is one of ten double-end PCCs bought by Muni in 1948. It carried San Franciscans on Muni routes until the 1980s. (Go here and click on the other preserved cars in this group, Nos. 1006, 1007, 1008, 1010, 1011, and 1015, to learn about them.)

After retirement, No. 1009 was stored by Muni for possible future restoration but terribly vandalized over the years, capped by a fire that almost destroyed it. Because of its flexibility (operable from either end) and capacity (one of the largest PCCs ever owned by Muni), it was nonetheless sent to Brookville Equipment Company in Pennsylvania for a complete remanufacturing, with spectacular results. No. 1009 has completed testing and is now in passenger service.

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What was left of Muni streetcar No. 1009 as it left San Francisco for restoration in June 2011.

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The interior of streetcar No. 1009 before restoration.

This leaves one additional double-ended Muni PCC yet to rejoin the fleet. No. 1011 is still at Brookville but should return to San Francisco, fully restored, within the next month.

"Gliding Beauty" Rejoins Muni's Streetcar Fleet

January 17, 2013 • PCC No. 1009, honoring Dallas, near the San Francisco Railway Museum on the F-line, January 17, 2013. Brian Leadingham photo. Dallas didn’t operate PCC streetcars very long — just 11 years. When they did, just after World War II,... (more)

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